• University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University College London Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
London School of Economics and Political Science Featured Masters Courses
"hearing" AND "impaired"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Hearing Impaired)

We have 6 Masters Degrees (Hearing Impaired)

  • "hearing" AND "impaired" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 6 of 6
Order by 
The purpose of this module is to provide you with knowledge and understanding of the core concepts related to Adult Auditory Rehabilitation including principles of health psychology and signal processing as well as technical and psychosocial aspects of the rehabilitation process. Read more

The purpose of this module is to provide you with knowledge and understanding of the core concepts related to Adult Auditory Rehabilitation including principles of health psychology and signal processing as well as technical and psychosocial aspects of the rehabilitation process. As an Audiologist or Hearing Aid Dispenser this will help you to assess the needs of adult patients with hearing loss and provide patients with accurate and up to date information in order that they can make informed decisions about their management and treatment including devices, equipment and features.

Module Aims

  • Equip you with the basic knowledge and understanding required to provide a clinical auditory rehabilitation service for adults with hearing loss and/or tinnitus or to pursue research in a hearing-aid related field.
  • Enable you to apply your practical and theoretical knowledge and comprehension to all aspects of the rehabilitation needs of adult hearing-impaired patients and adult patients with tinnitus.
  • Enable you to develop skills to critically evaluate and analyse information from the relevant scientific literature.

Learning Outcomes

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Explain and critically analyse the arguments for, and the current consensus on, patientcentred rehabilitation for adults with hearing loss, including the assessment and analysis of need, effects of psychosocial factors, the provision of accurate and balanced information regarding management options, the facilitation of the patient’s decision making (especially regarding technology) and the role of communication strategies and tactics.
  • Formulate evidence-based recommendations for the rehabilitation of individual patients with common forms of hearing loss and tinnitus based on critical evaluation of a range of sources of information including that shared by the patient and the research literature.
  • Explain the process of individualised hearing-aid fitting on the basis of audiometric and other information, including the selection of an ear-mould/shell with appropriate modifications, the verification of the technical performance and other functional properties of a hearing aid (both in a coupler and the real ear), the validation of the fitting and the provision of relevant instructions and information to the particular user.
  • Identify and describe a wide range of different technologies (e.g. hearing aids, assistive devices, auditory implants), strategies (e.g. communication), skills (e.g. facilitation) and tools. (e.g. counselling and decision making tools) and other resources potentially available to the audiologist and patient to improve the patient’s hearing-related quality of life and explain their main pros and cons for common forms of hearing loss and psychosocial circumstance.
  • Demonstrate mastery of effective self-directed learning, scientific and patient-centred communication.

Syllabus

  • Overview of adult auditory rehabilitation and hearing aid fitting.
  • Understanding the impact of hearing loss in the context of the World Health Organisation.
  • International Classification of Functioning and the biopsychosocial models of disability.
  • Psychosocial impact of acquired hearing loss.
  • Introduction to hearing aids and components.
  • Specification and measurement of electroacoustic characteristics.
  • Range of devices and features, advantages and limitations of different options, consideration of the evidence base where appropriate.
  • Impressions, ear moulds, earshells and modifications.
  • Hearing aid selection and fitting: candidacy, ergonomic considerations, selection of electroacoustic characteristics by prescription methods.
  • Verification of hearing aid performance.
  • Counselling skills in audiology, including enabling adjustment and change.
  • Models of tinnitus distress.
  • Tinnitus management approaches.
  • Evaluation of auditory rehabilitation.
  • Evaluation of tinnitus interventions.


Read less
The MA by Research is an opportunity for students to develop their research skills and to examine a research question in detail over an extended period, which can be a very rewarding experience. Read more
The MA by Research is an opportunity for students to develop their research skills and to examine a research question in detail over an extended period, which can be a very rewarding experience. The focus of this award is empirically researching and writing a supervised 25,000-word dissertation on an agreed and approved topic in media, cultural and communication studies. Examples from the diverse topics recently examined by students include ‘Xenophilia in Mass Media; a Comparative Study of Mexican and British News Media’; ‘Promoting Hungarian Culture and Constructing Cultural Identity’; ‘Subtitling and Accessibility for the Hearing Impaired in Mainstream Cinema and Television Programmes’ and ‘Television Fandom and Social Media: the Case of Doctor Who Online’. We have expertise in a wide range of methods, including case studies, ethnography, textual analysis, archival analysis, political economy and interviews. For more information, visit our research pages: http://www.southwales.ac.uk/research

What You Will Study

Teaching and learning involves a combination of one-to-one supervision and seminars, with assessment methods that include essays, projects, a dissertation and an oral examination (viva voce). The limited but intensive contact hours during the course will give you maximum flexibility in your study patterns. In addition, you will be allocated two dissertation supervisors who are available to meet with you on a regular basis to provide further support for your studies.

Possible Career Options

Your research, communication and writing skills will be highly developed by the end of this process. Your work can be used to further your career prospects if your dissertation involves the extended study of media and cultural producers, audiences and/or texts in relevant areas.

This Masters provides training that is relevant for further qualitative research at MPhil and PhD level. It also develops high-level qualitative research skills that are relevant to research-based jobs in the creative industries.

Read less
Discipline Overview. Audiology is a clinical science involving hearing and balance assessment and rehabilitation. Hearing assessment usually involves the use of a number of specialised tests which help to ascertain the site or type of problem within the auditory system. Read more

Discipline Overview

Audiology is a clinical science involving hearing and balance assessment and rehabilitation. Hearing assessment usually involves the use of a number of specialised tests which help to ascertain the site or type of problem within the auditory system. Audiologists working in this area often work closely with otologists (ear specialists). Aural rehabilitation involves helping people with impaired hearing to cope with their hearing difficulties. This work usually includes fitting hearing aids or other devices such as the cochlear implant (bionic ear), training in the use of these devices and helping people to use their vision and other compensatory mechanisms in order to communicate effectively. This profession should be of interest to those with a scientific background who are interested in working with people.

Course Overview

The first year of the course provides the basic scientific background for audiology and an introduction to clinical work. The second year provides comprehensive training in all aspects of clinical audiology along with an introduction to research methods in the field. The course consists of formal lectures, seminars, practical work and student presentations along with a substantial clinical component. Students will be scheduled for supervised clinical work at our clinical school and at various hearing care facilities across Victoria. The course runs from February to November and is made up of lectures, practical sessions and clinics. Please see the Course and Subject Handbook for more information about the subjects and the time commitment.

The Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology offers the Master of Clinical Audiology degree, which is a two year full time course. Since 1998, the Master of Clinical Audiology degree has been required for entry to the profession.

The aim of this course is to provide students with the necessary training to enter the profession of clinical audiology. The course provides comprehensive training in all aspects of clinical audiology along with an introduction to research methods in this field. Students who demonstrate an aptitude for research may be considered for PhD studies within the Department.

On completion of this course the students should have:

  • critical thinking, analytical and problem solving skills
  • the ability to integrate theory and practice and to apply this in novel situations
  • an openness to new ideas
  • planning and time management skills
  • the ability to communicate their knowledge in both oral and written form
  • the ability to behave in a professionally appropriate manner


Read less
This MSc is designed to provide first-class training in audiovisual translation and accessibility to the media. Read more

This MSc is designed to provide first-class training in audiovisual translation and accessibility to the media. The programme offers you the opportunity to develop your translation and language skills, to deepen your understanding of the workings of language as an essential tool of communication and to gain vital experience in the rapidly developing areas of audiovisual translation and translation technology.

About this degree

By focusing on the translation of audiovisual programmes, you'll be equipped with the skills needed for professional work in the translation industry and for research in translation studies. You'll practice translation in specific language pairs and will become conversant with industry standard subtitling software and computer-based translation technology, which have been transforming the way in which professional audiovisual translators work.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Language & Translation
  • Translation Technologies 1
  • Subtitling
  • Translating for Voiceover & Dubbing
  • Audio Description for the Blind & the Partially Sighted
  • Subtitling for the Deaf & the Hard-of-Hearing

Part-time students take set core modules in year one and year two.

Optional modules

Students choose two optional modules from the list below:

  • Language & Automation
  • Localisation
  • Professional Skills for Translators
  • Scientific & Technical Translation
  • Topics in Audiovisual Translation
  • Translation Technologies 2

Part-time students take optional modules in year two.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-words consisting of either an annotated translation or a critical discussion of a theoretical aspect of translation.

Teaching and learning

The degree programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, interactive practical seminars, practical translation assignments and hands-on experience with a wide range of translation tools and technology. Assessment is carried out through essays, project work, take-home translation assessments and in-class tests.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Specialised Translation (Audiovisual) MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Most students find challenging and rewarding work within the translation industry on completion of the degree. Some are working as in-house and freelance translators, while others are active as project managers and translation tools experts in companies such as SDL International, BBC, Expedia, Netflix, Hogarth, TransPerfect, SDI-Media, VSI, GoLocalise and Deluxe to name but a few. In addition, the MSc is designed to serve as a basis for a Translation Studies PhD.

Employability

Audiovisual translation is a dynamic and rapidly developing profession, which calls for linguistically talented people with a clear understanding of the issues involved in cross-cultural transcoding and who are able to utilise the latest computer-based tools. 

On completion of this MSc, you will be well placed for a fast-track progression in your chosen career. We aim to make you highly attractive to employers within the translation industry and the world of audiovisual communications. In addition, the skills acquired through taking this MSc will be highly relevant if your aim is to establish yourself as a freelance translator.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of London, UCL is excellently placed to offer opportunities for networking and to establish professional contacts. At UCL we prepare you for the professional world by performing different roles within the translation workflow, by translating a wide variety of audiovisual programmes, and by specialising in areas such as subtitling, subtitling for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing, audio description for the blind and the visually impaired, dubbing and voiceover.

We organise a wide range of activities which offer you a unique opportunity for informal contact with professional translators, translation agencies and leading academics. We also work closely with industry partners to ensure that the programme possesses the maximum professional relevance.

You will enjoy working with a team of renowned academics and professional translators, which has gained an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and research.



Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X