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There has been an increasing interest in happiness in many disciplines including healthcare, philosophy, psychology, economics and ethics. Read more
There has been an increasing interest in happiness in many disciplines including healthcare, philosophy, psychology, economics and ethics.

At the same time the concepts of wellness health, illness and disease have become issues of controversy.

This programme focuses on happiness and its overlap with health and wellbeing asking questions such as: What is happiness and health? How does illness affect our understanding of what matters? Do our views about death and mortality affect how happy we are?

You will explore issues at the intersection of philosophy, ethics, psychology and medicine, which have important implications for policy and health care. This programme is aimed at graduates with a background in philosophy, psychology, theology, health sciences, medicine or social sciences.

We also offer this programme by distance learning.

Taught by experts – you will study alongside some of the finest minds in Philosophy. We are ranked second among all Philosophy departments in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.

Flexibility – the wide range of modules on offer allows you to both identify and explore your specific interests.

Friendly and relaxed atmosphere – staff within the Department of Philosophy are very approachable and happy to offer additional advice on academic performance.

Small classes – teaching on the masters-level modules involve mainly small-group seminars allowing you to really get to grips with the learning material.

Be a part of an active postgraduate community – you will join a lively and stimulating Department where you can contribute to on-going research activities, including research seminars and events such as our weekly speaker series and various workshops, reading groups and conferences throughout the year.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Applied Positive Psychology focuses on questions that enable you, and the people around you, to lead fulfilling and meaningful lives. Read more
Applied Positive Psychology focuses on questions that enable you, and the people around you, to lead fulfilling and meaningful lives. From discovering strengths and the importance of positive emotion to ways of fostering hope and building resilience, the course offers the chance to develop knowledge and skills for professional and personal development.

Visit the website: http://bucks.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/MH2PPS9/

Is this course for me?

How does science define happiness? What does it mean to flourish? Would you be able to name your 'strengths' or those of others? These are all questions you will explore and answer while studying Applied Positive Psychology. Whatever work you do, whether you're a teacher, counsellor, coach, or team leader, Applied Positive Psychology can help you find ways to improve your own wellbeing and performance, as well as that of others.

The course encourages you to build on your existing skills and experience while exploring how you can use Positive Psychology in your day-to- day life.

We don't assume our students have a background in Psychology. We'll give you the grounding and skills you need to apply your knowledge in a critically reflective way.

Modules

Year One
• Introduction to Positive Psychology: Happiness, Well-being and Flourishing
• Strengths-based Development and Engagement
• Positive Subjective Emotion and Experience
• The Psychology of Hope and Resilience

Year Two
• The Journey of Change
• Positive Psychology in Practice
• Applied Research Skills
• Data Analysis and Interpretation
• Postgraduate Dissertation

Attendance

The full MSc Applied Psychology takes two years to complete on a part-time basis, however you can choose to study over three years and dedicate the last year to your dissertation. There is also the choice of completing the Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma that does not involve completing a dissertation project.

What are my career prospects?

Applied Positive Psychology can be used in a wide variety of job roles. Many of our students take advantage of flexible learning and stay in their current role. You'll immediately be able to apply what you learn. You'll see how Positive Psychology can make a huge difference, whether you need to boost morale in your workplace or improve productivity.

Some of our graduates choose to continue their education by completing a PhD. Continuing your education gives you the opportunity to develop your skills further and research your area of interest.

Other graduates have used their new skills to set a business. Positive Psychology Learning (PPL) was set up by two graduates and offers positive psychology courses, consultancy and coaching.

How will you help me prepare for my future career?

Positive Psychology will change the way you look at the world. From a personal perspective you'll understand your happiness and strengths in a different way.

This Applied Positive Psychology course will provide you with a confident skill set that will support you in any career. You'll immediately be able to apply your knowledge to day-
to-day life.

As well as learning theory and application, you will also learn to analyse and interpret a range of types of data and develop a critically reflective approach to your learning.

How to apply

Apply here: http://bucks.ac.uk/applynow/

Funding

There are a range of funding opportunities for postgraduate students which include sponsorship, bursaries, scholarships and loans: http://bucks.ac.uk/fees_funding/postgraduate-masters-scholarships/

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Applied Positive Psychology focuses on questions that enable you, and the people around you, to lead fulfilling and meaningful lives. Read more
Applied Positive Psychology focuses on questions that enable you, and the people around you, to lead fulfilling and meaningful lives. From discovering strengths and the importance of positive emotion to ways of fostering hope and building resilience, the course offers the chance to develop knowledge and skills for professional and personal development.

Visit the website: http://bucks.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/MH2PPS9/

Is this course for me?

How does science define happiness? What does it mean to flourish? Would you be able to name your 'strengths' or those of others? These are all questions you will explore and answer while studying Applied Positive Psychology. Whatever work you do, whether you're a teacher, counsellor, coach, or team leader, Applied Positive Psychology can help you find ways to improve your own wellbeing and performance, as well as that of others.

The course encourages you to build on your existing skills and experience while exploring how you can use Positive Psychology in your day-to- day life.

We don't assume our students have a background in Psychology. We'll give you the grounding and skills you need to apply your knowledge in a critically reflective way.

Modules

Year One
• Introduction to Positive Psychology: Happiness, Well-being and Flourishing
• Strengths-based Development and Engagement
• Positive Subjective Emotion and Experience
• The Psychology of Hope and Resilience

Year Two
• The Journey of Change
• Positive Psychology in Practice
• Applied Research Skills
• Data Analysis and Interpretation
• Postgraduate Dissertation

Attendance

The full MSc Applied Psychology takes two years to complete on a part-time basis, however you can choose to study over three years and dedicate the last year to your dissertation. There is also the choice of completing the Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma that does not involve completing a dissertation project.

What are my career prospects?

Applied Positive Psychology can be used in a wide variety of job roles. Many of our students take advantage of flexible learning and stay in their current role. You'll immediately be able to apply what you learn. You'll see how Positive Psychology can make a huge difference, whether you need to boost morale in your workplace or improve productivity.

Some of our graduates choose to continue their education by completing a PhD. Continuing your education gives you the opportunity to develop your skills further and research your area of interest.

Other graduates have used their new skills to set a business. Positive Psychology Learning (PPL) was set up by two graduates and offers positive psychology courses, consultancy and coaching.

How will you help me prepare for my future career?

Positive Psychology will change the way you look at the world. From a personal perspective you'll understand your happiness and strengths in a different way.

This Applied Positive Psychology course will provide you with a confident skill set that will support you in any career. You'll immediately be able to apply your knowledge to day-to-day life.

As well as learning theory and application, you will also learn to analyse and interpret a range of types of data and develop a critically reflective approach to your learning.

How to apply

Apply here: http://bucks.ac.uk/applynow/

Funding

There are a range of funding opportunities for postgraduate students which include sponsorship, bursaries, scholarships and loans: http://bucks.ac.uk/fees_funding/postgraduate-masters-scholarships/

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Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require. Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Read more
Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Immigrants frequently exhibit pathology different to natives. How can this be? And how do you deal with this? This Master’s specialisation focuses on the diversities in youth care. Diversities in the area of ethnicity, religion, gender and social-economic class. You will develop an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care challenges you to look differently at care giving and welfare policies. You will gain specific knowledge and develop a sixth sense on the health care needs of young people. You will broaden your vision. How come fewer immigrants accept (certain forms of) help? How can you make homosexuality a subject of discussion in certain cultures? You will look beyond your own values and differentiate between your own ethical beliefs and cultural values and universal beliefs.
Upon graduating you will be an expert in the area of diversities in youth care. Besides plenty of knowledge, skills and – if you want – experience abroad, you will have a dose of cultural relativism. Why do we do it like that? How could we do it differently? You can use this in your work as remedial educationalist or policy maker. After graduating you will be able to work in and outside of the Netherlands at (development) organisations and institutions in the fields of youth care, education, adoption and refugee relief.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

Why study Diversities in Youth Care at Radboud University?

- You may pick electives from different Master’s programmes like Religious Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Management Science. These electives fit in well with the programme Diversities in Youth Care. More information can be found on the programme outline page.

- There is plenty of opportunity to go abroad for an elective or an internship. Our network includes a university and relief organisations in Bangladesh, foster homes and orphanages in Romania and the Ukraine and schools in several African countries.

- Radboud University has the only education and research institute in the Netherlands within the field of social sciences which specialises in gender and sexuality: Institute for Gender Studies (IGS). This means you will have access to the latest and most relevant research.

- The programme collaborates with the knowledge centre Sekse en Diversiteit in Medisch Onderwijs (SDMO) (i.e. Gender and Diversity in Medical Education) of Radboudumc. We exchange case studies and give one another guest lectures. You will profit from this exchange of knowledge!

Change perspective

This programme will continually challenge you to adjust your point of view. To look beyond your own values. What is the dividing line between your ethical beliefs and those of the other people? And at what point have universal values been seriously affected?
You are taught to look at it from the point of view of a child growing up in poverty, of a homosexual youth, of someone with a Moroccan father and a Dutch mother, of a child living in a reconstituted family or in a family with strong religious beliefs. You are taught to continually look at issues from someone else’s perspective. In other words, to be flexible when it comes to making judgements and having expectations. Changing your perspective is the very core of this programme.

Career prospects

Upon completing this Master’s specialisation, you will be an expert in youth care concerning diverse backgrounds and personal traits. There is a large need for professionals who know how to deal with homosexual immigrants, with children who don’t speak the local language or youths that have been traumatised by war. Such knowledge and experience are gained in this programme. You will have a flexible view of diverse backgrounds and be critical of your own area of expertise. After graduating you will be a remedial educationalist or policy maker with an expertise that organisations are desperately in need of!

Job positions

As a professional in Diversities in Youth Care you can work in and outside of the Netherlands in the area of youth care and development. You can work as a policy maker or researcher in organisations as Unicef, adoption agencies, the EU, local governments or research institutions. You can also work as a remedial educationalist for mental health care organisations, refugee centres or with specific groups of children like refugees or LGBT children.

Our approach to this field

The political and media interest for problems regarding ethnicity, gender and sexuality is huge. How do you deal with it? How do you develop policies? This requires specialist knowledge. Knowledge that goes beyond the borders of a country, a culture and a set of beliefs. The Dutch have a very individualistic approach to happiness while other cultures believe that a happy family unit is more important for one’s own happiness. You will not learn what is wrong and what is right, but how things can be different. This will ensure that the policies you will develop will also be different.

The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care will train you to become a specialised caregiver. The programme focuses on social issues in the area of diversity. You can develop a clinical or policymaking approach within youth care and diversities of youth. After graduating you will have knowledge on the role of different backgrounds. Whether it’s about culture, religion or gender, you will be flexible enough to identify various problems and to judge and treat them from the right perspective.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

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Put yourself at the forefront of this developing discipline by joining a strand of applied psychology only offered at a few universities across the world. Read more
Put yourself at the forefront of this developing discipline by joining a strand of applied psychology only offered at a few universities across the world. Discover and discuss the nature of happiness, what helps people thrive and make a difference to everyday lives.

Positive psychology is life changing. Our course helps you investigate the science behind how we can prepare for more successful lives and better well-being, through challenging existing cognitive and emotional patterns and encouraging positivity with evidence-based activities.

You’ll be introduced to research and interventions around topics like positive and negative emotions, character strengths, motivation, resilience, creativity, wisdom and other conditions shown to make a difference to the lives of individuals, groups and organisations. You'll constantly test your skills and apply them to real-life situations, coming to understand which tools and strategies to use in delivering meaningful, high-impact interventions.

You’ll use your new skills to shape businesses, education and communities. Our wide choice of modules means that, whether you work in coaching, business, education or health, you can tailor your studies to your career goals. Our course will also suit you if you have a BSc in psychology and want to further your knowledge.

Our course is taught in Cambridge and Paris. In Paris, teaching takes place at Centre d’Études Diplomatiques et Stratégiques (CEDS), right in the centre of Paris near the Eiffel Tower. In Cambridge, you’ll also have access to our advanced psychology laboratories.

You’ll complete four intensive week-long modules, followed by online research methods teaching and supervision for your major project. In-between times you’ll undertake self-directed study.

Our tutors are leaders in the field of positive psychology. They include:

‌• Dr Ilona Boniwell, CEO of Positran
‌• Dr Richard Piech, cognitive neuroscientist
‌• Dr Christian van Nieuwerburgh, Managing Director of Growth Coaching
‌• Bridget Grenville-Cleave, Director of WorkMad
‌• Alexandre Jost, head of Spinoza Factory, a happiness think-tank
‌• J‌ean-Christophe Barralis and Jean Pages, directors of the French Institute of Appreciative Inquiry.

For an informal chat about our course please contact programme leaders Richard Piech or Ilona Boniwell.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applied-positive-psychology

Careers

You could find yourself using positive psychology within training, government, an organisation or even in life coaching. You might want to use the sustainable well-being and development skills you gain in the charity, social enterprise or heath sectors. Or you could even use the methods to transform a business or help develop and optimise the potential of a group, community or institution.

If you’re a qualified clinical psychologist, counsellor or psychotherapist, you’ll find positive psychology theory, research and applications will benefit your clinical work. Teachers, youth workers and educators also use positive psychology expertise in their work. You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Psychology PhD.

Modules & Assessment

Optional modules -

‌• Introduction to Positive Psychology (Cambridge or Paris)
‌• Neuroscience of Well-being (Cambridge)
‌• Positive Child Development (Cambridge)
‌• Positive Relationships (Cambridge)
‌• Positive Psychology for Practitioners (Cambridge)
‌• Well-being: Economic, Social and Behavioural Causes (Cambridge)
‌• Positive Performance (Paris)
‌• Positive Psychology Coaching (Paris)
‌• Positive Education (Paris)
‌• Positive Organisations and Appreciative Inquiry (Paris)
‌• Positive Society (Paris)

Core modules -

‌• Research Methods for Psychology (online)
‌• Major Project (online)

Assessment

100% of your assessment will be through coursework. This could include essays, blogs, a reflective portfolio, self-reflective log, handouts, video presentation, mind maps, reports, a research proposal and a major project. You'll also get the chance to carry out an applied project in either a personal or professional setting, to give you experience of how positive psychology can be implemented in practice.

- Module notes
You’ll choose four modules from the list of 12 available across Cambridge and Paris, including one research module (quantitative or qualitative). You'll also complete a major project.

Where you'll study

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/science-and-technology

Where can I study?

Paris - You'll study at Centre d’Études Diplomatiques et Stratégiques (CEDS), near the Eiffel Tower.
http://www.heip.fr/?ceds=true

Cambridge - Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.
http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/cambridge-campus

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This ground-breaking Master’s programme addresses the urban ‘data revolution’ that has transformed our understanding of the associations between ‘built form’ — buildings and how these relate to each other — and happiness, and both mental health and physical health. Read more
This ground-breaking Master’s programme addresses the urban ‘data revolution’ that has transformed our understanding of the associations between ‘built form’ — buildings and how these relate to each other — and happiness, and both mental health and physical health. Urban designers, however, have often struggled to integrate this emerging evidence into their own practice. The principal aim of this Master’s course is to help urban design professionals, civic leaders, developers or investors to better understand this recent research and to apply it to their work.

The course explores ways in which the processes of evidence gathering and community consultation can be integrated successfully into a creative design process – to blend art and science. It will also provide access to a stimulating body of scholarly literature, and to leading researchers and urban thinkers. The course offers a rich exploration of how various research methods can inform better urban design practice. Graduates will learn to be able to assess the quality of research across a range of disciplines, and understand how this evidence is to be interpreted and appropriately applied. Master’s students will achieve improved data literacy (distinguishing, for example, correlation from causation, mediator from moderator) and acquire the skills needed to utilise the insights derived from this research. The course will employ practical case studies to illuminate the process of commissioning and producing reliable and applicable evidence.

The need for applied academic study of these topics is rendered more urgent by the current British demand for a much-increased rate of house building. Given the consistently lower popularity of recently constructed urban space (as compared with most older designs), there is both a desire and a sense of necessity within government and among many involved in urban planning to improve their ability to create urban spaces and buildings that command general support. There is also added pressure to make better policy and planning decisions, reflected in the recent establishment by the UK Government of the ‘What Works Network’ — an initiative to enable government agencies and other organisations to create, share and use high quality evidence for decision-making.

Location of Seminars and Teaching

This programme is London-based and is co-directed by Nicholas Boys Smith, a Senior Research Fellow, director of Create Streets and Government advisor in urban design, Dr Jamie Anderson, a Knowledge Transfer Fellow based at University of Cambridge, and Jonathan Schifferes, an Associate Director at the Royal Society of Arts.

The Seminar Programme

There are ten seminars held in a central London location. Each will feature internationally distinguished scientists, policy-makers, property researchers and urban designers. The seminars will be held in the early evenings to permit the enrolment of working professionals, and each will be followed by a question session and a working dinner, for those who wish to attend, where there is an opportunity to continue the seminar discussion in an informal environment. Tutorials and meetings with supervisors will take place at the University of Buckingham’s London offices in Bloomsbury: 51 Gower Street, London, WC1E 6HJ.

In addition to the Course Directors, confirmed lecturers include Sir Anthony Seldon (Vice-Chancellor of the University of Buckingham and co-founder of Action for Happiness); Dr David Halpern (Chief Executive of the Behavioural Insights Team – founded by the Cabinet Office and better known as ‘The Nudge Unit’); Professor Yolande Barnes (Director of World Research at Savills and visiting professor at UCL); Professor Philip Steadman (UCL Energy Institute); Dr Kai Ruggeri (Affiliated Lecturer in Psychology, Director of Studies, Corpus Christi, Cambridge and Director of the Policy Research Group); and David Rudlin (Director of URBED and winner of the Wolfson Economic Prize).

The seminar programme will run from October to spring in the course of the academic year. Click on “Teaching & Assessment” for the seminar dates.

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Our Psychology Department is one of the top 10 psychology departments in the UK (REF 2014). You will be taught by a dynamic group of world-class psychologists whose areas of expertise span a broad range, including researchers and practitioners. Read more
Our Psychology Department is one of the top 10 psychology departments in the UK (REF 2014). You will be taught by a dynamic group of world-class psychologists whose areas of expertise span a broad range, including researchers and practitioners. We provide high quality supervision and teaching, and you will benefit from the friendly and supportive atmosphere in the Department, as evidenced by student feedback available on our website.

This MSc course will equip you with knowledge of cutting-edge developments and issues in applied social psychology, as well as an array of analytical, methodological and communication skills, important for those progressing to a PhD as well as for those looking for jobs in applied settings in commercial and governmental organizations.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/psychology/coursefinder/mscappliedsocialpsychology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- Our Department ranks among the best in the UK for research (rating in the top ten in the UK in the 2014 REF) and teaching (highest rating ‘excellent’ for teaching quality).

- You will develop an enhanced understanding of the subject area through an exciting mix of seminars, lectures and research conveyed by our friendly and accessible staff, who are all involved in cutting edge research.

- You will benefit from high quality lectures that combine theory, research, and application, providing you with insight into topical issues and the latest research in applied social psychology.

- Some of the lectures are delivered by applied psychologists in the field, providing you with insights into the real jobs that await our graduates.

- You will have the opportunity to complete an innovative research project under the supervision of a leading academic in the relevant field.

Department research and industry highlights

Example research projects of our academic staff:
- Wrath of God: Religious primes and punishment.
- Can values reduce prejudice against Muslims even when national identification is high?
- Monetary donations following humanitarian disasters.
- Recalling and recognizing faces of other-races: A behavioural and eye movement study.

Example relations with the industry:
- Laureus Sport for Good Foundation; developing an assessment tool on well-being of youth.
- Relations with care homes helping patients with Multiple Sclerosis.
- Hospitals for a clinical trial test and intervention to help people with back pain.

Course content and structure

You will study seven core units, including the Social Research Project:

Core course units:
Psychology in Applied Settings
In this unit you will:
- develop an enhanced understanding of the link between research and practice

- be equipped with research skills relevant to research in applied settings and implementation of research findings in the practice of psychologists

- participate in specialist seminars on applied psychology topics such as forensic and educational psychology

- take part in interactive discussions of all relevant issues guided by the tutor taking any given session.

- Multicultural Existence
This unit will introduce you to the social psychology of multicultural existence and familiarise you with existing theories and current research on this topic. You will be trained to apply your knowledge to the analysis of real-life examples of multicultural existence.

- Adjustment and Well-Being
This course will introduce you to theory, empirical findings, and applications regarding adjustment and well-being (happiness and self-fulfillment).

- Advanced Techniques in Social and Behavioural Research
You will explore many of the key research techniques that are used in social, health, and developmental research. You will develop an advanced understanding of current techniques within these areas and how to employ these techniques, and be able to evaluate and critique them.

- Social Research Project
You will be provided with the possibility to carry out an original piece of research on a topic of your interest within the broad area of applied and social psychology. You will be given the necessary support during the conception, conduct and writing up of your research

- Topics in Psychological Science
The aim of the unit is to stimulate an interest in topical research findings from a wide range of research areas relevant to psychology. You will develop the skills of presentation, evaluation, interpretation and discussion of original research findings.

- Statistics for Research
You will be provided with an overview and basic understanding of advanced statistical methods used in psychology and neuroscience research, including hands-on experience applying these methods to specific problems. The unit will provide a methodological foundation if you wish to pursue research in disciplines allied to the MSc course.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge of social psychology and its application
- strong research skills in social and applied psychology
- experience in transferable skills that are highly sought after in the job market, such as oral presentations, oral and written communication, and project planning.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, different types of presentations, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different psychology-related areas, including careers in human relations and organizational psychology. Our graduates are currently working for organizations such as community associations, NGO’s, organizational psychology firms, and consultancy firms. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Are you interested in the field of Philosophy? Do you want the opportunity to study the subject at a postgraduate level and pursue areas which interest you the most?. Read more
Are you interested in the field of Philosophy? Do you want the opportunity to study the subject at a postgraduate level and pursue areas which interest you the most?

On our MA Philosophy programme you will be able to choose from a variety of modules covering key areas in Philosophy. These include: philosophy of mind and cognitive science; ethics, metaethics and global ethics; epistemology and metaphysics; philosophy of language; and philosophy of health and happiness. You will be taught by a vibrant community of philosophers, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics on which expert supervision is available. This programme can also be used as a route into PhD research.

Taught by experts – You will study alongside some of the finest minds in Philosophy. We are ranked second among all Philosophy departments in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.

Friendly and relaxed atmosphere – Staff within the Department of Philosophy are very approachable and happy to offer additional advice on academic performance.

Small classes – teaching on the masters-level modules involve mainly small-group seminars allowing you to really get to grips with the learning material.

Be a part of an active postgraduate community – you will join a lively and stimulating Department where you can contribute to on-going research activities, including research seminars and events such as our weekly speaker series and various workshops, reading groups and conferences throughout the year.

Access to a wide range of services – as a postgraduate student you will have access to services such as the Academic Writing Advisory Service and the Bank of Assessed Work which will aid your transition from undergraduate to postgraduate level, or back into academia after a time away.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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People are the most valuable asset of any company and now, more than ever, organizations are committed to the happiness and retention of great employees. Read more
People are the most valuable asset of any company and now, more than ever, organizations are committed to the happiness and retention of great employees. The Human Resources Management major focuses on managing people from a social, cultural and political point of view while developing your management skills in the area. You will learn the methods of effective talent scouting and management, as well as the trends and techniques necessary to build a top-notch team of business professionals.

Program

Graduates of this program deliver added value to core stakeholders in a business world where management has to focus heavily on its most important asset: its people.

Term I
MCO 101 - Management Skills
MCO 102 - Organizational Behavior
MCO 103 - Managerial Accounting
MCO 104 - Marketing
MCO 105 - Quantitative Business Methods
MCO 106 - Negotiation (seminar)
MCO 107 - Business Law (seminar)
MCO 108 - Personal & Professional Development

Term II
MCO 201 - Finance
MCO 202 - Human Resources Management
MCO 203 - Global Economics
MCO 204 - Strategic Management
MCO 205 - Management Information Systems
MCO 206 - Business Strategy Simulation
MCO 207 - Job Career Planning (seminar)
MCO 208 - Communication Skills (seminar)
MCO 209 - Personal & Professional Development

Term III
MHR 301 - International Human Resources Management
MHR 302 - HR Development & Training
MHR 303 - Communication & Negotiation in Employee Relations
MHR 304 - People Management
MHR 305 - HR Workshops

Faculty

EU Business School faculty members are leading innovators who work both inside and outside of the classroom to guide our business students’ education.

EU’s high-caliber faculty is made up of full-time academics with doctoral degrees as well as part-time instructors who are also current members of the international professional community. Our faculty members possess experience as entrepreneurs, consultants and business leaders. This combination of the academic and business worlds supports a unique and exceptional quality of learning.

Employability

Graduates with an MBA in Human Resources Management go on to become heads of HR and managers for global companies, as well as independent advisors in the highly lucrative field of consultancy.

Read less
People are the most valuable asset of any company and now, more than ever, organizations are committed to the happiness and retention of great employees. Read more
People are the most valuable asset of any company and now, more than ever, organizations are committed to the happiness and retention of great employees. The Human Resources Management major focuses on managing people from a social, cultural and political point of view while developing your management skills in the area. You will learn the methods of effective talent scouting and management, as well as the trends and techniques necessary to build a top-notch team of business professionals.

Program

Graduates of this program deliver added value to core stakeholders in a business world where management has to focus heavily on its most important asset: its people.

Term I
MCO 101 - Management Skills
MCO 102 - Organizational Behavior
MCO 103 - Managerial Accounting
MCO 104 - Marketing
MCO 105 - Quantitative Business Methods
MCO 106 - Negotiation (seminar)
MCO 107 - Business Law (seminar)
MCO 108 - Personal & Professional Development

Term II
MCO 201 - Finance
MCO 202 - Human Resources Management
MCO 203 - Global Economics
MCO 204 - Strategic Management
MCO 205 - Management Information Systems
MCO 206 - Business Strategy Simulation
MCO 207 - Job Career Planning (seminar)
MCO 208 - Communication Skills (seminar)
MCO 209 - Personal & Professional Development

Term III
MHR 301 - International Human Resources Management
MHR 302 - HR Development & Training
MHR 303 - Communication & Negotiation in Employee Relations
MHR 304 - People Management
MHR 305 - HR Workshops

Faculty

EU Business School faculty members are leading innovators who work both inside and outside of the classroom to guide our business students’ education.

EU’s high-caliber faculty is made up of full-time academics with doctoral degrees as well as part-time instructors who are also current members of the international professional community. Our faculty members possess experience as entrepreneurs, consultants and business leaders. This combination of the academic and business worlds supports a unique and exceptional quality of learning.

Employability

Graduates with an MBA in Human Resources Management go on to become heads of HR and managers for global companies, as well as independent advisors in the highly lucrative field of consultancy.

Read less
People are the most valuable asset of any company and now, more than ever, organizations are committed to the happiness and retention of great employees. Read more
People are the most valuable asset of any company and now, more than ever, organizations are committed to the happiness and retention of great employees. The Human Resources Management major focuses on managing people from a social, cultural and political point of view while developing your management skills in the area. You will learn the methods of effective talent scouting and management, as well as the trends and techniques necessary to build a top-notch team of business professionals.

Program

Graduates of this program deliver added value to core stakeholders in a business world where management has to focus heavily on its most important asset: its people.

Term I
MCO 101 - Management Skills
MCO 102 - Organizational Behavior
MCO 103 - Managerial Accounting
MCO 104 - Marketing
MCO 105 - Quantitative Business Methods
MCO 106 - Negotiation (seminar)
MCO 107 - Business Law (seminar)
MCO 108 - Personal & Professional Development

Term II
MCO 201 - Finance
MCO 202 - Human Resources Management
MCO 203 - Global Economics
MCO 204 - Strategic Management
MCO 205 - Management Information Systems
MCO 206 - Business Strategy Simulation
MCO 207 - Job Career Planning (seminar)
MCO 208 - Communication Skills (seminar)
MCO 209 - Personal & Professional Development

Term III
MHR 301 - International Human Resources Management
MHR 302 - HR Development & Training
MHR 303 - Communication & Negotiation in Employee Relations
MHR 304 - People Management
MHR 305 - HR Workshops

Faculty

EU Business School faculty members are leading innovators who work both inside and outside of the classroom to guide our business students’ education.

EU’s high-caliber faculty is made up of full-time academics with doctoral degrees as well as part-time instructors who are also current members of the international professional community. Our faculty members possess experience as entrepreneurs, consultants and business leaders. This combination of the academic and business worlds supports a unique and exceptional quality of learning.

Employability

Graduates with an MBA in Human Resources Management go on to become heads of HR and managers for global companies, as well as independent advisors in the highly lucrative field of consultancy.

Read less
In the Master's programme History of Politics and Society you will learn how to use historical insights into the functioning of democracy, citizenship and the market to solve current-day problems. Read more

What does this Master entail?

In the Master's programme History of Politics and Society you will learn how to use historical insights into the functioning of democracy, citizenship and the market to solve current-day problems.

Use historical insights to solve present-day issues
Have you wondered how some societies manage to achieve wealth, security, justice, and freedom – and eventual happiness – while others do not? What role do citizenship, democracy, and the organisation of the market play in this process? Why do you think it is so difficult to avoid negative effects such as social polarisation and environmental damage?

History and origins of institutions
These are the core questions addressed in our Master’s programme in History of Politics and Society. The central theme is the concept of ‘institutions’, in the broadest sense of the word: the formal and informal rules, customs, and organisational structures that make up a society, but are themselves the result of a historical development process. As such, this programme is closely related to Institutions, one of Utrecht University’s strategic international research themes.

In this programme, you will study the history and origins of institutions over the past 1,000 years. The emphasis is mainly on Europe in the modern age, but emphatically placed within a broader perspective, as the programme also pays attention to other eras and other parts of the world. You will combine your historical knowledge and academic skills with concepts from the social sciences. You will learn how to use comparative research methods, and methods for long-term analysis. You will develop the tools to contribute, as a historian, to the solution of contemporary problems.

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The MPhil in European, Latin American and Comparative Literatures and Cultures provides you with the critical and theoretical tools to enable you to undertake in-depth study of specific aspects of European literature and culture or Latin American and Francophone contexts. Read more
The MPhil in European, Latin American and Comparative Literatures and Cultures provides you with the critical and theoretical tools to enable you to undertake in-depth study of specific aspects of European literature and culture or Latin American and Francophone contexts.

The course introduces you to a broad range of critical theory concepts and allows you to write a short thesis. Students take three taught courses consisting of lectures and seminars, one of which is a core course in critical theory.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mmmmmpelc

Course detail

During Lent term, students take two modules chosen from a range of module options. Two modules are run in conjunction with the MPhil in Latin American Studies, one of which is a module on Latin American Film. It is also possible to borrow modules from the MPhil in Screen Media and Cultures, and the MPhil in English Studies: Criticism and Culture, run by the Faculty of English.

Although not all students may wish to progress to higher research, this MPhil programme is designed to prepare students for continuation to PhD work. This preparation includes the academic and research training provided by the course content itself but also advice and support with PhD applications, funding applications and the drafting of a research proposal.

The Medieval and Early Modern pathway is aimed at students who wish to specialize in subjects linked to Medieval and/or Early Modern studies. The course offers tailored training to students working in this field, providing theoretical and practical tools to read, understand and work on pre-modern sources. The pathway is a flexible structure that can be adjusted to particular needs and interests offering a wide range of approaches to a variety of texts and historical contexts. This course is particularly suited to students wishing to pursue their graduate studies further and work on a PhD in Medieval and/or Early Modern studies. Students interested will have to register to the pathway at the beginning of the academic year.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme students will have:

1. developed a knowledge of critical theory and an ability to work with theory or specific critical approaches;
2. developed a deeper knowledge of one or more areas of European Literature & Culture and of the critical debates within that (or those) area(s);
3. developed more advanced critical judgement and sensitivity to literary texts;
4. demonstrated advanced skills in literary analysis;
5. developed intellectual and practical research skills;
6. presented their own ideas in a public forum.

Format

The EuroLit MPhil is a nine-month course that runs from October to June of any given academic year. It is classified as a research Master's. Students are expected to submit coursework and a thesis during the year, as follows:

Michaelmas Term: Core Course

During the first term of study, students attend weekly lectures and mini-seminars designed to give them a broad insight into European literature and culture. At the end of this term, they submit one 4,500-word essay. The essay focuses on a specific theoretical framework or critical approach. Additionally those following the early modern and medieval pathway may submit a paleography exercise as assessment for this course. Two hours of individual supervision are provided.

Lent Term: Modules

Students can choose from a range of module options. Some are shared with different MPhils (e.g. Screen Media and Cultures) and other Departments and Faculties within the University, such as Latin American Studies. (The list of modules can change from year to year depending on the availability of academic staff.)

During Lent Term, students attend weekly group seminars led by the module covenor, lasting around 1.5 to 2 hours per week per module. In addition, two hours of individual supervision (per essay) will be provided as students draft their module essays. Essays are submitted at the end of Lent Term.

Examples of modules

- Modern and Contemporary French and Francophone Culture: Articulations of the Real
- Searching for Happiness
- Identity and hybridity in Arthurian romance
- The alterity of medieval literature
- The Enlightenment and its Critics: from Kant to Foucault
- Memory and Subjectivity in the German Novel
- History of the Book, 1450-1650
- The Modern City
- Marginalities in Nineteenth-Century European Culture
- Europe and the Renaissance
- New Commitments: Literature, Cinema and Culture in Italy 1960 - present
- Dante: Medieval and Modern
- Women Writers in Early Modern Italy
- The Culture of East Slavic Lands from Rus to the Battle of Poltava
- Literature and Nationalism in Russia and Eastern Europe
- Revolutionising Body and Mind in Early Twentieth-Century Russia
- Al-Andalus and España: Translatio and Tolerance
- Golden Age Literature and Culture: The Baroque Marvel
- Iberian Voices
- The Consolidation and Crisis of Representation in Ibero-American Literature
- Latin American Literary Culture
- Latin American Film and Visual Arts

Assessment - Easter Term

During this term, students write a thesis. Theses must, according to the criteria laid down by the Board of Graduate Studies, 'represent a contribution to learning'. Theses must be written in English. The arrangements for their preparation are similar to those for the essays. Titles are chosen by students, in consultation with module convenors and/or prospective supervisors, and then have to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee.

Topics and precise thesis titles must be submitted by a specific deadline in Lent Term. Up to this point the Course Director is the titular supervisor of MPhil students, but once the thesis topics are approved, a specialist supervisor is appointed for each student. Students are entitled to up to four hour-long sessions with their supervisor. (In the event that a thesis is co-supervised, a candidate may expect two hours of individual teaching from each supervisor. Only one supervisor should comment on the full draft of the thesis.)

Continuing

For those applying to continue from the MPhil to PhD, the minimum academic standard is a distinction on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This programme is aimed at students interested in making a change to society, environment and economy with a background in politics, sociology, environmental sciences, biology, mathematics or economics. Read more

MSc in Sustainable Development

This programme is aimed at students interested in making a change to society, environment and economy with a background in politics, sociology, environmental sciences, biology, mathematics or economics.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development have been growing very rapidly. The original MSc programme started with nine students in the 2009-2010 academic year and currently 30 students are registered. On this programme you attend an average number of 24 lectures lasting for three hours each in Semester 1 and an additional 15 lectures in Semester 2. There are also a number of tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. There is also a dissertation conference where you can present your research findings before you submit your dissertation.

The double MSc in Sustainable Energy takes place in both St Andrews and Moscow. The first year involves taking similar modules in the one-year programme at St Andrews with a more specific focus on energy issues. The second year challenges students to complete study abroad on a wide range of energy modules.

Sustainable Development students are extremely well catered for in several aspects. Firstly, you have the use of a dedicated postgraduate space in the Observatory. There are ports for physical laptop internet access. The room is also served by high speed WiFi connections. You have access to the room on a 24/7 basis. It offers a location for group or individual work, classes, events, receptions and even relaxation. The building is primarily for the use of Sustainable Development postgraduate students. Secondly, you have a close relationship with staff on the course. Class sizes are limited to provide a one-to-one service for students. This is a unique aspect of undertaking Sustainable Development research and teaching at St Andrews. Thirdly, the interdisciplinary nature of Sustainable Development allows you to interact with a wide range of students in other disciplines. This allows for the creation of an extended group of student and staff contacts. Fourthly, Sustainable Development students have the benefit of a number of targeted field trips, including the Glen Tanar estate trip, pictured opposite, where students reflect on issues from ecology to landownership.

The University is working with a range of key stakeholders to promote sustainable development across the higher education sector. As an active member of the Environmental Association for Universities and Colleges (EAUC) the University shares learning across the higher education and further education sector.

Why does sustainable development matter?

Humanity faces enormous environmental and developmental challenges in the twenty-first century. The United Nations has identified five global issues of particular concern: the provision of clean water and adequate sanitation, energy generation and supply, human health, food production and distribution, and the continuing threat to biodiversity.

Sustainable development is now widely regarded as the most promising framework within which these challenges can be addressed, moving humanity towards the creation of a more just and environmentally sustainable ‘global village’.

There is no single description of what sustainable development means, but one commonly used definition can be found in the 1987 Brundtland Report: “Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunity, as people are working together across the globe to address the serious challenges facing humankind. We must learn to live within environmental limits and embrace sustainability as the key concept that will allow us to develop in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Our postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development, co-ordinated by the School of Geography & Geosciences, will enable you to develop the knowledge and understanding you need, not only to understand all these issues from multiple perspectives but also to utilise the knowledge you gain to tackle them and realise the opportunities they create.

Transition University of St Andrews

Transition University of St Andrews was launched in 2009 and is part of the UK-based Transition initiative, which has been expanding worldwide over the last five years. Transition operates within community groups on a grassroots level, founded and operated by the communities themselves, in response to the threats of climate change and peak oil. Through working on practical projects with different community groups, the initiative helps communities minimise their impact on the planet, become more self-sustaining, and strengthens community ties. It also benefits individuals by developing their skills and encouraging re-consideration of
the aspects of life that truly promote happiness and wellbeing. A number of MSc students in Sustainable Development have participated in Transition’s activities which complement a number of themes pursued in our programmes.

Careers

Your question should not be “What can I do with a degree in Sustainable Development?” but instead “Can you imagine a future where it could not be useful?” Sustainability impacts upon almost all aspects of life, so your future career could take you in one of many different directions. For example, you could:
• Work in industry addressing sustainability aspects of business management, engineering, planning, transport, project management, construction, waste, energy or environmental management.

• Make yourself heard as a sustainability researcher or policy adviser in local, regional or national government, NGOs and campaigning groups.

• Act as an adviser to supra-national bodies such as the United Nations, World Bank, European Union, and the OECD.

• Become a sustainability adviser and assessor working directly in private sector organisations, industry or as a consultant (in both mainstream and specialist businesses).

• Help others directly through development or aid work.

• Spread the word by outreach and education in sustainable living via public or third sector organisations (e.g. Councils or NGOs).

• Stay at university for a PhD, perhaps eventually going on to a teaching or research career.

• Recent graduates now work at: UNDP; the World Bank; Christian Aid in Africa; LCI consultancy; and at a global bank in Dubai.

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This programme is aimed at those looking to pursue further research in sustainable development or develop their research skills within an employment context. Read more

MRes in Sustainable Development

This programme is aimed at those looking to pursue further research in sustainable development or develop their research skills within an employment context.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development have been growing very rapidly. The original MSc programme started with nine students in the 2009-2010 academic year and currently 30 students are registered. On this programme you attend an average number of 24 lectures lasting for three hours each in Semester 1 and an additional 15 lectures in Semester 2. There are also a number of tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. There is also a dissertation conference where you can present your research findings before you submit your dissertation.

The double MSc in Sustainable Energy takes place in both St Andrews and Moscow. The first year involves taking similar modules in the one-year programme at St Andrews with a more specific focus on energy issues. The second year challenges students to complete study abroad on a wide range of energy modules.

Sustainable Development students are extremely well catered for in several aspects. Firstly, you have the use of a dedicated postgraduate space in the Observatory. There are ports for physical laptop internet access. The room is also served by high speed WiFi connections. You have access to the room on a 24/7 basis. It offers a location for group or individual work, classes, events, receptions and even relaxation. The building is primarily for the use of Sustainable Development postgraduate students. Secondly, you have a close relationship with staff on the course. Class sizes are limited to provide a one-to-one service for students. This is a unique aspect of undertaking Sustainable Development research and teaching at St Andrews. Thirdly, the interdisciplinary nature of Sustainable Development allows you to interact with a wide range of students in other disciplines. This allows for the creation of an extended group of student and staff contacts. Fourthly, Sustainable Development students have the benefit of a number of targeted field trips, including the Glen Tanar estate trip, pictured opposite, where students reflect on issues from ecology to landownership.

St Andrews is Scotland’s first university and the third oldest in the English speaking world, founded in 1413. As well as celebrating its long history, the University of St Andrews embraces its responsibilities for the future, by placing sustainable development at the heart of its operations along four integrated fronts: governance, teaching, research and sustainable estates management. The idea is to integrate sustainability into day-to-day thinking and decision-making processes of the University. New buildings and major refurbishments of existing buildings are being designed to meet strict environmental standards. The £1.7m SALIX energy fund is helping us to achieve this. The dedicated Estates Environment Team of professionals works closely with Schools and Units to raise awareness and understanding of operational sustainability issues.

The University is working with a range of key stakeholders to promote sustainable development across the higher education sector. As an active member of the Environmental Association for Universities and Colleges (EAUC) the University shares learning across the higher education and further education sector.

Why does sustainable development matter?

Humanity faces enormous environmental and developmental challenges in the twenty-first century. The United Nations has identified five global issues of particular concern: the provision of clean water and adequate sanitation, energy generation and supply, human health, food production and distribution, and the continuing threat to biodiversity.

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunity, as people are working together across the globe to address the serious challenges facing humankind. We must learn to live within environmental limits and embrace sustainability as the key concept that will allow us to develop in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Our postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development, co-ordinated by the School of Geography & Geosciences, will enable you to develop the knowledge and understanding you need, not only to understand all these issues from multiple perspectives but also to utilise the knowledge you gain to tackle them and realise the opportunities they create.

Transition University of St Andrews

Transition University of St Andrews was launched in 2009 and is part of the UK-based Transition initiative, which has been expanding worldwide over the last five years. Transition operates within community groups on a grassroots level, founded and operated by the communities themselves, in response to the threats of climate change and peak oil. Through working on practical projects with different community groups, the initiative helps communities minimise their impact on the planet, become more self-sustaining, and strengthens community ties. It also benefits individuals by developing their skills and encouraging re-consideration of
the aspects of life that truly promote happiness and wellbeing. A number of MSc students in Sustainable Development have participated in Transition’s activities which complement a number of themes pursued in our programmes.

Careers

Your question should not be “What can I do with a degree in Sustainable Development?” but instead “Can you imagine a future where it could not be useful?” Sustainability impacts upon almost all aspects of life, so your future career could take you in one of many different directions. For example, you could:
• Work in industry addressing sustainability aspects of business management, engineering, planning, transport, project management, construction, waste, energy or environmental management.

• Make yourself heard as a sustainability researcher or policy adviser in local, regional or national government, NGOs and campaigning groups.

• Act as an adviser to supra-national bodies such as the United Nations, World Bank, European Union, and the OECD.

• Become a sustainability adviser and assessor working directly in private sector organisations, industry or as a consultant (in both mainstream and specialist businesses).

• Spread the word by outreach and education in sustainable living via public or third sector organisations (e.g. Councils or NGOs).

• Stay at university for a PhD, perhaps eventually going on to a teaching or research career.

• Recent graduates now work at: UNDP; the World Bank; Christian Aid in Africa; LCI consultancy; and at a global bank in Dubai.

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