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From start-ups to multinationals, the MSc Business Economics course is about applying economics to business – and London is the ideal place to do it. Read more
From start-ups to multinationals, the MSc Business Economics course is about applying economics to business – and London is the ideal place to do it.

Who is it for?

The MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics is for students who want to apply economics to real-world issues. From transfer pricing, to the complexity of financial markets and the pros and cons of EU membership, you will need to be strong at statistics and quantitative methods to get to grips with the material that makes up the core modules. The MSc is designed to give you the tools to apply your knowledge, so we expect you to be downloading the free FT app and getting on top of current issues from the second you start.

Objectives

On the MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics you won’t be deriving equations. Instead, we use them to apply economics to current business issues.

The programme has been designed to equip students with a wealth of resources combining data banks from City’s Cass Business School and School of Arts and Social Sciences. This means you have access to everything from Datastream, Bloomberg and Bankscope, to Morning Star and Orbis.

MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics maximises City’s central London location. With high-profile guest lecturers such as Jim O’Neill, former Chief Economist from Goldman Sachs, you gain insight straight from the City studying in the heart of "the world's biggest financial centre" (Economist, 2012.)

Teaching and learning

The course is taught through a series of lectures (which are also available as online resources), seminars, student presentations and interactive group work. Computer laboratory teaching gives you practical experience using software packages to develop statistical and econometric skills that are formatively assessed by computer-based exercises.

You also undertake a research project or economics literature survey on a subject that is of interest to you. This must cover a current topic that is within the remit of Business Economics or International Business Economics.

Assessment

You are assessed by coursework and examination. Your overall degree result is based on your performance in the taught modules and the dissertation.

Modules

The core content is covered in the first term, making this a programme with a lot of choice. There is an economics and econometrics focus, but you also can study topics including the economics of micro-finance, e-commerce, asset pricing and the history of economic thought.

If you choose to study MSc International Business Economics you will need to study the International Business Economics elective in the second term, and your research project has to cover more than one country. So, for example, you could not focus on a single-country subject such as privatisation in the UK. For a detailed module breakdown, see the website: http://www.city.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/business-economics-international-business-economics/2017

Career prospects

When it comes to employer recognition, City is well established. City has become synonymous with quality and the Government Economic Service regularly recruits postgraduate students from this programme. There is also a range of career service events across the School of Arts and Social Sciences and Cass Business School, which you can attend throughout the programme.

Our graduates include Yuliya Bashmakov, Senior Gas Control Scheduler for ExxonMobil and Youssef Intabli who is now working as an account manager at Bloomberg.

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The aim of this traditional taught Masters is to provide you with rigorous training in the analysis of economics, including quantitative techniques and research methods. Read more
The aim of this traditional taught Masters is to provide you with rigorous training in the analysis of economics, including quantitative techniques and research methods. On completion of this degree you will be equipped with the tools of the professional economist and will be ready for your chosen career path, whether in government, the private and financial services sectors or further research in economics.

You will study core course units in Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Econometrics, as well as a range of optional courses to allow specialisation. You will be taught by a top-ranking Department of Economics with expertise in a wide set of areas and who produce world leading research.

With an intake of 25-30 places you will benefit from a strong sense of group-identity and enjoy close contact with the academic staff of the department. The course director serves as your personal advisor up until the spring and you will then be assigned a personal dissertation supervisor.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/economics/coursefinder/msceconomics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course offers an excellent opportunity to get a strong grounding in core areas of Economics and to specialise your knowledge further through the optional courses on offer.

- You will be taught by academics who produce world leading research. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise we were ranked among the top 10 Economics Departments in the UK

- Students attend a two week pre-sessional quantitative methods course to ensure they are in a good position to start this challenging Masters course.

- Our graduates are highly employable: 90% of graduates from the Department of Economics were in full time employment or further study within six months of graduation.

- The Department has expertise in a wide set of areas, including Labour Economics, Experimental Economics, and Public Economics, and the topics taught on our Masters courses reflect these areas of excellence.

- The Department of Economics at Royal Holloway is unique in being a young department, created in 1995, in an established and prestigious college of the University of London.

- We are one of the few Departments in the UK to have an in-house economics experiments laboratory, used by staff and research students.

Department research and industry highlights

- Economics is among the top departments in the UK for Research Excellence. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 80% of the Department's research submitted was ranked as world-leading or internationally excellent (rated 3* and 4*).

- A recent analysis of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) shows that the Economics Department at Royal Holloway is the third best department in the UK for publications. The study by Jim Taylor and Ian Walker provides further insight into the research standing of UK economics departments. Previous rankings from the data already showed the Department in the top 10 in the UK.

- The Department displays strength across the core fields of the discipline - microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics – and in particular labour economics, development economics, experimental economics and economics history.

- We run a weekly Internal Seminar which provides a lively forum for work at an early stage of development. Our External Seminar Series runs weekly during term and welcomed over 20 external speakers from prominent places during last academic year. Invitees are the usual mixture of established names and newer entrants to the profession thought to be doing exciting work.

Course content and structure

The duration of the course is 12 months, including a compulsory pre-sessional mathematics refresher course and a dissertation written over the summer.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced training in the principles of economics and their application appropriate to postgraduate level

- developed the ability to apply the advanced knowledge, research methods and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and/or applied problems in economic policy

- the ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline

- analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world and to be able to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues

- a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment

- the knowledge and skills base from which they can proceed to research in economics and related areas.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

90% of graduates from Royal Holloway, University of London’s Department of Economics were in full time employment or further study within six months of graduation.

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different economics-related areas, including working in the Public Sector (Government Economics Service), journalism, business analysis. careers as Economists, Journalists and Business Analysts. Our graduates are currently working for firms such as Accenture, TNS, Bloomberg, Citigroup, Royal Bank of Scotland, Credit Suisse, Pricewaterhouse Cooper and Baker and Mackenzie. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

Your careers ambitions are supported by our Careers Officer, Dr.Melanie Luhrmann as well as the College Careers Service, located right next door to the economics department. They offer application and interview coaching, career strategy discussions, and the opportunity to network with major employers on campus. Our careers service is provided by the Careers Group, the main provider of graduate recruitment services in London. Thus, you will have additional access to a wealth of presentations and networking opportunities.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Would you like to prepare yourself for high-level analysis and decision making roles in the public or private sectors?. From international trade to public policy and advanced econometrics, expose yourself to the latest thinking with a Master of Economics from the UWA Business School. Read more

Introduction

Would you like to prepare yourself for high-level analysis and decision making roles in the public or private sectors?

From international trade to public policy and advanced econometrics, expose yourself to the latest thinking with a Master of Economics from the UWA Business School.

Course description, features and facilities

The Master of Economics is designed for students who plan to pursue careers as economic researchers and decision makers in the public or private sectors.

The course attracts people employed by the public service and private enterprise, as well as teachers already holding a Bachelor of Economics who seek to improve their professional qualifications through postgraduate studies.

Topics covered include microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics, financial economics, resource economics, public economics, quantitative economics, economic history and economic development.

Economics at UWA

UWA’s Economics discipline enjoys a large number of international visiting experts and guest lecturers. For more than two decades, 
the discipline has been a partner in the innovative PhD Conference in Economics and Business, which has hosted almost 600 students from major universities around the world.

In addition, the discipline’s international connections are further enhanced by a significant flow of economists from other institutions who visit the Business School to present research results and to work with our staff and students. Recent visitors include Sir David Hendry from Oxford University, 
and the late Arnold Zellner from the University of Chicago.

Further, the annual Shann Memorial Lecture invites a prominent economist to deliver a presentation in the area of economics and finance. All of these events generate considerable interest from the economics community and stimulate the discipline’s teaching and learning activities.

Structure

Key to availability of units:
S1 = Semester 1; S2 = Semester 2; S3 = summer teaching period; N/A = not available in 2015;
NS = non-standard teaching period; OS = offshore teaching period; * = to be advised

All units have a value of six points unless otherwise stated.

Note: Units that are indicated as N/A may be available in 2016 or 2017.

Take all units (48 points):

S2 ECON5502 International Finance and Markets
S2 ECON5508 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory
S1 ECON5509 Advanced Microeceonomic Theory
S1 ECON5513 Applied Advanced Econometrics
S1, S2 ECON5881 Master's Dissertation (Economics) Part 1
S1, S2 ECON5882 Master's Dissertation (Economics) Part 2
S1, S2 ECON5883 Master's Dissertation (Economics) Part 3
S1, S2 ECON5884 Master's Dissertation (Economics) Part 4

Take unit(s) to the value of 48 points:

Group A

S2 ECON4405 Public Economics
S1 ECON4408 Advanced Development Economics
NS ECON4410 Environmental and Resource Economics
S2 ECON4450 Advanced International Trade
S2 ECON4503 Advanced Economic Analysis
N/A ECON4504 Advanced Quantitative Economics
S1 ECON4507 History of Economic Thought
NS ECON5510 Applied Demand and Production Analysis
NS ECON5511 Climate, Energy and Water Economics
NS ENVT4402 Analysis for Natural Resource Management
S1, S2 FINA5432 Introduction to Finance

Career opportunities

Graduates can expect to find work in government agencies at the local, state and federal levels, as well as opportunities in the private sector including banks, consultancy companies, international agencies, insurance companies and the finance industry.

As an economist, you could assess the implications of global economic trends on the Australian economy, regional economies or individual industries.

If you are interested in policy, you could contribute to the design of economic policy for institutions such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund and United Nations.

In the area of applied economics, you might conduct research and analysis of global and local events for federal agencies such as the Treasury, Reserve Bank of Australia, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) and Productivity Commission.

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If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes. Read more
If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes.

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA). This brings you up to the standards required to continue with MSc study. Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above then proceed to one of our MSc programmes. Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/196/economics-conversion-diploma-in-economic-analysis

Course structure

- Year 1

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA), which is a qualification in its own right, and brings you up to the standard required to continue with MSc study. The DEA consists of five compulsory modules.

- Year 2

Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above can then proceed to one of the following MSc programmes in year two:

- MSc Economics
- MSc Economics and Econometrics
- MSc Economics and Finance
- MSc Finance and Econometrics
- MSc International Finance and Economic Development
- MSc Agri-Environmental Economics and Policy

Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for students who already have a degree to proceed to study economics at Master’s level when they have not previously studied economics

- provide you with the knowledge, analytical and other skills from which you can proceed to further study in economics and develop a deeper understanding of economic theory, econometric and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential

- provide options to enable you to study selected areas of economics in depth

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional economist or in an area related to economics

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Economics and Finance MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced economic and finance theory and quantitative methods, while allowing you to specialise or take options in a range of subjects reflecting the School’s main areas of research expertise in finance. Read more
The Economics and Finance MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced economic and finance theory and quantitative methods, while allowing you to specialise or take options in a range of subjects reflecting the School’s main areas of research expertise in finance. It prepares you for work as a professional economist in the financial and banking sectors, public sector and international organisations.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/200/economics-and-finance

Course structure

The Economics and Finance MSc is studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (six of which are compulsory) and a dissertation.

There are compulosry modules in Financial Economics: Capital Market Instruments, Financial Economics and Asset Pricing, Advanced Macroeconomics, Econometric Methods, Time Series Econometrics and Research Methods. These modules build upon students’ existing knowledge, understanding and skills.

Students develop a deeper understanding of economic and finance theory, quantitative and research methods, and policy applications. The teaching and learning of skills are carefully integrated into the structure of the modules and degree programme. The final two modules are chosen from a range of options based upon the finance research interests of our academic staff.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme proceed to the dissertation stage where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on an Economics/Finance topic.

Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC805 - Advanced Macroeconomics I (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC820 - Time Series Econometrics (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC822 - Financial Economics: Capital Market Instruments (15 credits)
EC824 - Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC802 - Advanced Microeconomics of Consumers, Marketsand Welfare (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and finance, and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of economic and financial theory, econometrics, financial econometrics and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- provide options to enable you to study selected areas of economics and finance in depth

- develop your ability to apply economic and financial knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional in the fields of economics and finance or related areas

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics. Read more
This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics.

Who is it for?

The Development Economics MSc course at City is designed for those looking to gain an understanding of key issues in economic development and provide you with rigorous economic theory and statistical tools to be able to analyse policies and assess their impact on economic and human development.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your critical and analytical abilities in economics, with particular reference to development. By the time you graduate, you should be able to:
-Demonstrate that modern economic theory is relevant to development economics.
-Critically interpret current research in development economics and evaluate its relevance to development practice and policy analysis.
-Understand the enduring determinants of poverty.
-Analyse the issues of fertility, education, health, work, migration and microfinance and their contribution to economic development.
-Develop microeconomic models to explain how people make such decisions and how policy is likely to affect their choices.
-Assess policies designed towards helping the poor by taking into account how people react to policy interventions, and statistically assess the success of such policies.
-Undertake empirical investigations in development economics, using appropriate quantitative methods.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from City's London location, and our proximity to the centres of decision-making in development economics. (We are six tube stops away from the Department for International Development, for example.).

Teaching and learning

The Development Economics MSc course is designed to be flexible in the range of teaching methods used. You learn through a mixture of lecturing, discussions, analysis of case studies, student presentations and particularly for the quantitative elements of the course, interactive computer-based exercises. You are encouraged to participate actively in the classes.

The taught modules usually run for a term and have three hours of teaching each week. This time may include workshops and tutorials as well as lectures.

Outside your timetabled hours you have access to City’s library and computing facilities for independent study. Your independent study will include reading recommended books and papers, and “reading around” the field to develop a deeper understanding.

In your third term we organise for experts from outside City to come in and present current research on both methodological and applied topics.

For the dissertation or literature survey, each student is allocated a supervisor, who will guide you in your research and writing for this module. We also offer pre-sessional induction courses covering topics such as probability, microeconomics and the Stata software.

Assessment

For each taught module in the Department of Economics, you are assessed through a combination of coursework and one final examination. For most modules the coursework contributes 30% of the overall mark and the examination contributes 70%. The nature of the coursework which the lecturer assigns varies according to the module, for example essays, presentations or computer-based data analysis and calculations. Modules taught in the Department of International Politics are usually assessed solely by coursework.

Overall assessment is based on your performance in the taught modules and a dissertation or literature survey. Students require 180 credits to pass the MSc. The weighting of each module within the overall mark is determined by the credit value assigned to that module.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits. This includes taught modules worth 120 credits plus 60 credits through either of the below paths.
-Literature Survey: two extra elective taught modules of 15 credits each and a Literature Survey worth 30 credits
-Dissertation: a 60 credit Economics Research Project.

Each module typically has a weekly two-hour lecture and a one-hour tutorial, but this may vary.

Note: It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other, depending on which electives you choose.

Dissertation Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)
Elective modules
-Asset Pricing (15 credits)
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)

Literature Survey Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods (30 credits)
-Literature Survey (30 credits)
Elective modules
-Welfare Economics (15 credits)

Elective modules for both paths
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)
-History of Economic Thought (15 credits)
-Corporate Finance (15 credits)
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics (15 credits)*
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)*
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)*

*Students on the Dissertation Path can take only 1 of these modules, which are taught in the Department of International Politics. Students on the Literature Survey Path can take up to 2 of these modules.

Career prospects

Upon completion of this course you will have the skills to work in:
-Consulting firms specialising in development.
-Governmental bodies such as the Department for International Development (DFID).
-Major international financial and development institutions such as World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations or the Overseas Development Institute, which regularly recruits MSc graduates for overseas postings.

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Gain a thorough grounding in applied and theoretical econometrics. The public and private sectors are gaining an increasing awareness of the value of quantitative skills to assess and use evidence from large amounts of data, making econometricians highly sought after. Read more
Gain a thorough grounding in applied and theoretical econometrics.

Overview

The public and private sectors are gaining an increasing awareness of the value of quantitative skills to assess and use evidence from large amounts of data, making econometricians highly sought after. Our MSc in Econometrics and Economics will provide you with the essential skills that you need to follow a professional career, or to pursue further research, in applied and theoretical econometrics. The Masters is aimed at those with a prior knowledge of economics and econometrics, and/or mathematics and statistics.

You'll follow a core course in advanced economic and econometric theory. The modules are taught by world-leading experts in areas of economic theory, microeconometrics, panel data analysis, time series, spatial econometrics and nonparametric methods. Applied econometrics modules will equip you with state-of-the-art data analysis skills. You'll also develop your skills in analysing economic and financial data, and using econometric software widely employed by the leading researchers in the world.

Course Content

To achieve an MSc in Econometrics and Economics you'll complete modules to the value of 180 credits. This includes 90 credits from the core taught modules, 10 credits from the optional taught modules, and an 80 credit dissertation.

Modules
For the Masters you will need to take 100 credits of taught modules. There are seven compulsory core modules which amount to 90 of these credits:
-Advanced Microeconomics (20 credits)
-Advanced Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-International Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Econometric Methods for Research (20 credits)
-Applied Microeconometrics (10 credits)
-Time Series (10 credits)
-Either Project or Topics in Financial Econometrics (10 credits)

In addition, you'll choose one 10 credit option from:
-Design and Analysis of Mechanisms and Institutions (10 credits)
-Development Economics: Theory and Evidence (10 credits)
-Emerging Market Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Experimental Economics (10 credits)
-Industrial Economics (10 credits)
-Labour Economics (10 credits)
-Project (10 credits)
-Public Finance (10 credits)
-Public Sector Economics: Microeconomic Applications (10 credits)
-Topics in Financial Econometrics (10 credits)

You'll complete a piece of independent research carried out over three months of the summer, guided by a supervisor. The dissertation, of up to 10,000 words, is worth 80 credits and offers you the chance to examine a topic in depth and to develop your academic research skills.

The Department of Economics and Related Studies was ranked eighth in the UK for the impact of its research in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.

Since its foundation, members of the Department have made pioneering contributions in econometrics, as well as in public economics, health economics, macroeconomics and finance, experimental economics, economic theory, and economic history. York is one of only three UK institutions to receive five stars from the Centre of Higher Education Development for postgraduate economics.

Careers

The Masters will act as a springboard to a professional career in applied economics and econometrics. It is also an ideal preparation for a PhD. Research shows that around 80 per cent of our department's MSc graduates go on to economics related careers.

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The MSc in Agri-Environmental Economics and Policy prepares you for a career as a professional economist dealing with national and international issues in the area of food, agriculture and the environment. Read more
The MSc in Agri-Environmental Economics and Policy prepares you for a career as a professional economist dealing with national and international issues in the area of food, agriculture and the environment.

You gain a deep understanding of economic theory and policy, and their application to the environment at local, regional and global levels. The programnme develops your analytical ability to evaluate agri-environmental policy options that could be used to combat a wide range of issues including air and water pollution, bidiversity management, climate change, natural resources, and protection of rural areas.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/191/agri-environmental-economics-and-policy

Course structure

The MSc in Agri-Environmental Economics and Policy is studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (seven of which are compulsory) and a dissertation.

The compulsory modules provide a basis for you to acquire the basic skills for the programme, regardless of your first degree background, while the optional module enables you to acquire a broader understanding of the issues in growth and development, trade and development, or further your skills in econometrics. All MSc students take a module in Research Methods, which provides practical skills and knowledge for MSc-level research.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme, proceed to the dissertation stage, where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on an applied issue in environmental economics. Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC802 - Advanced Microeconomics of Consumers, Marketsand Welfare (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC829 - Environmental Valuation (15 credits)
EC831 - Rural and Peasant Economies (15 credits)
EC832 - Political Economy of Public Policy (15 credits)
EC834 - Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy (15 credits)
EC825 - Applied Microeconometrics (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of agri-environmental economics and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of economic theory, econometric and quantitative techniques, and policy and their applications to food, agriculture, environment and rural development

- provide options to enable you to study related subjects in the area of econometrics, trade and development

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of applied, national and international policy problems in the area of food agriculture and environment

- develop your independent research skills

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MSc in Applied Economics and International Development provides training in the application of economic principles to the problems of international development. Read more
The MSc in Applied Economics and International Development provides training in the application of economic principles to the problems of international development.

The programme is designed for students with a good first degree in a sciences or social sciences subject, who would like to pursue a career in economics and international development. You must also have some previous quantitative background, eg a good mark in mathematics from a pre-university school course.

The programme offers great flexibility and breadth of choice in module options in the areas of international finance, trade and development, environment and rural economies.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/192/applied-economics-and-international-development

Course structure

The programme is studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (six of which are compulsory) and a dissertation.

The compulsory modules provide a basis for you to acquire the basic skills for the programme, while the optional modules enable you to choose from applied subjects in the first and second terms. All MSc students take a module in Research Methods, which provides practical skills and knowledge for MSc-level research.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme, proceed to the dissertation stage, where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on an issue in international development. Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)
EC832 - Political Economy of Public Policy (15 credits)
EC833 - Economic Principles (15 credits)
EC835 - Quantitative Methods for Economists (15 credits)
EC834 - Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC825 - Applied Microeconometrics (15 credits)
EC829 - Environmental Valuation (15 credits)
EC831 - Rural and Peasant Economies (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and related subjects, and their application to problems of international development, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of the way in which economics and quantitative techniques can be applied to problem-solving and policy in international development

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as professionals in international development

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

- Labour and education economics

Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

- Macroeconomics, money and finance

Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

- Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour

Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

- Development economics

Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

- Agri-environmental economics

Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

- Transport and regional economics

Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Develop a deep understanding of key issues and methods in book history c.1445-1870. Become familiar with the invention, development, spread, and transformation of printing in the period concerned. Read more

MLitt in The Book. History and Techniques of Analysis

• Develop a deep understanding of key issues and methods in book history c.1445-1870.

• Become familiar with the invention, development, spread, and transformation of printing in the period concerned.

• Explore important aspects of book history, such as the economics of the book trade, the social and religious context of printed books, news and censorship, the development of the illustrated book, the relationship between books and the Enlightenment, the industrialisation of print, and the history of libraries and book collecting.

• Acquire the technical skills required for rare book curatorship (teaching involves the Special Collections department): bibliography, paper, format, type, provenance, bindings, fingerprints, technical description, cataloguing, research tools and methods.

• Undertake skills training in palaeography and either Latin or a modern foreign language.

• Study as part of active book history research community with the Universal Short Title Catalogue, Department of Special Collections, Book History Online, the St Andrews Book History Conference series.

Features

* With around 50 staff, we can offer an unusually broad and varied portfolio of research expertise.

* We have a friendly and collegial atmosphere, in which our postgraduates are actively involved. Social events run throughout the year, starting with a Welcome Reception, and including parties organised by the different Departments, Centres and Institutes.

* Our large postgraduate community includes around 90 research postgraduates and a further 50 taught postgraduates.

* We have a strong commitment to providing skills training to enhance the employability of our postgraduates.

* We are committed to the provision of language training throughout the degree; we also offer up to six language bursaries to incoming postgraduates wishing to develop skills essential to their research.

Postgraduate community

The University of St Andrews is one of the world’s Top 40 Arts and Humanities universities (Times Higher Education 2015) and home to a major centre for postgraduate historical study. Building on excellence in individual research, the School has expertise across the Mediaeval, Early Modern and Modern periods, and a wide geographical coverage. Our research interests range from sixth-century Scotland to Iran in the early twenty-first century (and innumerable other places in between). We have particular strengths in Middle Eastern, Transnational, British, Continental European and US History; as well as groupings focused on Reformation Studies, Environmental History, and Intellectual History. As befits Scotland’s oldest university, the School is also a leading centre of Scottish
historical research.
The School of History occupies three sites in the heart of the historic town of St Andrews. All are within a few minutes’ walk of each other, and of the University Library:
• On tree-lined South Street and close to the ruins of the Cathedral, most Mediaevalists and Reformation Studies colleagues are based in a charming seventeenth-century town house and the adjoining mediaeval residence of the Hospitallers.

• St Katharine’s Lodge is a nineteenth-century former school (attended by Field Marshal Earl Haig) close to St Andrews Castle and the magnificent West Sands beach.

• Middle Eastern History is in the Arts Building, which opened in 2008, with elegant new teaching and work spaces.

Facilities

• The University Library provides extensive collections for use in historical study, including an outstanding Special Collections facility, and continues to make substantial investment in materials, including electronic resources, each year.

• Computer facilities are also readily available within workspaces and University clusters.

• A scheme of competitive scholarships and bursaries is in place to support selected postgraduates financially.

• Language bursaries are available (through a competitive scheme) to enable students new to St Andrews to gain language skills in the summer before starting their postgraduate study.

• All History postgraduates at St Andrews receive financial assistance annually from the School of History specifically to subsidise research expenses.

• Postgraduate students can apply for material support for the organisation of conferences and seminars; this has led in the past to successful events and subsequent publication.

• Social events run throughout the year including the Welcome Reception, a Christmas Party and a Champagne Brunch at graduation. Students may also attend annual Reading Parties and enjoy the opportunity to meet visiting speakers over dinner after research seminars.

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in History at the University of St Andrews, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, publishing, think tanks, government, law, and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD.

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The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative, theoretical and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries. Read more
The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative, theoretical and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for anyone with an economics background interested in developing a career as a health economist working for the public and private sectors, as well as international health organisations and NGOs.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your analytical and modeling abilities and enable you to apply microeconomics and econometrics tools to understand the health care sector and the demand for health. This course will provide you with the experience and the skills you need to work as a health economists in private or public of institutions doing health economics.

Placements

Companies and organisations are invited to meet our students and propose subjects for their dissertation to be done during a placement. Organisations and students liaise directly with the approval of the academic supervisor.

Placements can be for instance with: Boehringer-I, Janssen –Cilag, Eli Lilly, Campbell Aliance, Office of Health Economics, Otsuka, Celgene, Curo, IMS Health, and many others.

Placements provide a unique opportunity to apply the skills learned during the MSc and acquire experience in the workplace.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from state of the art student-geared facilities, including a bright new gym and meeting points. Most importantly, you will benefit from City’s central London location.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by research active academic staff, teaching assistants and industry and visiting lecturers.

We also have invited speakers that come to present specialised topics in health economics.

Assessments are typically a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module) but this can vary by module. About two thirds of our students secure a placement at a firm. The placement is used to learn about the sector while writing the dissertation.

Assessment

The teaching takes place over two terms, from September to June. Full time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation/literature review and examination periods over one year. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme at the end of September, when they submit their literature review/dissertation. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August re-sit exam session will submit their literature review/dissertation in December.

Part time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation/literature review and examination periods spread over one year and 3 months. Part-time students complete all modules over the course of four terms, from September to June, before undertaking their literature review/dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme in December when they submit their literature review/dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules in August will submit in March of the following year.

Modules

The teaching takes place over two terms from September to June. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions finish the programme at the end of September when they submit their dissertation or literature review. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August resit exam session submit their dissertation or literature review in December.

Note: for part-time students, the modules are taught on weekdays during the daytime, alongside the students who are studying on the full-time Master’s programme. Please contact us for further details.

We are introducing a revised programme structure for students who join from September 2016. You will take three core modules, then subsequent modules are tailored to your chosen pathway.

Core modules for all students
-Economic Evaluation (15 credits)
-Advanced Economic Evaluation (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)

Core modules for the dissertation path
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Economics Research Project (60 credits)

Core modules for the literature survey path
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods Health (30 credits)
-Economics Literature Survey (30 credits)

Elective Modules - on the Dissertation route you will take one elective, on the literature survey route you will take three.
-Health Economics
-Economic Evaluation Workshops (15 credits)
-Welfare Economics (15 credits)
-Epidemiology (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory (15 credits)
-History of Economic Thought (15 credits)

Career prospects

This MSc prepares you for career opportunities in economic consultancies, think-tanks, the pharmaceutical industry, professional associations, governmental bodies and non-governmental organisations.

It also prepares you for a PhD in health economics, or teaching and research positions in academic institutions.

Examples: Abacus International, NICE, Optum, IMS Health, Research International, NHS, Kovis, Eli-Lilly, OHE, United Nations, Fidelity, Oxford Outcomes, Gallaher, Johnson&Johnson, Novo Nordisk, Synovate, Tomtah, as well as PhDs at UCL, York, City University London and Warwick.

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The MSc Economic History offers a flexible programme to those who have already studied economic history at first degree level, or for those who have studied a related discipline and whose interests have moved towards economic history. Read more

MSc Economic History

About the MSc programme

The MSc Economic History offers a flexible programme to those who have already studied economic history at first degree level, or for those who have studied a related discipline and whose interests have moved towards economic history.

You will be able to choose from a wide range of elective courses in economic history, allowing you to compile a programme according to your interests and career goals. You will also complete a dissertation on an approved topic of your choice. The programme provides a broad training in social science research methods and their application to historical study, including the role of theory, evaluation, analysis and explanation, quantitative techniques and computing, the use of sources and presentational skills.

Economic History combines the skills of the economist, the statistician and the sociologist, as well as those of the historian, therefore graduates leave the programme with a portfolio of highly transferable skills that can be applied across a wide variety of employment sectors.

Graduate destinations

Economic history graduates can be found in management and administration in the public and private sectors; banking; journalism; economic consultancy; and library and museum services, to mention just a few.

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Based in the Department of War Studies, the MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. Read more
Based in the Department of War Studies, the MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. With close links to the Department of History and the Institute of Contemporary British History, students can study most aspects of the history of armed conflict and society from the late medieval period to the present day.

Key benefits

- The Department of War Studies is internationally recognised as a global centre of excellence and is highly regarded by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a high calibre training institution.

- It is one of the only university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon. A remarkable diversity of research interests, disciplinary approaches, opinion and background exists in the department among both staff and students, reflecting the variety and complexity of the issues raised by war and the study of war.

- Students are taught by the best; experts and pioneers in their fields who are often at the forefront of world events as they happen. Our stellar academic cohort bring not only a wealth of knowledge but also an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions.

- Situated close to the seat of Government, the City, the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Inns of Court students have unique opportunities to network with key high profile visitors, from academics to government ministers, ambassadors and generals.

- The MA programmes in the Department of War Studies are designed to enhance your analytical, conceptual, research and critical thinking skills which will increase your employability and aid professional career development.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/history-of-war-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our programme challenges you to examine war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives, taking as a given that the history of warfare cannot be isolated from the study of general history. It encompasses more than what usually falls into the category of military history to include war from the viewpoint of combatants, societies, economies and cultures across the landscape of modern history, and in the spirit of war studies draws on the literature and methodology of other academic disciplines where appropriate.

Our MA History of War aims to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills you require to progress to advanced research in the field. To that end, it has been created with a compulsory module focused on research and analytical skills, supported by a range of optional modules addressing individual aspects of the history of warfare over time and across a wide geographical and thematic range. Our programme prepares you for future doctoral research into the history of warfare and related fields. It can also be taken as a free-standing master's degree if you are interested in warfare in the past and the intellectual, methodological and practical skills essential to its study.

- Course purpose -
Our programme offers you the opportunity to engage critically with the methods, materials and debates inherent in the study of the history of warfare.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas and exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Designed as a research preparation degree for those wishing to continue and to study for a PhD, it is also a valuable stand-alone degree. Students on MA programmes in the department have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching and the armed forces. For more information about career prospects and graduate destinations see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/employability.aspx

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Overview. The Master's in Monetary and Financial Economics (MEMF) is an international-level programme that follows the best European practices in the area. Read more
Overview
The Master's in Monetary and Financial Economics (MEMF) is an international-level programme that follows the best European practices in the area. As such, the selection criteria of applicants are demanding and this exigency level is kept along the course. Thus, the MEMF is not compatible with a weak background and with a low-effort profile, as we expect students to be prepared to spend a minimum of 3200 effort hours in 2 years.
The effort required from MEMF students is strongly valued in the labour market. Employers especially recognise to MEMF graduates a strong background in econometrics and quantitative methods, competence in macroeconomics and monetary economics, and a large capacity to face new challenges.
Exigency, competence, and rigour. These have been the leading principles of the MEMF for more than two decades and so they will be.

Objectives
The aims of the MEMF are: (i) providing advanced knowledge in the monetary and financial fields, based upon the most relevant results achieved by the scientific community; (ii) initiating its students in scientific research, by practicing the appropriate techniques and methodologies; and (iii) preparing the senior staff in monetary and financial institutions linked to financing the economy and to monetary policy issues.

History
The MEMF started in 1992/93, after being a specialisation area of the Master's in Economics, which had been created in 1981. From its beginning until 2010, it was directed by Vitor Constancio, who had also been the coordinator of the above-mentioned specialisation area in Monetary and Financial Economics. Luis Costa joined the directing team in 2003/04 and Miguel St. Aubyn officially joined it in 2010/11 after Vitor Constancio left it to become the Vice-President of the European Central Bank. Nevertheless, Vitor Constancio kept his relation to the MEMF as the non-executive Scientific Adviser.
In 1996/97 the programme was reformulated and in 2000/01 it was reformulated once again, jointly with other M.Sc. programmes in the scientific field of Economics. A new and profound upgrade would take place in 2007/08 in order to adapt the course to the Bologna Process.
The MEMF has worked continuously since its first edition in 1992/93. In this period amost four hundred students were enrolled and more than one hundred graduated. MEMF graduates work in several firms, both in the financial sector (banking, insurance, and other financial institutions) and in the non-financial sector, in public institutions (central banks, ministries, and international organisations), and in the academy, both in Portugal and abroad. Some opinions of former students are available online.

Designed for
The MEMF is intended to complement and to deepen first-cycle education provided by a Bachelor's in Economics or Finance. The main objective is that students learn how to analyse problems in a rigorous and constructive way, developing their ability to assess the contribution of research in Monetary and Financial Economics to solve the problems in the area, and to use advanced empirical and theoretical tools in Economics and Finance.

Employment
A master in Monetary and Financial Economics is prepared to work as an economist, financial analyst, researcher and teacher, senior staff member in financial institutions, central banks, international organisations, and public departments. The programme is also an intermediate step to obtain a Ph.D. in the areas of Economics and Finance.

Operational Regime
Full time. Compulsory courses and elective-option courses with origin in MEMF are taught after 18:00 h.

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This is a fast-track, nine-month programme that provides rigorous training in core skills in analytical economics and econometrics, as well as allowing some specialisation in chosen areas of the subject. Read more
This is a fast-track, nine-month programme that provides rigorous training in core skills in analytical economics and econometrics, as well as allowing some specialisation in chosen areas of the subject. It is intended for graduates whose first degree did not focus on economics. It is a free-standing qualification, enabling graduates to seek employment in economics-related fields. For graduates intending to pursue further study, the programme is designed to meet entrance requirements for postgraduate programmes at Master's level or higher.

Programme structure

Core units
Three units are taken from the school's undergraduate programmes:
-Econometrics
-Intermediate Economics 1 with extended essay
-Intermediate Economics 2 with extended essay

Optional units
You must select two specialised units from a list announced each year. This list includes both second- and third-year undergraduate units, and students must choose at least one third-year unit. A typical list might include:
-Current Economic Problems
-Environmental Economics
-History of Economic Thought
-Industrial Economics
-International Economics
-Labour Economics*
-Macroeconomic Theory and Policy
-Corporate Finance
-Growth and Development
-Applied Microeconomics
-Behavioural Economics

*Permission to take this unit is at the unit director's discretion.

Careers

Successful completion of this programme will enable graduates to seek employment in economics-related fields and meet entrance requirements for postgraduate programmes at Master's level or higher.

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