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Masters Degrees (Greek)

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The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Ancient Greek provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Ancient Greek language and literature. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Ancient Greek provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Ancient Greek language and literature.

Course Overview

These programmes offer students the opportunity to focus exclusively on the acquisition and/or development of ancient Greek and can be started at beginners, intermediate or advanced level depending on their linguistic ability.

The PGDip is a postgraduate degree comprised of 120 credits (six taught modules) of postgraduate study. The PGCert is a postgraduate degree comprised of 60 credits (three taught modules) of postgraduate study.

Modules

Our language system covers two main levels: Intensive and Advanced.

There are two Intensive modules for ancient Greek. Intensive I always runs in the first semester (September to January) and starts from complete beginners level, hence is the natural starting point for anyone who has no or very little knowledge of the language. Intensive II is the continuation of Intensive I and always runs in the second semester (February to May). Upon successful completion of both Intensive modules, a student is ready to go on to Advanced level and work directly with unadapted ancient Greek texts. The Intensive modules are designed to provide you with high level knowledge of grammar and syntax, and a good vocabulary. Each Intensive module is worth 30 credits, and you need to commit at least 23 hours per week (throughout the semester, so over 15 weeks, including examinations) to your language learning.

Advanced-level modules are in three separate levels: Advanced, Further Advanced and Higher Advanced. As you progress through the advanced-level modules, you will read a greater quantity of ancient Greek texts, and be asked to complete more challenging work in terms of the literary and linguistic investigation of the text. Every year there are two texts/authors chosen for Greek: one text is prose, the other is verse. The texts and authors change every year, and students have the opportunity to read both canonical and non-canonical authors. Over the last few years, we have read the Homeric Hymns, Plato, Diodorus, Sophocles and Euripides.

Key Features

The PG Diploma and Certificate in Greek are mainly of interest to those who want to learn ancient Greek to advanced level and beyond. One can start on either of the two programmes from complete beginners’ level, intermediate or advanced, based on their existing qualifications and knowledge. For those who have been studying Greek privately, we offer a test to place them in the correct level of language learning. PhD candidates, or those planning to embark on a PhD, can use these degrees to increase their competency in Greek. For those interested in teaching Greek at any level, the degrees can provide an internationally recognised qualification. The degrees in Greek are available only as part-time options.

Specifically for language learners who study at a distance, the School provides the support of dedicated distance language tutors for all its language modules. The distance language tutors provide assistance and support to language learners, as well as interim feedback on assessment. The distance learning tutors work alongside the module lecturers in providing material for language study to distance learners. All language modules include an examination; examination arrangements are communicated to distance learners by the TSD Registry, and distance learners can ask for the support of the School in making arrangements for examinations.

Assessment

Our language degrees in Greek involve a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays and exams, you will be assessed through commentaries and in-class tests. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a strong foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the Greek language. The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Greek and Latin provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in both the Greek and Latin language. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Greek and Latin provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in both the Greek and Latin language.

Course Overview

These programmes offer students the opportunity to focus on the acquisition and/or development of both Greek and Latin and can be started at beginners, intermediate or advanced level depending on their linguistic ability.

The PGDip is a postgraduate degree comprised of 120 credits (six taught modules) of postgraduate study. Students are normally expected to complete the programme over a period no longer than two years, taking 80 credits in the first year of the programme and 40 credits in the second year.

The PGCert is a postgraduate degree comprised of 60 credits (three taught modules) of postgraduate study.

Modules

Our language system covers two main levels: Intensive and Advanced.

There are two Intensive modules for each language. Intensive I always runs in the first semester (September to January) and starts from complete beginners level, hence is the natural starting point for anyone who has no or very little knowledge of the language. Intensive II is the continuation of Intensive I and always runs in the second semester (February to May). Upon successful completion of both Intensive modules, a student is ready to go on to Advanced level and work directly with unadapted ancient texts. The Intensive modules are designed to provide you with high level knowledge of grammar and syntax, and a good vocabulary. Each Intensive module is worth 30 credits, and you need to commit at least 23 hours per week (throughout the semester, so over 15 weeks, including examinations) to your language learning.

Advanced-level modules are in three separate levels: Advanced, Further Advanced and Higher Advanced. As you progress through the advanced-level modules, you will read a greater quantity of ancient texts, and be asked to complete more challenging work in terms of the literary and linguistic investigation of the text. Every year there are two texts/authors chosen for each language: one text is prose, the other is verse. The texts and authors change every year, and students have the opportunity to read both canonical and non-canonical authors. Over the last few years, we have read Petronius, Columella, Ovid, Claudian and Statius in Latin, and the Homeric Hymns, Plato, Diodorus, Sophocles and Euripides in Greek.

Key Features

The PG Diploma and Certificate in Greek and Latin are mainly of interest to those who want to learn or advance their existing knowledge of both Greek and Latin. One can start on either of the two programmes from complete beginners’ level, intermediate or advanced, based on their existing qualifications and knowledge. For those who have been studying Greek or Latin privately, we offer a test to place them in the correct level of language learning. PhD candidates, or those planning to embark on a PhD, can use these degrees to increase their competency in the ancient languages. For those interested in teaching Greek or Latin at any level, the degrees can provide an internationally recognised qualification. The degrees in Greek and Latin are available only as part-time options.

Specifically for language learners who study at a distance, the School provides the support of dedicated distance language tutors for all its language modules. The distance language tutors provide assistance and support to language learners, as well as interim feedback on assessment. The distance learning tutors work alongside the module lecturers in providing material for language study to distance learners. All language modules include an examination; examination arrangements are communicated to distance learners by the TSD Registry, and distance learners can ask for the support of the School in making arrangements for examinations.

Assessment

Our language degrees in Greek and Latin involve a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays and exams, you will be assessed through commentaries and in-class tests. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a strong foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the languages. The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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The MLitts in Greek, Greek and Latin and Latin are for students who have studied the relevant language(s) to Honours level, and wish to pursue their study of the language(s) further. Read more
The MLitts in Greek, Greek and Latin and Latin are for students who have studied the relevant language(s) to Honours level, and wish to pursue their study of the language(s) further. If you have studied only one of the languages previously, you may take a beginners’ course in the other.

Work in Semesters 1 and 2

All the taught programmes in classical subjects maintain very high academic rigour with maximum flexibility for you. They offer an excellent opportunity to develop research skills, and to prepare for a doctorate, by choosing from a broad range of modules.

All students take a compulsory core module which provides generic skill-based training. The two-hour seminars are held most weeks and cover a range of topics and methodologies essential to research in the relevant field. Assessment Is by written and oral presentations; there is no exam.

Careers

Many of our recent taught postgraduate students have gone on to study for a PhD in the UK or the USA, but others have used our Masters degrees as an intellectual foundation for diverse professional careers, such as teaching in schools, law, or museum curatorship.

Features

* Between 8 and 20 taught postgraduates admitted each year, with a postgraduate community numbering over 30.

* Friendly but academically challenging departmental ethos.

* The School of Classics is housed in the centre of the town, adjacent to the University Library, with views out to St Andrews Bay.

* Vibrant conference and workshop programme.

* Excellent collections in the University Library, as well as a dedicated class library in the School building.

* Beginners’ courses in Greek and Latin available if you need to acquire a classical language as part of your training for subsequent research.

All the MLitt programmes offer:

• An opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of particular aspects of the literature, history, archaeology or reception of the cultures and societies of ancient Greece and Rome.

• An excellent training in a classical discipline.

• Instruction in the skills appropriate to postgraduate study, and an introduction to research opportunities and various methodologies currently used in the field.

• Regular tutorials with a tutor who is an expert in the field and provides overall direction and guidance.

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The University of Calgary is one of Canada's leading research universities, serving over 25,000 full-time undergraduates and 6,000 graduate students. Read more
The University of Calgary is one of Canada's leading research universities, serving over 25,000 full-time undergraduates and 6,000 graduate students. Calgary is a modern city of over one million people with a wide range of cultural activities, and is close to Banff and the Rocky Mountains. The university occupies a suburban campus and has excellent residence and recreational facilities.

The Department of Greek & Roman Studies teaches over two thousand students in its courses each year, and has several strong undergraduate programs and a growing graduate program. Most graduate students participate in undergraduate teaching. Resources include a departmental reference library and extensive computer and database support. The Nickle Collection of some 15,000 ancient coins is available for study in the Nickle Arts Museum.

The Department has a strong international outlook, with five nationalities represented amongst its academic staff. There are particular strengths in the areas of Greek and Roman poetry, medieval Latin, cultural and social history, Hellenistic history, late Roman history, and Greek and Roman material culture.

Degree Programs

Master of Arts (MA), thesis-based (full-time)
-Greek and Roman Studies 603 Language Study and Research Techniques (first year).
-Four other seminar half-courses, normally taken in the first year of the program; these may include up to two half courses outside the department if appropriate to the area of specialization.
-Four quarter courses of directed studies in Greek and Latin Texts (GREK or LATI 607), normally taken in the Fall and Winter terms of the first and second year.
-An examination in translation, with dictionary, from French or German or Italian into English (normally to be attempted within the first twelve months of registration).
-A thesis of about 20,000 words, with oral examination.

Master of Arts (MA), course-based (full-time or part-time)
-Greek and Roman Studies 603 Language Study and Research Techniques (first year).
-Eight other seminar half-courses; these may include up to two half courses outside the department if appropriate to the area of specialization.
-Four quarter courses of directed studies in Greek and Latin Texts (GREK or LATI 607), normally taken in the Fall and Winter terms of the first and second year.
-An examination in translation, with dictionary, from French or German or Italian into English (normally to be attempted within the first twelve months of registration).

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The aim of this course is to give you the opportunity to have an overall view and appreciation of Greek history and culture, from the Homeric and Classical age, through the Hellenistic and Roman times, the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period to the modern world. Read more
The aim of this course is to give you the opportunity to have an overall view and appreciation of Greek history and culture, from the Homeric and Classical age, through the Hellenistic and Roman times, the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period to the modern world. Its diachronic and interdisciplinary nature enables you to examine the elements which characterise Hellenic culture through the centuries, at the same time helping you to acquire a deeper knowledge of a certain period and discipline; including philosophy, history, law, religion, theatre, language, literature, papyrology and palaeography.

The Hellenic Institute, established in 1993, brings together two areas of teaching and research in which Royall Holloway has long excelled: the study of the language, literature and history of Ancient Greece, based largely in the Department of Classics and Philosophy, but also in the Department of Drama and Theatre, and Byzantine Studies, which have always found a home in the Department of History.

It aims to consolidate existing strengths and to extend them by promoting the study of the Hellenic traditional across the centuries from archaic and classical Greece, through the Byzantine period, to the modern world.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/mahistoryhellenicstudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Hellenic Institute seeks to bring together at a national and international level all those who share its interests. We collaborate closely with other Colleges and research centres in the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Institute of Historical Research and the Warburg Institute, as well as the British Library, Lambeth Palace Library and The Hellenic Centre, a cultural meeting place for the Greek community in London.

- We maintain links with universities overseas, especially in Greece and Cyprus. Scholars from the Universities of Athens, Ioannina and Cyprus regularly visit the Institute as part of collaborative research, offering their expertise to our students and members of staff.

- The Institute organises a range of lectures, seminars, conferences, workshops and other events for students, scholars and the wider public, giving the opportunity to engage with experts in the field.

- We receive funding in support of our activities from the Ministries of Culture and Education of the Hellenic Republic, the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus, the A.G. Leventis Foundation, the Hellenic Foundation, the Orthodox Cultural Association (Athens), The Friends of the Hellenic Institute and private donors.

- The Institute offers a number of annual fees-only studentships, bursaries and other awards in support of its students.

Department research and industry highlights

Collaborative research includes:
- Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus
- Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts
- Byzantine Autographs
- A Catalogue of the Greek Manuscript Collection of Lambeth Palace Library
- The Porphyrogenitus Project: Lexicon of Abbreviations and Ligatures in Greek
- Minuscule Hands, c.800-c.1600
- Lexicon of Terms used in Palaeography, Codicology and Diplomatics
- Triadic Monarchy: The Concept of Monarchy in the Triadology of the Greek Fathers -
- Ecclesiological Repercussions and the Monastic Model
- The Greek Population of Rhodes under Hospitaller Rule
- The Greek Community in London, 1500-1945.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of Hellenic Studies and their limitations

- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline

- an awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms of historical information

- a general appreciation of the varied and interlinked methodologies for understanding Greek antiquity, Byzantium, the post-Byzantine period and the Modern Greek world

- the reading and understanding of ancient, medieval and modern Greek texts, both in print and in manuscript

- a grasp of literary criticism necessary for understanding and appreciating the style of ancient, medieval and modern Greek authors

- an awareness of the main forms of material available to those studying Classical antiquity, the Byzantine, Post-Byzantine and Modern Greek world.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, written examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers as researchers, museum staff and teachers in secondary education. A considerable number of our graduates pursue MPhil/PhD studies in the field of Greek History and Culture at the Hellenic Institute of Royal Holloway and at other universities in Britain and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Read more

This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature.

It is an Intercollegiate programme enabling you to take a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The MA programme in Classics is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that we can combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. The course centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

To further add to the breadth of our course, you can also take appropriate modules from other MA courses at King's. You will study modules through texts in the original languages as well as through translated texts. Besides purely literary and linguistic topics, you can also take modules in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology & Art and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, including Latin and Ancient Greek at both a beginner’s and intermediate level.

If you intend to pursue further research in Classics, you are likely to find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence, provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

Libraries

As well as the extensive library resources at King's, you will have access to the world-leading Classics library at the Institute of Classical Studies, as well as other University of London libraries.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of the classical world, with special reference to Greek and Latin language and literature; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of Classics.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake around 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department, whilst others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.



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Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. Read more

Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. This is an intercollegiate course that draws on the strengths of King’s, UCL and Royal Holloway and the Institute of Classical Studies. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's was ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The Ancient History MA course is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the course combines the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

The course consists of a required module, Sources & Methods in Ancient History, two to four optional modules, and a dissertation. The first and last of these will provide you with concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. You will also study texts in the original languages as well as in translation. Besides purely ancient historical topics, modules may also be taken from our master's courses in Classics, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. You may also be able to take appropriate modules from other master's courses at King's. 

If you have ambitions to take your study of ancient history further, there are modules on this course that you will find especially valuable: Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography. These will advance your technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence. You can also choose to take modules in Greek and Latin languages at beginners or intermediate level.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Our Department also regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This course offers the advanced study of the history of the Greek, Roman and Near Eastern worlds; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of ancient history.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide six to eight hours of lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide two to six hours of lectures and seminars a week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

 Assessment

We will assess your modules through a combination of coursework, essays and examinations, depending on your module choices. Typically, we assess 20-credit modules through a 5,000-word essay or a 3-hour examination, and 40-credit modules through approximately 10,000 words of coursework or a combination of coursework and examination, but this may vary. The dissertation is a 12,000-word essay.



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Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. Read more
Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. We have strong links with related disciplines such as history, archaeology and modern languages. We welcome postgraduates in any of our areas of research expertise.

Classics and Ancient History at Newcastle has a long and distinguished international reputation. We deliver quality research and teaching. We have taught Latin and Greek since 1874. We have taught Ancient History since 1910 and Classical Archaeology since 1931.

Our staff include scholars of outstanding international reputation. Our research covers all major aspects of the study of the ancient world, with research strengths in:
-Rhetoric and historiography
-Ancient philosophy, science and medicine
-Reception and recreation of ancient texts
-Ancient concepts of divinity

Our research specialities include:
-The ancient Near East
-Greco-Roman culture and religion
-Early Christianity and patristics
-Greek art and archaeology
-Greek ethnography
-History and archaeology of Roman Italy
-Greek and Roman music
-Greek language and literature, including Homer, tragedy, historiography and rhetoric
-Latin language and literature, including historiography, rhetoric and Augustan poetry
-Reception of the classical tradition
-Ancient science and medicine
-Ancient Greek and Roman patristics and philosophy

MPhil supervision is usually available in:

Ancient history and classical archaeology

-The history and archaeology of pre-Roman and Roman Italy
-The late Roman Republic
-Greco–Roman religion
-The social and cultural history of the Roman Empire
-Roman Greece
-Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt
-History of the Jews
-Greek art and archaeology
-The history and archaeology of the ancient Near East

Classical language and literature

-Latin language and literature
-Ancient oratory and rhetoric
-Latin poetry
-Ancient historiography
-Greek tragedy
-Greek influence on later literature
-Greek and Roman music

Philosophy and science

-Ancient and early Christian philosophy
-The history of Greek and Roman medicine
-Greek and Roman music
-The exact sciences in Graeco-Roman antiquity

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If you wish to pursue research in any period of Greek Archaeology, from Prehistoric to Hellenistic, and have a good grounding in the field of your proposed research project, this programme will give you essential training in method and practice in the Greek context. Read more
If you wish to pursue research in any period of Greek Archaeology, from Prehistoric to Hellenistic, and have a good grounding in the field of your proposed research project, this programme will give you essential training in method and practice in the Greek context.

Including a research methods taught module and two modules in appropriate subject areas, the programme aims to complement your existing knowledge and inform your chosen research topic.

The main component of this degree is the 20,000-word research dissertation on a topic of your choice. We recommend that you discuss your proposed research project with a potential supervisor before applying.

In addition, you will take 60 credits of taught modules.

Research Methods (20 credits)
Greek Archaeology - with special emphasis on the period/area of your dissertation topic (20 credits)

and either

The Practice of Greek Archaeology - with a focus on Theory or Scientific and Environmental Methods as appropriate to your interests (20 credits)

Or

Modern Greek for Archaeologists, from beginners level to enable you to use primary materials published in Greece in your future research (20 credits).

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This programme introduces you to recent developments in the areas of Modern Greek language, literature, history and culture. It comprises a major individual research project, supervised by a specialist in the field of study, and taught elements which provide a solid grounding in Modern Greek Studies. Read more
This programme introduces you to recent developments in the areas of Modern Greek language, literature, history and culture.

It comprises a major individual research project, supervised by a specialist in the field of study, and taught elements which provide a solid grounding in Modern Greek Studies.

The University of Birmingham is the only UK isntitution to offer this programme, uniquely combining modules in literature, history, politics and culture.

The taught elements of this course give you the opportunity to enhance your knowledge and understanding of critical theory, linguistic skills or historical methodology, in addition to translation strategies, literary movements or wider cultural, historical or political developments.

Overall, the programme enables you to situate your research in relation to disciplinary and interdisciplinary intellectual traditions, and provides both a foundation for doctoral research and also a chance to enrich your previous understanding in different areas of Modern Greek Studies.

It is made up of 60 credits of taught modules (see the modules section below) and 120 credits achieved through a 20,000 word supervised research project on topic of your choice in Modern Greek Studies. We recommend that you discuss your proposed research project with a potential supervisor before applying.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Classics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Classics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Greek and Latin languages are the key to our knowledge of the ancient world, and the origin of many modern European languages. This MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in the ancient languages, and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world. In addition to developing their ability to read fluently in the ancient languages and to translate them accurately and sensitively, students are introduced to the critical and analytical methodologies that shape the study of Classical literature in the twenty-first century. Students in the MA in Classics should normally already have studied either Latin or Greek, and will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of the other.

Key Features of MA in Classics

The MA Classics studies Greek and Latin language, literature and civilisation.

The MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in ancient languages and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Classics MA is split across the year offering three modules in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of your choosing.

Part-time Classics MA students take three modules in the first year, three in the second year and write the dissertation in the third year.

MA in Classics Aims

To acquire advanced reading skills in ancient Greek and Latin.

To develop the ability to translate from ancient Greek and Latin accurately and sensitively.

To develop the theoretical and analytical skills relevant to the study of ancient texts in the original languages.

To prepare for further text-based research on any aspect of Greek or Roman history and culture.

Through the precision and awareness to detail entailed in the study of ancient languages, to acquire a range of transferable skills relevant to a range of employment opportunities, including those which involve language acquisition and translation.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Classics course typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres

• Ancient Greek or Latin Language

• Ancient Greek or Latin Texts

• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed

• Explorers, Travel and Geography

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

Research Interests

Staff research interests cover the core disciplines of culture, religion, language, history and archaeology.

Particular strengths include:

• Ancient Narrative Literature

• The Ancient Novel

• Plato and Platonism

• Greek Tragedy

• Ancient Technology

• The Archaeology of Roman Egypt

• Graeco-Roman Urbanisation

• Greek Social History

• The History and Archaeology of Asia Minor

• Late Antiquity

• Roman Military History

All staff in History and Classics are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. In addition, regular research seminars and lectures are run through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are

encouraged to attend.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Classics graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions; humanitarian organisations; the civil service, and education.



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The Archaeology MA inspires you to think about the human past from a variety of thematic and analytical perspectives. Newcastle is surrounded by world-class prehistoric, Roman and medieval heritage. Read more

The Archaeology MA inspires you to think about the human past from a variety of thematic and analytical perspectives. Newcastle is surrounded by world-class prehistoric, Roman and medieval heritage. We make full use of our rich archaeological landscape with regular study trips and fieldwork.

The Archaeology MA has five specialist pathways and a generic route to suit your individual needs, background and career aspirations:

  • Prehistoric Archaeology
  • Greek Archaeology
  • Roman Archaeology
  • Roman Frontier Studies
  • Late Antique, Medieval and Byzantine Archaeology

Newcastle University has a long and distinguished history of archaeology, including:

  • Prehistoric
  • Greek
  • Roman
  • Late Antique
  • Western Medieval
  • Byzantine
  • Historical Archaeology

We have access to some of the finest collections of archaeological artefacts in Great Britain in the on-campus Great North Museum: Hancock.

We provide quality teaching in small groups. This means you'll reach a level of familiarity with artefacts that most students can only dream of.

We have a range of period-based, practical and theoretical modules available. Our modules will give you an understanding of the interpretive approaches that archaeologists adopt. They will also help you understand the methodologies and sources available during your investigations.

You can develop a range of advanced practical skills in:

  • artefact analysis, including metallography and use-wear analysis
  • archaeological surveying, including topographical, buildings and geophysical survey
  • database and archive use
  • geographical information systems (GIS)
  • ancient languages

You'll join a vibrant archaeology community at Newcastle. You'll receive specialist teaching from leading academics in subjects of their research expertise.

Throughout the course you'll have opportunities to engage and learn about our innovative research. We have an extensive programme of invited speakers organised by our research groups. Our Postgraduate Forum also has a seminar series, annual conference and e-journal.

The Archaeology MA provides you with outstanding skills and the ability to enter a range of professions. You will gain advanced skills in literacy, research and project management. You could also choose to continue your academic career with a PhD in archaeology.

Fieldtrips

The North East has an outstanding prehistoric, Roman and medieval heritage. We take full advantage of this through regular study trips and fieldwork. You can also take optional modules with field trips to:

  • Rome 
  • Athens

The tuition of these trips is included in your course fees. If you select a module with an overseas trip you should budget about £450 to cover your flights and accommodation.

Delivery

All campus-based teaching takes place during the working week. Some field trips take place during holidays and weekends, depending on the modules taken. 

Contact and independent study times vary depending on the module and time of year.

Semesters one and two: You typically attend between 6 - 15 hours of teaching per week. The remaining hours of a standard week are for independent study.

Work experience

Work experience

There are many opportunities for you to gain archaeological experience outside your course. We'll encourage you to gain this experience whilst part of our archaeology community.

Staff carry out a wide range of archaeological projects. Most of our students participate in projects run in Newcastle and by partners in the UK and overseas.

Facilities

Facilities

Archaeologists have exceptional facilities on campus. This includes over 200 years of scholarship, libraries and archaeological collections built up by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle and the Great North Museum: Hancock.

You'll have access to one of finest archaeological collections in the UK. You can access the following internationally important collections:

  • prehistoric
  • Greek
  • Etruscan
  • Roman 
  • medieval artefacts
  • Gertrude Bell archive.

You'll be based in the recently renovated Armstrong Building. It has:

  • dedicated study spaces
  • Reading Room
  • computers
  • free printing
  • photocopying
  • laptops for research trips,

You'll also get a personal research allowance and an interlibrary loan allowance to support your studies.



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-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK. -Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources. Read more
-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK
-Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources
-Opportunities to begin or continue your study of Ancient Greek or Latin

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. Demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.
ii. Understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.
iii. Be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.
iv. Be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.
v. Work effectively as autonomous scholars.
vi. Be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units. If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

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This programme will give you the opportunity to study specific periods and regions of classical civilisation, analyse the literary significance of texts, and develop your language skills in Greek and Latin. Read more

This programme will give you the opportunity to study specific periods and regions of classical civilisation, analyse the literary significance of texts, and develop your language skills in Greek and Latin.

Drawing on the diverse interests of our academic staff (which number more than 20 in this area), the programme content is highly flexible, allowing you to choose a specialised path or a more interdisciplinary approach. We have specialists in the central areas of Greek and Latin literature and thought, Greek and Roman history, and Classical art and archaeology. We also take a broad view of the discipline with, for example, expertise in late antiquity, and reception history.

We provide opportunities for you to hear from distinguished speakers in the weekly classics research seminar series and to share your research with your peers at the classics graduate seminar.

Studying Classics in Edinburgh is the perfect marriage; known as the Athens of the North, Edinburgh is a stunningly beautiful city with a worldwide reputation as a cultural and academic capital.

Programme structure

The modular structure of the programme allows you to concentrate on areas of particular interest while still providing breadth of coverage. Your required course in classics research methods and skills equips you with the independent skills you need to complete your dissertation. In addition, you will choose five courses from a list of options.

The compulsory course is:

  • Skills and Methods in Classics.

Option courses previously offered include:

  • Elementary Greek 1 and 2
  • Elementary Latin 1 and 2
  • Intermediate Latin 1 and 2
  • Intermediate Greek 1 and 2
  • Greek Text Seminars
  • Latin Text Seminars
  • Epicurus and Epicureanism
  • Agricultural Slavery in the Graeco-Roman World;
  • The Hellenistic City
  • Women in the Classical World
  • A Period of Ancient History 1 and 2
  • Late Antique Visual Culture.

Learning outcomes

Students who follow this programme will gain:

  • an advanced knowledge of the archaeology/art and history of specific regions and periods of classical civilisation
  • an opportunity to study and analyse the literary significance of Greek and Latin texts and develop knowledge of current interpretation of them
  • an ability to comment in a detailed manner on passages from a selection of Greek and Latin
  • a developed knowledge of the Greek or Latin languages

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Those students interested in long-term academic careers consider the programme as preparation for a PhD.

The programme provides a toolkit of transferable skills in organisation, research and analysis that will be highly prized in any field of work. This programme can form the stepping stone to many career options, such as further academic research, museum and art curation, literary translation or analysis, education or public heritage. Recent graduates in Classics are now putting their skills to use as tutors, archivists, writers and conference coordinators for a range of employers including the RSPB.



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Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London have a long tradition. It was Professor Joan M. Read more
Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London have a long tradition. It was Professor Joan M. Hussey who first introduced and devised the study of Byzantine History in the University of London in 1950; throughout her long academic career she instilled ‘the principles of scholarship and demonstrated the perfect balance between historical detail and the wider implication of the subject’.

Her legacy was continued by Julian Chrysostomides, who taught the next generations of undergraduate and postgraduate students, and in 1987, together with Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith and Dr Athanasios Angelou, established the taught MA degree course in Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway. This programme centred on the middle and later period of Byzantine history, placing particular emphasis on Byzantine sources and Greek Palaeography. This initiative was joined by King’s College London (KCL) under Professor Averil Cameron and Professor Charlotte Roueché, whose interests centred in Late Antiquity and early Byzantium; thus, the University of London federal MA course in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies (MA LABS) took its original form.

Since October 2009 the MA LABS has been offered as part of the intercollegiate arrangements among Royal Holloway, King's College London and University College London (UCL). In choosing where to register, students should note that they will normally be expected to undertake their MA dissertation at their home College; they should therefore aim to register at the College where staff interests are closest to their own. The MA LABS at Royal Holloway is taught by members of staff of the Hellenic Institute, a research centre for the diachronic and interdisciplinary study of Hellenism, based in the History Department.

Since its establishment a large number of students have successfully pursued this MA course, the majority of whom continued their research on a doctoral level. Today graduates of the programme hold research and teaching posts in universities in Britain and abroad, testifying to its success in meeting its aims.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/malateantiquebyzantinestudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Hellenic Institute, established in 1993, brings together two areas of teaching and research in which Royal Holloway has long excelled: the study of the language, literature and history of Ancient Greece, based largely in the Department of Classics and Philosophy, but also in the Department of Drama and Theatre; and Byzantine Studies, which have always found a home in the Department of History. It aims to consolidate existing strengths and to extend them by promoting the study of the Hellenic tradition across the centuries from archaic and classical Greece, through the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period, to the modern world.

- We collaborate closely with other Colleges and research centres in the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Institute of Historical Research and the Warburg Institute, as well as the British Library, Lambeth Palace Library and The Hellenic Centre, a cultural meeting place for the Greek community in London.

- We maintain links with universities overseas, especially in Greece and Cyprus. Scholars from the Universities of Athens, Ioannina and Cyprus regularly visit the Institute as part of collaborative research, offering their expertise to our students and members of staff.

- The Institute organises a range of lectures, seminars, conferences, workshops and other events for students, scholars and the wider public, giving the opportunity to engage with experts in the field.

- We receive funding in support of our activities from the Ministries of Culture and Education of the Hellenic Republic, the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus, the A.G. Leventis Foundation, the Hellenic Foundation, the Orthodox Cultural Association (Athens), The Friends of the Hellenic Institute and private donors.

- The Institute offers a number of annual fees-only studentships, bursaries and other awards in support of its students.

Department research and industry highlights

Collaborative research includes:
- Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus
- Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts
- Byzantine Autographs
- A Catalogue of the Greek Manuscript Collection of Lambeth Palace Library
- The Porphyrogenitus Project: Lexicon of Abbreviations and Ligatures in Greek
- Minuscule Hands, c.800-c.1600
- Lexicon of Terms used in Palaeography, Codicology and Diplomatics
- Triadic Monarchy: The Concept of Monarchy in the Triadology of the Greek Fathers -
- Ecclesiological Repercussions and the Monastic Model
- The Greek Population of Rhodes under Hospitaller Rule
- The Greek Community in London, 1500-1945.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, and their limitations

- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline

- an awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms of historical information

- a general appreciation of the varied and interlinked methodologies for understanding antiquity and the medieval age

- the reading and understanding of ancient and medieval texts, both in print and in manuscript

- a grasp of literary criticism necessary for understanding and appreciating the style of ancient and medieval authors

- an awareness of the main forms of material available to those studying classical antiquity and the Byzantine world.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, written examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers as researchers and university lecturers, teachers in secondary education, librarians, archivists, book conservators, and editors of history journals. A number of our graduates hold teaching posts and research fellowships at the Universities of London, Cyprus, Patras and the Peloponnese, the Institute for Byzantine Research of the Hellenic National Research Foundation, and are employed by the Library of the Greek Parliament and the Department of Book Conservation of the Cultural Foundation of the National Bank of Greece.

The majority of our graduates pursue MPhil/PhD studies in the field of Byzantine Literature and History, and Greek Palaeography at the Hellenic Institute of Royal Holloway and at other universities in Britain and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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