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The MA in Professional Creative Writing enables students to develop their writing craft and hone their writing skills towards the real world needs of the publishing, communication and media industries. Read more
The MA in Professional Creative Writing enables students to develop their writing craft and hone their writing skills towards the real world needs of the publishing, communication and media industries. The course covers traditional, contemporary and emerging forms of writing, from novel writing to the graphic novel and creative nonfiction, from playwriting to writing for television, screen and multimedia, from poetry to pyschogeography and ecowriting.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The MA Professional Creative Writing has been so named as to emphasise the professional aspects of creative writing: it is designed to enhance employability and focus is directed towards the development of students into professional writers. In particular:
-There are major mandatory modules in the key professional genres of narrative and dramatic writing (including ‘writing for television’), reflecting the real world professional activities of writers and employability opportunities for writers;
-Modules have professional coursework outputs in industry-ready form;
-Specific attention is given to commercial and related opportunities (professional networks, awards and competitions, submission windows, commissions and grants).

Innovation and internationalisation are key, with a focus on contemporary and emerging forms, such as the graphic novel, creative nonfiction, multimodal writing, eco-writing, e-publishing and writing for online video production. There will be a high level of virtual learning resources including video lectures, podcasts, virtual workshops, online writers’ groups, writers’ blogs and online peer-to-peer feedback, enabling easy global access. The course has and international outlook with texts studied coming from around the world and we have Online International Learning partners in institutions overseas: these offer the possibility of online student writing collaborations.

Two themed writers’ retreats are incorporated into the course: these are one week long field trips to coincide with significant writing up periods and may be in the UK or abroad. Current options include two of the following:
-The Horror: a winter week in the seaside town of Whitby, where Bram Stoker gave birth to Dracula;
-Romance: a spring week in the Lake District, haunt of the English Romantic poets;
-The Lost World: a spring or summer week in Spain, ‘lost’ in the remote mountains of the Alpujarras;
-Crime: a spring or summer week in Sicily, home of the Mafia;
-Myth and the Muses: a summer week in Greece, ancestral home of Western literature.

A student may as an alternative elect to organise a DIY writers’ retreat, aligned to their own specific needs as a writer.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The core mandatory modules are:
-The Novel, the Graphic Novel and Creative Non-Fiction
-Writing for Stage and Television
-Writing Genre Fiction
-Creative Dissertation

Optional modules* include:
-Writing for Film and Video Production
-Poetry and Style in a Digital Age
-Eco-writing
-Multimodal Writing

*Choose two. Note that the provision of optional modules is dependent on student choice and numbers and may vary year to year.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

Teaching and learning will take place in workshops, seminars, lectures and tutorials. Eco-writing sessions will take place outside of the classroom and multimodal writing will take place in an Art and Design laboratory. Specialist software is available for scriptwriting and screenwriting and there will be a large array of online materials and resources available. There will be guest lectures by industry professionals and themed trips. Writers’ retreats will also be an inclusive feature of this course: these enable students to write in a relaxed environment and are in places of special interest to writers.

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Explore a broad range of literature and culture from Britain, North America and the English-speaking world covering the 19th and 20th centuries. Read more
Explore a broad range of literature and culture from Britain, North America and the English-speaking world covering the 19th and 20th centuries. The course offers you the chance to delve into a range of research topics and texts from this period including Victorian Studies, Modernism, and American Studies. It will give you the opportunity to read widely and to think broadly across conventional period boundaries, with optional modules ranging from lyric poetry to the graphic novel.

You'll be studying at one of the oldest English departments in the country in a fantastic central London location where you'll get the chance to explore the literature of the 19th and 20th centuries in a place where that literary history actually took place and you'll benefit from being in London, where the city and its rich literary heritage will be your classroom.

As part of the course you will receive experience and training in a wide variety of research, writing and presentation skills and you'll get the chance to complete a large-scale research project within a research environment which values independent thought.

Key benefits

- Unrivalled location in the centre of London, with easy access to the British Library and the major libraries and archives of the capital.

- Flexible programme with a wide range of options allows students the opportunity to specialise in areas of their choice.

- A dynamic, research-led department with an international reputation for excellence.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/english-1850-present-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This course focuses on a broad range of 19th and 20th century literature and culture from Britain, North America and the English-speaking world. You will read widely in 19th century and Modernist literature, while also exploring more specialised topics through a range of optional modules which cover almost every aspect of modern literature and culture: from the Victorian novel and Modernist poetics to postcolonial life writing and the Graphic novel.

In semester one, the core module, Text, Culture, Theory: London and Urban Modernity, introduces key literary and theoretical approaches to urban modernity while encouraging you to explore the rich cultural history of our immediate surroundings in the cultural heart of London. King’s has the oldest English Department in the country and graduates will join an illustrious tradition of literary Londoners: writers, readers, and critics.

The course offers teaching and research training at postgraduate level in a wide range of aspects of English literature, language and culture, based in a research environment which values independence of thought and offers graduate students a clear sense of what would be involved in progressing to PhD study. Students receive training in research and writing skills (including manuscript work, bibliographies, internet resources) in preparation for the completion of a large-scale research project.

- Course purpose -

This programme enables you to develop critical understanding, to concentrate on specific areas of literary and cultural studies, acquire advanced skills in research methods and prepare you for doctoral study or for work within the broader cultural sector.

- Course format and assessment -

Taught core and optional modules assessed by coursework plus a compulsory dissertation.

Career Prospects:

Many students go on to pursue research in our and other departments; others have developed their skills in teaching, journalism, cultural arts and management, or the legal and financial sectors.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MA Graphic Design course encourages designers to explore ways of developing understanding between co-communicators. Read more
The MA Graphic Design course encourages designers to explore ways of developing understanding between co-communicators.

You will do this by systematically interrogating design practice, through using design methods to analyse and comprehend situations and behaviour and by generating alternative and novel visual solutions. Students apply to the course predominantly from graphic design courses but are welcomed from a variety of backgrounds (if they can show an aptitude for typography) where they may have studied photography, architecture, illustration, interaction design, three dimensional design, fine art, or, subjects such as journalism, philosophy, psychology, anthropology or sociology. Whatever your background, you will be required to reflect on your worldview; the underlying assumptions and understanding that guides and constrains your practice, and to use this reflection as a starting point from which to further develop. Your practice can take many forms: it can be self-expressive, or socially orientated; print, screen-based or three-dimensional. It can focus on an aspect of a well-defined area of design, such as branding, experimental typography, publishing, and user-centred design, or on something more unconventional defined as part of your study.

Depending on what kind of focus you identify you will select one of three different types of Professional Development Portfolio (PDP). These reflect either a business, academic or curatorial/editing focus and provide you with another way of tailoring your study to meet your aspirations.

Graphic designers often work in groups, sometimes comprising members from different disciplines. The MA Graphic Design course provides many opportunities to work in interdisciplinary ways as it sits alongside the courses of other disciplines. Many of the taught sessions such as the introduction to research methods and processes occur in these interdisciplinary groups. At other times however you will be developing your project with your supervisor and other students on your course. This will require you to develop a theoretical framework, methodology and research methods that support your research focus.

As a graphic designer you should anticipate the possible consequences of your design interventions, including the meanings constructed through your practice, in relation to ethical and sustainability issues as well as to other relevant contexts. Creative approaches are required that respond to complex situations in which many problems reside. Outcomes are not constrained by media or by limited interpretations of what it is to be a graphic designer.

Consequently, an outcome might involve the design of an experience or service, as much as it might concern more conventional forms of graphic production.

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The future for writing and reading is moving towards transmedia and storytelling. Rather than a particular narrative being limited to a book, TV episode or graphic novel, storylines are now being extended into other platforms. Read more
The future for writing and reading is moving towards transmedia and storytelling. Rather than a particular narrative being limited to a book, TV episode or graphic novel, storylines are now being extended into other platforms.

This new MA will equip participants with the creative, professional and technical knowledge and craft skills required by professional screenwriters across a range of media—from interactive narratives, Twitter fiction and blogging to webisodes, mobisodes and movellas, as well as film and television.

Modules studied will include:

Future Narratives: Transmedia Storytelling

Writing for Film and Television

Writing for Interactive & New Media

Writing for Animation

Business Futures for Transmedia Writers

Research Methods: The Screenwriter's Craft & Practice

Masters Writing Project

Possible career routes include (but are not limited to)

scriptwriter, script editor, script reader, script supervisor

researcher

agent

writer-producer or writer-director

technical video scriptwriter

media journalist

teaching

museum, heritage and tourism writer (e.g., virtual/interactive tours)

e-learning developer

On a much broader scale, the programme will also enhance the individual qualities needed for employment in circumstances
requiring sound judgement, good communication skills, personal responsibility, creativity and initiative in the professional environment.

The MA will also provide a sound intellectual and stylistic platform for students to progress on to doctorate level study and a career in higher education.

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The MA in Contemporary Literature, Culture and Theory explores a range of texts and themes from 1945 to the present, with an option to focus on the 21st century. Read more
The MA in Contemporary Literature, Culture and Theory explores a range of texts and themes from 1945 to the present, with an option to focus on the 21st century. Offers the opportunity to study cutting-edge topics such as the American novel after 1999, new directions in theory, the graphic novel, urban culture, performance studies, bioethics, and cultures of conflict and dissent from Africa to the Middle East.

Key benefits

- Unrivalled location in the centre of London, with easy access to the British Library and the major libraries and archives of the capital.
- Flexible programme offering a range of approaches to contemporary literature, culture and theory.
- A dynamic, research-led department with an international reputation for excellence.
- Find out more about the programme from Dr Jane Elliot, Course Convenor, in our video.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/contemporary-literature-culture-and-theory-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This programme aims to provide students with an opportunity to explore a range of topics and texts from 1945 to the present, with a particular focus on the intersection of literature, culture and theory and an opportunity to focus on the 21st century. It offers teaching and research training at postgraduate level in a wide range of aspects of English literature, language and culture, based in a research environment which values scholarly inquiry and independence of thought and offers graduate students a clear sense of what would be involved in progressing to the doctorate. Students receive training in research and writing skills (including manuscript work, bibliographies, internet resources) in preparation for the complextion of a large-scale research project.

- Course purpose -

This programme enables you to develop critical understanding, to concentrate on specific areas of literary and cultural studies, to acquire advanced skills in research methods and to prepare you for doctoral study.

- Course format and assessment -

Taught core and optional modules assessed by coursework plus a compulsory dissertation.

Career prospects:

We expect some students will go on to pursue research in our and other departments; others may developed their skills in teaching, journalism, cultural arts and management, or the legal and financial sectors.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Offering an unprecedented 11 genres for potential study, students work in a learner-centered, workshop-driven program which offers an exciting breadth of choices, award-winning faculty and a setting in one of the world’s most beautiful and livable cities. Read more
Offering an unprecedented 11 genres for potential study, students work in a learner-centered, workshop-driven program which offers an exciting breadth of choices, award-winning faculty and a setting in one of the world’s most beautiful and livable cities.

We provide a two-year studio course of resident (on-campus) study in which apprentice writers are offered instruction by faculty who work in a variety of literary and dramatic forms.

The UBC Advantage

A Focus on Writing

We emphasize the creation and critical discussion of original writing rather than the study of literature or literary criticism. Readings are assigned or suggested by instructors where appropriate, but there is not a significant reading or criticism component to the degree.

Eleven Genres of Study

More than any other Creative Writing Program in the world. Study fiction, non-fiction, poetry, screenwriting, playwriting, radio drama, writing for children, lyric & libretto, graphic novel, new media writing and translation. Students work in at least three separate genres during the course of their degree – literary cross-training that makes our graduates more well-rounded writers and opens more doors for teaching and publication.

Award-winning Faculty

Our faculty members are all working writers, with multiple awards, international publication and production records to their names.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Fine Arts
- Specialization: Creative Writing
- Subject: Creative and Performing Arts
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

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From all over the world! From Den Haag in the Netherlands to Santiago in Chile; from Gabriola Island, BC to Halifax, NS; from Brooklyn, NY to Portland, OR, we have students across North America and beyond. Read more

Optional-Residency MFA Program

Where are our students writing from?

From all over the world! From Den Haag in the Netherlands to Santiago in Chile; from Gabriola Island, BC to Halifax, NS; from Brooklyn, NY to Portland, OR, we have students across North America and beyond. They may live miles apart, yet they’re all intimately connected to a community of fellow writers through the Optional-Residency MFA program.
Join our community, wherever you’re writing from.
Take distance education classes online while remaining at home. Optional summer intensives on the Vancouver campus of UBC enable you to meet faculty and other students face-to-face, and provide a complement to the work performed online.
The Optional-Residency MFA Program mirrors our highly-regarded on-campus MFA. You graduate with the same degree, and are evaluated by the same criteria and standards.

The Optional-Residency Advantage

A Focus on Writing

We emphasize the creation and critical discussion of original writing rather than the study of literature or literary criticism. Readings are assigned or suggested by instructors where appropriate, but there is not a significant reading or criticism component to the degree.

Nine Genres of Study

More than any other Low Residency program. Study fiction, non-fiction, poetry, screenwriting, playwriting, writing for children, graphic novel, songwriting and translation. Students are required to work in at least three separate genres during the course of their degree – literary cross-training that makes our graduates more well-rounded writers and opens more doors for teaching and publication.

Study full-time or part-time

You can take up to five years to complete your degree, taking as little as one course per year if that’s all your schedule will allow.

Summer Residency

The residencies anchor the online courses, bringing students and faculty together at the beautiful Vancouver campus of UBC each July for ten days of workshops, seminars and community. The residencies are great experiences, but they are entirely optional. Some students complete their entire degree at a distance.

Workshops Online

The workshop format is at the core of the study of creative writing; online workshop critique is a powerful way for students to learn critical reading and writing skills and to make connections with other writers that will last beyond your time in school.
At the end of it all, you will emerge with a body of work in at least three different genres as well as your thesis, a book-length manuscript (or full length production) of your original creative work.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Fine Arts
- Specialization: Creative Writing
- Subject: Creative and Performing Arts
- Mode of delivery: Online / Distance (100%)
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Registration options: Full or Part-time
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

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This exciting new programme is ideal if you have an interest in the academic study of children’s literature, or work in education (e.g. Read more
This exciting new programme is ideal if you have an interest in the academic study of children’s literature, or work in education (e.g. as a teacher or librarian), publishing or children's media. It's also aimed at authors who want to create texts for children- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-childrens-literature/

Award-winning author Michael Rosen is just one of the leading teaching staff on this programme, which is taught mainly in the Department of Educational Studies at Goldsmiths, although those pursuing the Creative Writing pathway will also study modules in the Department of English and Comparative Literature.

From classic works to contemporary texts

You will deepen your familiarity with the range and diversity of genres for children from ‘classic’ works to contemporary texts and develop detailed knowledge and critical understanding of issues and debates in the field. Studying children’s literature at Goldsmiths will also involve examining how texts for children reflect contested constructions of childhood.

Creative writing opportunities

If you are already a committed writer, although you may not have experience of writing for children/young adults, the MA in children's Literature offers a Creative Writing pathway which is taught in partnership with the Department of English and Comparative Literature. You can select modules that will support creative writing practices and enable you to work with practising and published creative writing lecturers and education lecturers to study and explore the nature of writing for children/young adults, creating original texts in the genres of short story, novel and poetry (but not script/screen writing or picture books/graphic novels).

The sociopolitical contexts of children's literature

Goldsmiths' MA in Children’s Literature is unique in its focus on inclusive practices and social justice. We will question the sociopolitical contexts in which texts are produced and interpreted and you will be encouraged to explore how texts for children can challenge or reinforce dominant ideological constructions. We interrogate the power relations that determine what is published, distributed and selected to be read by children in schools.

You will explore the relationship between reader, writer, text and context, and consider the processes that underpin those interactions. We will also examine the inherent paradox that studying children’s literature will involve adults' writing, selecting and responding to texts that are normally intended for children.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maggie Pitfield.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to specialise in children’s literature in a range of careers:

Teaching
Publishing
Children’s media
Writing texts for children
Librarianship
Academic study
Youth and community work
Skills
You will acquire a wide-ranging understanding of the field of children’s literature and the social, political cultural processes that surround it. You will also develop your critical thinking, communication and research skills.

Additional Entry Requirement for the Creative Writing Pathway

To study on the Creative Writing Pathway as part of the MA in Children's Literature you should follow the usual application process. If offered a place on the programme, you will submit a substantial piece or pieces of original creative writing, up to a maximum of 3,000 words, prior to the beginning of the programme. This work does not have to be in the form of writing for children/young adults. It will be considered by the Moudle Leader of the Workshop in Creative and Life Writing.

Your submission should include one item from the following list: Your submission should include one item from the following list: 1 short story; 7-10 poems; 1 or 2 extracts from a novel; 1 or 2 extracts from non-fiction writing, for example, memoir.

Submissions can be emailed directly to Maggie Pitfield, Head of Programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Hone your writing and expand your opportunities for publication. Our workshops will help you to develop your self-editing and refine your work using feedback from your peers and tutors. Read more
Hone your writing and expand your opportunities for publication. Our workshops will help you to develop your self-editing and refine your work using feedback from your peers and tutors. Get advice from our team of specialist lecturers, study classic and contemporary authors, and learn about the modern publishing industry.

Overview

If you’re a practising writer, this course will allow you to develop your craft in a supportive literary environment.

You’ll get the chance to work on your existing projects or try out something completely new, working across a range of styles and genres. Your first modules will focus on novels and short stories, while Special Topic and dissertation projects can range from drama and screenwriting to graphic novels and performance poetry*.

You’ll share your work with, and get invaluable feedback from, our experienced teaching team as well as your fellow students, giving you a unique perspective on how your work is read by different audiences.

All your writing will be supported by a close study of the most distinguished writers and works in each form. You’ll learn to reflect critically on other people’s writing, and through this discover new ways to understand and improve your own.

If you want to get published, you can get advice from our team of specialists, led by Laura Dietz, Una McCormack and Colette Paul, as well as our current Royal Literary Fund Fellows. We’ll introduce you to the writing industry through talks, masterclasses and networking opportunities with agents, publishers and established fiction writers. Our past tutors and speakers have included writers like Rebecca Stott, Toby Litt, Shelley Weiner, Martyn Waites, Julia Bell, Chris Beckett, Graham Joyce and Esther Freud.

You can choose to study this course in Cambridge (full- or part-time) or Chelmsford (part-time only).

Careers

This course will prepare you for a career as a creative writer or in related areas such as publishing and the media, but will also give you critical and analytical skills valued by many employers.

For an idea of how past students have moved from MA study to careers as published authors, read more about Kaddy Benyon, Penny Hancock and Kate Swindlehurst.

Modules

Core modules:
Patterns of Story: Fiction and its Forms
Master's Project in Creative Writing

Optional modules:
Workshop: the Short Story
Workshop: the Novel
Special Topic in Creative Writing/English Literature

Or change one of the above options to:
Renaissance Drama and Cultures of Performance
Re-reading Modernism, Practising Postmodernism
Creativity and Content in Publishing
The Long 19th Century: Controversies and Cities
The Business of Publishing
Independent Learning Module

Assessment

On each core module, you’ll show your progress through one or more pieces of writing. For the Patterns of Fiction module, this will be a single critical essay including samples of your own writing. For the other three modules you’ll submit one creative portfolio of up to 4,500 words, plus a critical reflection on your work and writing process.

You can also take several optional modules from our MA Publishing or MA English Literature courses.

The major project at the end of the course will allow you to present up to 15,000 words of your chosen writing project, including a critical commentary.

Cultural activities and events

In addition to our Creative Writing and Publishing events series, the department organises many extra-curricular activities, like the annual three-day trip to Stratford-upon-Avon, poetry and writing evenings, and research symposia and conferences.

You’ll also be able to join the Anglia Ruskin Literary Society, which arranges trips to local plays and poetry readings, organises workshops, and hosts guest speakers and performance evenings.

As a founding member, we also host events for CAMPUS, Cambridge’s only publishing society.

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The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms. Read more
The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms.

These forms have included written and illustrated books for children and adults, interactive design, film, graphic novels, stage and exhibition design, animation, book arts, narrative textiles, experimental writing, product design and even community projects that encourage social development through storytelling.

In its 25-year history, this course has built on the gathered knowledge and experience of its staff and students to cover topics that are relevant to all MA students interested in storytelling, visual narrative and delivering complex sequential messages.

Recent graduate work – ranging from a biography of Edith Sitwell to a series of calendars made from human hair – demonstrates the diversity of individual research. Other students have examined the legacy of recipes, the secret language of headscarves, the parallels between quantum physics and Taoism as demonstrated through a detective novel, and the role of plumage in communication.

Course structure

You can study on a part-time or full-time basis:

• Part-time, for two years, is designed to fit in with your professional life and allows more time for reflection. Part-time students work on the course for two days a week – one day on site and one day working independently.

• Full-time, for one year, is an intensive year of study. You work four days a week: two days with the course and two days independently.

Lectures, seminars, reviews and assessments are held at fixed times on Wednesdays. Other patterns of attendance vary according to individual circumstances. During holidays you will be engaged in independent study.

Your work will be predominantly project based, which may comprise of one or more parts focusing on a central theme or idea. A single project or investigation will in most cases sustain a student through the entire duration of the course, but at stage assessment, in consultation with tutors, it may naturally evolve into a new or related area of study.

The nature of the subject demands the continual interaction between research, analysis, and practical realisation, as well as an extended period of development for ideas to become fully meaningful. Throughout this investigation you will receive support and guidance from the course tutors.

Areas of study

As the course develops, there is increasing opportunity for independent and self-directed work, though each student is allocated a personal tutor who oversees the planning and content of individual projects. Besides practice-based work, the course also includes a written element in which you will be asked to reflect critically on the research and development of your project.

The Visual Narrative module includes lectures, themed group events and small practical activities such as the Surprise Project, where you are asked to deliver a surprise though a sequence of six images or objects, with the module group as your target audience. From this experience, you learn the nature and importance of surprise in basic storytelling and develop a vocabulary for narrative. In scheduled theme day events, such as Modern Cautionary Tales, you work in groups to challenge your quick-thinking skills in the invention, planning and presentation of a story.

While students accepted on the course should come with the technical skills necessary to fulfil their projects, access to the diverse workshops facilities – for example in bookbinding, letterpress, printmaking and photography – will be made available as appropriate to your project. There is also a substantial specialist library and a full range of computer facilities.

In order to bring together a variety of students and approaches, this course coexists with the Arts and Design by Independent Project MA. Both are based at our Grand Parade campus.

Stage 1:

Sequential Project(s)
Visual Narrative
Research and Investigation

Stage 2:

Major Sequential Project(s)
Project Report

Visiting lecturers

We arrange a programme of weekly lectures by a range of practitioners and academics to broaden your experience and understanding of professional issues and activity. Lecturers describe their practice and professional experience, sharing insights about their research methods and discoveries.

The programme is organised to relate to specific stages of the course and varies on a two-year cycle, so part-time students have access to a different set of events in each of their two years of study.

Careers and employability

Because of the diversity of our students and the projects they create, their professional achievements are equally wide-ranging. Successful commercial enterprises have been established, research degrees undertaken, books published, collaborative design groups formed, and work exhibited in major galleries and institutions. Graduates have also participated in festivals and conferences around the world.

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Love writing and reading literature? Want to challenge yourself to develop your craft and technique in a small community of writers?. Read more

Overview

Love writing and reading literature? Want to challenge yourself to develop your craft and technique in a small community of writers?

Our Master of Creative Writing students undertake intensive practical workshops across a range of genres including children’s literature, creative non-fiction, short story, novella, novel and poetry. You have opportunities to apply your skills in professional context projects, and to value-add to your writing with a suite of editing and publishing units. And, if children’s literature is also your passion you can select units from our internationally acclaimed Master of Children’s Literature.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-creative-writing

Key benefits

- You will be taught by high calibre teachers including winners of university teaching awards and published writers
- Small group workshops, online or on campus
- Weekly creative writing workshops for peer feedback and discussion
- Create an e-portfolio of your work and learn new skills in our state-of-the art online learning platforms
- Your choice of studying on campus or online
- Flexibility of part-time or full-time study options
- Access to practical, writing intensive units to further develop your skills

Suitable for

Emerging and aspiring writers, communication professionals wanting to explore and develop their creativity, including editors, manuscript readers, technical writers, journalists, secondary and primary teachers, especially English literature teachers.

Recognition of prior learning

Course Duration
- 1.5 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and work experience in a relevant area;
Work experience in a relevant area.

- 1 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline and work experience in a relevant area;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and Honours or Graduate Diploma in a relevant discipline;
Honours or Graduate Diploma in relevant discipline and work experience in a relevant area at senior level;
Work experience in a relevant area at a senior level.

- Relevant disciplines
Arts/Humanities, Performing Arts, Visual Arts, Graphic and Design Studies, Communication and Media Studies, Studies in Human Society, Language and Literature, Political Science and Policy Studies.

- Relevant areas
Music or Media industries, production.

English language requirements

IELTS of 7.0 overall (with minimum 6.5 in Reading, 7.0 in Writing, 6.5 in Listening, 6.5 in Speaking) or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements. http://mq.edu.au/study/international/how_to_apply/english_language_requirements/

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Careers

Career Opportunities
Graduates launch new careers, freelance or develop and promote their existing careers in the Arts, Media, Education and Training industries, including:
- advertising
- book publishing – editorial, public relations, and copy editing
- corporate, technical and copywriting
- creative authorship – including picture books, young adult fiction, adult fiction, poetry
- secondary, tertiary and continuing education creative writing, literature and English studies teaching
- theatre and film writing and production
- travel, social media, health, arts journalism and magazine writing, online and in print
- TV script writing

Employers
Employers in Arts, Media, Education and Training industries, including government, schools, online and print education and entertainment media, and writing skills to develop your small business.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-creative-writing

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The Global Burden of Disease Study predicts that by 2020 the top ten leading causes of disability-adjusted life years has ischaemic heart disease at number 1, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at number 5, and lower respiratory tract infections at number 6. Read more
The Global Burden of Disease Study predicts that by 2020 the top ten leading causes of disability-adjusted life years has ischaemic heart disease at number 1, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at number 5, and lower respiratory tract infections at number 6. COPD is predicted to quickly rise ‘up the charts’ after 2020 because it is unique in being currently untreatable, with four people a minute worldwide dying of this condition.

Consequently, study of respiratory and cardiovascular science is essential to improving our future health prospects. To that end, the Respiratory and Cardiovascular Science (RCVS) stream combines lectures and journal clubs covering the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart and lungs to provide a solid grounding on how dysfunction in physiology can lead to pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of severe heart or lung disease. The RCVS stream covers the main areas of respiratory physiology and cellular and molecular biology, and introduces the major disease-causing conditions, giving you a broad base of understanding of the heart and lungs.

Laboratory-based research projects will be directly related to advancing our understanding of heart and lung function and/or dysfunction. Dedicated RCVS sessions on data interpretation are designed to facilitate and complement the project experience.

Most of the tutors on the RCVS stream work at the National Heart & Lung Institute, and represent the largest ‘critical mass’ of research-active, respiratory or cardiovascular science academics in Europe. For example, Professor Peter Barnes (FRS) is the most cited published author for COPD in the world. Consequently, students will be in a premier, cutting-edge environment of respiratory and cardiovascular teaching and research.

After completion of the RCVS stream the student will be able to:

-Describe the basic physiology of cardiac function
-Describe the pathophysiology of the major cardiovascular diseases (for example, cardiac ischaemia)
-Describe the pathophysiology of the major respiratory diseases, including asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis
-Understand the advantages and limitations of animal models of respiratory and cardiovascular disease
-Understand the rationale behind the design of novel treatments for respiratory and cardiovascular disease
-Use library and other research sources effectively
-Design laboratory-based experiments to effectively test a specified hypothesis, incorporating use of appropriate controls
-Interpret data sets, depict data in an appropriate graphic format and apply appropriate statistical analysis
-Understand and be able to use bioinformatic approaches
-Be able to write a grant proposal for a research project
-Be able to present research project data in various formats, including as a poster, an oral presentation, a PhD-style write-up and a journal-based research paper write-up
-Be able to read, understand and critically evaluate research papers in peer-review journals

Please note that Postgraduate Diplomas and Certificates for part-completion are not available for this course.

A wide range of research projects is made available to students twice a year. The range of projects available to each student is determined by their stream. Students may have access to projects from other streams, but have priority only on projects offered by their own stream.

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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.


Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ
http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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Uniting emergency response, disaster risk reduction and space technology this programme is designed to prepare students to work in the fields of satellite technology and disaster response to explore the management of risk and disaster losses from a range of perspectives, focusing on emerging risks posed to modern technology by space weather and the monitoring of hazards on Earth from outer space. Read more
Uniting emergency response, disaster risk reduction and space technology this programme is designed to prepare students to work in the fields of satellite technology and disaster response to explore the management of risk and disaster losses from a range of perspectives, focusing on emerging risks posed to modern technology by space weather and the monitoring of hazards on Earth from outer space.

Degree information

Students will learn about a wide variety of natural hazards, how to prepare and plan for emergencies and disasters and how to respond. Students will also learn practical aspects of designing, building and operating satellites and spacecraft including the challenges and risks posed by the environment of outer space.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Emergency and Crisis Management
-Research Appraisal and Proposal
-The Variable Sun: Space Weather Risks
-Space Science, Environment and Satellite Missions
-Space Systems Engineering

Optional modules - students choose two 15-credit optional modules from the following:
-Decision and Risk Statistics
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Global Monitoring and Security
-Mechanical Design of Spacecraft
-Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Risk and Disaster Research Tools
-Space-Based Communication Systems
-Space Instrumentation and Applications
-Spacecraft Design - Electronic Sub-systems

Optional modules are subject to availability of places.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent project culminating in a report of between 10,000 and 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching is delivered by lectures, seminars and interactive problem sessions. Assessment is by examination, poster, presentation and written essay coursework.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The unique selling point of the programme is the direct access to key government and business drivers in the field of space weather, with invited seminars and reserch projects supported by the UK Met Office, EDF, Atkins and other institutions interested in the hazards of space.

The natural hazard of space weather is a "new" hazard which has only recently been identified as a significant risk to human society. As the first generation of researchers, practitioners and engineers in this field, students will be at the forefront of major new issues in an expanding sector of the economy. As disaster response comes to rely on more advanced technology aid, relief and disaster response agencies require experts trained in the technological infrastructure to innovate, explain, operate and understand the limitations of these novel systems and the help they can provide before, during and after disasters.

The programme will also provide students will advanced training in many transferable skills, such as computor programming, technical writing, oral and written presentation, the use of engineering design tools and graphic visualisation software.

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