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Masters Degrees (Heritage Identity)

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The MA in Heritage Practice offers students an in-depth opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the heritage sector from the perspective of different disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology and history. Read more
The MA in Heritage Practice offers students an in-depth opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the heritage sector from the perspective of different disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology and history. It also enables students to gain critical acumen in exploring the meanings of heritage as a concept and how such concepts are applied in the UK and on a worldwide basis, thus providing valuable insights and an understanding of a sector that is gaining increased significance in today’s world.

Course Overview

The programme of study offers students a unique opportunity to explore a wide range of heritage issues. It combines broadly based compulsory modules with two distinct and specialised optional pathways in Cultural Heritage and Museums and Archives.

The Cultural Heritage pathway consists of two modules, focusing upon the notion of heritage as cultural practice. It enables students to explore important questions, for example where does heritage come from, how is it constructed, what does it do, how does it relate to the past and present, and what are its potential uses for the future? This pathway also encourages students to investigate relationships between heritage and the construction of identity, as well as the role of landscape, architecture and monuments in determining and embedding heritage.

The second pathway, on Museums and Archives, is also composed of two modules, which explore many of the issues surrounding the management, conservation, practice and legislation surrounding the operation of museums and archives.

In both pathways, students are encouraged to undertake a work placement at a museum or heritage site of their choice, while those on the Lampeter campus can undertake their placement in the Roderic Bowen Research Centre.

Students therefore gain understanding and appreciation in a broadly defined field of heritage in addition to a more concentrated and specialist knowledge based on a particular strand. Running through all these modules is a focus upon the practice based, employability side of heritage. The work placement module permits students to enter the work place, taking with them the knowledge and understanding from the course which they apply in a practical, hands-on setting.

Modules

Part 1
Compulsory modules:
-Research Methodologies (20 credits)
-Heritage: Representation and Interpretation (20 credits)
-Heritage Tourism Contexts (20 credits)

Optional modules:
-Exhibiting the Past Museums, Collections and Heritage (20 credits)
-Documenting the Past Archives: Libraries and Heritage (20 credits)
-Heritage and Architecture: Heritage and the Built Environment (20 credits)
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World (20 credits)
-Work placement (20 credits)
-Independent project (20 credits)

Part 2
-Dissertation (60Credits)

Key Features

Teaching staff who deliver this programme rely upon their established research and expertise in heritage and heritage related concerns. The range of projects they have undertaken over a number of years, sometimes with partners in other institutions, includes:
-The excavation and conservation of the Newport Ship, Wales
-The excavation of a medieval bishop’s palace at Fetternear, Scotland, as well as the post-excavation research on and exhibition of the finds
-The development of a collaborative museum exhibition of Egyptian scarabs
-The excavation of the medieval abbey site at Strata Florida, with community and schools engagement
-Landscape heritage and interpretation
-The construction of social memory through war remembrance and memorials
-The Tregaron Elephant project, with its community engagement
-Research into ancient Andean textiles in association with the British Museum

This considerable bank of knowledge and skills underpins the programme, contributing to a high quality educational experience. As part of their research and project management, staff have worked with bodies including CADW, Historic England/English Heritage, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, RCAHMW, UNESCO, Qatari Museums Authority, the British Museum, Blairs Museum (Aberdeenshire) and St Fagans National History Museum.

This experience feeds into teaching that offers unique insights into the heritage sector, its organisations and structures, its operational procedures and regulation, as well as its ethical and conservation considerations. It provides students with strong opportunities for entering heritage-related employment.

For residential students, most of the teaching takes place on the Lampeter campus, where the university is built round an archaeological site. Old Building is a listed building which backs onto a medieval motte.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports on a heritage site, project designs, an exhibition, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

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The MRes in Heritage Practice is a programme with a 60-credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits, which has an allowance of up to 30,000 words. Read more
The MRes in Heritage Practice is a programme with a 60-credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits, which has an allowance of up to 30,000 words. The taught element enables students to engage critically with concepts of heritage and its practice in Wales as well as in other parts of the world. It enhances your skills, enabling you to develop research strategies for use in exploring your chosen angle on a sector that is gaining increased significance in today’s world.

Course Overview

The programme of study offers students a unique opportunity to explore a targeted range of heritage issues because the taught modules lead to a programme of research devised by the individual student, under the direction of a supervisor. All MRes students take the Research Methodologies module, but then their routes diverge as they select one module from each of two distinct and specialised pathways, one in Cultural Heritage and the other in Museums and Archives. This preparation leads to the student’s own dissertation project.

The Cultural Heritage pathway focuses upon the notion of heritage as cultural practice. It enables students to explore important questions, for example where does heritage come from, how is it constructed, what does it do, how does it relate to the past and present, and what are its potential uses for the future? This pathway also encourages students to investigate relationships between heritage and the construction of identity, as well as the role of landscape, architecture and monuments in determining and embedding heritage.

The second pathway, on Museums and Archives, explores many of the issues surrounding the management, conservation, practice and legislation surrounding the operation of museums and archives.

Students who complete the MRes programme are equipped with a sound basis for undertaking a research degree. Alternatively they may take their specific knowledge and understanding to apply in the workplace or in other settings.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Research Methodologies
-Heritage: Representation and Interpretation
-Heritage Tourism Contexts
-Exhibiting the Past Museums, Collections and Heritage
-Documenting the Past Archives: Libraries and Heritage
-Heritage and Architecture: Heritage and the Built Environment
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World
-Work placement
-Independent project

Key Features

Teaching staff who deliver this programme rely upon their established research and expertise in heritage and heritage related concerns. The range of projects they have undertaken over a number of years, sometimes with partners in other institutions, includes:
-The excavation and conservation of the Newport Ship, Wales
-The excavation of a medieval bishop’s palace at Fetternear, Scotland, as well as the post-excavation research on and exhibition of the finds
-The development of a collaborative museum exhibition of Egyptian scarabs
-The excavation of the medieval abbey site at Strata Florida, with community and schools engagement
-Landscape heritage and interpretation
-The construction of social memory through war remembrance and memorials
-The Tregaron Elephant project, with its community engagement
-Tesearch into ancient Andean textiles in association with the British Museum

This considerable bank of knowledge and skills underpins the programme, contributing to a high quality educational experience. As part of their research and project management, staff have worked with bodies including CADW, Historic England/English Heritage, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, RCAHMW, UNESCO, Qatari Museums Authority, the British Museum, Blairs Museum (Aberdeenshire) and St Fagans National History Museum.

This experience feeds into teaching that offers unique insights into the heritage sector, its organisations and structures, its operational procedures and regulation, as well as its ethical and conservation considerations. It provides students with strong opportunities for entering heritage-related employment.

For residential students, most of the teaching takes place on the Lampeter campus, where the university is built round an archaeological site. Old Building is a listed building which backs onto a medieval motte.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports on a heritage site, project designs, an exhibition, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

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The MSc in Environment, Heritage and Policy has been developed to provide interdisciplinary training at an advanced level for existing practitioners in the heritage sector or those seeking a career in that sector. Read more

Introduction

The MSc in Environment, Heritage and Policy has been developed to provide interdisciplinary training at an advanced level for existing practitioners in the heritage sector or those seeking a career in that sector.
The course offers an ideal balance between the practical and intellectual elements of heritage and heritage policy. Students both explore cultural, natural, tangible and intangible heritage through the lens of environmental history, whilst also developing a strong practical skills-base.

The course provides
- a foundation in the concepts, ideas, theory, practice and application of heritage and heritage policy
- skills in the principal subject areas contributing to the study of cultural and natural heritage
- advanced study in the main subject areas of candidates’ primary disciplines
- training in appropriate quantitative and qualitative research, interpretative and presentational methodologies.

Students have the opportunity to work with members of staff on a one to one basis, and experience the Scottish cultural and natural environments first-hand on a number of field trips designed to enhance class based teaching. The course of study prepares students in the concepts and ideas of the field and in one year enables them to investigate issues such as:
- Protected Spaces/Legislative Framework
- Designation; Heritage, Identity and Place
- ‘The Highlands and the Roots of Green Consciousness’
- World Heritage and National Parks
- Public Relations and Marketing and Interpretation Media
- and apply their skills in an individual research project.

Placement opportunities will be available in a range of venues across the sector. These will include heritage attractions and outdoor centres, museums, galleries and libraries, NGOs, and private sector industry partners.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Catherine Mills

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Depending on module content, delivery is by weekly, three-hour seminar or workshop and/or field visit/class. Assessment for both 30-credit core modules and 15-credit options is 100% coursework including assessed oral presentations, plus a 15,000-word traditional dissertation (100% of final grade) or work-based project portfolio (70% of the final grade) and a 5,000-word critical essay (30% of final grade)

Employability

This course is designed to produce graduates with advanced skills for careers in the Cultural and Natural Heritage sectors, particularly in cultural heritage resource management and curation, interpretation and presentation of heritage, promotion and marketing of heritage, and sustainable tourism. Typical careers would include management roles within NGOs working in the cultural and natural heritage sectors, National Parks authorities, local and national government agencies, and heritage-focused charities (especially historic and built environment), senior education, interpretation and marketing roles in similar bodies. It is also designed to provide an advanced-level academic qualification for those already employed within the sector seeking professional development opportunities for the step into middle and upper management roles.

Industry connections

Projects with OLP Dunblane museum and Innerpeffrey library.

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Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?. Read more
Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?

Memory produces identity. That is why heritage is crucial for our sense of continuity in rapidly changing societies.Governments, national and international organizations need to make sense of the past as they make policies for and invest in heritage. The aim of this master's degree is to give you the theoretical and practical education necessary to take an active role in this exciting and growing field.

Why study heritage at a faculty of Theology and Religious Studies? Because most of the heritage around us stems, one way or another, from religious practices and ideas. If you want to understand heritage in all its facets, you want to study with experts who know the full story behind material and intangible heritages both locally and abroad.

The track Religion and Cultural Heritage in the Master's Programme in Theology and Religious Studies combines broad cultural competence with a high-level academic research training and the practical skills relevant for today's job market. Through concrete projects and internships, you can gain hands-on experience in the field.

Why Groningen?

• rated best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands
• top 100 university
• unique focus on religion within the field of cultural heritage
• combination of broad cultural competence and academic research skills with practical skills relevant for job market;
• strong heritage region
• excellent network for internships
• taught by internationally recognized experts in the field
• vibrant research hub with global links

Job perspectives

You can advise or write policy documents on heritage subjects, such as the preservation of old churches or the distribution of funding for cultural activities. You could work for cultural organisations, the government, in the tourist business or at an NGO. You may also work in the media or as a teacher of religion in secondary education after completing your Educational Master's programme.

Would you like to stay in academia, you can choose to apply for a placement in the Research Master.

Job examples

• Cultural Education
You can work within organizations that consult upon the content and organization within the field of arts and cultural education. Or you could work at an educational department within institutions such as a cultural centers or museums.

• Consulting & Policy
Your knowledge about religious heritage will enable you to advise upon or write policy documents on the conservation of religious heritage. You could find a job with central government but also at organizations and foundations in the cultural sector. This could, for example, be the Museum Catharijneconvent in Utrecht or the Stichting Oude Groninger Kerken.

• Education
Once you have completed this Master's track, you will have sufficient knowledge of the subject to be able to teach Religious Studies or Social Studies in secondary education. Alternatively, you could opt for a position in higher vocational education. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher or lecturer, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

• Media & Journalism
A number of publishers have shown renewed interest in religion and society. With your knowledge and skills, you can make an expert contribution to publications in this field. You could also use your expertise as an editor at a broadcasting company, newspaper or current affairs magazine.

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There are two routes through the MA. The . Cultural Heritage Research.  route which concludes with a dissertation. The . Read more

There are two routes through the MA:

  • The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation.
  • The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report.

Course modules

  • Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities: This module will explore the conceptual, intellectual and philosophical frameworks for tangible and intangible cultural heritages. You will explore the social roles of cultural heritage in relation to community, identity and memory and examine the political, legal and economic context in which heritage institutions exist. Heritage will be debated in the context of conservation, tourism and sustainability.
  • Managing Cultural Heritage in Context (double unit running through two terms): This module will draw on case studies and seminars from international heritage organisations including World Heritage Sites. You will participate in student-led seminars in which each student will develop a case study including consideration of education and outreach in cultural heritage. It includes management of cultural heritage including strategic planning, financial management, people, collection and site management and disaster preparedness. A project-based placement (or equivalent) provides a professional practice element.
  • Dissertation or Analytical Case Study Report: The programme concludes with a choice of modules. Students wanting to work in the profession may choose to prepare detailed and fully justified analytical case study report in a country or site of their choice. Students wishing to continue to explore theoretical issues in this complex subject or plan to pursue a career in other contexts, including taking a higher level degree, may choose the Dissertation module.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

Do you want to know more about your roots in terms of ancestry, history, influences and reasons why you or others moved? Are you interested in Scottish heritage from the point of view of arts, music, history, literature, architecture and major enlightenment periods, the clans through to civil wars and battles and effects on migration of people?

Scottish Heritage is known far and wide for its richness in terms of cultural identify, the way it has travelled to other countries where Scottish people settled and how this rich past of people moving in and out of Scotland has influenced major heritage of today, innovations, ancestry and roots of a great many people in the UK, Europe and internationally. This programme brings together many elements of Scottish History to provide you with a rich tapestry of cultural knowledge, historical knowledge and the changes which affected emigration and movement of Scottish people to many communities in the UK and internationally. You discover the European influences, the different periods of major change culturally and in terms of people, and you explore visual history and researching archives.

You are taught by the School of Divinity, History, Philosophy, History, History of Art to conduct research, read and explore the vast areas of Scottish Heritage. Experts will guide you through literature, poetry, art, cultural traditions, history and context and much more. This is a unique degree which takes full advantage of the wealth of cultural, historical and art history knowledge in University of Aberdeen and allows you to work at your own pace in finding out more about this fascinating area.

Careers in this area can be within teaching at local or community level, work in heritage attractions. International work can include re-invention of cultural areas overseas to explore identity, museums, research, publishing and more. You may wish to take your studies further to explore a specific area of interest to you. University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495 by Bishop Elphinstone to provide learning and study in specific historical areas which would influence social and business life of people in the North East of Scotland. The campus dates from the Middle Ages with tours being provided on site around the stunning buildings and streets.. Students come from Scotland and internationally to the campus or choose to study online. From Aberdeen nearby attractions include Orkney and Shetland - from the ferry in the city centre, the Highlands and Inverness, the wild Cairngorms National Park, the birthplace of J.M Barrie in Angus, and much more.

Courses listed for the programme

Year 1

  • Scotland: A Millennium of History
  • The Scottish Diaspora
  • Scottish Visual History

Year 2

  • Approaches to Research: Archives and Sources
  • The Scottish Diaspora
  • Scottish Visual History

Year 3

  • Dissertation in Scottish Heritage

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • University of Aberdeen provides a wealth of areas which all contribute to enriching your experience of learning about Scottish Heritage. Areas include: Art History, History, Archaeology, Philosophy, Divinity and external links to Aberdeen Bestiary, the Burgh Records, Buildings of Scotland and Scottish Emigration Database.
  • You learn about Scottish people and history that connect to communities in Diaspora

Where you study

  • Online
  • Qualification - MLitt

International Student Fees 2017/2018

£1300 per module

Find out about international fees:

  • International
  • EU and Scotland
  • Other UK

Find out more about fees on the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support


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Our flexible research programme focuses on our key research themes. These are. cultural politics and policy; identity, community and place; and representation and media. Read more
Our flexible research programme focuses on our key research themes. These are: cultural politics and policy; identity, community and place; and representation and media. The course is ideal for professionals interested in enhancing their career through research. It will also suit those who want to progress to doctoral study.

The Heritage Museums and Galleries MLitt is a researched based programme with some taught elements. The taught research methods part of the programme provides structured learning. This is ideal if you're unfamiliar with academic research or have been away from academia for a long time.

The flexible nature of the assignments make this programme particularly suitable for sector professionals. It will suit those interested in advancing their career and knowledge through research. The assignments offer the opportunity for you to explore a variety of smaller topics or carry out in-depth research on a single topic.

The programme is in Media, Culture, Heritage, within the School of Arts and Cultures. We also have links with the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies (ICCHS). This is a leading academic centre for research and teaching in museum, gallery, and heritage studies.

ICCHS has a thriving, high-profile interdisciplinary research community of:
-Postgraduate research students
-Experienced academic researchers who are key figures in their fields

Facilities

As a research student in Media, Culture, Heritage, you will have access to a dedicated study space with networked PCs, printing and photocopying facilities. You can also use the common room and kitchen to meet with fellow researchers and academics.

You will have access to our top quality facilities, plus the extensive cultural resources available on campus and in the city:
-Our libraries and eResources
-The Great North Museum: Hancock, located on campus, houses the collections that previously made up the Hancock Museum, the Shefton Museum of Greek Art and Archaeology (an internationally-renowned collection of over 1,000 Greek and Etruscan artefacts), and the Museum of Antiquities
-The Hatton Gallery, located on campus, has been at the heart of cultural life in the North East since the early 20th century
-The Language Resource Centre is a specialist language facility providing free access to self-study materials in 50 languages
-Computing facilities with access to relevant databases and over 1,400 fully networked PCs
-The Gertrude Bell Archive
-Non-campus facilities that are often used for student projects include Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums and the Victoria Tunnel

In addition to our expertise in heritage studies, the city of Newcastle and the wider region offers a wonderful resource with two World Heritage Sites, many heritage sites and over 80 regional museums and galleries. Much of the region's countryside is designated as National Park or Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

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Our Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA examines the origins, forms and effects of cultural constructions of history and memory, with a practical focus on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. Read more
Our Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA examines the origins, forms and effects of cultural constructions of history and memory, with a practical focus on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations.

Emphasising the close relation between academic study and broader cultural interest in the past and its significance in everyday life, the programme enables the investigation of various cultural forms and practices, from oral history and autobiography to television and virtual reality.

The course comprises three pathways:

• Cultural Memory
• Making Histories: Public History and Heritage
• ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity

The general concerns of the masters programme are developed in relation to these pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus. The pathways also provide the basis for the PGCert and PGDip awards.

Why study with us?

• Chance to specialise through one of three pathways: Cultural Memory; Making Histories – Public History and Heritage; or Race, Nation and Ethnicity

• Practical emphasis on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations

• Lecturers with expertise across cultural, social and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies, and the history of ideas

• Interdisciplinary approach informed by cultural and critical theory

• Close relationship to the University of Brighton's Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories

• Flexible modes of study for students with personal or professional commitments

Syllabus

Cultural memory pathway:

Cultural History: Concepts, Theories and Methods
Cultural Memory in Ireland: Conflict Resolution and the Irish Troubles OR Holocaust Memory
Research Methods
Research Project
Optional module

Making histories pathway:

Making Histories: Making the History of Brighton and Hove
Slavery in the Atlantic World OR Britain in the Second World War
Research Methods
Research Project
Optional module

'Race', nation and ethnicity pathway:

Constructions of Britishness: Histories, Cultures and Identities
The Making of the Black Atlantic: Transformations of History, Representation and Identity OR Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures: Fictions and Histories
Research Methods
Research Project
Optional module

To find out more about the course content please visit the website:

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/cultural-history-memory-and-identity-ma-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Careers and employability

The knowledge, intellectual skills and confidence acquired through study on this MA provides excellent training for doctoral research. All CHMI students are encouraged to participate in the rich programme of seminars, symposia and conferences, which includes an annual postgraduate conference organised by the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics, and the School of Humanities. CHMI graduates have a direct route on to our Humanities PhD programme, but have also gone on to doctoral research at other universities.

CHMI students have used the MA to secure work in the education, heritage and museum, health and voluntary sectors, and the course has proved attractive to those looking to develop their careers by augmenting existing skills and experience or by opening new professional paths within their workplace or organisation. We have established a small number of voluntary work placements for our students with the local community history group, Brighton and Hove Black History, and hope to maintain this opportunity as well as establish further volunteering opportunities in future.

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This programme enables you to carry out an original piece of research in museum, gallery and heritage studies. As a research student you will join an interdisciplinary group of researchers and academics at the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies, fully supported by world expert supervisors. Read more
This programme enables you to carry out an original piece of research in museum, gallery and heritage studies. As a research student you will join an interdisciplinary group of researchers and academics at the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies, fully supported by world expert supervisors.

MPhil students in Museum, Gallery and Heritage Studies are based in the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies (ICCHS), a leading academic centre for research and teaching at Newcastle.

ICCHS is internationally renowned for its research, securing significant support (around £3m since 2008) from a variety of funders, such as the UK Research Councils and the European Commission. We have a thriving, high-profile interdisciplinary research community made up of postgraduate research students and experienced academic researchers who are key figures in their fields.

Our academic supervisors have significant experience and expertise in interdisciplinary research and practice in the UK and abroad. Through our emphasis on empirical research and having a grounding in professional practice, our research alumni have been successful in securing careers in academia, governmental organisations, and the cultural and creative industry sectors worldwide.

Our research students pursue a variety of topics that explore both historical and contemporary issues with local, national and international dimensions. They have also consistently achieved high submission and completion rates in their chosen programme of study. Recent student research topics in ICCHS include:
-Attitudes towards human remains
-Constructions and uses of Welsh identity in American museums
-The social roles and regulation of art museum education in China and Taiwan
-The management and interpretation of archaeological sites in Turkey
-Meaning making around historic photographic collections on Flickr

Delivery

Attendance on this programme is flexible and agreed between you and your supervisors depending on the requirements of your research project. The main focus of the programme is a piece of independent research carried out by you with the support of your supervisory team.

You will also undertake research methods training and be encouraged to participate in our research activities. You will be able to carry out fieldwork away from Newcastle, in other UK locations or abroad. The programme is supported by Blackboard, our virtual learning environment.

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This innovative course, taught jointly between the Management School and the Department of Archaeology, is the first of its kind in the UK. Read more

About the course

This innovative course, taught jointly between the Management School and the Department of Archaeology, is the first of its kind in the UK. This course combines the strengths of both departments, whilst actively forging close links with the heritage sector within our region, nationally and overseas. These links with industry form an integral feature of your studies, providing you with the opportunity to apply the principles you learn to real world situations.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Heritage, History and Identity; Heritage, Place and Community; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Introduction to the Creative and Cultural Industries; Cultural Marketing; Managing Museums and Cultural Heritage Sites; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Landscapes in Archaeology: methods and perspectives; Accounting and Financial Management; Fundraising Management: sponsorship, philanthropy and the state; Critical Theories and Concepts in the Cultural and Creative Industries; Managing Creative Brands.

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The MSc in Marketing provides graduates, professionals or consultants with critical insights into marketing, and the marketing management practices of national and international organisations. Read more

About the course

The MSc in Marketing provides graduates, professionals or consultants with critical insights into marketing, and the marketing management practices of national and international organisations.

This course offers students the opportunity to understand traditional and contemporary marketing philosophies and theories adopted by practitioners, based on knowledge gained from academic research and industrial practices.

The programme will develop critical and creative skills, procedural thinking and expertise that enable students to generate, implement and evaluate organisational activities that satisfy the requirements of their employer and the customers.

Aims

MSc Marketing is designed for anyone wishing to become a marketing professional or planning to undertake research in an academic, consultancy or commercial setting.

Those with little or no marketing experience will appreciate the breath of management subjects covered in the degree, specifically how marketing fits within organisation practice.

This programme offers an excellent preparation for a career in marketing or associated fields and in a myriad of organisations employing marketing professions.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Consumer Behaviour
Marketing Principles
Strategic Marketing Management
Marketing Communications
International Marketing
Business Planning
Understanding Business and Management Research
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Corporate Branding Theory and Issues
Global Diversity Management
International Business Ethics and Corporate Governance
Knowledge Management, Social Networks and Innovation

Teaching

As a research active university, international level research findings by Brunel Business School tutors are regularly used in lectures. Tutors on this programme are leaders in the field of management and active researchers within one of the six centres of research within the School.

Modes of Study

1-year full-time in September: The taught element of the course (September to April) includes eight modules; delivery will be by a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials/group work. A further four months (May to September) is spent undertaking the dissertation.

1-year full-time in January: The taught element of the programme includes 8 modules which are delivered in two terms (four in January to April, and four in September to December); delivery will be by a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials/group work. The dissertation is undertaken May to August, and then can be completed January to March after the second teaching term.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by individual assessment and an examination in May.

Teaching methods include lectures and informal small study groups.

Coursework and examinations place considerable stress on the ability to think and reason critically, but constructively.

The dissertation (12,000 words) is the capstone demonstration of these skills, requiring students to conceive, justify, design and execute a major project.

Individual and/or group presentations using laptops, PCs and digital projectors.

Special Features

Brunel Business School won the Times Higher Education Awards Business School of the Year 2013

The Business Planning module provides practical experience in creating a business plan and route to marketing for a real entrepreneurial venture (see Capstone Event on the Employability tab).

Career talks and presentation are available to students on this course.

Tutors are internationally recognised academics and industry practitioners who are active members of the School’s Marketing and
Corporate Brand Management Research Group (MCBM).

Students will benefit from discussions with subject experts and practitioners who visit us as guest speakers

Marketing and Corporate Brand Management Research Group (MCBM)

Led by John Balmer, a world-renowned expert in corporate branding and identity, MCBM has built on a well-established background in corporate branding, identity and marketing. MCBM is leading the way in developing international research into corporate heritage identity and branding (John Balmer and Weifeng Chen) – an underexplored concept that has potential to offer powerful symbolic and cultural value in a global, commercial context that is increasingly disengaged from the past. Recent publications on the above have appeared in European Journal of Marketing and Journal of Business Research

Accreditation

A number of Associate memberships to the CMI are open to graduates of Brunel Business School postgraduate programmes, offering discounted full membership rates upon application. Members of the CMI may use the following letters as appropriate:'ACMI', Members 'MCMI' and Fellows 'FCMI'.

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Creative Futures offers recent graduates and established practitioners a chance to continue to develop their chosen discipline and specialist practice at masters level. Read more
Creative Futures offers recent graduates and established practitioners a chance to continue to develop their chosen discipline and specialist practice at masters level. You will gain advanced creative, technical and business skills, a sophisticated understanding of the business environment and a formalised work experience placement. The aim is to enhance your appeal in the job market and/or provide you with the tools needed to set up in freelance practice or to create your own business.

Students will receive tuition in business skills that are designed and delivered specifically for creative practitioners as well as access to our extensive workshops and specialist facilities.

The course is designed to provide maximum flexibility, whether it is being studied on a full or part-time basis. All modules have an extensive distance learning component, combined with intensive, full day workshops.

Course content

Modules you will study include:
-Creativity and Enterprise
-Developing Knowledge, Creative, Technical, Digital and Business Skills
-Creative Futures: Work Experience
-Creative Futures: Masters Project

There will also be an opportunity to choose from the following option modules:
-The Marketing Context
-Personal Branding
-Design Management
-Community Arts in a Global Perspective
-Creativity and Innovation
-New Media and Society
-Culture and Identity

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Study in the European heartland of medieval archaeology. The buildings, material culture and landscapes of York and the north of England offer unrivalled opportunities for the study and research of medieval archaeology. Read more
Study in the European heartland of medieval archaeology

Why choose this course?

The buildings, material culture and landscapes of York and the north of England offer unrivalled opportunities for the study and research of medieval archaeology. The Archaeology department in York was established as the first in the UK to specialise in medieval archaeology, and that legacy is evident today in the department’s concentration of medieval archaeologists. Their specialisms cover the entire medieval period, from the post-Roman era to early modern times.
-Study in the heartland of medieval archaeology in Europe
-Learn from leading archaeologists, specialising in every aspect of the Middle Ages
-Immerse yourself in the medieval community at the Centre for Medieval Studies
-Gain volunteering and work experience in the heritage sector
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive careers advice from knowledgeable staff with valuable contacts in the academic and heritage sectors

What does the course cover?
The course focuses on the artefacts, landscapes, buildings and social, cultural and environmental contexts of medieval Britain and Western Europe. It covers the period from the end of the Roman Empire to the Reformation, and explores themes such settlement, trade and economy, religion, buildings and artefacts, social structure, ethnicity and identity, conquest and cultural contact, and methodological and theoretical approaches.

The flexible modular structure of the course means you can tailor your MA to suit your interests and goals. There is an opportunity to learn valuable practical skills, which are essential for a wide range of archaeological and associated careers.

Who is it for?
This degree is for anyone interested in studying the medieval period from a material perspective. It is primarily for students with previous experience in archaeology, history, art history or anthropology, but our students do come from a wide variety of academic backgrounds.

What can it lead to?
The course provides a solid foundation for a wide range of careers and further studies. Our students have gone on to research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units, and heritage bodies such as English Heritage and the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

Careers

The MA in Medieval Archaeology enables you to:
-Study a broad range of issues in medieval archaeology at a general level
-Explore selected topics in detail, which may be drawn from both the early and later medieval periods
-Relate general research principles and skills to your studies of medieval archaeology in particular
-Develop an ability to gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner
-Undertake a piece of independent research on a topic within the field of medieval archaeology
-Develop written communication skills through essays and your dissertation
-Develop presentation skills through the delivery of seminar papers and a short lecture on your dissertation topic

The skills and knowledge gained on the course are applicable to wide range of archaeological careers, as well as further study and research.

Course postgraduates have gone on to pursue research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Some of the organisations our students now work for include:
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Portable Antiquities Scheme
-British Museum
-Church of England
-Churches Conservation Trust
-Jorvik Viking Centre

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Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence.

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome (http://www.aur.edu), where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English. The experience of staying in Rome and studying the city alters brings into focus new ideas and a new perspective of the ‘Eternal City’.

Each week is structured around a series of site visits, so that you gain an in-depth knowledge of the ancient city. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a research topic defined in collaboration with your supervisor. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise and benefit from the experience and confidence gained from living and studying overseas.

Course structure

During the first term at Canterbury you take two core modules. Your second term is in Rome and you take one core module and one optional module. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

Term 1 (Canterbury):
Compulsory modules:

CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues

Term 2 (Rome):
Compulsory Module:

CL828 - Rome: The Imperial City

One option from:

Optional modules in Rome are taken through the American University in Rome and change each year. Past options have included:

Rome: Writing the city

This upper level Classics course will examine depictions of the city of Rome in classical literature. It will examine the fabric of the city and the idea of Rome as a symbol of civilization. The buildings and public spaces of Rome were the backdrop for performance, spectacle, ceremony and daily and these activities generated meaning and symbolism. For the Romans specific locations were connected to history, myth and collective memory and were protected by the genius loci. Amongst others, the following authors will be studied: Cicero, Livy, Lucan, Ovid, Propertius, Tacitus, Virgil. All texts will be studied in translation.

Etruscan Art and Archaeology

This is an upper level course studying the art and archaeology of the Etruscans from their emergence at the beginning of the first millennium BCE until their absorption by the Romans. The course will take full advantage of the rich museum collections of Etruscan material in Rome and will include a field trip to the sites of Cerveterii and Tarquinia. The course will look at the origins of the Etruscans, their art and material culture, their interactions with other groups and their eventual absorption by the Romans.

Global Heritage

This upper level seminar course examines global heritage concerns looking in particular at how the past conditions the present and influences identity. Lectures and seminars will be built around four topics: the role of international organizations, heritage and memory, heritage and economic development and contemporary issues in global heritage. Each topic unit will be completed by a seminar where students will present case studies that illustrate the issues raised.

Term 3: Dissertation

CL897 - Dissertation
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues (30 credits)
CL828 - Rome-The Imperial City (30 credits)
CL829 - Rome Optional Module (30 credits)
CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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This course responds to the increasing need in a globalised, interconnected world for highly qualified translators who can navigate different genres of text and negotiate the language needs of diverse audiences and industries. Read more

This course responds to the increasing need in a globalised, interconnected world for highly qualified translators who can navigate different genres of text and negotiate the language needs of diverse audiences and industries.

"Without translation, we would be living in provinces bordering on silence" - George Steiner

Based in a truly global city, Goldsmiths’ location makes it the perfect place to study translation.

You will study the theory and practice of translation, giving you the expertise to compete for work as a professional translator. Study in a department with expertise across linguistics, creative writing, and literary studies, with the option to tailor your studies and explore areas in other departments relevant to your own interests. You will also have the opportunity to engage in and apply for translation work experience opportunities with a range of external organisations.

Pathways

You can choose between three pathways:

Translation Studies

This pathway is for people who are interested in the technical, legal, business, scientific, medical, financial, creative arts and academic fields and enables you to benefit from dedicated core modules offering a solid grounding in the theory and practice of translation across diverse areas of professional practice.

The Translation Studies pathway also opens up to you the specialist teaching and research expertise offered by subject experts in the Department of English and Comparative Literature in linguistics, comparative literature and literary theory, from discourse analysis, sociolinguistics and language and its interface with issues of gender, ethnicity and identity, to key currents of concern in literary and cultural theory and the role of the text in shifting boundaries of cultural and linguistic identity in a globalised, multicultural world.

Cultural Tourism, Hospitality and Cultural Heritage

This pathway focuses on translation for museums, galleries, cultural heritage sites, hotels and other tourist destinations. If you choose this pathway, you will benefit from the specialist research and teaching expertise offered by the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship where optional modules focus on a range of topics relating to the tourism, hospitality, cultural development and cultural heritage sectors, from cultural tourism, language, communication and intercultural mediation in museums, galleries and other cultural organisations, to destination management and the development of new tourism products.

Depending on your optional module choices you may also have the opportunity to undertake fieldwork in the cultural and creative tourism sector in central London.

English-Chinese Translation and Interpreting

This pathway is aimed at native speakers of Chinese (Mandarin) who have a high level of English-language competence and who wish to increase their understanding of professional written translation and oral interpreting practice from English to Chinese, to build their intercultural and interpretive skills and to develop their knowledge across a number of English-language subject areas. It is also open to native speakers of English who have a high-level of competence in Chinese (Mandarin) and who wish to increase their ability to translate and interpret confidently into Chinese from English and to expand their written and spoken Chinese skills.

The core specialist module for this pathway is co-taught by the Goldsmiths Confucius Institute and the Department of English and Comparative Literature and focuses on producing written Chinese translations of a wide range of English-language texts and text types and covers translation across a broad variety of professional domains, from scientific, academic, business and technical texts written in English, to journalism, finance, advertising and marketing, media, literary fiction, poetry, theatre and other creative industries.

Alongside this, and with the help of Chinese and English native speakers, you will develop consecutive and bilateral/liaison interpreting skills for facilitating communication between monolingual speakers of English and Chinese across a range of business, diplomatic, government, community, health and criminal justice contexts.

Modules & structure

Core modules on the MA in Translation cover both the theory and practice of translation. These are taught in seminar-based and tutorial small-group sessions and may include an individually supervised practice project.

Students undertaking the translation work placement module will work directly with an external organisation to provide a range of translation and other language services and gain first-hand experience of translation in a professional setting.

You also undertake a dissertation in which you will either reflect critically on one aspect of the theory and/or practice of translation, or focus on the practice of translation in the form of a concrete translation project.

Your choice of core modules will depend on your pathway choice,. Core modules from other translation pathways may also be taken as optional modules, subject to availability and eligibility. 

Core modules

Optional Modules

In addition, you are able to choose from a range of optional modules, which allows you to explore your interests and to gain specialist knowledge relating to your future career plans. This could include modules from within the Department of English and Comparative Literature, or from other departments such as the Institute for Creative and Cultural EntrepreneurshipMedia and Communications.

Skills

This MA provides you with both theoretical knowledge and practical skills in translation. The interdisciplinary option choices allow you to tailor your studies to your career plans. You'll develop professional behaviours and leadership skills through fortnightly workshops which will provide guided mentoring. 

Careers

This degree will equip graduates with the expertise to work as professional translators across the public and private sector, both in the UK and abroad. The possibility of taking option modules from other departments means that you could develop knowledge ideal for careers in translation for the arts industry, including in the media and publishing.

As part of the course you'll be brought face-to-face with representatives from across the language service industry, from translation agencies and multinational corporations where translations are commissioned or where in-house translators are employed, to international organisations with in-house translation departments, freelance translators and other language professionals. These connections will help you in your future careers.



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