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Masters Degrees (Historiography)

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Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. Read more
Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. We have strong links with related disciplines such as history, archaeology and modern languages. We welcome postgraduates in any of our areas of research expertise.

Classics and Ancient History at Newcastle has a long and distinguished international reputation. We deliver quality research and teaching. We have taught Latin and Greek since 1874. We have taught Ancient History since 1910 and Classical Archaeology since 1931.

Our staff include scholars of outstanding international reputation. Our research covers all major aspects of the study of the ancient world, with research strengths in:
-Rhetoric and historiography
-Ancient philosophy, science and medicine
-Reception and recreation of ancient texts
-Ancient concepts of divinity

Our research specialities include:
-The ancient Near East
-Greco-Roman culture and religion
-Early Christianity and patristics
-Greek art and archaeology
-Greek ethnography
-History and archaeology of Roman Italy
-Greek and Roman music
-Greek language and literature, including Homer, tragedy, historiography and rhetoric
-Latin language and literature, including historiography, rhetoric and Augustan poetry
-Reception of the classical tradition
-Ancient science and medicine
-Ancient Greek and Roman patristics and philosophy

MPhil supervision is usually available in:

Ancient history and classical archaeology

-The history and archaeology of pre-Roman and Roman Italy
-The late Roman Republic
-Greco–Roman religion
-The social and cultural history of the Roman Empire
-Roman Greece
-Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt
-History of the Jews
-Greek art and archaeology
-The history and archaeology of the ancient Near East

Classical language and literature

-Latin language and literature
-Ancient oratory and rhetoric
-Latin poetry
-Ancient historiography
-Greek tragedy
-Greek influence on later literature
-Greek and Roman music

Philosophy and science

-Ancient and early Christian philosophy
-The history of Greek and Roman medicine
-Greek and Roman music
-The exact sciences in Graeco-Roman antiquity

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For the MPhil in American History, in the first term, students on the course will be offered an intensive training programme consisting of classes, seminars, workshops, individual and group assignments. Read more
For the MPhil in American History, in the first term, students on the course will be offered an intensive training programme consisting of classes, seminars, workshops, individual and group assignments. Each student will take a compulsory core readings course in American history. This course will include weekly classes in Michaelmas Term on major themes, historiography, and methods, based on key readings, so that students come to a foundational understanding of central themes in American history. Students will also choose two Options, one in Michaelmas Term and one in Lent Term, from a range of Options in American and other history. Each of these modules will require a 3,000-4,000 word essay (or equivalent) and will count for 10% of the final mark (so all three modules will count for 30% of the final degree mark). Those who satisfactorily complete this programme of study will continue on to a research project, closely supervised by one of Cambridge’s outstanding group of American historians. They will be expected to submit a dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words by the middle of June. This dissertation is worth 70% of the final degree mark.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimpamh

Course detail

The MPhil in American History aims to:

- explore key themes underpinning American history as well as the debates that shaped this dynamic field
- train students in the use of the printed, manuscript, visual, material culture, and oral sources for the study of American history, and introduce the use of sources, within and beyond U.S. archives;
- offer an intensive introduction to research methodologies and skills useful for the study of American history
- provide an opportunity for students to undertake, at postgraduate level, a piece of original historical research in American history under close supervision: to write a substantial piece of history in the form of a dissertation with full scholarly apparatus.

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- knowledge of key debates and trends in American history and historiography
- greater understanding of issues, events, and people in American history
- skills in presenting work in both oral and written form
- advanced research and writing skills (at postgraduate level)

Format

Compulsory Core Course, Michaelmas Term, “Readings in American History and Historiography”: Weekly classes in Michaelmas Term on major themes, historiography and methods, based on key readings, so that students come to a foundational understanding of key themes in American history. The final essay in this option, of 3,000-4,000 words and incorporating a presentation, is assessed and is worth 10% of the final mark.

Options in Michaelmas and Lent Term: Weekly classes in Michaelmas and Lent Terms on broad but more specialized topics (for example, on the Atlantic World, or on Politics and Society in the 20th century). There will also be options from other MPhils which students can take. Students will be required to take one option in each term. They would be required to make a presentation, and to complete a 3,000-4,000 word essay. Each Option is worth 10% of the final mark.

- Language Training: This is encouraged, especially for those working in early American or America in the world topics.

- Research Seminar and Training: Students are required to attend the weekly US Research Seminar, to log attendance, and to ask at least one question per Term.

- Graduate Workshop and Training: Students are required to attend the weekly US History Graduate Workshop, to present their work once in the academic year, and to offer feedback on the work presented by others.

Assessment

- The thesis is Part II of the course. The thesis will be 15,000-20,000 words. It will be due in early-June and will count for 70% of the final degree mark.

- An oral examination will only be required in cases where one of the marks is a marginal fail.

- Each of three modules in Michaelmas and Lent (one Compulsory Core, and two Options) will require a 3,000-4,000 words essay (or equivalent). Each will count toward 10% of the final degree mark, for a total of 30%. Taken together, these are Part I, and students must receive passing marks in order to move to Part II.

- Students will also prepare a 2,000 word dissertation proposal essay due in the Lent Term. This essay will be unassessed but students will meet with their supervisor to discuss the essay and get feedback.

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimpamh/apply

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

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In the first term, students on the course will be offered an intensive training programme consisting of classes, seminars, workshops, individual and group assignments. Read more
In the first term, students on the course will be offered an intensive training programme consisting of classes, seminars, workshops, individual and group assignments. Each student will take a compulsory core readings course in Modern British history. This course will include weekly classes on major themes, historiography, and methods, based on key readings, so that students come to a foundational understanding of central themes in Modern British history.

Students will also choose two Options, one in Michaelmas Term and one in Lent Term, from a range of Options in British history and historiography.

From the first term students begin research for a 15-20,000-word dissertation, working closely with a supervisor.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimpmbh

Course detail

By the end of the programme, students will have acquired:

1. a firm grasp of the historiographical debates in Modern British History;
2. research skills relevant to the specific area in which they will have written a dissertation;
3. the ability to situate their own research findings within the context of previous and current interpretative scholarly debates in the field.

Format

1. Compulsory core option, Michaelmas Term, taken from the core course ‘Readings in Modern British History and Historiography’. The core course focuses on key debates in British political, social, cultural or economic history. The following fields will be covered: the industrial revolution; the language of the social order; faith and secularisation; democracy; liberalism; the impact of empire; gender history. Students will attend weekly classes on these major themes, based on key readings, in order to come to a foundational understanding of key themes in British history. The final essay, of a maximum of 4,000 words, will be assessed and worth 10% of the final MPhil mark.

2. One option in Michaelmas Term and one option in Lent Term. Weekly classes on broad but more specialized topics, such as ‘the long eighteenth century’, ‘class and social mobility in the long twentieth century’, ‘history and public policy’. Each of these modules will require an essay (maximum word length of 4,000) which will count for 10% of the final mark for the MPhil (so all three modules, including the core course essay, will count for 30% of the final degree mark). In addition, each Option will incorporate a presentation (unassessed) for each student.

3. Dissertation. Those who satisfactorily complete this programme of study will continue on to a research project, closely supervised by one of Cambridge’s outstanding group of historians of Modern Britain. The dissertation, of between 15,000 and 20,000 words, will be submitted by the middle of June. This dissertation is worth 70% of the final mark in the degree.

4. Research seminar. The students are asked to regularly attend at least one seminar offered by the Modern British history subject group (among which the Modern British history, Modern Cultural History, Irish history, British social and economic history) and to engage in the discussion.

5. Graduate training. Alongside regular presentations and debates with the Options, a graduate workshop or ‘training day’ will take place late in Lent Term at which students will present their work to other students and to the Faculty involved in the Modern British history MPhil. This workshop provides an excellent opportunity to exchange with other students as well as senior historians about their present work, their achievements and difficulties, and to learn a variety of presentation skills.

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Please see the Faculty website for more information:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-mphil-phd
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-ltc-home

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. Read more
Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. As an MPhil or PhD student you will enjoy a research environment in which ambitious and original ideas can flourish.

Many of the research opportunities in history are interdisciplinary and are available for most periods of history and in most geographical regions.

You can find out more about MPhil and PhD supervision areas from the School of History, Classics and Archaeology. There are opportunities for joint supervision with Latin American researchers in the School of Modern Languages.

Supervision is normally available in the following subject areas:

Classical, medieval and early modern medicine

Topics include:
-Reception(s) of Hippocratic medicine and Hippocratic Oath
-History of medical ethics
-History and iconography of melancholy and psychopathology
-Medical history/historiography as an academic discipline
-Genres of medical writing
-Interface between medicine and literature, Thomas Mann and medicine
-Medicine and philosophy; medicine and law

The supervisor in this area is Dr T Rütten.

Death and burial

The history of poverty and poor relief in pre-industrial England (Professor J Boulton).

Gender, women's history and the history of sexuality

Britain (Dr H Berry); the modern Atlantic world (Dr D Paton); Greece (Dr V Hionidou).

Historical demography

The history of nutrition, famine and mortality; the history of fertility, birth control and contraception (Dr V Hionidou).

History of ideas

Revolutionary ideology in 18th and 19th century Britain and France (Dr R Hammersley); European historiography (Dr L Racaut).

History of psychiatry

Mental health and the 'asylum'; forensic psychiatry, criminal lunacy and crime; the history of the body; early modern social and cultural history of health; history of hospitals; history of sexuality; domestic/household medicine; travel and medicine (Dr J Andrews).

Early medieval Britain and Europe (Dr S Ashley, Ms A Redgate).

National identity, inter-ethnic relations and border issues

Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); North America (Dr B Houston); Russia and Ukraine (Professor D Saunders); Mexico and Cuba (Dr K Brewster); the Caribbean (Dr D Paton); Spain (Dr A Quiroga); Ireland (Dr S Ashley, Dr F Campbell); the Irish in Britain (Dr J Allen).

Politics, international relations and the impact of war

Modern British politics (Dr J Allen, Dr M Farr, Dr F Campbell); European fascism and the Nazi new order (Professor T Kirk); 20th century France (Dr M Perry); 20th century Italy (Dr C Baldoli); transwar Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); American Civil War and the United States in the 19th century (Professor S M Grant); the United States in the 20th century (Dr B Houston).

Urban history and urban culture

History of the press in early modern France (Dr L Racaut); 19th century Newcastle and the North East (Dr J Allen); 18th century urban cultures in Britain (Dr H Berry); 17th century London (Professor J Boulton); urban culture in the Habsburg Empire (Professor T Kirk).

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The MRes is an advanced historical research programme, and students specialize in ancient, medieval, early modern or modern history under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field of research. Read more
The MRes is an advanced historical research programme, and students specialize in ancient, medieval, early modern or modern history under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field of research. Students receive training in historiographical and technical skills necessary for doctoral study and develop their knowledge of the period they choose to focus on.

Key benefits

- One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2015).

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK.

- Ideal preparation for doctoral study, with advanced training in research skills combined with an extended dissertation.

- Specialise in Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern or Modern History.

- The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/history-mres.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MRes History programme provides students with the opportunity to engage in advanced historical research and appropriate research training tailored to students’ particular research interests. At its heart is the 30,000 word dissertation, delivered through a series of intensive one-to-one supervisions with tutors expert in the students’ fields of research. Through its taught training modules, the programme offers students the chance to engage at an advanced level with disciplinary and methodological debates, as well as conduct training work preliminary to writing the dissertation. These modules, combined with the dissertation, provide students with the ability to conduct large-scale independent research projects.

- Pathways -

Students on the MRes History follow one of four pathways, best suited to their research interests:

Ancient History – this pathway draws on the great strength of ancient history research in the University of London, which has the largest number of ancient historians in post anywhere in the world. The compulsory Sources & Methods in Ancient History is an intercollegiate module, involving most of the ancient historians in London, who take seminar sessions on their own specialist areas. Students are also required to study Greek and/or Latin for Research, Epigraphy or Papyrology.

Medieval History – this pathway builds on the popular MA in Medieval History at King’s, which has an outstanding track record for training medievalists for doctoral research. Students take the compulsory module Materials and Methods, which introduces methodological problems that medieval historians confront when handling source materials and when engaging with historical methods or schools of thought, as well as compulsory training in Palaeography and Latin for Graduates.

Early Modern History – this pathway enables each student to put together a tailor-made programme best suited to his or her research interests, providing an excellent basis for the research dissertation. Students choose between two core modules that focus on historiography (Approaches to Early Modern History) or practical skills (Advanced Skills for Historians). Optional modules cover topics including the history of religion, power, ritual, bodies, science, cities, knowledge, images and objects.

Modern History – students focus either on British and European history since the French Revolution, or on the history of global interaction since the 16th century. All students choose between two core modules that focus on historiography (Transnational History) or practical skills (Historical Methods). In addition, students are permitted to choose from a very wide range of taught optional modules.

- Course purpose -

Both to provide training in the historiographical and technical skills necessary for further study, and also to deepen your knowledge of the period studied. Suitable both for potential academics and for personal interest for those with a clear research focus.

- Course format and assessment -

We will provide you with two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you undertake at least 17 hours of independent study. If you are a part-time student, this will only apply during your first year. For your dissertation, we will provide 12 hours of one-to-one supervision and we will expect you to undertake 1,118 hours of independent study.

Career Prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Much contemporary debate relates to global patterns and global change, and also to the history of the European empires which were a key part of 'globalization' from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. Read more
Much contemporary debate relates to global patterns and global change, and also to the history of the European empires which were a key part of 'globalization' from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. This course addresses issues of growing concern, and builds on the current expertise within our department to offer a distinctive programme which is not found in any other Scottish university.

Why study Global Empires at Dundee?

This degree programme is designed to provide you with an understanding of the development of the major European empires from the early modern period to the present. The course provides an opportunity for you to examine issues such as the impact of empires on the rest of the world, their rivalries, and the economic consequences of their imperial activity.

The course is taught by leading specialists in American, Spanish, Dutch and British history and utilises archival and digital resources held at the university and in nearby collections.

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. The MLitt in Global Empires is a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

This course is suitable for all students who wish to gain a grounding in, and a deeper appreciation of, the major topics and historiography of the major European global empires and the historical origins of modern globalisation. It is also suitable if you are interested in gaining additional skills and knowledge to further your employment prospects. If you wish to proceed to further study for a PhD, this course will also provide you with the necessary research skills.

Research Skills:
You will gain skills in various historical approaches as well as practical skills in areas such oral history or historical databases. The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

Aims of the Programme

The central aim of this course is to examine the many different interpretations of aspects of imperial and global history and you will be encouraged to think critically about the various ways in which historians have viewed these developments over the past five centuries.

In addition the course aims to equip you with the core competencies, knowledge and skills required to understand and interpret sources and historiography in the context of your own research and to gain experience in using those skills in independent research. Finally the course aims to further develop your written communication and presentation skills.

How is the course taught?

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. The modules are taught through mixtures of introductory lectures, seminars, involving students in weekly journals, and group work.

Programme content

The course is made up of the following modules:

Global Empires (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

Careers

Due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

However, for those wishing to use their studies directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of Scottish history and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

The course will therefore contribute to enhancing prospects in careers such as: teaching, libraries, archives, museums, heritage and tourism industries, as well as providing content relevant to the continuing professional development of employees in many public-facing roles.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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This distinctive full-time MA programme provides you with an opportunity to study the history and historiography of warfare from a multi-disciplinary and multi-period perspective. Read more
This distinctive full-time MA programme provides you with an opportunity to study the history and historiography of warfare from a multi-disciplinary and multi-period perspective.

A thorough grounding is provided in research methods and in the historiography and economics of warfare while a wide choice of options complements the broad range of possible dissertation subjects that can be supported by our staff.

All students will study three core modules:

Historical Methods
Research Skills: Dissertation Preparation
Economics of War

Students who did not take the BA War Studies degree at the University of Birmingham will also study an additional core module: Writing the History of Warfare.

Those who did not take the BA War Studies degree will then take 40 credits of optional modules, while University of Birmingham BA War Studies graduates will take 60 credits of optional modules. These are chosen from:

40-credit special subject modules (which run across the autumn and spring semesters)
20-credit advanced options (taken in the autumn or spring semesters)

Each module is assessed by 4,000-word essay and you will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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September, January and May. Masters degree / Postgraduate Diploma / Postgraduate Certificate / Single-module study. Read more

Course start date

September, January and May

About the course

Masters degree / Postgraduate Diploma / Postgraduate Certificate / Single-module study

Seeking to deepen your understanding of Scotland’s history and heritage in the global context from the comfort of your home? This course will equip you with the skills you need, and offers access to cutting edge, innovative research in Scottish historical studies. Delivered in an interactive online environment, this course is designed to provide students who cannot attend a fulltime postgraduate degree course in Scottish History with an opportunity to develop research skills and an understanding of the major topics and historiography of Scottish History.

Why study Scottish History at Dundee?

This course builds upon the current expertise within the History programme at Dundee to provide an integrated programme of study including research skills, a critical understanding of the principal theories and concepts of Scottish History and historiography, and the chance through independent research to make a contribution to the development of Scottish history.

The central aim of this course is to examine the many different interpretations of Scottish history and you will be encouraged to think critically about the various ways in which historians have viewed the development of Scotland over the past five centuries and to consider some of the ways in which Scottish history has been portrayed in a popular context.

You will learn about:

- Debates and Issues in Scottish History from the sixteenth century to the present
- How to use the main sources available to historians of Scotland
- The Union of 1603 and the Covenanters
- The Scottish Reformation: Politics and Society
- The Union of 1707
- Jacobite rising
- Scottish Identity and Culture
- The ‘Highland Question’: Clearance and Improvement
- Health and welfare in the Highlands
- The Industrial Revolution
- Landscape and Environment
- Scotland and Empire
- Tourism and Leisure

Who should study this course?

This course is aimed at:

- Anyone with a good undergraduate degree wishing to gain a deeper appreciation and understanding of Scottish History. The University can consider applications from people with experience, but no first degree
- Graduates in History or related disciplines wishing to gain additional knowledge and skills to further their employment prospects
- History graduates considering PhD research

Individual modules can be taken as non-accredited modules for interest or personal development.

How you will be taught

The programme is delivered through online distance learning. You study from home and can be based anywhere in the world. You will have a tutor who is an expert in their field and will work through the modules with other students so you won’t feel isolated. Module authors and tutors include Dr Alan MacDonald, Professor Graeme Morton and Dr Patricia Whatley.

Modules run for 15 weeks, and pathways can take between 1 and 5 years. We suggest that students account for 15 hours per week of work for each module undertaken. Most of the student cohort will be studying part-time alongside employment and other commitments.

What you will study

There is one core module, worth 20 credits:

- Debates and Issues in Scottish History: Sources, Interpretations and Arguments

You will take 100 credits of optional modules from the following:

- Scottish National Identities since 1807
- Scottish Tourism, 1780-1930
- Health, Politics and Society in the Scottish Highlands, 1840-1945
- Scotland in the Age of Mary Queen of Scots
- War, Empire and Society: Scotland c 1870-1922
- Scotland: Land and People
- The Union of 1707

You can also take 40 credits worth of modules from the Centre for Archive and Information Studies

- Public History
- Scots Palaeography and Diplomatic
- Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in Scotland

Students can choose to graduate at 60 credits with a PG Cert, at 120 credits with a PG Dip or complete the Research Proposal and Dissertation module for the Masters. All modules are available in a standalone basis.

How you will be assessed

Coursework (100%) consisting of, per module:

- 55% Essay (4,000 words)
- 30% Assessed Tasks (2 short essays of c. 1000 words each)
- 15% Module Journal (c. 500 words every 2 weeks)

Tutors will provide regular support and feedback from the assessed tasks and module journal as the module progresses.

To complete the MLitt, students are also required to write an 18,000 word dissertation.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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This programme offers a unique opportunity to deepen and develop your knowledge of ancient history by combining a substantial (20,000 words) dissertation with research training and taught elements. Read more
This programme offers a unique opportunity to deepen and develop your knowledge of ancient history by combining a substantial (20,000 words) dissertation with research training and taught elements. It can lead to doctoral research, but also provides the chance to undertake scholarly research as enrichment of undergraduate study or for career development purposes.

This programme will enhance your skills as an ancient historian. You will undertake training in key fields such as classical languages or historiography, which will equip you with the essential skills for your Greek or Roman History research project in any period from Archaic Greece to Imperial Rome and its provinces. You will also have the opportunity to choose modules from across the MA Antiquity syllabus which are complementary to your research.

Your thesis will be on an aspect of Greek or Roman history, culture or society.

It will be supervised by a specialist in the area of your work. A research skills training module equips you for your thesis with a range of specialised and generic skills, including textual criticism, document handling, literary theory, information resources, thesis presentation and bibliographical management.

Many students also opt to take training in classical languages but you may choose to take modules from the MA Antiquity syllabus, which allows for interdisciplinary study of the ancient world and includes modules on historiography and ancient societies. We also offer the opportunity to take modules from other related postgraduate programmes, such as Byzantine Studies.

Typically, applicants will have a degree in some area of ancient historical, archaeological, historical or classical studies, and we recommend that you discuss your proposed research with a potential supervisor before applying - see the full range of academic research interests of individual staff.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Royal Holloway’s Holocaust Research Centre is the leading academic centre of its kind in Europe and we are internationally recognised for our research, teaching, public advocacy and creative work. Read more
Royal Holloway’s Holocaust Research Centre is the leading academic centre of its kind in Europe and we are internationally recognised for our research, teaching, public advocacy and creative work.

The Research Centre’s mission is to promote research into the Holocaust, its origins and aftermath, and to examine the extent to which genocide, war and dictatorship can be understood as defining elements in the history of the twentieth century. It is an international forum bringing together researchers working on different aspects of the Holocaust in a range of disciplines, including history, literary and language studies, film and media studies, philosophy and sociology.

The MA Holocaust Studies is taught by staff from several different Royal Holloway Departments, including English, Modern Languages and History. Courses are taught both at the Wiener Library in central London and the Royal Holloway Egham campus.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/maholocauststudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Holocaust Research Centre has a very active research culture which features lectures from the leading figures in the field. Recent speakers have included Robert Jan van Pelt, Ulrich Herbert, Reinhard Rürup, Dina Porat, Saul Friedländer, Geoffrey Hartman and Jeffrey Herff.

- We host several workshops each year on cutting edge research and regular international conferences.

- Our core staff, which includes internationally recognised scholars Peter Longerich, Dan Stone, Colin Davis, Zoe Waxman and Robert Eaglestone, have published over 30 books in the last five years with major presses and three books have won international prizes.

Department research and industry highlights

In responding to the Holocaust we research in a range of disciplines, including history, literary studies, theory film and media studies and philosophy, and welcome graduates in any of these areas. We especially welcome students with interdisciplinary projects.

The research of the members of the Centre has been supported by grants from Leverhulme, the AHRC, the British Academy, DAAD, Humboldt, the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and elsewhere.

Course content and structure

You will study one core course unit, three elective units and undertake a dissertation.

Core course units:
- History and Historiography of the Holocaust
This unit will introduce you to the history of the Holocaust and will focus on major historical debates.

- Dissertation
The dissertation must be between 14,000 - 16,000 words and is mainly written in the third term and the summer (deadline 1st September). Students are expected to develop a topic together with their supervisor(s) during the Spring Term. Topics can be taken from various areas, like history and presentation of the Holocaust or its impact on literature, culture, media and philosophy.

Elective course units:
- Holocaust Literature
You will consider various cultural representations of the Holocaust in British and American literature and in particular the relationship between history, testimony and literature.

- Post-Holocaust Philosophy
This unit looks at the response in European philosophy to the murder of the Jews. To what extent does the Holocaust render previous philosophy redundant?

- Documents of the Holocaust
You will study in depth crucial documents regarding the Nazi persecution of the Jews and the “Final Solution”. All documents will be presented in English translations.

- Faith, Politics, and the Jews of Europe, 1848-1918
This unit explores the emergence of conservative Jewish movements opposed to assimilation and the response to anti-Jewish movements and ideologies from the late 1870s onwards.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge and understanding of:
- the most important aspects of the history and historiography of the Holocaust
- significant questions of schools of culture, philosophy and representation arising from the Holocaust
- methods and concepts of various disciplines (historical, literary, philosophical and others).

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers in academia, charities (such as the Holocaust Educational Trust) and the media. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The MA in History and Philosophy of Art (with a term in Rome) provides a structured introduction to postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Read more
The MA in History and Philosophy of Art (with a term in Rome) provides a structured introduction to postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art.

It includes a term in Rome where we run the MA with the American University of Rome. A range of themes and approaches are considered in this MA with a particular focus on medieval, Renaissance and Baroque art in Italy. The first term is taught in Canterbury.

During the term in Rome you will study the art of Rome first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study the history of Rome and specific artists. Kent staff are present for part of the spring term in Rome to ensure continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support. The campus is located in the Monteverde district of Rome, a picturesque district with a wide range of shops and amenities. From nearby Trastevere, it is a short bus-ride to the historic centre of Rome with its astonishing range of Roman sites, monuments, churches and museums.

The programme is intended for graduates in art history and other arts subjects. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/344/history-of-art-rome

About the Department of History of Art

The History of Art Department within the School of Arts, provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Course structure

You take one core module and one optional module during your first term in Canterbury and your second term in Rome. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Term 1 (Canterbury):

Compulsory modules:
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art

One option from:

HA826 - History and Theory of Curating
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought
HA826 - History and Theory of Curating
HA835 - A Matter of Taste: The Art and Aesthetics of Food and Drink
HA898 Dissertation

Term 2 (Rome):
Compulsory Module:
HA833 Discovering Rome in Rome: Arts in Rome from antiquity to the present day

One option from:

Optional modules in Rome are taken through the American University in Rome and change each year. Past options have included:

- Michelangelo in Rome

This seminar on Michelangelo examines the work of the Renaissance master; his sculpture, painting, architecture and literary production. His works are investigated within their specific historical context, focusing on issues of commission, iconography, censorship, biography, historiography and aesthetics. An excursion to Florence is also planned. Beyond a complete comprehension of Michelangelo’s work, the course aims toward a mastery of art historical research skills, the evaluation of current scholarship and independent critical thought on art.

Term 3: Dissertation
HA833 - Discovering Rome in Rome: Arts in Rome from Antiquity to the Present Da (30 credits)
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)
HA898 - History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by two assignments per module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art; enhanced through the opportunity to study for one term in Rome

- provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research

- enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art

- enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate; especially through study abroad and site visits

- enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art

- provide access to enhanced intercultural awareness and understanding through the opportunity to study for one term in Rome

- enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives

- provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This MA in the History of the British Isles will deepen your appreciation of the distinctive political, social and cultural aspects of the British and Irish historical experience, from the Reformation period to the present day, while also fostering your awareness of values and experiences the British and the Irish share with their European and global neighbours. Read more
This MA in the History of the British Isles will deepen your appreciation of the distinctive political, social and cultural aspects of the British and Irish historical experience, from the Reformation period to the present day, while also fostering your awareness of values and experiences the British and the Irish share with their European and global neighbours. This Master's degree considers the constituent countries of the British Isles - England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales - and asks how and why the geographical and political entities that are Great Britain, the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland came into being.

The pressing current day issue of devolution is encouraging discussions about the formation of nation-states and national identities which feed into debates amongst historians about whether the territorial state is the most useful or constructive means of assessing historical developments and how the creation (and re-creation) of national identities relate to religion, race, gender and class.

The core module will introduce you to the systematic study of historiography and the methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of historical source material. You can explore the enormous breadth of research interests in the department via the 3 option modules you choose, which span from the ancient period to the contemporary moment. This programme will enable you to engage with the most important and up-to-date themes, debates and historiographies in the study of the British Isles.

Finally, the dissertation gives you the chance to pursue your own interests and undertake your own research and critical thinking under the supervision of a member of staff with relevant expertise. By drawing on the expertise of staff directly engaged in English, Irish and Scottish research areas, the programme provides support and encouragement if you want to go on to pursue independent, professional or PhD research, develop new skills in relation to existing careers, or simply deepen your own understanding of the richness, diversity and complexity of the British historical experience in comparative perspective.

Key teaching staff on this programme

Course director: Professor Jerry White.

Other staff who teach on this MA programme include:

Dr Laura Stewart
Dr Sean Brady
Professor Joanna Bourke
Dr Jan Rueger
Professor Frank Trentmann
Professor Vanessa Harding
Professor David Feldman.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
This exciting, collaborative Master's degree offers you the chance to use the British Isles as a focus for the study of broad historical themes.
You can follow, further develop and enhance your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while improving your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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Our MRes in History offers a research-rich master’s programme for those students wanting to develop specialist knowledge and scholarly techniques, as the first step on the path to doctoral research or research-related career paths. Read more

Summary

Our MRes in History offers a research-rich master’s programme for those students wanting to develop specialist knowledge and scholarly techniques, as the first step on the path to doctoral research or research-related career paths. We offer a unique combination of focused expertise and applied historical experience in a friendly, supportive graduate environment.

On this course, you will work closely with members of our History staff, who have internationally-recognised expertise in a wide range of subjects, periods and geographical areas. The programme would suit students who already have a well-defined research interest, and the course will help you to work at that higher level, primarily via research. You will engage with a broad range of research methods relevant for advanced historical research.

You will be closely supported in your research journey through informed, innovative and expert supervision, and receive training for doctoral work, particularly in the field of history. However, this course will also prepare you for a wide range of professional careers that require advanced level research and communication skills. Your training will consist of study in relevant methodological processes for research, including language skills, palaeography, quantitative methods, data presentation, and oral history.

Using these skills, you will gain experience of applied historical research in a range of working environments, via a tailored research internship. Students on this course will prepare an original, extended research project, engaging critically and creatively with historical texts, objects and images as well as extant research in historiography and history.

As part of having the opportunity to contribute to the national and international research profile of the University, as a student on the MRes in History, you will have access to opportunities for co-operation and collaboration with related institutions in the UK.

Content

The core module of the course is a 30,000 word dissertation. This is an intellectually-stimulating and challenging experience, representing substantial independent research into a topic in any period of history, approved in concert with an appointed supervisor. In this module, students will apply their advanced research skills developed on the rest of the course.

Another key module on the course is the Research Internship. It will provide a link between your academic training and practical research in cultural institutions such as museums, libraries, archives or archaeological sites. The placement will further develop your skills in critical and historical analysis and interpretation, and allow you to see them in use in your chosen area of employment. Students will come to understand and critically evaluate the range of possible career opportunities associated with the professional application of historical research skills, within an institutional setting in the private or public sector.

Other modules are designed to provide you with opportunities to engage with primary documents, and to use these to develop your research skills. There is an emphasis in these optional modules on developing a historiographical understanding of the study of history in areas such as the politics of health in recent Britain; Gender and Sexuality in Modern Europe; or in the History of the family.

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This new MA in Theatre and Performance Research will focus on preparation for research at MPhil/PhD level, while also enabling students to update their knowledge of contemporary trends in theatre and performance studies. Read more
This new MA in Theatre and Performance Research will focus on preparation for research at MPhil/PhD level, while also enabling students to update their knowledge of contemporary trends in theatre and performance studies. It will draw on the existing academic strengths and international outreach of the department, and help students to develop theoretical insights into contemporary theatre and performance theories and practices in areas such as trauma and performance, political performance, interculturalism, dramaturgy, performance-making and historiography.

There are two core modules - Theoretical Thematics and Research Methods - and students may take a further two optional modules.

Additionally, all students undertake a written or practical dissertation as a part of their assessment. The School has a strong history of placing students in PhD programmes and a dynamic research culture. It also has a good relationship with Warwick Arts Centre, which provides regular performance events on campus.

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This popular Modern History course is focused on European and British history from the mid 18th century onwards and explores the key topics of the period, from European nation building to modern British politics. Read more
This popular Modern History course is focused on European and British history from the mid 18th century onwards and explores the key topics of the period, from European nation building to modern British politics. The couse is designed primarily for those interested in Continental European and/or British History and draws on a wide range of approaches to give you a comparative perspective.

It offers a huge range of options taught by world-leading experts, including modules taught in the Institute of Contemporary British History.

Key benefits

- One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 7th in the Guardian University Guide 2015 rankings for History.

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

- Innovative comparative approach to British and Continental European history since the 18th-century.

- The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/modern-history-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The history of modern Europe and Britain has always been central to teaching at King’s. The popular MA programme teaches students the skills required for modern historical study and delves into key topics of the period, from European nation building to modern British politics. The MA is primarily intended for those interested in Continental European and/or British History since the mid 18th century and draws upon a wide range of approaches to create a comparative perspective. You will also have the opportunity to study a modern language, which will extend the range of sources that you can engage with.

Teaching on the MA is underpinned by the belief that an ability to make comparisons between the experience of different societies and polities is vital to understanding historical issues, and a compulsory historiography module has been designed with this in mind. Students are encouraged to think beyond the rigid confines of country, period and discipline. Opportunities to do so are enhanced by the wide choice of modules made available across the Faculty of Arts & Humanities as well as intercollegiately.

- Course purpose -

Provides a distinctive programme suitable both for those intending to proceed to a PhD and for those who wish to study modern history at an advanced level. Encourage a broad vision in study that escapes rigid divisions of country, period or discipline.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: 6 hours of taught classes per week.

Part-time study: 2-4 hours of taught classes per week.

The taught compulsory and optional modules are assessed by coursework and/or take-home examination. The compulsory 15,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career Prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, archives, the media, finance, politics and heritage industries.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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