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The MSc in Group Processes and Intergroup Relations is a specialist version of our existing MSc in Social and Applied Psychology that focuses on social psychological theory and research in intergroup and group behaviour. Read more
The MSc in Group Processes and Intergroup Relations is a specialist version of our existing MSc in Social and Applied Psychology that focuses on social psychological theory and research in intergroup and group behaviour.

Group processes and intergroup relations have become an increasingly central part of the discipline of social psychology, addressing issues of prejudice, discrimination, conflict reduction, persuasion and social influence, power, group decision making and ethnic loyalty.

This programme explores major and current research covering issues such as intergroup contact, social and cognitive processes underlying prejudice, discrimination, collective protest, group decision-making, leadership and group performance. Suitable students are encouraged to go on to register for PhD degrees.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/70/group-processes-and-intergroup-relations

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our long-established international reputation in social psychology is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP802 - Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology Part 1 (20 credits)
SP813 - Advanced Topics in Intergroup Relations (20 credits)
SP844 - Advanced Topics in Group Processes (20 credits)
SP998 - Advanced Research Project in Psychology (60 credits)
SP852 - Developmental Psychology in Professional Practice (20 credits)
SP853 - The Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony (20 credits)
SP817 - Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology II :Applications (20 credits)
SP842 - Advanced Developmental Social Psychology (20 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4-6,000-word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology module only), plus the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for the advanced study of group and intergroup processes, with particular emphasis on the context of social psychological theory, different analytical perspectives in social psychological theory, different ways of applying social psychological theory, and the methodological advantages and disadvantages of social psychological investigation

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as social psychologists

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Professional recognition

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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The own-group biases are indicated by superior recognition for faces of one’s own group relative to another group. These groups include ethnicity (Meissner & Brigham, 2001), gender (Wright & Sladden, 2001), age (Anastasi & Rhodes, 2007), and even university (Hugenberg, Millar, & Claypool, 2008). Read more
The own-group biases are indicated by superior recognition for faces of one’s own group relative to another group. These groups include ethnicity (Meissner & Brigham, 2001), gender (Wright & Sladden, 2001), age (Anastasi & Rhodes, 2007), and even university (Hugenberg, Millar, & Claypool, 2008). There are two broad theories explaining these biases: socio-cognitive motivational theories (Sporer, 2001) and perceptual theories (Valentine & Endo, 2002). Eye-tracking has been used to find evidence for both theories but using different groups thereby making any general conclusions about the own-group biases impossible. Evidence suggests that ethnicity determines how faces are viewed (Caldara et al., 2010; Hills, Cooper, & Pake, 2013). However, Hills & Willis (2016) and Man & Hills (in press) have found that people view own- and other-age and gender faces differently. This, therefore, suggests that these biases may be based on different mechanisms.

The proposed study will employ eye-tracking to explore four own-group biases described above using within-participant designs in order to rule out confounding variables and participant effects. Participants view 40 faces (half inverted to measure the face-inversion effect, Yin, 1969) and after a delay view 80 faces (half new) in a standard old/new recognition paradigm, repeated for each type of face.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24 July 2017.

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Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows. Read more
Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows.

We make every attempt to allocate you to a supervisor directly in your field of interest, consistent with available funding and staff loading. When you apply, please give specific indications of your research interest – including, where appropriate, the member(s) of staff you wish to work with – and whether you are applying for a studentship or propose to be self-funded.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/18/chemistry

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Research areas

- Applied Optics Group (AOG):

Optical sensors
This activity largely covers research into the fundamental properties of guided wave interferometers, and their application in fields ranging from monitoring bridge structures to diagnostic procedures in medicine.

Biomedical imaging/Optical coherence tomography (OCT)
OCT is a relatively new technique which can provide very high-resolution images of tissue, and which has a major application in imaging the human eye. We are investigating different time domain and spectral domain OCT configurations.

The Group is developing systems in collaboration with a variety of different national and international institutions to extend the OCT capabilities from systems dedicated to eye imaging to systems for endoscopy, imaging skin and tooth caries. Distinctively, the OCT systems developed at Kent can provide both transverse and longitudinal images from the tissue, along with a confocal image, useful in associating the easy to interpret en-face view with the more traditional OCT cross section views.

The Group also conducts research on coherence gated wavefront sensors and multiple path interferometry, that extend the hardware technology of OCT to imaging with reduced aberrations and to sensing applications of optical time domain reflectometry.

- Forensic Imaging Group (FIG):

The research of the forensic imaging team is primarily applied, focusing on mathematical and computational techniques and employing a wide variety of image processing and analysis methods for applications in modern forensic science. The Group has attracted approximately £850,000 of research funding in the last five years, from several academic, industrial and commercial organisations in the UK and the US. The Group also collaborates closely with the Forensic Psychology Group of the Open University.

Current active research projects include:

- the development of high-quality, fast facial composite systems based on evolutionary algorithms and statistical models of human facial appearance

- interactive, evolutionary search methods and evolutionary design

- statistically rigorous ageing of photo-quality images of the human face (for tracing and identifying missing persons)

- real and pseudo 3D models for modelling and analysis of the human face

- generating ‘mathematically fair’ virtual line-ups for suspect identification.

- Functional Materials Group (FMG):
The research in FMG is concerned with synthesis and characterisation of functional materials, as exemplified by materials with useful optical, catalytic, or electronic properties, and with an
emerging theme in biomaterials. The Group also uses computer modelling studies to augment
experimental work. The research covers the following main areas:

- Amorphous and nanostructured solids
- Soft functional material
- Theory and modelling of materials

- Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science (CAPS):
The group’s research focuses on observational and modelling programmes in star formation, planetary science and early solar system bodies, galactic astronomy and astrobiology. We gain data from the largest telescopes in the world and in space, such as ESO’s Very Large Telescope, the New Technology Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory. We also use our in-house facilities which include a two-stage light gas gun for impact studies.

Staff are involved in a wide range of international collaborative research projects. Areas of particular interest include: star formation, extragalactic astronomy, solar system science and instrumentation development.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Students are able to pursue a particular area of research interest as part of their dissertation project. Fundamental issues in health professional education are addressed and a range of options in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and the Faculty of Education are offered. Read more

Introduction

Students are able to pursue a particular area of research interest as part of their dissertation project.

Course description, features and facilities

Fundamental issues in health professional education are addressed and a range of options in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and the Faculty of Education are offered.

Structure

Key to availability of units:
S1 = Semester 1; S2 = Semester 2; S3 = summer teaching period; N/A = not available in 2015;
NS = non-standard teaching period; OS = offshore teaching period; * = to be advised

All units have a value of six points unless otherwise stated.

Note: Units that are indicated as N/A may be available in 2016 or 2017.

Take unit(s) to a value 30 points from Group A and unit(s) to a value of 24 points from Group C;

or

take unit(s) to a value 24 points from Group A and unit(s) to a value of 6 points from Group B and unit(s) to a value of 24 points from Group C;

or

take unit(s) to a value of 18 points from Group A and unit(s) to a value of 12 points from Group B and unit(s) to a value of 24 points from Group C.

Take all units (18 points):

S1, S2 IMED5801 Principles of Teaching and Learning
S1 IMED5802 Principles of Assessment and Evaluation
S1, S2 IMED5803 Introduction to Research in Health Professions Education

Group A

S1, S2 IMED5804 Clinical Teaching and Supervision
S2 IMED5805 Innovation and Contemporary Issues in Health Professions Education
S2 IMED5806 Simulation and Interprofessional Learning in Health Professions Education
N/A IMED5810 Program Evaluation
S1 IMED5811 Professional Portfolio
N/A IMED5831 Advanced Simulation in Health Professional Education
N/A IMED5832 Interprofessional Education

Group B

S1 EDUC5610 Human Resource Development in Education
S2, OS EDUC5612 Leadership for Learning
S2 EDUC5618 Teaching and Learning with ICTs
NS, OS EDUC5633 Quantitative Inquiry
S2, OS EDUC5634 Qualitative Inquiry
S2, OS EDUC5678 Improving Learning and Teaching in the Curriculum
S2 MGMT5508 Organisational Behaviour and Leadership
NS PUBH5801 Economic Evaluation of Health Care
NS RMED4403 Health Program Evaluation

Group C

S1, S2 IMED5812 Dissertation (full-time) (24 points)

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The MSc in Intelligent Robotics will provide the opportunity to learn about the growing area of mobile and autonomous robotics, and intelligent systems. Read more
The MSc in Intelligent Robotics will provide the opportunity to learn about the growing area of mobile and autonomous robotics, and intelligent systems. You will gain experience in an exciting wide range of topics, providing you hands-on experience. You will learn about the development of embedded control systems for robots, intelligent algorithms and their application to robotics, communications and systems programming, all with a focus on the practical implementation, both in hardware and simulation. The MSc culminates in a large group project focussed on collective robotic systems, ranging from ground-based units to flying robots. You will have the opportunity to work in a state of the art, dedicated, robotics laboratory for some of your modules and your final project, see the York Robotics Laboratory website for more details on the lab.

The MSc is intended for students who want to learn about robotic and autonomous systems for employment in related industries, or who are seeking a route into a PhD.

The broad aims of the course are to provide:
-A thorough grounding in the use of scientific and engineering techniques as applied to intelligent robotic systems
-A detailed knowledge of the development and deployment of intelligent robotic systems
-A detailed knowledge of the latest developments in intelligent robotics and an ability to reflect critically on those developments
-A detailed understanding of engineering collective robotic systems with emergent behaviours
-Experience of undertaking a substantial group project, on a subject related to research in autonomous robotic systems

Group Project

The aim of this substantial group project is to immerse the students in a life-like scenario of a group of engineers developing a large scale collective robotic system. The project will involve the design, construction and implementation of the control of a heterogeneous collective robotic system, providing students with practical experience of project management and team skills. The system will include both software (such as individual and collective robotic control, low-level programming) and hardware (such as hardware design or customisation) components. The project will culminate in the design and realisation of a collective robotic system that will undergo various test scenarios in the robotics laboratory.

The project preparation will begin towards the end of the Autumn term when groups will be develop a Quality Assurance manual, that will prepare the students to establish effective group policies, procedures and roles for group members, introducing the Quality Assurance processes applied to medium to large projects in industry. The group will be given a scenario and begin establishing requirements and develop outline designs.

In the Summer term, the project will get under way. Groups of 4-6 students will be formed, assigned a target system to design, and provided with a budget. In this term, the students will prepare a design document that will be followed for the remainder of the project. Detailed system specifications will be established and initial prototypes developed. You will make full use of the Robotics Laboratory and spend the vast majority of your time working on robotic systems and attempting to develop an innovative solution to the problem given. Full technical support is available in the laboratory.

A final presentation of each group is done in September where live demos of the system developed have to be provided. This is combined with a group presentation on the work undertaken and contributions made by each individual. Group documentation is submitted along with an individual report.

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The School of Engineering and Digital Arts offers research-led degrees in a wide range of research disciplines, related to Electronic, Control and Information Engineering, in a highly stimulating academic environment. Read more
The School of Engineering and Digital Arts offers research-led degrees in a wide range of research disciplines, related to Electronic, Control and Information Engineering, in a highly stimulating academic environment. The School enjoys an international reputation for its work and prides itself in allowing students the freedom to realise their maximum potential.

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

We undertake high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/262/electronic-engineering

Project opportunities

Some projects available for postgraduate research degrees (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/postgraduate/projects_funding/pgr_projects.aspx).

Research areas

- Communications

The Group’s activities cover system and component technologies from microwave to terahertz frequencies. These include photonics, antennae and wireless components for a broad range of communication systems. The Group has extensive software research tools together with antenna anechoic chambers, network and spectrum analysers to millimetre wave frequencies and optical signal generation, processing and measurement facilities. Current research themes include:

- photonic components
- networks/wireless systems
- microwave and millimetre-wave systems
- antenna systems
- radio-over-fibre systems
- electromagnetic bandgaps and metamaterials
- frequency selective surfaces.

- Intelligent Interactions:

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

- Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems:

The Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems Research Group comprises a mixture of highly experienced, young and vibrant academics working in three complementary research themes – embedded systems, instrumentation and control. The Group has established a major reputation in recent years for solving challenging scientific and technical problems across a range of industrial sectors, and has strong links with many European countries through EU-funded research programmes. The Group also has a history of industrial collaboration in the UK through Knowledge Transfer Partnerships.

The Group’s main expertise lies primarily in image processing, signal processing, embedded systems, optical sensors, neural networks, and systems on chip and advanced control. It is currently working in the following areas:

- monitoring and characterisation of combustion flames
- flow measurement of particulate solids
- medical instrumentation
- control of autonomous vehicles
- control of time-delay systems
- high-speed architectures for real-time image processing
- novel signal processing architectures based on logarithmic arithmetic.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Laser Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Laser Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The two main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

Fundamental Atomic Physics
Condensed Matter and Material Physics
Analytical Laser Spectroscopy
Particle Physics Theory Group

String theory, quantum gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence
Lattice gauge theories, QCD
Supersymmetric field theory, perturbative gauge theory
Field Theory in curved spacetime
Physics beyond the standard model

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Laser Physics programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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An MSc-level conversion programme for those with first degrees in numerate disciplines (e.g. Maths, Physics, others with some mathematics to pre-university level should enquire). Read more
An MSc-level conversion programme for those with first degrees in numerate disciplines (e.g. Maths, Physics, others with some mathematics to pre-university level should enquire). The programme targets producing engineers with the knowledge and skills required for working in the communications industry on programmable hardware, in particular. There is a high demand for people to fill such roles in communications and test & measure equipment vendors, and in many smaller companies developing devices for the internet of things.

The huge growth of interconnected devices expected in the Internet of Things and the goals of flexible, high-speed wireless connections for 5G mobile networks and beyond, require programmable, embedded electronics to play a vital role. From the development of small, intelligence sensors to the design of large-scale network hardware that can be functionally adaptive in software-defined networking, there is a huge demand for advanced embedded electronics knowledge and skills in the communications sector.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1223/embedded-communications-engineering

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media.

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EL829 - Embedded Real-Time Operating Systems (15 credits)
EL849 - Research Methods & Project Design (30 credits)
EL893 - Reconfigurable Architectures (15 credits)
EL896 - Computer and Microcontroller Architectures (15 credits)
EL822 - Communication Networks (15 credits)
EL827 - Signal & Communication Theory II (15 credits)
EL871 - Digital Signal Processing (DSP) (15 credits)
EL872 - Wireless/Mobile Communications (15 credits)
EL873 - Broadband Networks (15 credits)
EL890 - MSc Project (60 credits)

Research areas

- Communications

The Group’s activities cover system and component technologies from microwave to terahertz frequencies. These include photonics, antennae and wireless components for a broad range of communication systems. The Group has extensive software research tools together with antenna anechoic chambers, network and spectrum analysers to millimetre wave frequencies and optical signal generation, processing and measurement facilities. Current research themes include:

- photonic components
- networks/wireless systems
- microwave and millimetre-wave systems
- antenna systems
- radio-over-fibre systems
- electromagnetic bandgaps and metamaterials
- frequency selective surfaces.

- Intelligent Interactions:

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

- Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems:

The Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems Research Group comprises a mixture of highly experienced, young and vibrant academics working in three complementary research themes – embedded systems, instrumentation and control. The Group has established a major reputation in recent years for solving challenging scientific and technical problems across a range of industrial sectors, and has strong links with many European countries through EU-funded research programmes. The Group also has a history of industrial collaboration in the UK through Knowledge Transfer Partnerships.

The Group’s main expertise lies primarily in image processing, signal processing, embedded systems, optical sensors, neural networks, and systems on chip and advanced control. It is currently working in the following areas:

- monitoring and characterisation of combustion flames
- flow measurement of particulate solids
- medical instrumentation
- control of autonomous vehicles
- control of time-delay systems
- high-speed architectures for real-time image processing
- novel signal processing architectures based on logarithmic arithmetic.

Careers

The programme targets producing engineers with the knowledge and skills required for working in the communications industry on programmable hardware, in particular. There is a high demand for people to fill such roles in communications and test & measure equipment vendors, and in many smaller companies developing devices for the internet of things.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Postgraduate Diploma is designed for those who work with young people in educational or other settings who have either satisfactorily completed the Introduction to Child and Adolescent Counselling Skills (60-hour PAES course) or have an equivalent qualification in counselling and psychotherapy. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma is designed for those who work with young people in educational or other settings who have either satisfactorily completed the Introduction to Child and Adolescent Counselling Skills (60-hour PAES course) or have an equivalent qualification in counselling and psychotherapy.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/component/courses/?view=course&cid=16022

Course detail

The programme is designed to enable participants to:

- work therapeutically with children and young people especially through communication using the arts and play;
- develop the skills of counselling in one-to-one and group settings through the use of practicums, experiential, active learning methods and practical work with other students;
- gain a grounding in the theoretical base of counselling and group work;
- increase their understanding of the development of young people personally, socially and emotionally;
- explore the ethical and professional aspects of working with children and adolescents in schools and other settings.

Format

The diploma comprises three core units:

- Unit 1: Working through the therapeutic relationship and developing counselling skills: practicum and theory sessions
- Unit 2: Communication through images: the use of the creative arts in counselling and affective education
- Unit 3: Working with and understanding groups

Unit 1

Three main areas will be explored:

- Counselling theory and psychology - including a detailed look at the main approaches to counselling children and adolescents, the theory of human development and motivation and the psychology of change.

- Working with the therapeutic relationship - where participants will explore the role of the relationship in therapeutic work and have an opportunity to develop relational qualities including the core processes. There will also be discussions of transference and counter-transference and the use of self.

- Counselling skills and their application - where participants will study and practise the skills of listening, reflecting, observation and attunement, questioning, summarising, communicating empathy and challenging, which will involve the use of a practicum (working on skills in the group).

The unit also covers the social and professional content of counselling, where the ethical and professional issues of working with children and in organisations will be explored, which involves an exploration of issues such as confidentiality and working with colleagues, other professionals and children’s networks.

Unit 2

This unit aims to work in an experiential way and to explore the following:

- the use of non-verbal methods in counselling and affective education (this is important because many participants will be working with students who are either young or unable to express themselves with ease verbally);
- the theory behind the use of play and arts media in counselling;
- the satisfactory expression of an experience through metaphor;
- exploring working with key emotional themes and feelings;
- the use of the creative arts in counselling and affective education in schools.

Practicum work will continue through the use of video with opportunity for peer review and tutor supervision

Unit 3

The final unit aims to provide an opportunity for participants to:

- develop an understanding and awareness of how they experience and behave in a group;
- increase their knowledge and understanding of the theory of group psychology and psychotherapy and the application of this to therapeutic group work with children.

It will be structured around four components:

- the theory of group and group processes;
- application in the workplace, which looks at ways of integrating knowledge and awareness of groups and group processes into the work setting;
- personal growth and awareness, in which activities will be used to engage participants in reflection on themselves and their communication;
- the personal development group, which offers participants the opportunity to develop self-awareness by sharing their thoughts and feelings with each other and the effect they have on each other.

This is an essential process for future counsellors as otherwise their own preconceptions, anxiety and distress may distort their attempts to help the client.

In addition participants are required to complete a minimum of 40 hours of self-funded personal therapy during the course of the Postgraduate Diploma year.

Assessment

- 2 x 4,000-word essays
- 1 x 8,000-word essay

Participants receive formal feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course (including through supervision).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Hoxter bursary (deadline 31 July annually) http://www.bacp.co.uk/crs/Training/bursary.php

Sources of government funding and financial support (including Professional and Career Development Loans) https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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The MSc in Social and Applied Psychology gives you the opportunity to sample a range of modules from our Group Processes and Developmental programmes as well as other modules related to social and applied psychology. Read more
The MSc in Social and Applied Psychology gives you the opportunity to sample a range of modules from our Group Processes and Developmental programmes as well as other modules related to social and applied psychology.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Key benefits

- Much of our social psychology research is co-ordinated through the Centre for the Study of Group Processes (CSGP), the largest research group in this area in Europe. The Centre attracts a stream of major international social psychology researchers, who regularly visit to work with our staff and are officially affiliated to the Centre.The Social Psychology group also includes the co-editor of Group Processes and Intergroup Relations (Abrams).

- Social psychology research at Kent is funded by a variety of British and international sources, currently and recently including ESRC, British Academy, Leverhulme, Age Concern, European Commission, European Science Foundation, Home Office, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Nuffield, and Joseph Rowntree Foundation, as well as government departments such as the Department for Communities and Local Government and the Department for Work and Pensions.

- All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/75/social-and-applied-psychology

Course detail

This programme considers how social psychology can be applied to a wide range of social problems and answer key questions such as: How are attitudes formed and developed, and how do they relate to behaviour? What are the key motives that affect people’s reactions to the social world? What social psychological processes are implicated in the form and content of language and communication?

Our teaching and research covers the psychology of intergroup behaviour, group decision and performance, attitudes and persuasion, organisational psychology, social cognition, children’s self-concept and social attitudes, and cross-cultural questions, relating social psychological research in these areas to social problems. Course tutors include academics and experts who work in the media, the health service and other applied settings.

Purpose

You will gain a thorough grounding in research methods, and conduct a project in an area of social/applied psychology that interests you. The programme is taught by the School’s outstanding research group in social psychology.

Course structure

The programme consists of 4 compulsory modules and 2 option modules.

Core modules include:

• Advanced Statistics and Methodology
• Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology I: Theory
• Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology II: Applications
• Dissertation

You also select two from a choice of the following:

• Advanced Topics in Intergroup Relations
• Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development
• Advanced Developmental Social Psychology
• Advanced Topics in Group Processes
• Developmental Psychology in Professional Practice
• The Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony
• Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychopathology

Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4-6,000-word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology module only), plus the dissertation.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Our Economics MPhil programme aims to develop rigorous scholars who can advance both academic knowledge and practice in the area of Economics. Read more
Our Economics MPhil programme aims to develop rigorous scholars who can advance both academic knowledge and practice in the area of Economics. The programmes are designed to give you greater depth to your professional life and to equip you with the skills necessary to succeed in a knowledge-intensive economy.

Our research is organised into 15 research centres and groups. Each of these involves externally funded research, international collaboration and the active involvement of doctoral students. A brief outline of some of the disciplines is outlined below.

The Applied and Theoretical Microeconomics (ATM) group focuses on issues in theoretical microeconomics and applied microeconomics. The interests of group members includes:
-General equilibrium theory with production and financial markets, game theory and overlapping generation economies
-Theoretical work on markets with search frictions
-The labour market
-Spatial economics including industrial location, health economics, transport economics,
-The role of information in markets
-The effects of government intervention on private-sector behaviour

The Applied Econometrics (AE) group is an interdisciplinary School research group with members from both the Economics and the Accounting & Finance subject groups. Members of the AE group undertake research on topics in economics and finance, linked by their use of econometrics. Main areas of interest include:
-Bayesian econometrics
-Linear and nonlinear time series models
-Time series forecasting
-Structural break estimation
-Unit root testing and cointegration analysis
-Vector autoregressive models

The Economics of Safety, Health, Environment and Risk (ESHER) research group brings together some world-leading research in health economics and the economics of safety and environment. ESHER is co-led by Professor Luke Vale, Health Foundation Chair in Health Economics and Professor Sue Chilton in Economics. Its areas of research include:
-Valuing benefits/quantifying preferences in health, safety and environment
-Development and application of economic evaluation
-Priority-setting in health care
-Econometric applications in studies of health, safety and the environment (especially income and health inequalities)

The Macroeconomic Analysis & Applications (MAnA) group focuses on the ever-evolving boundaries between economic theory and real world phenomena. The group promotes academic and policy relevant research on all areas of macroeconomics and currently the main research interests of MAnA members includes:
-The study of microeconomic behavior with macroeconomic implications
-Monetary policy, inflation, expectations
-International prices and the macroeconomy
-Economic integration and economic interdependence
-Economic growth and institutions

The Economics groups offer supervision across the broad range of microeconomics and macroeconomics, and have a good number of doctoral students in these areas.

Accreditation

Newcastle University Business School is accredited by the:
-Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB)
-European Quality Improvement System (EQUIS)
-Association of MBAs (AMBA)

Only 1% of business schools worldwide hold this triple crown and we are one of only 20 to have these accreditations in the UK.

Our accreditations reflect the investments we make for our students through providing a high quality teaching environment, innovative programming and active engagement with industry.

Facilities

Newcastle University Business School is one of the largest Schools in the University, with over 3,100 students representing over 93 nationalities. The School's location and modern design creates a dynamic centre point for a valuable network of regional, national and international thought leaders, alumni and leading professions.

Our facilities provide:
-A flexible and dedicated conference suite with panoramic views across the city
-Wi-Fi enabled connectivity throughout the building, including three computer clusters housing approximately 120 PCs
-Four large lecture theatres and 21 seminar rooms, providing comfortable teaching and group study space
-A dedicated Hub, Base, and Lounge providing a balanced mix of study space and relaxation areas
-A contemporary café

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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This is the first masters level degree course that brings academic rigour and focus to this multi-disciplinary subject. The MSc in Flow Assurance for Oil and Gas Production is suitable for engineering and applied science graduates who wish to embark on successful careers in the oil and gas industry. Read more

Course Description

This is the first masters level degree course that brings academic rigour and focus to this multi-disciplinary subject. The MSc in Flow Assurance for Oil and Gas Production is suitable for engineering and applied science graduates who wish to embark on successful careers in the oil and gas industry. Our strategic links with industry ensures that all the materials taught on the course are relevant, timely and meets the needs of organisations competing within the sector. This industry-led education makes our graduates some of the most desirable the world for energy companies to recruit.

In the foreseeable future, hydrocarbon (oil and gas) will still be the major energy source irrespective of the developments in renewable and nuclear energy. The term ‘flow assurance’ was coined by Petrobras in the early 1990s meaning literally “guarantee of flow.” It covers all methods to ensure the safe and efficient delive