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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.


Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ
http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. Read more

Program overview

Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. HCI research is driven by technological advances and the increasing pervasiveness of computing devices in our society. With an emphasis on making computing technologies more user-friendly, HCI has emerged as a dynamic, multifaceted area of study that merges theory from science, engineering, and design––as well as concepts and methodologies from psychology, anthropology, sociology, and industrial design––with the technical concerns of computing.

The master of science degree in human-computer interaction provides the knowledge and skills necessary for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and evaluating software applications and computing technologies for the benefit of the user, whether the user is an individual, a group, an organization, or a society. Human, technological, and organizational concerns are interwoven throughout the curriculum and addressed in team- and project-based learning experiences.

Plan of study

The program is comprised of four required core courses, up to three program electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), two application domain courses, and a capstone project or thesis.

Core courses

The core courses provide knowledge and skills in the conceptual and methodological frameworks of HCI and HCI research. Emphasis is on understanding human cognition as it applies to information systems plus interaction design, interface prototyping, and usability evaluation.

Electives

Student choose up to three electives, depending on which capstone option they choose to complete.

Program electives

Students will select two courses from the program electives list. In select cases, students can petition for approval to include a course complementray to the degree program as a program elective. See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Application domain courses

To gain breadth in a technical area to which HCI concepts can be applied, students complete two courses in any of the following application domain areas. A special topics option is also available, with faculty approval, for individuals with interest in other HCI-related areas. See website for further details of available domain courses: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Thesis/Capstone project

Students may complete a thesis or capstone project. (Student who choose the capstone will complete one additional elective.) This experience is meant to be an empirical study of a HCI problem, which can be the development of a software product through user-centered design processes. The results are either published in a peer-reviewed journal or publicly disseminated in an appropriate professional venue.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to selected thesis/project option, see website for further details of a particular option's modules and electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0* (B average).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have prior study or professional experience in computing; however, study in other disciplines will be given consideration.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.
-Applicants with undergraduate degrees from foreign universities are required to submit GRE scores.

*Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered, but are required to submit standard Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
The program requires strong technical and social science skills. Knowledge of quantitative statistical methodologies is important since students review research studies as well as analyze the results of their own usability evaluations. Students are also expected to have a solid background in computer programming. These competencies may be demonstrated by previous course work, technical certifications, or comparable work experience. Bridge courses are available to fulfill any gaps in an applicant's qualifications. Applicants will be made aware of any areas where additional course work may be necessary.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Online option:
The program can be completed on campus or online.

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This course provides students with advanced knowledge, industry-valued skills and new design perspectives, empowering them to succeed in a User Experience (UX) career. Read more
This course provides students with advanced knowledge, industry-valued skills and new design perspectives, empowering them to succeed in a User Experience (UX) career.

Who is it for?

This course is for people who share our ethos of wanting to design technology that meets user needs - interactive systems that are useful, easy-to-use and engaging. It is for people who get frustrated when they interact with unnecessarily complicated Websites, mobile apps or other interactive systems and think 'I want to be able to improve this.' It is for people that want to design technology based on an understanding of users' needs and to ensure that the products they and others design meet those needs. We welcome students who share this user-centred ethos.

Objectives

This course will equip you with the latest academic research, theories and techniques in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), User Experience (UX), usability and Interaction Design and encourages you to think about design in new ways - recognising that there are many 'right' ways to design interactive systems.

You will gain a mix of theoretical and practical knowledge, along with the necessary skills and experience to create engaging user experiences. You will study modules that cover the entire user-centred design and evaluation process; from understanding user needs, to designing interactive systems that meet those needs, to evaluating the usability of those (and existing systems) through user research.

Placements

You will have the option to undertake a six month UX internship, after the taught part of the course has finished.

All internships are paid and provide valuable work experience, enhancing employability. As an internship student you can apply the HCI/UX knowledge and skills you have developed on the course in real-world projects and build a UX work portfolio. This supports you in standing out in the job market. You will also get the opportunity to conduct your independent research project on a topic of interest to both you and the internship company. This helps ensure the practical importance of the research.

Previous internships include positions at:
-London UX agencies (e.g Webcredible, Foolproof, Bunnyfoot)
-The BBC
-The Telegraph
-Nature.com

Academic facilities

You will benefit from the use of the City Interaction Lab - a combined commercial and research lab, where we have undertaken UX consultancy for prestigious companies including Virgin Atlantic. The lab is fitted with the latest technologies including a usability testing suite, mobile testing station, eye-tracker, interactive tabletop, brain interaction technology, 3D printer and more. We employ student consultants on some projects, providing the opportunity to work on real client projects.

Teaching and learning

The course is delivered by distinguished academics from City University London's Centre for HCI Design, who all have a passion for user-centred design. Industry professionals also participate in teaching and learning - by giving guest lectures, running practitioner tutorials and even by providing feedback on students' design outputs and input into module content, ensuring that students learn the knowledge and skills most valued by industry.

Assessment

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, online activities and interactive workshops and tutorials. It is assessed in a variety of ways, including:
-Examinations (which focus on applying HCI theory in realistic situations).
-Coursework (which range from written reports and essays, to posters, presentations and design documentation - e.g. wireframe prototypes). A range of both group and individual courseworks are set during the course. Group courseworks are often centred around realistic design projects.
-Independent research project (dissertation). The independent project allows students to conduct original research on an HCI topic of their choice.
-Each of these account for around one-third of the total course assessment. However, the exact balance varies according to the chosen elective module.

Modules

You will study seven core modules and one elective module that cover the entire user-centred design and evaluation process. Modules are delivered through a combination of lectures, online activities and interactive workshops and tutorials. These include sessions delivered by guest lecturers from industry. Full-time students spend eight hours/week in lectures and four hours/week in seminars/tutorials. Part-time students spend half this time in classes. Overall workload is around 36 hours/week for full-time and 18 hours/week for part-time students.

You will also undertake an independent Research Project, for which our module on Research Methods and Professional Issues will prepare you.

A series of optional, but recommended, practitioner tutorials supplement the taught modules. These include talks, workshops and field trips. Previous tutorials have featured HCI/UX practitioners from prestigious companies including Foolproof, Futureheads and eBay.

Taught Core Modules
-Interaction design (15 credits)
-Creativity in design (15 credits)
-Information architecture (15 credits)
.-Evaluating interactive systems (15 credits)
-Inclusive design (15 credits)
-Cognition and technologies (15 credits)
-Research, methods and professional issues (15 credits)

Taught Elective modules
-Web applications development (15 credits)
-Data visualisation (15 credits)
-Telemedicine (15 credits)

Career prospects

This course empowers students to succeed in a variety of User Experience (UX) roles in leading digital agencies, business consultancies, IT companies and commercial/government organisations.

Roles include:
-UX Designer/Consultant
-User Researcher
-Information Architect
-Accessibility Specialist.

There is an increasing need for specialists with a deep knowledge of Human-Computer Interaction design. As the industry continues to expand, there is no better time to become a Master in this field. The course is also an excellent starting point for those wanting to pursue a PhD in HCI.

Our course is highly respected by industry, with exceptional employability; Over 90% of students are employed within six months of graduating (City Graduate Destinations), in prestigious companies including Samsung, Tesco, Thomson Reuters and Google.

The median annual salary for our recent graduates is £34,000 per year (City Graduate Destinations).

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computing and Future Interaction Technologies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computing and Future Interaction Technologies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Research Masters in Future Interaction Technologies and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) teaches graduate students to go beyond simply building new software and hardware, to evaluating how they would be used, and how they can be improved.

The MRes is taught by the Future Interaction Technology (FIT) Lab, within the Computer Science. The FIT Lab’s mission is to explore and apply Advanced Computer Science to make interaction technologies dependable, enjoyable and effective. Interaction technologies include mobile devices, the Web, Web 2.0, implants, home TVs, microwave cookers, ticket machines, navigational aids, etc. Furthermore, we aim to work on grand challenges, like improving safety in healthcare, or developing technology to reach the millions and help us live more effective and sustainable lives.

Our Research Masters programme in Future Interaction Technologies mainly concludes of a large individual research project worth 120 credits. Inclusive of this 120 credits is training and experience provided by our Lab & Field Research Methods module. You will spend around 8 months preparing for and working on this extensive project, which provides key experience in performing research-oriented projects. As the MRes has a research focus, you will spend more independent research time building a strong knowledge of research literature and striving to make a novel contribution to the HCI community.

Taught Component

In addition to the research project, you can choose from a range of modules that provide skills and development training in different areas during your studies on the Computing and Future Interaction Technologies MRes.

Modules available currently include:

Human Computer Interaction Project

Development (compulsory)

Interaction Technologies: Lab & Field Work (compulsory)

Interaction Technologies: Seminars & Readings (compulsory)

Research Methodology (compulsory)

Mobile Interaction Design

Interactive Systems Design

Interaction Technologies: Information Retrieval

Interaction Technologies: Hardware & Devices

The MRes in Computing & Future Interaction Technologies is ideally suited for continued academic research, but also provides the necessary skills and key experience to apply research methods in HCI practitioner positions in industry.



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The M.Sc. programme Computer Science for Digital Media at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar is an internationally oriented 2-years degree programme. Read more
The M.Sc. programme Computer Science for Digital Media at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar is an internationally oriented 2-years degree programme. It aims at creative and innovative thinking graduates of Computer Science or related subjects with the desire of deepening their knowledge in applied Computer Science, with a focus on applications relevant to the media.

Programme Features

In accordance with the »Weimar Model«, research-oriented projects are a large and defining part of the Master’s programme. Additional elective modules allow students to select courses from other degree programmes such as Computational Engineering, Arts and Design, Architecture, as well as courses from the Computer Science for Digital Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included. The fourth and final semester is dedicated entirely to the Master’s thesis.

The degree programme offers students to focus on different fields. Core components of the programme and areas of specialisation include:
• Web Technologies
• Information Retrieval and Data Mining
• Big Data Analytics
• Intelligent Software Systems
• Computer Graphics and Visualization
• Computer Vision
• Virtual Reality, 3D Interfaces
• Human Computer Interfaces
• Usability
• Secure Protocols and Cryptographic Algorithms

Key skills and competences are acquired through a project-based teaching approach: on a semester basis, students work in teams to solve assigned research tasks in the labs of the faculty. This approach provides our graduates with soft- and hard- skills which are very welcome in research and development institutions. Within the recently built »Digital Bauhaus Lab«, the faculty of media has excellent research facilities equipped with the latest advanced hardware.

Visit the Computer Science for Digital Media on the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar website for more details on the programme.

Career Options

Our graduates find employment in the R&D departments of companies in the automotive, telecommunication, software, gaming and animation industry, as well as at academic institutions in Germany and overseas. A specialisation in Computer Science with focus on media opens the door for employment and research in innovative areas such as system development, algorithm development, data analysis, data mining, scientific visualisation, image processing, physical simulation, interface development and testing and security protocols development.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe should apply online on http://www.uni-assist.de/index_en.html. Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa can apply online at: https://movein-uni-weimar.moveonnet.eu/movein/portal/studyportal.php?_language=en

Please find further information for your application on http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-csm/

We also maintain a FAQ page: http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-csm/

Studying in Weimar

The »Bauhaus « was the most influential design school in the 20th century and was founded in 1919 in Weimar. The Bauhaus-Universität Weimar is the living continuation of this tradition. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum! Experimentation and excellence are our mission throughout our university faculties Media, Architecture and Urbanism, Civil Engineering and Art and Design. Across our Faculties, transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are an important part of this mission.

Find out more about student life in Weimar on http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/university/studies/einblickbauhaus/university-town-of-weimar/

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Improve your employment prospects and accelerate your career with our cutting-edge postgraduate qualification aimed specifically at non-computing graduates and experienced professionals. Read more
Improve your employment prospects and accelerate your career with our cutting-edge postgraduate qualification aimed specifically at non-computing graduates and experienced professionals. Equip yourself with the computational tools and skills required to address strategic problems in your area of expertise and make your move into the growing, international, high-value IT industry.

Key features

-Structure: This programme will give you knowledge of computational problem solving, computer technology and software development with a focus on human-computer-interaction and usability as competitive factors. The programme includes a CS workshop module that guarantees that you will collaborate with experts from our world-leading research centres.
-Resources: Benefit from easy access to cutting-edge specialist labs and next-generation software and hardware on a single-campus. You will benefit directly from facilities such as our NVIDIA sponsored GPU Research Centre and our High-Performance Computing Centre. You will be provided with a personal (free) iPad mini enabling you to fully take part of our electronically enhanced teaching.
Financial support: Plymouth University offers a range of general and merit-based postgraduate scholarships for local and international students including GREAT scholarships for students of Indian nationality. To be considered for one of these scholarships you must first hold a conditional offer of a place on a postgraduate taught (PGT) degree programme.
-Careers: A post-graduate qualification in computer science combined with a background in a non-computing field opens the door to a wide range of careers including Systems Analyst (start £20-25K, senior £40K+), Information Security or Multimedia Specialist (start £20-25K, senior £35-60K), Operational Researcher (start £20-28K, senior £40-100K+) and IT consultant (starting salary £20-30K, senior salary £40-80K) . With the recognised skill gap in the IT sector, currently, 85 per cent of computer science students find employment within six months of finishing their programme.
-Lifestyle: Work hard and play hard in Britain’s Ocean City with its beautiful moors and beaches and its historical naval links. The City of Plymouth is located in the county of Devon, repeatedly selected as the best place to live in the UK. Find out more about life in Plymouth and the South West.
-Quality: As one of UK’s ten largest universities, Plymouth combines the best of modern and traditional higher education, with friendly and approachable professors and a world-leading research profile in future-focused areas such as medicine, cognitive science, environmental science and robotics.

Course details

Semester 1 modules
-Computational Problem Solving and Computer Systems
-Software Development and Databases
-Computer Networks and Cybersecurity

Semester 2 modules
-HCI, Web and Mobile Development
-Software Project Management (including group project)
-Computer Science Workshops

Individual project
-The taught element of the programme is followed by an individual project.

Core modules
-ISAD515 Computational Problem Solving and Computer Systems
-NET505 Computer Networks and Cybersecurity
-PROJ516 MSc Project
-SOFT562 Software Development and Databases
-SOFT549 HCI, Web and Mobile Development
-AINT514 Computer Science Workshop
-ISAD516 Software Project Management

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. Read more
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. This interdisciplinary degree programme sits at the intersection of engineering, behavioural sciences, and design. It combines academic rigour with practical and professional skills highly valued by employers.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of the relevance and application of human physical, cognitive, social and affective knowledge to the design of interactive systems. They learn to analyse and test user performance, preferences and experience in relation to human-centred interactive systems. Students will be able to characterise and apply range of human-computer interaction and user-centred design styles.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two compulsory 30 credit core modules, four 15 credit optional modules and a 60 credit research project.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible up to three years is offered) consisting of two compulsory 30 credit core modules and four 15 credit optional modules. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), full-time three months or flexible up to two years is offered. This consists of one 30 credit core module and 30 credits of optional modules.

Core modules
-Interaction Science
-Interaction Design

Optional modules
-Accessibility and Assistive Technologies
-Affective Interaction
-Future Interfaces
-Human Factors for Digital Health
-Persuasive Games
-Physical Computing and Prototyping
-Socio-technical Systems

Dissertation/report
The MSc project gives you the opportunity to conduct research in the area of human-computer interaction under the supervision of a member of UCLIC staff. A broad range of topics and questions are offered and you will work closely with your supervisor in selecting and carrying out your project. Many former projects have contributed to publications at leading international conferences, such as the ACM SIGCHI conference.

Teaching and learning
Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Modules are assessed through a mixture of coursework and exams. Coursework is varied and includes design portfolios, presentations, videos, reflective reports, and online peer learning tasks as well as more traditional academic essays.

Careers

Our graduates are employed by technology multinationals, start-ups, government agencies, consultancies and in academia. They take up roles such as User Experience (UX) Researchers, Interaction Designers, Usability Specialists and Information Architects. Many progress to senior roles within a few years of graduation.

Employability
This degree is highly regarded by our colleagues in industry. Along with developing HCI research skills, the programme allows students to demonstrate skills in presenting, writing and collaboration that are valued by employers. We have a large network of alumni working in London and across the world. Many of them are involved with our industry speaker series and careers events, and they regularly send opportunities to our jobs mailing list for recent graduates.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is taught by the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC), a world leading Centre of Excellence in Human-Computer Interaction, working collaboratively with industry and the research community. UCLIC, and before it the UCL Ergonomics Unit, have provided training in this field for over thirty years. We have excellent links with industry partners, offer students a weekly indsutry speaker series and run visits to consultancies and field sites.

Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Assessments are varied and include design portfolios, presentations, videos and reflective reports as well as academic essays and exams.

The MSc research project allows students to undertake cutting-edge research in human-computer interaction. Many former projects have been published and presented at leading international conferences.

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The discipline of Human Computer Interaction is about many things. It is about the interface that a system provides (and, therefore, is the most important and most complex component of most systems) but it is also about so much more. Read more
The discipline of Human Computer Interaction is about many things: It is about the interface that a system provides (and, therefore, is the most important and most complex component of most systems) but it is also about so much more. We need to understand the people that use the systems and their abilities and constraints. We need to understand how to build systems that really work and also how to evaluate them. We also need to be able to think creatively in order to build innovative solutions to new problems and emerging applications and domains - to be able to solve the problems of tomorrow’s world rather than just those of today.

This course covers the underpinning theories, methodologies and practices of HCI. It includes specialist modules in application domains. Through course and project work your degree is intimately integrated into the research of the University’s HCI centre.

Breakdown of course

This is a one year, full-time course. In the first 8 months, students will spend half of their time studying taught modules. Here we will cover the core principles, theories, methodologies and application areas of the discipline. There will also be an opportunity to take optional modules in areas such as Computer Security, Robotics or Nature Inspired Computation.

The other half of your time will be spent on two mini-projects. Here you will work one-to-one with one of our research-active staff to explore an area in great depth – analyzing the problem and existing solutions, developing new ideas and building or evaluating prototype systems. Here you will develop your skills in analysis, research, technology and also in presenting and explaining your work clearly and effectively.

The final four months will be spent extending the work of one of your mini-projects, again with expert one-to-one supervision.

About the School of Computer Science

The School of Computer Science at University of Birmingham has consistently been ranked in the Top 10 in UK league tables and has regularly achieved high satisfaction scores in National Student Surveys. 95% of our students go into graduate employment (Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2014/15), and our School is ranked 8th nationally for research quality in the '2014 Research Excellence Framework'.
Our work is regularly presented in international conferences and journals, indicating the high standards we achieve in research. In 2008, the UK Funding Councils undertook a national assessment of the quality of research at British universities, the RAE. Among 81 submissions nationally for computer science, the School is equal 7th in the proportion of 4* awards, for research quality that is world-leading in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The programme intends to develop your competence in using tools and techniques for producing computer systems solutions from a sound mathematical and scientific base while appreciating the professional responsibilities and quality needed by industry. Read more
The programme intends to develop your competence in using tools and techniques for producing computer systems solutions from a sound mathematical and scientific base while appreciating the professional responsibilities and quality needed by industry.

What's covered in the course?

The course is designed to cover the advanced concepts of computer science in the first semester, including service-oriented architecture, advanced HCI techniques and advanced mobile computing.

In your second semester, you will consolidate your first semester learning by studying further advanced subjects that emphasise Semantic Web technologies, advanced data science, and Research and Project Management. In addition, you will complete an individual project that provides opportunity to demonstrate technical and general employability skills in preparation for career progression. More specifically, the individual project simulates typical graduate workplace tasks that require in-depth knowledge and skills in a specific area of computer science. This will include consideration of wider issues and the ability to manage activities and resources, as well as generate, implement and report on solutions to meet task objectives.

Throughout your studies, you’ll be supported by our expert teaching staff, all of whom have a wide range of research and industrial experience in areas such as intelligent systems, mobile computing, Semantic Web, machine learning and software engineering, which they use to enhance the curriculum.

Why choose us?

-You’ll have access to dedicated industry-standard facilities in our own fully equipped laboratory. Based within our £114 million Millennium Point building, you’ll be able to undertake work such as artificial intelligence, human computer interaction, mobile and web application development, and data science.
-We are home to a Cisco Systems and a Microsoft Academy Centre – one of Microsoft’s top UK university-based academies – and we are a member of the Microsoft Developer Network Academic Alliance. We are also a Cisco ASC (Academy Support Centre) and Cisco Instructor Training Centre (ITC) – one of only 10 such instructor training centres in the UK.
-The course is supported through the activities of the Innovations in Computing Education research group, designed to keep teaching and assessment updated to match international trends.
-We have strong links with companies such as Oracle, LPI, Microsoft, AWS and Apple, which ensure that the course is relevant and respected by employers.

Course in depth

Knowledge and understanding are acquired though a mixture of formal lectures, tutor-led seminars and practical activities, with other independent learning activities at all stages.

Emphasis is placed on guided, self-directed and student-centred learning with increasing independence of approach, thought and process.

The course provides access to effective commercial development environments and ensures students have practical awareness of computer systems requirements. You are required to meet strict deadlines, and to manage and plan overall workload.

Knowledge is assessed formatively and summatively, by a number of methods, including seminars, course-work, viva, presentation, and project work.

Assessment criteria are published both at a generic course level and to provide guidance for individual items of assessment.

You will undertake a major project involving research and application of that research in the solution of appropriate systems problems.

Semester One
-Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) 20 credits
-Advanced Mobile Computing 20 credits
-Advanced HCI 20 credits

Semester Two
-Research Methods and Project Management 20 credits
-Advanced Data Science 20 credits
-Semantic Web and Knowledge Engineering 20 credits

Semester Three
-Master’s Project 60 credits

Enhancing your employability skills

We know that employers are looking for graduates who have a good balance between in-depth academic knowledge and technical and practical expertise, which is why our course is geared towards employability.

What you learn on our course will help you to stand out when you look for your first professional role.Because you’ll know how to use sophisticated, industry-standard software, you will be able to demonstrate that you can put into practice your deep theoretical knowledge.

We will also prepare you for a career by equipping you with a range of transferable skills, such as complex problem-solving expertise, the ability to analyse in a careful and considered manner, and working as a team member.

In addition, our specialist industry links with the Linux Professional Institute, the Oracle Academy, Cisco, and Microsoft, plus our world-class facilities, will mark you out as a highly employable graduate.

This is why our graduates have gone on to pursue computing and software development and designer careers in a wide range of industries, from SME software companies, to industry, government, banking and healthcare. Furthermore, many graduates continue their studies to Doctorate level.

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For most companies, understanding the complex web of relationships between people, technology and design the 'user experience' is vital in acquiring the competitive edge. Read more
For most companies, understanding the complex web of relationships between people, technology and design the 'user experience' is vital in acquiring the competitive edge. Especially when considering the development and production of technology based devices and services. MSc User Experience Engineering brings together knowledge and skill sets into a single programme focused on the user experience where computing technology is the heart of the devices and services.

Why study MSc User Experience Engineering at Dundee?

The importance of human computer interaction and good interface design is increasingly recognised as the key to the future of successful software development.

At the University of Dundee we provide students with the knowledge skills and support necessary to become move into a career in user experience engineering. The University of Dundee is at the forefront of computing and as such you will have the opportunity to learn from leading researchers.

What's great about User Experience Engineering at Dundee?

This course is designed to:
Give you a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of user experience research and implementation in the domain of computing and technology.

Enable you to acquire advanced knowledge and skills in the professional procedures necessary to ensure that user experience research and requirements-gathering is both valid and actionable in technology implementation contexts.

Enable you to understand and engage with contemporary debate about the role, ethics and utility of user experience research in commercial and other settings.

An additional aim for overseas students is to provide you with educational and cultural experiences which are unique to the UK.

Our facilities:
You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

The start date is September each year. The MSc course lasts for 12 months and the PGDip lasts for 9 months.

How you will be taught

The programme will be delivered principally by a mix of traditional lectures, study of academic background texts, lab and studio based practice sessions, and field and project based learning. These will be supplemented by seminars and workshops on key areas of practice

What you will study

The course will be taught in 20 credit modules plus a 60 credit dissertation. Students will be required to complete 180 credits for the award of the MSc (including 60 credits for the dissertation). Students completing 120 credits (without the dissertation) will be eligible for a Postgraduate Diploma.

Semester 1 (Sept-Dec)
Computing the User Experience (20 Credits)
Elective Module- one from:
Internet and Computer Systems
Software Development
Software Engineering
Agile Engineering
Technology Innovation Management
Secure e-Commerce
Computer Graphics
Computer Vision
Multimedia Audio
International Marketing
Eye Movements & Cognition (10 Credits)
Quantitative Methods (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (Jan-Mar)
Research Methods (20 Credits)- experimental design requires researchers to understand the context of the research being undertaken and being able to apply appropriate methods to measure and compare data. This module aims to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of research methods relevant in the context of computing.
Research Frontiers(20 Credits) - Students select a total of four units from available units which currently include:
Accessibility & Computing (AC)
Applied Computational Intelligence (ACI)
Constraint Programming (CP)
Games (G)
Intelligent Agents (IA)
Aspects of Assistive Technology (AT) and Augmentative and Alternate Communication (AAC)
Interactive Systems Design (ISD)
Space Systems (SS)
What Computer Eyes Can Do (CE)
Eye Gaze Tracking
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) (20 Credits) - the aim of this module is to provide you with a broad introduction to human-computer interaction through study of the components, both human and machine, which make up interfaces and the ways in which they interact, illustrating this with examples of good and bad practice.

Semester 3 (Apr-Sept)
Research Project or Field Project (60 Credits) - this module will provide you with a professional level experience of specifying, conducting and presenting a substantial piece of user experience research.
Please note that some of the modules in the programme are shared with other masters programmes and some of the teaching and resources may be shared with our BSc programme.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be a mix of continuous or coursework assessments and exams, with group and individual projects assessed by set deliverables and final presentation.

Careers

This programme is intended to enhance the employability of graduates in the following ways:

For technologists and computing professionals, this programme should build their skills in implementing technology that are appropriate to the needs and wishes of users in the relevant usage context

For human factors specialists, this programme should build their understanding of the fit between users and technology and should enhance their methodology skill set when exploring beyind the understanding of the human factors towards the deployment of appropriate or enhanced user experiences.

For design specialists, this programme should build their skills in marrying technologies and materials to the requirements of users and in blending this within appropriate aesthetics.

For UX team managers this programme should enhance their insights and give them practical experience of the skill sets of all members of their teams in order to direct their work so as to optimize the user experience within real business and technical constraints.

For all professionals, this programme should enhance their ability to communicate the impact of the user experience investigations on their work and the impact of their work on the user experience, not only within the UX team but also to other business functions such as senior management and marketing.

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The effective use of information technology is vital to industry and commerce. Our course aims to equip you to work professionally within these environments as an information systems specialist. Read more

Why take this course?

The effective use of information technology is vital to industry and commerce. Our course aims to equip you to work professionally within these environments as an information systems specialist.

In particular, it aims to develop reflective academic skills while providing you with the knowledge and technical skills associated with the development and management of information systems and related software and equipment.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Apply your skills to real-life practical problems as part of the department’s partnership scheme with local and global organisations
Use our fully equipped multi-platform suites and computer labs to enhance your learning experience
Design and develop your own piece of software, hardware, or network system as part of your final project

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is designed to firmly establish and develop your skills in computer programming, systems analysis and software development in the context of professional business. All companies and organisations rely on information systems for a number of business processes, and IS specialists can really be the competitive advantage in this area meaning that your employment opportunities will be extensive.

Accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT for the purposes of partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional (CITP).

Module Details

Alongside a selection of key compulsory topics, you’ll also undertake a substantial project. This involves in-depth research, where you will apply the skills and knowledge from the taught part of the course to a practical computing problem, usually supplied by local businesses or other external clients.

Here are the units you will study:

Information Systems Development: The unit prepares and enhances skills for industry with specialisation in the areas of the software process, systems design, object-oriented analysis and relational database development. It provides a balance between theoretical and practical elements.

Information Systems Management: This unit introduces students to the project management of IS/IT developments and encourages understanding of the techniques and methods currently used. It is based on monitoring and managing the activities in a project development life cycle, covering estimating and planning techniques, design, implementation and integration, project team building and motivation, configuration management and risk management. The unit requires students to consider project management techniques applicable to the development of current types of information system and to apply these techniques and methods specifically to the task of website development.

Interaction in Computer Systems: This unit introduces interaction with and by computer systems, and the role of computer systems and data communications in network environments. Concepts of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and ergonomics are introduced to students, and used to analyse and assess interactive systems in terms of accessibility and usability.

Web Development: Website design and development is a central skill for IS professionals. It involves not only a basic understanding of how websites are constructed and served, but also an understanding of how the websites function as part of a user-computer interactive system. This requires a developed understanding both of users and of the information tasks they are trying to perform.

Master's Project: You will undertake either an engineering unit or a study project, during the summer period. The project offers students the opportunity to apply the taught material in the solution of a real-world problem directly related to their course. The engineering project usually involves building a piece of software to solve a problem. An example of the sort of thing you might do would be building an information system to address a specific organisation’s requirements. The study project usually involves undertaking a study of an information systems problem domain. An example of the sort of thing you might do for a study project would be an evaluation of the information systems impact of mobile devices on an organisation.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught using a combination of formal lectures, tutorials and lab sessions. You’ll also be required to spend a significant amount of time in private study, which may involve additional software development or research as appropriate to the topic you are currently studying.

You will encounter a range of assessment styles depending on the content and nature of the unit topic. This can include written assignments, presentations as well as group and individual lab-based assessments. However, the most significant assessment element is the final dissertation, which reports and reflects on your final project.

Student Destinations

On completing this course, you will be all set to enter into a wide variety of careers in the computing industry, progress onto computing research or use computing as an additional skill in support of your principal career. Many of our previous graduates have taken the course with a view to changing career direction, be it as part of an IT company or an IT department of a company or local government organisation.

You can also use the course as a route to an academic career by undertaking research study leading to a PhD, with the aim of eventually becoming a university lecturer or researcher.

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* Subject to validation, 2017 entry. Liverpool Hope’s MSc Computer Science is a research-informed, academically rigorous course and is designed to provide a flexible, purposeful and challenging set of coherent courses to meet scientific, industrial and employment challenges in this fast-evolving technological area. Read more
* Subject to validation, 2017 entry

Liverpool Hope’s MSc Computer Science is a research-informed, academically rigorous course and is designed to provide a flexible, purposeful and challenging set of coherent courses to meet scientific, industrial and employment challenges in this fast-evolving technological area. Graduates will have developed scientific and analytical skills which are highly valued in the computing, engineering, IT and business industries.

The course offers a mix of compulsory and elective courses, and a research dissertation, so you can focus your skill base and your potential career direction.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, whether it is within IT industry or as a function of other sectors, scientific computing and technical skills are in great demand and therefore highly valued. There are opportunities for placements and enterprise development.

Curriculum

The MSc Computer Science combines academic and practical course, consisting of eight taught courses (four compulsory and four elective) and a dissertation (final research project).

The Compulsory courses are:

· Computational Modelling and Simulation

· Algorithms

· Innovations in Computer Science

· Research Methods for Computer Science

· Dissertation for MSc Computer Science

Elective courses include:

· Embedded Systems and Robotics

· Cloud Computing and Web Services

· Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing

· Human Computer Interaction

· E-Business

Course Descriptions

· Computational Modelling and Simulation (compulsory – 15 credits): This course develops understanding and knowledge of the principles, techniques and design of computational modelling and their applications.

· Algorithms (compulsory - 15 credits): This course gives a firm grounding in the philosophy and evolution of algorithmic design and analysis for computer science, engineering and information systems.

· Innovations in Computer Science (compulsory - 15 credits): You will examine the particular research interests of Computer Science Department.

· Research Methods for Computer Science (compulsory - 15 credits): The course will expose you to the established techniques of research and enquiry that are used to extend, create and interpret knowledge in computer science

· Embedded Systems and Robotics (elective - 15 credits): This course will examine the Robotics Operating System and robotic programming languages, such as Urbi.

· Cloud Computing and Web Services (elective - 15 credits): You will study the concepts behind the idea of cloud computing and web services and gain practical knowledge of Azure, the .Net framework and C#.

· Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing (elective - 15 credits): You will examine mobile phone OSs (Android) and Windows Phone 7. You will learn how to develop software for these devices using JavaFX and C#/Silverlight.

· Human Computer Interaction (elective - 15 credits): Human computer interaction (HCI) is the study of interaction between people and computers and is the most multi-disciplinary module available in the MSc Computer Science.

·
* E-Business (elective - 15 credits): E-business encompasses, and is more than, e-commerce. You will examine e-commerce technology, such as the internet and web-based technologies.

· Dissertation for MSc Computer Science (compulsory - 60 credits): This module will allow the students to develop a Masters level research project with the support of an academic supervisor.

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This course builds upon typical computing courses available at undergraduate level and develops new knowledge and skills in areas critical for the successful introduction of information systems into business enterprises and organisations. Read more
This course builds upon typical computing courses available at undergraduate level and develops new knowledge and skills in areas critical for the successful introduction of information systems into business enterprises and organisations.

Information systems (IS) today are large, complex, varied in form and distributed, serving different types of people who use a variety of devices to access information. Specialists who recognise diverse business needs, and have a systematic approach to understanding the impact of technology on organisations, are essential to the success of any IS/IT strategy. Equal in importance to the architectures of systems and the supporting technologies, is the management and delivery of content, whether in the form of data, documents, images and sound.

Increasingly, the fundamental systems comprise digital architectures and networks which then embody and enable the distribution of digital content. Developed information systems are in reality socio-technical systems incorporating people, technologies and content. The information systems specialist becomes a more broadly based information professional as they extend their range and scope of operations towards the end users and their environments. Providing services to users and people at large and ensuring information resources deliver value is equally a part of the wider world of information systems.

Course detail

The course also provides a route for people with other backgrounds and experience to engage with the world of information systems. It helps you gain a full understanding of how information systems are designed and constructed, and of the impact of technology and its integration into an organisation.

It will also give you the skills you need to work effectively in a business-consulting environment, and provide a solid basis for research.

Modules

• Enterprise Architecture
• Knowledge Management
• Consultancy and Technical Innovation
• Information Systems Project Management
• UML Component Modelling
• Advanced Rich Media (optional)
• Data Architecture (optional)
• Security Management (optional)
• HCI for Information Systems (optional)
• Mobile Applications Development (optional)
• Research Methods
• Dissertation.

Format

Diverse methods are used to explore all aspects of the field. A strong supportive culture exists amongst the course tutors which enables students to achieve their potential.

Assessment

Course assessed work is a significant part of the total assessment. There is practical work, report writing, critical academic writing and the skills and knowledge gained in these contribute to a capacity to deliver a high quality dissertation.

There are a number of end of module exams. Course tutors provide appropriate support throughout the module to ensure candidates are well prepared.

Career and study progression

The course aims to provide routes into a number of career options and positions. There are good opportunities for employment in the core IS and ICT functions at the development and service levels. Employers require information officers, librarians, information service staff, content and intelligence gatherers and analysts, researchers, editors, searchers and intermediaries, advice and assistance workers, data managers, management information systems staff, as well as multimedia content workers, mapping specialists and cartographers, marketing research, public relations and communication staff. All these wider information professional positions are grounded in the fundamental core the discipline of information systems and the broader computing and ICT environment.

Graduates have a good record of achieving employment and progressing in professional information work especially in the voluntary and private sector as well as in the public sector.

Outstanding graduates have gone on to further study at the level of MPhil and PhD at UWL and at other institutions. We actively encourage students with potential for research to make their interest known early on in their course.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The MSc in Human Computer Interaction is a one-year taught programme run by the School of Computer Science. Much of the core content is delivered by members of the . Read more

The MSc in Human Computer Interaction is a one-year taught programme run by the School of Computer Science. Much of the core content is delivered by members of the St Andrews Human Computer Interaction (SACHI) research group.

The course consists of two semesters of taught components followed by an 11-week project leading to the submission of a 15,000-word dissertation in August.

Highlights

  • The MSc in Human Computer Interaction is a specialist course but retains some flexibility, allowing students to pursue other areas of computer science alongside the compulsory specialist modules.
  • The course develops students' practical skills in the process and practice of prototyping and implementing interactive computing systems.
  • Students undertake a significant project, including a wide-ranging investigation, leading to their dissertation which enables them to consolidate and extend their specialist knowledge and critical thinking.
  • The School has a dedicated HCI laboratory with specialist equipment, including an 84-inch Microsoft Hub, a 3D printer, Google Soli sensors, and a diverse range of eye-tracking and motion-capture equipment.
  • Students have 24-hour access to modern computing laboratories, provisioned with dual-screen PC workstations and group-working facilities.

Students may switch to an MSc in Advanced Computer Science or in Information Technology after the first semester.

Teaching format

The taught portion of the MSc programme includes eight modules: five compulsory and three optional from a wide range available. Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical classes. Most modules are assessed through practical coursework exercises and examinations. Class sizes typically range from 10 to 50 students.

All students are assigned an advisor who meets with them at the start of the year to discuss module choices and is available to assist with any academic difficulties during the year. A designated member of staff provides close supervision for the MSc project and dissertation.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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