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Masters Degrees (Historic Buildings)

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Accredited training for building conservation professionals. The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. Read more
Accredited training for building conservation professionals

Why choose this course?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. The programme conforms with the international ICOMOS Guidelines for Education and Training in Conservation.

Having run successfully for more than 40 years, the programme is now supported by a network of specialist conservation and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally. Contributors to the course include national experts from English Heritage, Council for British Archaeology, ICOMOS-UK, Historic Scotland, and the National Trust and from a large number of local conservation and heritage organisations.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage building conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build working relationships with national and international conservation specialists and research organisations.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, practical experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

What does the course cover?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) covers the history, ethics and philosophy of historic environment conservation together with a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. It is complemented by training in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings. The practical ‘skills modules’ focus on specific aspects of professional practice, repair and conservation techniques, legislation and planning, policy, finance and managing conservation projects.

Who is it for?

This course attracts graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history and related subjects. It also appeals to experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields, who wish to advance their professional training.

What can it lead to?

The course provides the knowledge and practical skills required for a range of careers in historic building conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust and English Heritage to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) focuses on enhancing students’ employability and professional development with a combination of practical skills training and theoretical teaching. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge so that your chances of employment as a conservation professional are improved.
-Developed both intellectually and personally as a result of having dealt directly with conservation professionals and completed a sustained independent research project.
-Developed the ability to work both within a group through seminar and placement experiences, and independently through research for a dissertation.

The accredited training provided by this course has led postgraduates into varied careers in historic building conservation across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

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The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation. Read more
The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation.

Our course is taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals and is based on the Department's well established tradition of interdisciplinary education and training.

It will not only help prepare you for an exciting career in the industry, but it will also help prepare you to continue your studies onto a Doctor of Philosophy research programme.

Many distinction-level graduates from this programme stay on for a PhD, often funded in part by the University of Bath.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/conservation/index.html

Key programme features

- Provides technical training within an academic framework
- Taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals
- Based on interdisciplinary co-operation between architects and engineers
- International leader in its field
- Proven track record of employability
- Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
- Fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Buildings Conservation (IHBC)
- Suited to engineers, architects, surveyors, planners, geographers, archaeologists, historians and managers, but we also accept (and encourage) students who have either taken a non-vocational degree (usually history or history of art, but also geographers, archaeologists, etc.) or have a degree in a different field that they want to change from.

The programme draws profoundly on its unique location, the World Heritage City of Bath, an ideal study material and environment.

Structure and Content

See programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ar/ar-proglist-pg.html#B) for more detail on individual units.

Teaching for taught units takes place on Wednesdays and Fridays, with one day given to each set of two units. The sequence in which units are taught is reversed each year so that part-time students attend on the same day over the period of their study.

- Full-time study: 12 months, with students attending two days a week (Wednesday and Friday)
- Part-time study: 24 months, with students attending one day a week (Wednesday or Friday)
- Extended part-time study: 48 months, with students attending one day/one semester per year.

Where students do not wish to write the dissertation, or are ineligible to progress, a PG Diploma is awarded after successful completion of the taught course only.

Dissertation:
During the final three months of the degree you will produce a dissertation. This is your opportunity to explore a particular topic that has been covered during the programme in far greater depth.

Transfer:
A student may request a transfer from part-time to extended part-time study. If approved, the transfer will take into account units completed already and will be applied on a pro rata basis. For example, if a part-time student completes four units in year one and then transfers to the extended part-time programme, they will be given two more years to complete.

Conservation techniques

- Structural conservation techniques: principles, faults and their causes, diagnoses and remedies, and surveying and analytical techniques
- Materials conservation techniques: technology and conservation of building elements from structure to finishes
- Information and awareness about related fields (including furniture and fabric conservation), and the experts who can be called upon
- The legal framework of conservation.

Philosophy

- A range of philosophies towards the repair and re-use of old buildings
- History of conservation, from John Wood and James Wyatt, the Victorian age, William Morris and the development of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings through to present day policies and the listing of twentieth century buildings
Stimulating debate and the opportunity to develop an individual viewpoint
- A body of knowledge on the history of British architecture from town planning to interiors
- An awareness of adjacent related fields including garden conservation and archaeology.

Teaching of the Theory of Classical Architecture

- Visual training based around the teaching of classical architecture within the context of Bath as a classical city
- Aims to achieve a high level of architectural correctness and competence in detailing architectural elements.

Case studies

- You will attend six case studies (a combination of large and small buildings at sites both local to Bath and further afield)
- The case studies cover the philosophy upon which the conservation work is based, the architectural and engineering principles involved and a study of the techniques and technologies employed.

Career Options

Bath students have an excellent track record for getting jobs.


The MSc provides a short cut to becoming a Chartered Surveyor. Graduates get exemption from the RICS internal examinations and are eligible for entry to the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence (APC). This usually involves two years of structured training with an employer followed by the APC. Visit the RICS website for more information.

Graduate destinations:

- Inspector for the Victorian Society
- English Heritage (historic research department, inspectors, managers)
- Architects’ practices working on conservation and building new country houses in the classical style
- National Trust Manager of Uppark House
- Conservation officer, UNESCO, Paris
- Conservation architects with well-known practices working on every type of historic building from Salisbury cathedral to medieval timber-framed barns
- Development Officer with Turquoise Mountain repairing a mosque in Kabul
- Member of the Information Team, the Science Museum, South Kensington.

About the department

The Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering brings together the related disciplines of Architecture and Civil Engineering. It has an interdisciplinary approach to research, encompassing the fields of Architectural History and Theory, Architectural and Structural Conservation, Lightweight Structures, Hydraulics and Earthquake Engineering and Dynamics.

Our Department was ranked equal first in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 for its research submission in the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit of assessment.


Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/

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The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors. Read more
The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors.

This course is fully recognised by The Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The course provides both a thorough understanding of architectural heritage and the skills required to contribute to the preservation and development of historic sites. Benefiting from its location in the historic town of Canterbury, the programme combines the study of conservation theory and philosophy with an exploration of the technical aspects of repair and reconstruction. The city’s stunning Cathedral provides students with an education resource, giving them the opportunity to learn from the conservation of a World Heritage Site.

Open to students and professionals with an interest in architectural heritage, the course represents an ideal gateway to a career in demanding professional fields, such as conservation-oriented architectural practice, conservation consultancy and heritage management. As the future leaders in these fields, the course’s graduates are expected to play a central role in disciplines that lie at the centre of the current economic, environmental and social agendas.

This programme is offered jointly within two faculties, Humanities and Sciences.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/362/architectural-conservation

About Kent School of Architecture

Research at Kent School of Architecture achieves excellence in both the history and theory of architecture and in sustainable urban, peri-urban and environmental design. School staff have design expertise and specialist knowledge; they are at the forefront of current architectural issues, including sustainability, technology, professional practice and research. Our staff are active at academic and professional conferences, both nationally and internationally, and appear and publish in local and national media. The School promotes innovative and interdisciplinary research, emphasising sustainable design.

Much of the project work involved in the Kent School of Architecture is located on 'live' sites in the local region, using real clients and engaging challenging issues. Students in all stages of the school have been introduced to real urban and architectural design challenges in Lille, Margate, Folkestone, Dover, Rye, Chatham and, of course, Canterbury. Much of this work involves liaising with external bodies, such as architects, planners, council and development groups.

Course structure

The MSc is composed of four taught modules (two modules per term full-time, one module per term part-time) and a dissertation on the topic of your own choice.

The programme has a varied curriculum which reflects the multidisciplinary nature of conservation. The autumn term cultivates a critical understanding of historic buildings and provides an introduction to conservation philosophy and policy. The acquisition of a strong theoretical background is the basis for the study of practical techniques for the survey and preservation of architectural heritage.

Case studies and workshops carried out in collaboration with Canterbury Cathedral introduce you to the properties of historic building materials and the techniques employed in the repair of historic buildings. This aspect of the programme benefits from cutting-edge survey equipment and the use of conservation laboratories. A conservation project offers you the opportunity to design an intervention to an existing historic site in the historic centre of Canterbury. The dissertation that concludes the programme invites you to study an aspect of the conservation cycle of your choice, employing a high standard of scholarship.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

AR841 - Structural Appraisal of Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR842 - The Legislative Framework (30 credits)
AR843 - Intervention at Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR844 - Conservation Principles (30 credits)
AR898 - Dissertation: MSc in Architectural Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mostly through coursework, with essays, reports, projects and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- ensure you are equipped with academic, professional, and personal skills and qualities that enable you to make a positive contribution related to the preservation of historic buildings.

- cultivate an appreciation of the different values that people can attach to historic buildings and places.

- promote an awareness of traditional building crafts as a valuable cultural resource.

- develop a thorough understanding of the processes that maintain and enhance historic places and the activities that change them.

- develop knowledge of the theoretical, historical, and professional context of architectural conservation.

- promote multidisciplinary collaboration and interaction with a wide range of professional bodies and individuals who have a role to play in the development of the built environment.

- ensure graduates develop the knowledge and confidence necessary to provide informed and specialist advice and to cultivate an awareness of their responsibility as consultants in the field of architectural conservation.

- understand the role that architectural conservation has to play as part of the modern ecological agenda.

- encourage the observation of the historic environment as a whole and its use as an educational resource.

- provide teaching informed by research and scholarship.

- develop an understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research.

- enable you to develop strategies for self-improvement and commitment to research and learning.

- build on close ties within Europe and elsewhere, reflecting Kent’s position as the UK’s European university.

- promote the understanding and preservation of local and national architectural heritage.

Careers

Our Master’s programmes have been devised to enhance your prospects in a competitive world. Professionals in the architectural, planning, environmental design and conservation fields who develop higher-level skills, accredited by relevant bodies, will find themselves well-placed to progress in their field. Our students have gone on to work for major public agencies and universities, as well as leading practitioners in the private sector.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology. Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. Read more
Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology.

Why choose this course?

Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. It brings together experts in buildings survey and recording, archive research, legislation and policy, conservation, theoretical interpretation and computer modelling to deliver a dynamic course, which will equip you with the specialist skills and knowledge required for a career in researching, managing and conserving historic buildings.
-Learn the specialised skills required for researching, analysing and recording historic buildings.
-Gain experience in rectified photography, photogrammetry and other 3D recording methods, CAD drawing and computer modelling of historic buildings.
-Develop the knowledge and skills essential for careers in the architectural and archaeological sectors.
-Study in the cultural heritage capital of the UK – experience buildings archaeology in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including survey support, archives and libraries.
-Receive careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings is designed to train students in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and research projects, the course will:
-Introduce the specialised skills required for the historical research, visual analysis and archaeological recording of buildings.
-Give you a foundational knowledge of the history of architecture in the UK, from c.1000 to the present day.
-Introduce you to current intellectual and professional research priorities in the archaeology of buildings.
-Introduce you to conservation legislation, policy and practice.
-Enable you to develop excellent research and communication skills relating to the research, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students of Archaeology, History of Art, Architectural History and related subjects, as well as for mid-career professionals seeking to develop or enhance their professional specialism in buildings archaeology.

What can it lead to?

The discipline of buildings archaeology has grown in confidence, with new theoretical and methodological developments allowing archaeologists to record, date, model and present research in exciting new ways. There is significant demand for buildings archaeology professionals in the commercial sector and in national and local heritage organisations.

Course alumni have successfully launched careers in key roles with organisations across the heritage sector, including English Heritage, National Trust, Historic Scotland and Historic Royal Palaces, as well as with local authorities and conservation bodies, conservation architects, archaeological units and commercial developers.

Placement

Work placements provide a valuable opportunity to gain practical experience of working in the professional buildings sector. Your placement will draw on and contribute to the knowledge and experience you have gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new insights, understanding and expertise in buildings archaeology that will be extremely valuable in future employment.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of buildings archaeology in a professional working environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of buildings archaeology procedures and issues gained from the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing these placements you should have:
-Gained experience and knowledge of how building recording and research inform conservation and heritage practice, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed experience in practical applications, facilitating critical reflection on the theoretical and philosophical issues raised in both core modules.

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, according to availability, the following list is a good indication of the choices likely to be available:
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Council for British Archaeology
-York Civic Trust
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-The Churches Conservation Trust
-Purcell Architects
-Quercus Design
-City of York Council
-Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings
-York Archaeological Trust
-Cathedral and Church Buildings Division

Careers

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings offers practical skills and research training that provide excellent preparation for a range of careers. By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Record and analyse structures of all types, selecting a level of record appropriate to the end use.
-Execute hand, metric and photographic surveys and present the results in hand drawings, photographs and CAD.
-Recognise and apply the principles of structural analysis to elucidate a building’s history.
-Draw on a sound knowledge of British architectural history and, where appropriate, that of other countries.
-Carry out research using a wide range of archival sources on buildings in the UK and integrate these critically and effectively into the interpretation of buildings.
-Discuss and debate current research agendas in buildings archaeology.
-Direct your own independent work, and also interact with others as a member of a recording or conservation team.
-Communicate the results of research effectively through oral, written and graphic forms of presentation.

Alumni from the course have been employed in a range of commercial and heritage organisations across the UK, including:
-Field Archaeology Specialists (FAS Heritage)
-Oxford Archaeology
-URS Corporation
-Purcell Architects
-AOC Archaeology Group
-Pre-Construct Archaeology
-Headland Archaeology
-Arc Heritage
-York Archaeological trust
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Historic Scotland
-Historic Royal Palaces
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

Others have been employed as freelance building archaeologists, local authority conservation officers and museum professionals.

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Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints. Read more

Why this course?

Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints.

It is an emerging area of work which requires specialist training and knowledge to deal with its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature. It also requires the development of a critical approach for the analysis and design of the intervention, informed by the shared international principles and the specific nature and context of the historic building to be conserved.

We need to attract new talent to the field of architectural conservation. To work with historic buildings is an enriching experience, which combines the creative aspects of designing a new building with the in-depth research required to understand in full the building and its context. Working with historic buildings is also a great training to improve the design of new buildings, as you learn a great deal about the importance of design ideas, innovation, durability and care. It is also a very sociable work, interacting with a variety of people from all backgrounds, joining forces in helping current generations to enjoy historic buildings, to create community identities around them, and to transmit the buildings and their values to the future.

Glasgow and its surrounding area provide an excellent location for the course, with architectural heritage from all periods, from Roman to Medieval, Georgian, Victorian and contemporary, without forgetting the better known C. R. Mackintosh and Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson’s buildings. Strathclyde has a lively international community of staff and students and we enjoy a privileged position in the centre of Glasgow.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/architecturaldesignfortheconservationofbuiltheritage/

You’ll study

The course is a platform for:
- collaboration with both practice and research partners
- architectural critique
- discussion and debate

All full-time students take instructional classes and a design project in the first two semesters. MSc students then complete a dissertation project.

Compulsory taught classes are delivered intensively, making them more accessible to part-time students and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Areas explored in classes include:
- theory
- history
- survey
- investigations
- legislation
- materials
- structures

The course is informed by the outcomes of the research being carried out at the Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU). It is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Open Access

Open Access modules are offered on individual modules from the MSc programme. They can be taken as stand-alone CPD options or gradually built towards a qualification.

Open Access students may transfer onto a part-time MSc or PgDip programme to complete their studies (subject to a maximum period of time).

Guest Lecturers/speakers

You’ll benefit from a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, who’ll lecture on up-to-date current practices, with a diverse point of views.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).

- PC Lab
Our lab computers have AutoCad and InDesign.

We also offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

The course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The IHBC is the principal professional body for building conservation practitioners and historic environment specialists working in United Kingdom.

The course also conforms to the internationally recognised Guidelines for Education and Training in the Conservation of Monuments, Ensembles and Sites adopted by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). These criteria are used by professional institutes for the assessment of evidence and professional accreditation in conservation.

Learning & teaching

The course is balanced between theory and practice. It’s delivered through:
- lectures
- workshops
- studio-based, and seminar-led learning, by staff and visiting experts from the UK and overseas

The course is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Assessment

Formative assessment will take place throughout the course.
You’ll be assessed through lectures, seminars, interim Studio Reviews and workshops, supported by student presentations, symposia and peer feedback.
Methods of teaching vary; some subjects are formally taught using lectures and seminars, others use a mix of methods which may incorporate small projects.
The main architectural conservation project is a studio based project which involves one-to-one tuition and appraisals in review seminars. Team teaching techniques are used in several projects and increasing use is made of student peer group reviews. Summative assessment will be through:
- studio reviews
- individual written essays and reports
- oral presentations
- dissertation - directly linked to the conservation project

Careers

Areas of employment for graduates are numerous. They can work as independent professionals in conservation or for architectural firms all over the worlds. The completion of the Masters will give a variety of opportunities:
- IHBC affiliate member with option to progress to full membership
- RIBA Conservation Registrant (CR) and/or RIAS Accredited Conservation Architect
- progress to RIBA Conservation architect (CA), RIBA Specialist Conservation architect (SCA) and/or RIAS Accredited or Advance Conservation Architect
- progress to Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE), the joint register between the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

"We work with a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, offering potential placement opportunities for students to work after their postgraduate degree study."

Heritage is recognised as a sector of international strategic importance. Local authorities and communities are also very interested in preserving their heritage. The conservation of historic buildings becomes more and more a day to day activity for architects and engineers.

Potential careers include:
- conservation architect in architectural firms
- conservation engineer in engineering firms
- conservation Officer in local authorities
- work in UK government agencies: Historic Scotland, English Heritage, CadW and the Environment and Heritage Service in Northern Ireland
- architect/conservation officer in other countries for government and local authorities
- work in UK and internationally architect/conservation officer for conservation organisations and charities such as UNESCO, ICOMOS, Council of Europe, ICCROM

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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This programme consists of two elements. The taught modules aim to equip you with the knowledge and skills to undertake the conservation of buildings and places, while the dissertation gives you the opportunity for independent study leading to the MA award. Read more
This programme consists of two elements. The taught modules aim to equip you with the knowledge and skills to undertake the conservation of buildings and places, while the dissertation gives you the opportunity for independent study leading to the MA award.

Programme Structure

There are seven key objectives to the taught modules:
•to enhance your understanding of the legislative and management framework related to architectural conservation
•to develop your understanding of the philosophies and attitudes underpinning conservation
•to further your skills in observing, recording, analysis, understanding and evaluation of historic buildings and places so that your knowledge of, and sensitivity towards the built environment, particularly in the South West
•to emphasise conservation as a design activity and hone your skills in better judging the nature of intervention, and to increase design awareness of the appropriate professionals
•to extend your knowledge of techniques for care, repair retro-fitting
•to uncover the role of the many experts and specialists in the field of conservation, and
•to prepare you for professional accreditation in architectural conservation.
The MA stage has four key objectives:
•to provide you with the opportunity to pursue a topic of your choice in depth
•to deepen your understanding of the research process via a research project
•to generate research-based knowledge of relevance to architectural conservation, policy and practice within work settings and/or wider community, and
•to develop the skills enabling you to take leadership roles in relation to research and practice.

Programme content

•Evaluation of historic buildings
•Attitudes and philosophies of conservation
•Conservation techniques
•Framework of conservation
•Care and repair of cob buildings
•Care of ecclesiastic buildings
•Historic buildings interiors
•Conservation areas
•15,000 – 20,000-word dissertation

Special features

Taught modules can be taken as short courses by post-experience students. These may fulfil CPD requirements of several built environment-related professions in preparation for accreditation.

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This course enables you to become a professional within the specialist field of historic building conservation. London is rich in its collection of historic buildings, and the course team places great emphasis on using these to illustrate and inform elements of the course. Read more
This course enables you to become a professional within the specialist field of historic building conservation. London is rich in its collection of historic buildings, and the course team places great emphasis on using these to illustrate and inform elements of the course. In particular, past and ongoing works at the Historic Royal Palaces, together with several national and local heritage organisations and practitioners, are used as the basis for project work.

Key features
-The course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), and on successful completion graduates will be able to register for the RICS final assessment programme. The course is also recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC).
-The course team works closely with a variety of different organisations, including Historic Royal Palaces, building preservation trusts, Historic England, specialist practitioners, craftsmen and contractors.
-The course is consciously interdisciplinary and international. Current and former students include archaeologists, architects, architectural technologists, chartered surveyors, craftsmen, engineers, and project and construction managers.
-The course provides opportunities to work alongside other postgraduates in the Faculty and the wider university, including those studying architecture, landscape architecture and building surveying.

What will you study?

The course is designed to balance strategic analysis with a good working knowledge of core techniques. You will acquire the skills and knowledge to extend your current practice and/or gain knowledge and expertise in new areas. You will work with a range of professionals and specialists to broaden your understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of the field. A week-long field trip to a European city will provide the opportunity to further develop your technical knowledge and embed it within a practice scenario.

Assessment

Essays, reports, seminars, workshops, group field trip, project work, presentations, and dissertation.
Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Analysing and Condition of Historic Buildings
-Defects and Pathology, Repair and Renewal
-Legislation and Economics for Historic Buildings
-Regeneration and Conservation of Historic Environments
-Research Principles and Application
-Research Project

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The MSc in Architecture and Sustainable Environment (MASE) is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in sustainability in the built environment, including architects, engineers, geographers, surveyors, historians and urban designers. Read more
The MSc in Architecture and Sustainable Environment (MASE) is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in sustainability in the built environment, including architects, engineers, geographers, surveyors, historians and urban designers.

The MSc is offered by Centre for Architecture and Sustainable Environment, a new research centre in the Kent School of Architecture that promotes a cross-disciplinary approach to research in the field of sustainability in the built environment, bridging the traditional boundaries between the arts and the sciences, research and practice. The course content ranges from the development of the design skills and the technical and scientific understanding required to develop sustainable solutions for new and existing buildings, the analysis of historic buildings and past environment technologies, to a critical exploration of the historical and cultural context of sustainability and environmental design.

The course, which can be studied full-time or part-time, offers an academically rigorous and intellectually challenging learning environment, which aims to enhance career development within the field for professionals and academics. The over-arching aim of the programme is to provide participants with a systematic understanding of core and advanced areas of sustainable design through a combination of taught courses, research assignments and project work. Students will be asked to conduct rigorous technical and historical research and to explore the practical application of their findings in the context of design and technology.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/182/architecture-and-the-sustainable-environment

Course structure

The programme is aimed at professionals and academics with an interest in sustainability in the built environment, including architects, engineers, geographers, surveyors, historians and urban designers. The MSc promotes a cross-disciplinary approach to research in the field of sustainability in the built environment, bridging the traditional boundaries between architecture and the sciences, research and practice.

The course content ranges from the development of the technical and scientific understanding required to develop sustainable design solutions for new and existing buildings, the analysis of past environment technologies, to a critical exploration of the context of sustainability and environmental design.

The programme may lead to a postgraduate diploma, if taken without the dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

AR827 - Principles of Environmental Design (30 credits)
AR828 - Rediscovery - Understanding Historic Buildings and Past Environmental T (30 credits)
AR829 - Monitoring and Modelling of Environmental Performance (30 credits)
AR830 - Sustainable Design Project (30 credits)
AR899 - Dissertation: Architecture and the Sustainable Environment (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mostly based on coursework, with presentations, case-study analyses, design proposals, essays and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable students to develop systematic understanding of the effect of the built environment on the environmental performance and energy consumption of buildings, while optimising comfortable conditions for the occupants

- develop your understanding of the sustainability drivers for the built environment

- develop your in-depth knowledge of the theoretical principles of low carbon design

- develop the ability to analyse the environmental behaviour of historic structures and the efficiency of past environmental technologies, using modern scientific methods

- promote creativity in the integration of sustainable solutions in the built environment at different scales

- enable you to develop skills for physical monitoring and digital modelling of the environmental and energy performance of buildings

- provide you with the ability to work in multidisciplinary design teams

- promote and support independent research skills.

- enable you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

- support you, so that you can fulfil your full potential in the programme.

Research areas

- Research centres

KSA incorporates the Centre for Research in European Architecture (CREAte), which focuses on research in architectural humanities and design, and Centre for Architecture and Sustainable Environment (CASE), which promotes research in the field of sustainable architecture.

- CREAte

The Centre provides a focus for research in architecture in the European context. Its emphasis is on the role and contribution of humanities to architecture and urban design in the context of urban and regional regeneration, nationally and internationally.

CREAte provides a platform for evening lectures by contemporary architects and scholars; hosting debates and events that are in the heart of architectural agenda of today.

The Centre builds upon its staff specialisms, interests and skills in the following areas: regional studies, contemporary architectural and urban theory and design, architectural history and theory (ranging from antiquity to contemporary European cities), sustainability, European topographies (landscape, urban, suburban and metropolitan) etc. Staff participate in the activities of AHRA – Architecture Humanities Research Association and are internationally published authors.

- CASE

The Centre promotes research in the field of sustainable environment regionally, nationally and internationally.

Its research focus encompasses different aspects and scales of the sustainable built environment from the individual building to the urban block, promoting the wider environmental agenda and keeping the School at the forefront of research and development in the field. CASE also pursues research into the historical and cultural dimension of environmental design to foster links between the sciences, arts and humanities. There is a strong interest in understanding the environmental behaviour of historic buildings and the strategies originally deployed to manage the internal environment.

The Centre has already secured funding from various sources. This includes three EPSRC projects on climate change weather data for a sustainable built environment, sustainability of airport terminal buildings and design interventions in the public realm for affecting human behaviour, and two TSB-funded projects on Building Performance Evaluation. CASE is also involved with the recent EPSRC large-scale network on Digital Economy Communities and Culture.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This innovative programme gives you an in-depth knowledge of Renaissance and Early Modern culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. Read more

Programme description

This innovative programme gives you an in-depth knowledge of Renaissance and Early Modern culture from an interdisciplinary perspective.

It also offers the opportunity to work closely with Renaissance and Early Modern collections in Edinburgh, from paintings by Botticelli or Titian, to early printed editions of Shakespeare, pioneering scientific texts, historic buildings and archival documents.

Programme structure

The first two semesters are based around small-group teaching and a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. As well as the choice of a full range of option courses taught by experts in different humanities subjects, you will have the opportunity to choose an internship at a local museum, gallery or library, subject to availability. There may also be the option of an intensive course taught in Italy, subject to availability.

If the internship option is taken, this will require you to work one day a week at the host institution. From April to September, you will be engaged full-time researching and writing your dissertation.

Learning outcomes

Students will develop:

an interdisciplinary understanding of the key changes in European cultural life between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment;
familiarity with the variety of materials that can be used to explore this cultural life and the changes it underwent;
a critical understanding of some of the principal ways in which these changes have been conceptualised and their significance articulated by scholars, past and present;
skills that will allow them to undertake the kind of independent research required in fields such as collections management and curatorship, work in historic buildings or landmarks, as well as going on to further academic research at PhD level.

Career opportunities

You may choose to take your research skills and advanced knowledge into the area of doctoral research and work towards an academic career. Alternatively, you will be equipped to enter the cultural heritage field, especially with the practical experience you gain through the internship element of this programme.

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Conservation of historic buildings and structures presents many challenges to professionals working in this specialist field, from identifying cultural significance, through to understanding the technical performance of historic buildings and the materials they use. Read more

Programme Background

Conservation of historic buildings and structures presents many challenges to professionals working in this specialist field, from identifying cultural significance, through to understanding the technical performance of historic buildings and the materials they use. Increasingly, conservation practitioners have to understand the environmental impact of historic structures and energy use in buildings. This relies on the sensitive design and integration of modern building services.

The Building Conservation (Technology and Management) programme is a combination of social, historic, philosophical, technical and legislative processes and has been specifically designed to encapsulate these core areas. Delivered only by Independent Distance Learning (IDL) this programme is ideal for those in employment or with other commitments, providing flexible study options that fit around work or family.

Professional Recognition

The MSc programme is fully accredited by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). The MSc also has full accreditation from the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). This means that students who successfully complete the programme need only two years of professional experience to apply for full accredited membership.

Programme Content

The programme structure follows the International Council on Monuments and Sites’ (ICOMOS) education and training guidelines. It is also closely aligned with the recently introduced accreditation schemes for building conservation within the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and Chartered Institute of Builders (CIOB). The programme consists of seven mandatory courses as well as one optional course.

Mandatory Courses

· Conservation Philosophy and Practice
· History of the Built Environment
· Building and Contextual Investigation
· Services and Technology for Conservation
· Applied Building Pathology
· Materials and Structures for Conservation
· People and Organisation Management in the Built Environment

Optional Courses

· Contracts and Procurement
· Project Management Theory and Practice

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Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. Read more
Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. The programme combines aspects of cultural heritage - historic buildings, museums, collections, sites and landscapes - with the best preventive conservation and heritage management policies, projects, methodologies and practices.

Degree information

Students are encouraged to take a long view of preservation and heritage management, and challenged to define problems, set objectives and explore a range of sustainability issues and strategies. Concepts of value, sustainability, life expectancy, stewardship, ownership, vulnerability and risk are interwoven with the scientific study of historic materials, assemblies, technologies and systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (120 credits), a research report (60 credits) and an optional project placement (not credit bearing). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Sustainability and Heritage Value
-Heritage Materials and Assemblies
-Sustainable Strategies
-Project Planning, Management and Maintenance

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught using a variety of media and strategies including problem-based and case-based learning, discussion groups, project work, exercises, coursework and reports. Assessment is through written assignments, oral examination and the 10,000-word dissertation.

Fieldwork
A two-week study visit to Malta forms an integral part of the degree. This is hosted by Heritage Malta, the national agency responsible for the management of national museums, heritage sites and their collections in Malta and Gozo.
Travel and accomodation expenses for the visit to Malta are covered by the programme.

Careers

Most graduates are expected to assume responsibility for directing major projects within museums, libraries, archives, or organisations responsible for historic buildings and archaeological sites; or as a part of interdisciplinary architectural, engineering or project management practices. Additional career enhancement may be achieved by using the MSc as a foundation for PhD research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Project Manager, National Trust
-Consultant to Ministry of Culture India, Advisory Committee on World Heritage Matters
-Carbon Consultant, Sturgis Carbon Profiling
-Project Planner, Transport for London
-Green Building Consultant, ECADI (East China Architectural Design & Research Institute)

Employability
The programme, which is accredited by RICS, is an internationally recognised qualification from a world-leading university that improves equips students with the skills and expertise needed to contribute to heritage projects at an advanced level.
There is an opportunity to undertake a placement at a leading heritage organisation or practice during the programme.
Students gain access to an extensive alumni network of professionals who have studied on the programme and are currently leaders in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Students on this programme benefit from: international, interdisciplinary teachers who are leading professionals in their field; real-life heritage case studies as the basis for discussing complex and demanding issues; access to public stewards and private owners of heritage - in order to learn from practice and leading heritage stakeholders; a fully funded study visit to Malta; project placement opportunities with leading international heritage organisations.

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Define and explore the concepts and practicalities of conservation, restoration and preservation of historic buildings. Our course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and you’ll benefit from our established links with leading organisations such as English Heritage. Read more
Define and explore the concepts and practicalities of conservation, restoration and preservation of historic buildings. Our course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and you’ll benefit from our established links with leading organisations such as English Heritage.

We’ll examine the process from the assessment of a building’s suitability for repair, through to the repair work itself, along with building maintenance, servicing, adaptation and strategic management.

We’ll cover the current legislative framework, decisions over longevity and regional styles and contexts, as well historic construction and repair techniques.

We’ll give you the preparation to embark on a career as a consultant, adviser or practitioner, while our connections with other institutions give you the opportunity to forge links with conservation schemes both at home and overseas.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/conservation-of-buildings

The aims of our course are to:
• develop your vision and understanding of what is required when undertaking the conservation of buildings;
• equip you with specialist conservation knowledge;
• provide study that will foster, inspire and enhance your technical, personal and inter-personal skills;
• develop your leadership skills, ability to evaluate challenging situations and produce solutions to problems.

You will absorb the academic, philosophical and technical aspects of building conservation, together with the underlying legislative and economic background, designed to produce competent consultants, advisors and practitioners.

Staff will have enhanced knowledge and skills of up-to-date building conservation practice, heritage management, academic awareness, and strength in networking.

On successful completion of our course you will be able to:
• understand how conservation is affected by historical, political, social, economic, legal and technical processes;
• be able to contribute to the formulation of conservation policies and their implementation, with an awareness of intended and unintended results of such policies and procedures;
• contribute to the effective running of an organisation concerned with conservation;
• apply local and general principles to the practical requirements of particular communities, their historical heritage and environment;
• compare conservation policies of various European countries with that of your own;
• forge links with conservation schemes at United Kingdom and overseas based Institutions.

Careers

We take pride in giving our graduates a great start as highly-qualified individuals whose knowledge and experience are well matched to the current needs of the industry. Career opportunities include specialist consultancy, local authority conservation and specialist statutory (building) control posts, and historic building and heritage asset management. You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Built Environment PhD.

Core modules

The Science & Economics of Historic Buildings
Conservation and Legislation of Heritage Buildings
Facilities Management of Heritage Buildings
Research, Design and Methods
Surveying the Historic Building
Major Project/Dissertation

Assessment

We’ll assess you on your understanding and skill in applying the relevant technologies. These will include practical software projects and presentations, along with written assignments, and your final dissertation.

Special features

Our course is small and highly specialised. All students are taught together to enable new students to take advantage of the experience of more advanced students. We have strong links with conservationists in local authorities (including Essex County Council), conservation trusts and English Heritage, together with several EU universities.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

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Training for careers in heritage conservation. If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Read more
Training for careers in heritage conservation

Why choose this course?

If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Established in 1972, the course was the first of its kind in the UK, and has developed an international reputation for producing highly skilled and knowledgeable conservation practitioners.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build relationships with conservation specialists and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

The University also validates the MSc in Building Conservation and Timber Building Conservation at the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum in Sussex, more details from the Weald & Downland Museum webpage.

What does the course at York cover?

The core of the MA in Conservation Studies covers the history and philosophy of historic environment conservation, and provides a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. Theoretical elements of the course are complemented by a wide choice of short ‘skills modules’, which focus on developing your knowledge of the specialist skills that are an essential part of professional practice.

By choosing a specific set of accredited modules, you can gain the more specialised MA in Conservations Studies (Historic Buildings), which is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). As such, it offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners working towards full professional membership of the IHBC.

Who is it for?

This course attracts a vibrant mix of UK and international students. These include graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history, and related subjects, as well as experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields. We welcome the diversity of our students’ backgrounds.

What can it lead to?

The course focuses on the knowledge and skills required for a wide range of careers in heritage conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust, Historic England, English Heritage and ICCROM to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies has a strong focus on enhancing employability and professional development with a valuable combination of practical skills and theoretical understanding. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge, improving your chances of employment as a heritage-conservation practitioner.
-Developed intellectually and personally through direct engagement with conservation professionals and specialists.
-Developed the ability to work in a team through group working and placement experiences, and independently through research for your dissertation
-Received guidance on career opportunities in the conservation sector and the key networks for employment
-Worked alongside our Regional Heritage Skills Coordinator with the National Heritage Training Academy

Course postgraduates have gone on to careers in heritage conservation roles across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-INTACH (Indian National Trust)
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

Others have used the skills gained to pursue careers in other sectors, including:
-Chartered surveying
-Planning
-Business and administration
-Education
-International affairs
-Research

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The MA in English Building History is a collaborative programme delivered by Lifelong Learning and the Department of Archaeology. Read more
The MA in English Building History is a collaborative programme delivered by Lifelong Learning and the Department of Archaeology.

Over the course of study, we broadly cover England’s architectural history from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day. A range of significant buildings and sites from vernacular dwellings to the Country House are considered, and thus the difference between vernacular and polite styles of building. As well as engaging with key themes and debates, students will be trained in the practical skills of analysis. You will learn how to recognise archetypal styles, and how these were shaped by technological, social, economic, geographic and cultural forces; different methods of investigation; and the relevance of such buildings today, drawing on examples from across the country.

The programme starts in late September/early October, concurrent with each new academic year – places are limited to ensure a constructive atmosphere for discussions.

This is a three-year, part-time, MA programme delivered online in a fully-supported learning environment, with blended learning support for the final year Independent Study Module. Students can exit with a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma if their circumstances change.

Overview

-Demonstrate detailed knowledge and expertise of English building history and of key buildings c.1000-1950
-Demonstrate understanding of buildings as manifestations of complex social, cultural, economic, and political influences characteristic of a particular historical era and an awareness of the associated scholarly themes and debates
-Apply a range of specialised skills required for analysing, understanding, and interpreting English built history
Assimilate material from a variety of sources and contextualise information in relation to the history of buildings in various forms
-Identify a range of historic buildings’ developments and analyse their phases, date, materials, style, and function
-Identify, select, and employ appropriate media for communicating ideas clearly on English building history to specialist and non-specialist audiences
-Research and develop a critical argument using resources from a broad spectrum of intellectual fields
-Apply contemporary interpretive and theoretical approaches to the form, function, and meaning of a range of historic building types
-Complete a dissertation that is a substantial piece of independent research and present an assessed lecture
-Apply research skills in the field of English Building History.

Structure

This part-time three-year programme will initially comprise six 20-credit modules:
-An Introduction to the Built Environment
-The Medieval Era
-Early Modern Buildings
-The Neo-Classical Tradition
-The Modern Era
-Approaches to Historic Buildings Research

Students will then undertake a 60-credit Independent Study Module (ISM) facilitated by the Department of Archaeology in the third year, which will operate under their usual regulations for ISMs. The ISM includes an assessed lecture assessment. The dates of these will be made available in a timely fashion to allow for travel and accommodation to be arranged. An alternative assessment via Skype (or its equivalent) will be arranged in the event the student is unable to attend campus.

Online Study

Our approach to e-learning is distinctive and may be different from your general perceptions about online study:
-Flexible, fully supported, modular delivery
-Taught exclusively online
-Part-time study (approximately 15 hours per week) allows participants to structure their learning around the other life circumstances

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Do you want to address the big challenges which face our world today - climate change, quality of life and the new economic reality? Gain the knowledge and skills needed to be at the leading edge of the building discipline and work towards the best products and processes in the industry by studying this course. Read more
Do you want to address the big challenges which face our world today - climate change, quality of life and the new economic reality? Gain the knowledge and skills needed to be at the leading edge of the building discipline and work towards the best products and processes in the industry by studying this course. On graduating you will be in a unique position to work on integrated design project teams, in building energy/facility management or continue towards postgraduate research.

Key features

-Join a course that aims to set new international standards in building performance. Move beyond the concepts of green buildings or sustainability - these are embedded in this programme, but we go the extra mile, giving you a more holistic view.
-Combine a solid grounding in core aspects of this subject area such as energy efficiency with a wider context that includes the economic, socio-cultural and historic dimensions.
-Help tackle some of the key challenges that face the building industry, such as the new economic reality, quality of life, climate change, and population growth.
-Gain expertise in the key enabling technologies of building performance simulation, building information modelling, and energy management.
-Get inspired through research-informed teaching. All staff contributing to this programme are part of a research group that runs projects funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), European Union, InnovateUK, Leverhulme Trust and others.
-Interact with various stakeholders in the building domain, including design and engineering companies, contractors, property developers, facility managers, and governmental organisations.
-Expand your network through special interest groups that focus both on industry as well as research.
-Become part of a vibrant multidisciplinary school. Part of this programme allows you to explore modules of our Masters in Architecture (MArch) programme.

Course details

The programme aims to provide you with an opportunity to develop your knowledge in quantifying building performance, and the application of the performance concept throughout the building life cycle. The regular duration is one year, full-time.

On successful completion of the programme you will have developed knowledge and understanding of building systems. You will be able to assess performance from different perspectives, such as environmental, socio-economic and cultural point of view. You will have the skills to use building performance simulation tools, carry out monitoring, and analyse complex data. You will have the skills to deal with the different stakeholders in building performance.

Core modules
-HPB701 Introduction to High Performance Buildings
-HPB702 Emerging Construction Technology
-HPB703 Smart and Intelligent Buildings
-HPB705 Performance Finance and Investment
-HPB706 Performative Architecture
-HPB707 High Performance Buildings Research Project
-HPB704 Advanced Building Performance Simulation

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