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Masters Degrees (Greek Theatre)

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This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Read more
This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Its historical range is wide and students should be ready to research and trouble-shoot plays from different eras, whether classical Greek and Roman, medieval, early modern or contemporary.

Traditional formats of discussion groups and seminars are coupled with workshops and problem-solving sessions which address all the negotiations involved in transferring words on the page into a fully realised performance. The main emphasis of the MA is on the interpretation of text through the consideration of acting and directing processes, production conditions, historical context, and institutional and cultural politics. The MA incorporates masterclasses by leading theatre professionals which are part of an integrated visitor programme.

The MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance is unique in that it is designed to accommodate both students who may wish to pursue further academic study and students who wish to go into the theatre or media industries. We aim to produce graduates with a sophisticated understanding of how plays in performance work, and to develop high-quality researchers and theatre practitioners who understand the practical dynamics of process and production. Applicants may have a range of academic backgrounds and extensive practical experience is not a prerequisite for the course, but students must be willing to enter into the spirit of practical experiment whatever their particular strengths.

Aims

-To promote cutting-edge interdisciplinary thinking and collaboration
-To provide analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of play and performance texts
-To offer in-depth analysis of the dynamics of the processes of writing, acting and directing
-To provide an understanding of the need to conduct investigation within historical, political, institutional and cultural frames
-To develop high-quality theatre researchers and practitioners

Teaching and assessment

Seminars and workshops
In terms 1 and 2 Directing Early Modern Plays and Case Studies in Writing, Directing and Performance are examined by 2,500 word essays. In Term 1 Writing into Performance is examined by a scriptwriting assignment. In term 2 Directing Modern Plays is examined by a combination of seminar performance and a 3,000 word essay. Storytelling for Theatre, Film and Television is examined by a 3,000 word project in each term. An ambitious programme of masterclasses given by leading practitioners is an important part of the MA.

Screenings
During terms 1 and 2 there will be screenings of relevant film and television material relating to specific performances, plays and productions under discussion.

Dissertation or practical project
In term 3 students prepare for their dissertation or practical project work. Students are assigned dissertation/project supervisors and receive individual supervision through the period of research. Assessment is by 20,000 word dissertation or by a substantial practical project such as a production, performance or piece of creative writing, supported by a 4,000 word essay mapping the project's planning and evolution. All final projects are subject to the approval of the convenors of the MA.

Careers

Because of the innovative emphasis on acquiring a wide range of analytical and practical skills centred around the performance and production of theatre texts, students are highly employable.

An in-depth understanding of narrative structures and their visual, technical, performative and political dimensions is of paramount importance to the entertainment industry and a significant number at the top of these businesses support this programme because it plugs an increasingly serious gap in the skills market. Recent students from the BA and MA Writing and Performance (a forerunner of this MA) have benefited from placements with theatre, film and television companies, and the MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance builds on that ethos. Placements have been informally arranged subject to student interest and industry availability from year to year.

Past graduates have gone on to study PhDs and also to conservatoires to continue their practical training. Many are now working as screenwriters, playwrights, actors, directors, designers, producers, technicians, literary managers, dramaturges, and literary agents. A significant number of graduates have set up their own theatre companies. Others work in theatre-in-education initiatives, arts funding organisations, youth theatre, journalism, publishing, and dramatherapy. Past students are also employed by major animation companies, and have gained work as script editors and production assistants.

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Why this course?. This is a unique programme, the only one in Scotland, which offers qualified teachers the opportunity to gain the required 80 credits in drama, which will enable you to provisionally register with the GTCS to teach the subject at all levels in secondary schools. Read more

Why this course?

This is a unique programme, the only one in Scotland, which offers qualified teachers the opportunity to gain the required 80 credits in drama, which will enable you to provisionally register with the GTCS to teach the subject at all levels in secondary schools.

The course has been given the approval of the GTCS as another route into gaining a second teaching qualification.

Although aimed specifically at qualified teachers, we also welcome other applicants with an interest in developing their knowledge and practice of drama/theatre.

The course combines theory and practice where you’ll demonstrate the knowledge you gain on the modules through written analysis and criticism. You’ll then apply that theory to underpin the movement, directorial and performance fields studied.

What you'll study

You'll study four 20 credit classes (two each year). You may be eligible for credit for relevant previous study. Where this is the case, in consultation with the course leader, you'll study three out of four classes.

The classes are:

  • Greek Theatre to the National Theatre of Scotland
  • Directing in the Theatre
  • Dramatic Work in Performance
  • Studio Theatre Performance

Work placement

Once you successfully complete the programme, you’ll be able to apply to the GTCS. If all other GTCS conditions have been met, you’ll gain provisional registration to teach drama in a secondary school.

Learning & teaching

Module delivery will combine seminar presentation and discussion with workshop activities. You'll be encouraged to critically analyse and respond creatively to the tasks set. Audio-visual material and internet sources will be integral to the workshop sessions with key reading and workshop themes distributed at the start of the programme.

Assessment

Classes one and two have two assessment points with the first assessment in each having a group element.

The second assessment is entirely an individual submission. It includes theatrical documentation for a piece of dramatic text chosen by you which is supported by an analytical essay.

Class three has two assessments. The first assessment has a strong practical group focus with supportive individual essay and the second requires you to direct a short piece of dramatic text, supported by a critical essay.

Class four has one assessment where you're required to produce a 40 – 45minute performance, supported by an individual analytical essay on that performance.

Careers

Qualified teachers who take and successfully complete this programme can apply for provisional registration with the GTCS to teach drama in a secondary school.

The conditions for full-registration with the GTCS apply ie 95 days teaching drama under supervision.



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The MA in Hellenic Studies enables students to develop their knowledge and appreciation of Greek history and culture, from the Homeric and Classical age, through the Hellenistic and Roman times, the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period to the modern world. Read more

The MA in Hellenic Studies enables students to develop their knowledge and appreciation of Greek history and culture, from the Homeric and Classical age, through the Hellenistic and Roman times, the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period to the modern world. It is suitable for students from a wide range of different discipline and ideal if you are interested in progressing to doctoral research in Greek History and Culture. It can also lead to careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Through your studies you will examine the elements which characterise Hellenic culture through the centuries, at the same time acquiring a deeper knowledge of a certain period and discipline, including philosophy, history, law, religion, theatre, language, literature, epigraphy, papyrology and palaeography.

You will be taught by experts from the College’s Hellenic Institute, a research centre for the diachronic and interdisciplinary study of Hellenism. The Hellenic Institute brings together teaching and research on the language, literature and history of Ancient Greece from across the College. It promotes the study of Greek language, literature and history, from the archaic and classical age, through the Hellenistic and Roman times, Byzantium and the Post-Byzantine period, to the establishment of the Modern Greek State and the modern world.

  • Become part of the Hellenic Institute where we bring together, at a national and international level, all those who share its interests. We collaborate closely with other Colleges and research centres in the University of London as well as the British Library, Lambeth Palace Library and The Hellenic Centre, a cultural meeting place for the Greek community in London.
  • Participate in a number of research projects and seminars, lectures and conferences hosted by the Hellenic Institute.
  • Annual fees-only studentships, bursaries and other awards are offered by the Institute in support of its students. 
  • Royal Holloway has one of the largest and liveliest History departments in the UK yet our size is not at the cost of anonymity; you will receive our individual attention and become part of our close-knit post graduate community.

Course structure

Core modules

  • The Hellenic Tradition
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

  • Greek Law and Lawcourts
  • Elementary Greek Palaeography
  • Greek Palaeography
  • Greek Hands of the Palaeologan Period - 13th to 15th Century
  • Byzantine Autographs of the Palaeologan Period - 13th to 15th century
  • Byzantium and The First Crusade
  • Byzantium and the Fourth Crusade

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, written examinations and a dissertation.

Your future career

The MA in Hellenic Studies at Royal Holloway enables students to develop strong presentation and negation skills, along with analytical and research skills, which makes them highly employable and can lead to careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural. A considerable number of graduates continue research on a doctoral level in the field of Greek History and Culture at the Hellenic Institute of Royal Holloway and at other universities in Britain and abroad.

Our Careers team will work with you to enhance your employability and prepare you for the choices ahead. Their support doesn’t end when you graduate; you can access the service for up to two years after graduation.

  • Recent graduates have entered many different areas, including careers as researchers, museum staff and teachers in secondary education.


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This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern. Read more

This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern.

It is taught in the Department of Classics, by experts in the field of Classical reception. The Department's research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture, giving the programme a breadth unmatched anywhere in the world. 

The programme is interdisciplinary, and is open to students with no prior knowledge of ancient languages. 

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

Our MA course focuses on the way the classical world has influenced the culture of later periods, and how it continues to do so. With a strong focus on research the course is taught in the Department of Classics by experts in the field of classical reception. Our Department’s research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture. This means we can offer you a breadth of expertise that is unmatched anywhere in the world. Through this advanced course of study, we will develop your literary, historical and archaeological analysis skills, and provide you with the opportunity to learn ancient and modern languages to extend these skills.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to typically 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

Career prospects

The advanced skills that we give you have proved very popular with employers in a wide range of professions, and many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department. Others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.

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The Reception of the Classical World MA investigates the interactions of later ages with the cultures of the ancient world across a variety of media, making extensive use of London's unique resources of literary, historical and artistic study and research. Read more

The Reception of the Classical World MA investigates the interactions of later ages with the cultures of the ancient world across a variety of media, making extensive use of London's unique resources of literary, historical and artistic study and research. The programme attracts European students and other students from overseas as well as the UK.

About this degree

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key figures, narratives, art forms, concepts, and social, religious and political practices of the classical world that have been most put to use by later cultures. The programme equips them with the tools necessary for research, including training in the use of digital resources online, library catalogues and archives.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Approaches to the Reception of the Classical World

Optional modules

Dedicated reception modules have included:

  • Rome on Film
  • Ancient Greece on Stage
  • Dionysus in Rome
  • Athens in Ancient and Modern Political Thought
  • Students can also choose modules available also to other programmes concerning the ancient world, in areas such as:
  • Language
  • Literature
  • History
  • Religion and Philosophy
  • Art and Archaeology
  • other reception topics

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on a subject related to the reception of the classical world, which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (60 credits).

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars and research visits to relevant institutions. Seminars will provide practical tuition in bibliographic searches and the use of a variety of electronic databases. Student performance will be assessed through coursework essays, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Reception of the Classical World MA

Funding

Several funding options may be possible for applicants to this programme, including: UCL Scholarships for UK/EU & Overseas Students, Arts & Humanities Faculty Awards, and Greek and Latin departmental awards.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The MA is an ideal springboard for a PhD programme and offers a unique range and depth of study in reception contexts from antiquity to the present. Some students go on to pursue research at UCL or in other institutions. Others have developed their skills in order to enter careers in e.g. teaching, publishing, the media, cultural heritage or the legal, business, charitable or financial sectors.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Librarian, University of Cambridge
  • Programme Manager, Key4Life
  • Programme Manager, Spire Hub
  • CRM Information Manager - Telecommunications, Tancroft Communications
  • Research Degree: Greek and Latin,UCL

Employability

Students develop a wide range of skills highly valued by employers, such as advanced written and oral communication, the ability to abstract and synthesise information, the ability to construct and manage arguments, independent and critical thinking on difficult issues, competence in planning and executing essays, presentations and projects, self-motivation, information technology skills (including the ability to access and evaluate electronic data), team work, co-operation, and good time management. Students go on to employment in many sectors, including advertising, publishing, education, law, finance, libraries and museums, and the culture industries (including theatre and the media).

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme makes extensive use of the unique features of UCL: its central location, diverse international expertise and interdisciplinary outlook. Students benefit from research tours of nearby resources, such as the British Museum and the Warburg Institute as well as UCL's Petrie Museum and Library Special Collections.

UCL Greek & Latin is recognised as one of the leading international centres for postgraduate study and research in the ancient world. Students benefit from the large range of modules offered by the department, by other departments at UCL, and by the intercollegiate Classics MA programme. The MA opens a pathway to a wide variety of careers.



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The MA in Classical Acting is a postgraduate acting course for live-performance actors at all stages of their career and is taught by highly regarded specialists in acting and directing. Read more
The MA in Classical Acting is a postgraduate acting course for live-performance actors at all stages of their career and is taught by highly regarded specialists in acting and directing.

You’ll gain insight into the classical drama canon (from Ancient Greece to the mid-20th century) and enhance your understanding, creativity and delivery of classical texts. Your skills will be developed through:

• Evaluation and reflection on your own practice
• Expanding your artistic and market awareness
• Gaining insights into innovative artistic practices

You might explore areas such as:

• Greek Comedies and Tragedies
• English Renaissance Plays
• Naturalistic Plays from Germany, Norway, Russia, America and Britain

MODULES

In trimester one, you’ll be immersed in practical training, leading to performances of monologues, duologues, and scenes. You’ll also get a grounding in current research methods, completing practical or scholarly research. This leads to a presentation and an essay.

In trimester two, we’ll give you the opportunity to train at Shakespeare’s Globe in London. You’ll develop your training into a professional portfolio. Alongside this you’ll develop a theatre company with fellow students for public performances of classical plays of your choice.

In trimester three, you can choose to undertake a more traditional written dissertation, a performance based dissertation or a mixture of the two. You might direct a production, lead workshops, or research into areas relating to directing as part of your dissertation.

TEACHING METHODS

The degree is delivered through a variety of workshops, lectures, seminars, master classes, off-site visits, performance and production work, and through the Virtual Learning Environment, Minerva. We get professional actors and directors in to work with you; we have an ever-expanding list of lecturers, specialists, artists and guest scholars.

ASSESSMENT

Assessments could include performances, essays, literature reviews, written documentation of work, presentations, portfolios, leading workshops, written evaluations, rehearsal and practice blogs, written dissertations, practical dissertation projects, and critical play reviews.

For more information on teaching and assessment methods, please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-classical-acting/

OPPORTUNITIES

We currently give all students the opportunity to take part in a two week residency at Shakespeare's Globe. You’ll benefit from intensive, full-time training, leading to a production on the Globe’s stage.

You’ll have the opportunity to see a lot of theatre, as well as visit museums and theatres. Previous destinations have included Bath, Bristol, Stratford upon Avon and London. Other field trips may give you the chance to work with professional theatre groups and actors; we’ve previously rented studios in London for this purpose. Some trips are subsidised, however, you may have to contribute to fund travel and tickets.

For more information on the various opportunities available on this course, please go to the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-classical-acting/

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Translation, as a trade and an art, plays and important part in bringing nations together, and facilitating dialogue, understanding and co-operation. Read more

Translation, as a trade and an art, plays and important part in bringing nations together, and facilitating dialogue, understanding and co-operation.

Our innovative MA is ideal for those looking to embark on, or develop, careers as professional translators. Translation practice is at the heart of the programme, and you will undertake extensive practical and specialised translation in Arabic, Catalan, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese or Russian. The programme offers training in state-of-the-art translation technology and the opportunity to study another foreign language at beginners, intermediate or advanced level. From September 2017, we are also able to offer an optional module in English-Chinese Interpreting.

There is a range of optional modules focusing on theory and methodology, meaning that this MA also provides excellent preparation for further study at PhD level.

We also offer a distance learning programme over 2.5 years – for more information, see Translation Studies MA by distance learning.

Course details

The Translation Studies MA is a degree offered by the Department of Modern Languages. It features a balance of theory and practice which provides an ideal foundation both for careers in the translation industry or for further study in translation.

In addition to being accredited by the EMT Network, we are a member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI). We are also part of the SDL University Partner Program, which allows us to allocate free SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance licenses to the top two students studying translation technology each academic year.

The programme is available to students who are proficient in English and one of the following languages: Arabic, Catalan, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese or Russian. We can accommodate all language pairs in both directions except Mandarin, where we offer English to Mandarin but not Mandarin to English.

The core programme content offers ample opportunity for translation practice. You will study four core modules:  

  • Introduction to Translation Theory 
  • Practical Translation*
  • Specialised Translation*
  • Research and Critical Commentary Skills

* Language combinations offered are as stated above

You will also choose two modules from a range of options

Assessment

Most core and optional modules on this course are assessed by coursework, rather than by written examination. The exceptions are Practical Translation which is assessed by exam and English-Chinese Interpreting which features a classroom-based live interpreting test. See module descriptions for further details.

You will also complete a 15,000-word Translation Studies dissertation or an Extended Translation Project.

Learning and teaching

All of our students are offered the opportunity to work in small groups with tutors and to receive training in the use of state-of-the art translation technology.

All modules make use of our modern facilities, and teaching will take place in a lecture theatre or a computer lab. For your translation classes (Practical Translation and Specialised Translation) you will be divided into language groups – each year we can have up to ten language-specific groups. 

We also make extensive use of Canvas, the University’s virtual learning environment, and this is where you can find all material related to your studies and also contribute to online discussions. 

Course delivery

Teaching takes place over ten weeks in the Autumn Term (September-December) and ten weeks in the Spring Term (January-March) through weekly seminars.

Full-time students will take two core modules in the Autumn Term, and two core modules in the Spring Term, as follows:

  • Autumn Term: Introduction to Translation Theory; Practical Translation
  • Spring Term: Research and Critical Commentary Skills; Specialised Translation

You will then take two optional modules; one in each term. During the Summer Term, you will be working on your dissertation or extended translation project, and you will be assigned an appropriate supervisor according to your chosen topic and language pair. 

Part-time students will take three modules in year one and three modules in year two. To cater for the needs of part-time students, we make an effort to group classes on specific days of the week. There is some flexibility, but the recommended structure is as follows:

  • Autumn Term, year one: Introduction to Translation Theory and Practical Translation
  • Spring Term, year one: Research and Critical Commentary Skills or Specialised Translation
  • Autumn Term, year two: Your choice of optional module
  • Spring Term, year two: Research and Critical Commentary Skills or Specialised Translation; your choice of optional module 

During the Summer Term of year two, you will be working on your dissertation or extended translation project, and you will be assigned an appropriate supervisor according to your chosen topic and language pair. 

Learning and teaching methods

The course will: 

  • Encourage reflective practice in translation
  • Familiarise you with state-of-the-art technological tools currently used in the translation industry and with the professional environment in which translators operate
  • Provide you with the opportunity to carry out extensive practical translation work with the guidance of experienced tutors so as to develop skills in line with current professional practice
  • Enable you to develop a sophisticated understanding of the most up-to-date concepts and theories of the discipline of translation studies
  • Develop a critical understanding of the social constraints on and consequences of translation, and the differing contexts of translation throughout the world
  • Encourage an understanding of how English and other languages work and how they may usefully be analysed, in particular with reference to its grammar, lexis and discourse, and how such an analysis may benefit you as a translator
  • Provide a practical understanding of established techniques of research and enquiry used to created and interpret knowledge in the discipline, so as to enable you to undertake further research, either as part of your future professional career or by enrolling for a research degree.


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The Philosophy MA enables students to benefit from the acknowledged expertise of UCL's lively, close-knit intellectual community, and also access the stimulation and dynamism of London's wider philosophical community. Read more

The Philosophy MA enables students to benefit from the acknowledged expertise of UCL's lively, close-knit intellectual community, and also access the stimulation and dynamism of London's wider philosophical community. The programme offers the flexibility for recent graduates in the subject to study chosen topics in greater depth.

About this degree

The programme allows students to develop an advanced knowledge of problems in contemporary analytic philosophy, the history of philosophy and the study of value. It provides students with an understanding of a representative range of central philosophical debates and of the nature of philosophical problems, and encourages them to develop and defend their own viewpoint.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), six optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

These modules introduce students to graduate study in philosophy. Students will give short presentations on central topics and classic papers which form the basis of discussion.

  • Research Preparation in Philosophy 1
  • Research Preparation in Philosophy 2

Optional modules

Options may include the following: 

  • Foundations of Effective Altruism
  • Intentional Agency, Acting for a Reason and Responsibility
  • Early Wittgenstein
  • Epistemology
  • Self-Knowledge
  • Philosophy of Mind
  • Global Justice and Health
  • Free Speech
  • Greek Philosophy
  • Nineteenth Century Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science
  • Metaphysics of Science
  • The Self in Early Analytic Philosophy
  • Sartre’s Philosophy
  • Epistemology of Disagreement
  • Equality
  • Recent Work in Practical Philosophy
  • Graduate Studies in the Philosophy of Language
  • Perception and its History

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in any area of philosophy taught and approved by the department, leading to in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught through a combination of seminars, lectures, and supervisions. Students' performance is assessed through examinations, presentations, coursework, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Philosophy MA

Funding

Applicants for this programme may be eligible for a number of funding opportunities, including UCL graduate scholarships.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme have become successful lawyers, journalists, theatre directors and novelists among other careers. Those who perform sufficiently well on the MA can expect to pursue further research in philosophy in London or elsewhere.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • BPTC (Bar Professional Training Course), University of Law
  • MFA in Creative Writing, Queens University of Charlotte, North Carolina
  • MPhil in Greek and Latin, UCL
  • MPhil Stud in Philosophy, UCL

Employability

The programme equips graduates with the skills to analyse complex ideas, develop independence of judgement and originality of thought, evaluate arguments rigorously, present views lucidly both orally and on paper, and question orthodox views. The programme provides an ideal basis for future academic study and many graduates proceed to research degrees in the UK and abroad.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The department has strengths in philosophy of mind, language, political and moral philosophy, metaphysics, epistemology and the history of philosophy.

Our students benefit significantly from our location in London, which is one of the international centres of philosophical activity. London is home of a number of renowned journals (PhilosophyMind & LanguageProceedings of the Aristotelian Society) and hosts regular visiting speakers from across the world. Over 60 philosophers are active in London making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.



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Note. this MPhil can be developed into a PHD. You'll be required to write a thesis of up to 60,000 words (exclusive of appendices, footnotes, tables and bibliography). Read more

Note: this MPhil can be developed into a PHD.

You'll be required to write a thesis of up to 60,000 words (exclusive of appendices, footnotes, tables and bibliography). Work for this degree can be done in any of the areas where the Centre can offer expert supervision. Please consult the staff list to see current research interests.  https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/centrestaff/

Please note that all doctoral students are first registered as MPhil students. There is an upgrade procedure in the third term of the first year (for full-time students) or the first term of the second year (for part-time students), in order to register for a PhD degree.  Details of the procedure are included in the Graduate Handbook which students receive upon arrival in the Department. Further details may be requested from the Director of Graduate Studies, https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/

The University of Warwick boasts an unusually high concentration of staff with research interests in the Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern periods, many of whom are recognised international experts in their field. Their joint expertise offers unparalleled opportunities for interdisciplinary study. Staff who teach for the Centre are drawn from the departments of English and Comparative Literary Studies, History, History of Art, Theatre Studies, Classics, School of Modern Languages (inc Italian, French and Hispanic Studies). Geographically, the Centre for the Study of the Renaissance has particular strengths in Renaissance and Early-Modern England and Britain, Italy, France, and central Europe (especially Germany and Switzerland). Thematically, the CSR promotes research in (but not limited to):

  • Aristotelianism and Platonism in Early Modern Europe
  • Court and Civic Culture
  • Early modern theatre and performance
  • Education in the Renaissance
  • Greek Diaspora in Renaissance Europe
  • History of Art
  • History of Translation
  • Intellectual Culture
  • Manuscript studies, print culture and the history of the book
  • Medieval and Renaissance Drama
  • Modern thought and intellectual culture (including the history of scholarship and universities; The Classical tradition / reception studies; commentaries; the history of medicine and the history of science)
  • Neo-Latin Literature
  • Religious, political and social history
  • Renaissance Venice
  • The visual arts and the world of artisans, especially in Italy

Courses typically start in September/October of each year; other dates are possible subject to various rules & regulations and supervisor(s) availability.  Further details may be requested from the Director of Graduate Studies, https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/



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If you already have a considerable base of knowledge and a firm idea of where your interests lie, this course could be for you. The degree requires no coursework; the main focus is a 40,00-word dissertation, supervised by an appropriate member of staff. Read more

If you already have a considerable base of knowledge and a firm idea of where your interests lie, this course could be for you. The degree requires no coursework; the main focus is a 40,00-word dissertation, supervised by an appropriate member of staff. You will be encouraged to undertake relevant research-skills training and, where appropriate, further language study. 

Courses typically start in September/October of each year; other dates are possible subject to various rules & regulations and supervisor(s) availability. The University of Warwick boasts an unusually high concentration of staff with research interests in the Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern periods, many of whom are recognised international experts in their field. Their joint expertise offers unparalleled opportunities for interdisciplinary study. Staff who teach for the Centre are drawn from the departments of English and Comparative Literary Studies, History, History of Art, Theatre Studies, Classics, School of Modern Languages (inc Italian, French and Hispanic Studies). Geographically, the Centre for the Study of the Renaissance has particular strengths in Renaissance and Early-Modern England and Britain, Italy, France, and central Europe (especially Germany and Switzerland).  Further details of staff who are linked to the Renaissance Centre can be found on this webpage: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/centrestaff/ by checking the 'academic staff' box, top left.

Thematically, the CSR promotes research in (but not limited to):

  • Aristotelianism and Platonism in Early Modern Europe
  • Court and Civic Culture
  • Early modern theatre and performance
  • Education in the Renaissance
  • Greek Diaspora in Renaissance Europe
  • History of Art
  • History of Translation
  • Intellectual Culture
  • Manuscript studies, print culture and the history of the book
  • Medieval and Renaissance Drama
  • Modern thought and intellectual culture (including the history of scholarship and universities; The Classical tradition / reception studies; commentaries; the history of medicine and the history of science)
  • Neo-Latin Literature
  • Religious, political and social history
  • Renaissance Venice
  • The visual arts and the world of artisans, especially in Italy

Further details may be requested from the Director of Graduate Studies, https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/



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ABOUT MA ACTING. The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING

The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Successful applicants will be offered a place on one of the two strands.

CLASSICAL STRAND

The Classical strand follows the development of the theatrical art from its earliest ritual roots to the birth of naturalism:

> Greek Tragedy, Chorus and the Neutral Mask

> Clowning and Commedia dell’arte

> Shakespeare and the English Renaissance

> Stanislavski, the Method and ‘Realist’ Theatre.

The Classical strand draws on the hugely influential theories and techniques of the great French acting teacher Michel Saint-Denis, training the expressive body, voice and imagination. Working with some of the greatest dramatic texts ever written, students are asked to consider what they mean now, and how their 21st century reinterpretation and re-imagining still holds a ‘mirror up to nature’. Students are encouraged to understand the demands of both art and craft, as participants in, and practitioners of, the western theatrical tradition, through a course structure that examines, in chronological order, four key periods of innovation and transition.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

All staff are well connected to industry. In the past few years, students have participated in a research symposium and worked on the stage

of Shakespeare’s Globe, performed at the Brighton Festival, made a film with Sir Donald Sinden at the Garrick Club, taken part in workshops with Hannah Miller (Head of Casting, Royal Shakespeare Company) and attended public lectures by Judi Dench, Vanessa

Redgrave, Michael Boyd and Declan Donnellan. Students from Canada and the USA have participated in the Conference of Drama Schools

Showcase in New York and LA, and all students participate in Central’s MA Acting showcase.

ASSESSMENT

Through a combination of practical and written assessments, including a Sustained Independent Project and research presentation.



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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture ;

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.

- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.

- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.

- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.

- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups

There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture

The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century

This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism

This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:

For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:

- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)

- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen

- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered

- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings

- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture



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This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society. Read more

This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society.

Whether you prefer ancient Greek dramas, medieval Dutch poetry, contemporary American literature, or general literary theory, this Master’s is suited to students wishing to contribute to textual research. The Master’s in Literary Studies will teach you how to approach historical and contemporary texts from an international perspective, as well as to examine the current societal significance of literature. By the end of the programme, you’ll be able to discuss literary texts and scholarly approaches with other scholars at the highest academic level.

At Radboud University, we believe that to fully understand literature, you need to broaden your scope. You will gain insight into methods and theories in both literary studies and the humanities in general. You’ll become familiar with a wide range of literary traditions, critical approaches and theoretical debates. This will enhance your own research. In order to expand your horizon as a literary scholar, you’ll spend a semester conducting research and taking courses abroad.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary

Europe and its worlds

The programme welcomes students with interest in all fields of literary studies, but our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including the ways Europe interacts with and differs from the rest of the world. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups.

Why study Literary Studies at Radboud University?

- There is a strong focus on textual scholarship and methods of literary interpretation. The programme studies all forms of literary texts and written records from all historical periods.

- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s as Historical Studies, and Art and Visual Culture. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of other disciplines within the humanities.

- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic world.

- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.

- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Literary Studies will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

- Thematic research groups

There is a literary scientist in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to a literary researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Literary Studies students:

- European Literary History

This group explores the various forms, functions, agents, media, infrastructures, traditions and theories of literature that, now or then, have been involved in relating ‘Europe’ to a certain space, tradition, or identity.

- Studying Criticism And Reception Across Borders

This group researches literary reception in its broadest sense, from analysing the practice of book reviewers and literary criticism, to studying all sorts of literary institutions like publishers, literary magazines.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism

This group studies the media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Literary Studies:

For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:

- Classicism under Justinian. A study of Justinian's classicising policies in the fields of literature, legislation and military conquest.

- The early transmission of Sappho's songs reflected in the ancient sources.

- Performing the Past, Staging the Future: Memory, Modernity, and (Inter)nationalist Identities at the Dublin Gate Theatre.

- Austen: The Next Generation. Modern reworkings of Pride and Prejudice and the Quest for New Audiences.

- De naam van de schrijver. Auteur, lezer en pseudoniem.

- Lolita - ethiek, lezer & effect. Een cognitief narratologische analyse van Vladimir Nabokovs Lolita (1955).

Academia and beyond

This programme is initially intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also do well and often find academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:

- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre

- Assistant of a senior researcher

- Teacher at an institution for higher education

- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science

- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship

- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals

- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector

- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary



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