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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The MA in Environmental Education and Communication is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Graduates of the program have gone on to advance in a variety of fields, from creating schools within the public and private education systems, to leading communications sections within major national and international non-profit organizations, to advising senior government ministers and Premiers, to gaining their PhD degrees with one alumni recently taking on a professorial position in a North American university.

Financial Awards

Royal Roads University has a variety of awards, scholarships, and bursaries available to help offset your tuition fees. The MA in Environmental Education and Communication program has a comparatively high success rate in Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant competitions and many of the program’s students win significant financial awards. The SSHRC award at the MA level often aids the competitiveness of students for future grants, and grant writing is a marketable skill The unique advising structure and ability to gain one-to-one aid in grant writing are important features of RRU that help account for this success.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Graduates will be able to:
-Develop and implement programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with up-to-date, reputable scientific and technological information, as well as traditional knowledge, about current environmental issues and opportunities
-Apply the best current knowledge of learning and cognition to the design, development, and implementation of programs about environmental education and communication
-Design, develop and implement environmental communications and education programs using a range of formats and incorporating relevant current technologies and media
-Evaluate the status of public information and prior knowledge concerning environmental values, issues and opportunities
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the range of perspectives (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values) towards the environment and human activity in the environment
-Evaluate environmental information and education programs
-Develop and implement strategies to foster conflict resolution, constructive dialogue and community knowledge construction concerning environmental issues
-Develop approaches to nurture effective and responsible environmental actions on the part of corporations, governmental and non-governmental organizations and citizens' coalitions
-Provide up to date information about innovations in environmental communication and education
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the nature of contemporary human-environment issues and their implications for education and communications programs
-Develop a systems perspective on problems in environmental education and communications
-Develop an understanding of environmental education and communication functions within organizational contexts

Delivery Method

Combining the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction, the MA in Environmental Education and Communication program allows both busy working professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences allows students to benefit from the intensity of the program while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

Participants in the MA program take 11 courses (41 credits) including the thesis course. Six courses are taken on-campus, and five are delivered at a distance through Internet-based technologies.

Certificate students take the first three courses in the schedule for a total of 9 credits. Diploma students take the first nine courses for a total of 24 credits.

We will utilize a range of educational methodologies, including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules. RRU has become a leader in the delivery of web-based interactive distance education courses, and these will be of great value during non-residential periods.

Residency
Over two years, MA students attend two separate three-week residencies and one final two-week residency. The first residency introduces the cohort of students to each other, the faculty, and the RRU style of education as they participate in their first two courses. The middle residency incorporates two courses, may have a more directed field-based orientation, and helps prepare students for their thesis research. The final residency allows completing students to present their thesis findings to the larger environmental education and RRU community and incorporates their final courses, preparing them to be leaders in the field.

Students should expect to be fully occupied during the residency period. The regular classroom schedule is Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. with homework, readings, and team meetings done outside of these hours. There are activities during the regular workday and in the evenings. In addition to educational activities, there are a number of planned field trips and recreational events.

Online Courses
Online courses are delivered through the innovative use of internet technologies. Students draw on a range of learning resources, while using online discussion groups and drop boxes to develop and complete the electronic submission of both individual and team assignments.

Students take one nine-week distance course at a time. Each distance course requires an average time commitment of 10 - 20 hours per week.

Program Laddering
The structure of the program is laddered so that individuals are able to complete a Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, or full Master's degree.

-The Graduate Certificate program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the Diploma or Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication. The Certificate would be awarded upon successful completion of a residency and one distance-based semester (approximately five months). Students may apply for transfer to the Diploma or MA stream during the Graduate Certificate program, or apply to the Diploma or MA program once they have completed the Certificate
-The Graduate Diploma program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the MA in Environmental Education and Communication. The Diploma would be awarded upon successful completion of two residencies and one distance-based semester (approximately 12 months). Students may apply for transfer to the MA stream during the Graduate Diploma program, or apply to the MA program once they have completed the Diploma
-The full two-year program leading to the MA is delivered through a combination of three residential periods, three distance-based semesters, and a thesis

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Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The MA in Environmental Education and Communication is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Applicants who do not have the formal academic education to qualify for admission may be assessed on the basis of both their formal education and their informal learning, in accordance with the Flexible Admission Process.

Graduates of the program have gone on to advance in a variety of fields, from creating schools within the public and private education systems, to leading communications sections within major national and international non-profit organizations, to advising senior government ministers and Premiers, to gaining their PhD degrees with one alumni recently taking on a professorial position in a North American university.

Financial Awards

Royal Roads University has a variety of awards, scholarships, and bursaries available to help offset your tuition fees. The MA in Environmental Education and Communication program has a comparatively high success rate in Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant competitions and many of the program’s students win significant financial awards. The SSHRC award at the MA level often aids the competitiveness of students for future grants, and grant writing is a marketable skill The unique advising structure and ability to gain one-to-one aid in grant writing are important features of RRU that help account for this success.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Graduates will be able to:
-Develop and implement programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with up-to-date, reputable scientific and technological information, as well as traditional knowledge, about current environmental issues and opportunities
-Apply the best current knowledge of learning and cognition to the design, development, and implementation of programs about environmental education and communication
-Design, develop and implement environmental communications and education programs using a range of formats and incorporating relevant current technologies and media
-Evaluate the status of public information and prior knowledge concerning environmental values, issues and opportunities
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the range of perspectives (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values) towards the environment and human activity in the environment
-Evaluate environmental information and education programs
-Develop and implement strategies to foster conflict resolution, constructive dialogue and community knowledge construction concerning environmental issues
-Develop approaches to nurture effective and responsible environmental actions on the part of corporations, governmental and non-governmental organizations and citizens' coalitions
-Provide up to date information about innovations in environmental communication and education
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the nature of contemporary human-environment issues and their implications for education and communications programs
-Develop a systems perspective on problems in environmental education and communications
-Develop an understanding of environmental education and communication functions within organizational contexts

Delivery Model

Combining the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction, the MA in Environmental Education and Communication program allows both busy working professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences allows students to benefit from the intensity of the program while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

Participants in the MA program take 11 courses (41 credits) including the thesis course. Six courses are taken on-campus, and five are delivered at a distance through Internet-based technologies.

Certificate students take the first three courses in the schedule for a total of 9 credits. Diploma students take the first nine courses for a total of 24 credits.

We will utilize a range of educational methodologies, including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules. RRU has become a leader in the delivery of web-based interactive distance education courses, and these will be of great value during non-residential periods.

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The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Read more

Overview

The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Not only do students benefit from the inclusion of such specialist practitioners onto our teaching programmes, but could also be offered highly competitive research opportunities working within the hospital itself.

This MSc programme builds on this wealth of experience and best practice to enable well-qualified students to develop their scientific training and employability skills within a Biomedical context. The need for innovation and a multidisciplinary approach to Biomedical Science has never been more important. The teaching strategies embedded within this programme embrace these principles in its pursuit of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

IBMS Accreditation

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) as the professional body of Biomedical Scientists within the United Kingdom. The IBMS aims to promote and develop the role of Biomedical Science within healthcare to deliver he best possible service for patient care and safety.

Accreditation is a process of peer review and recognition by the profession of the achievement of quality standards for delivering Masters level programmes.

Individuals awarded a Masters degree accredited by the Institute are eligible for the title of Chartered Scientist and the designation CSci if they meet the other eligibility criteria of corporate membership and active engagement in Continued Professional Development. A Masters level qualification is also one of the entry criteria for the Institute’s Higher Specialist Examination and award of the Higher Specialist Diploma, a pre-requisite for the membership grade of Fellowship and designation FIBMS.

The aim of IBMS accreditation is to ensure that, through a spirit of partnership between the Institute and the University, a good quality degree is achieved that prepares the student for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, critical thinking, personal responsibility and initiative in complex and unpredictable professional environments.

The Institute lists 10 advantages of IBMS accreditation:
1. Advances professional practice to benefit healthcare services and professions related to biomedical science.

2. Develops specific knowledge and competence that underpins biomedical science.

3. Provides expertise to support development of appropriate education and training.

4. Ensures curriculum content is both current and anticipatory of future change.

5. Facilitates peer recognition of education and best practice and the dissemination of information through education and employer networks.

6. Ensures qualification is fit for purpose.

7. Recognises the achievement of a benchmark standard of education.

8. The degree award provides access to professional body membership as a Chartered Scientist and for entry to the Higher Specialist Diploma examination.

9. Strengthens links between the professional body, education providers employers and students.

10. Provides eligibility for the Higher Education Institution (HEI) to become a member of HUCBMS (Heads of University Centres of Biomedical Science)

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomedicalbloodscience/

Course Aims

The main aim of the programme is to provide multidisciplinary, Masters Level postgraduate training in Biomedical Blood Science. This will involve building on existing, undergraduate knowledge in basic science and applying it to clinical, diagnostic and research applications relevant to Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme reflect what successful students should know, understand or to be able to do by the end of the programme. Programme specific learning outcomes are provided in the Programme Specification available by request, but to summarise the overarching course, aims are as follows:

- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of different theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, research interests and practical applications within Blood Science

- To explore and explicitly critique the clinical, diagnostic and research implications within the fields of Clinical Biochemistry,

- Medical Immunology and Haematology, and to place this in the context of a clinical laboratory, fully considering the potential implications for patients, health workers and research alike

- To develop a critical awareness of Biomedical ethics and to fully integrate these issues into project management including grant application and business planning

- To support student autonomy and innovation by providing opportunities for students to demonstrate originality in developing or applying their own ideas

- To direct students to integrate a complex knowledge base in the scrutiny and accomplishment of professional problem-solving scenarios and project development

- To enable student acquirement of advanced laboratory practical competencies and high level analytical skills

- To promote and sustain communities of practice that allow students to share best practice, encourage a multidisciplinary approach to problem-solving and to develop extensive communication skills, particularly their ability to convey complex, underpinning knowledge alongside their personal conclusions and rationale to specialist and nonspecialist listeners

- To provide students with a wide range of learning activities and a diverse assessment strategy in order to fully develop their employability and academic skills, ensuring both professional and academic attainment

Course Content

This one year programme is structured so that all taught sessions are delivered in just two days of the working week. Full-time students are expected to engage in independent study for the remaining 3 days per week. Consolidating taught sessions in this way allows greater flexibility for part-time students who will be expected to attend one day a week for two academic years, reducing potential impact in terms of workforce planning for employers and direct contact for students with needs outside of their academic responsibilities.

Semester 1 will focus on two main areas, the first being Biomedical ethics, grant application and laboratory competencies. The second area focuses on the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Clinical Biochemistry.

Semester 2 will also focus on two main themes; firstly, business planning methodological approaches, analytical reasoning and research. Secondly, the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Haematology and Immunology.

Compulsory Modules (each 15 credits) consist of:
- Biomedical Ethics & Grant Proposal
- Project Management & Business Planning
- Advanced Laboratory Techniques*
- Research Methodologies *
- Case Studies in Blood Science I
- Case Studies in Blood Science II
- Clinical Pathology I
- Clinical Pathology II

*Students who have attained the IBMS Specialist Diploma and are successfully enrolling with accredited prior certified learning are exempt from these two modules.

Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project (60 credits)

This research project and final dissertation of 20,000 words is an excellent opportunity for students to undertake laboratory based research in their chosen topic and should provide an opportunity for them to demonstrate their understanding of the field via applications in Biomedical Science. Biomedical Science practitioners are expected to complete the laboratory and data collection aspects of this module in conjunction with their employers.

Requirements for an Award:
In order to obtain the Masters degree, students are required to satisfactorily accrue 180 M Level credits. Students who exit having accrued 60 or 120 M Level credits excluding the ‘Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project’ are eligible to be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate (PgC) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) respectively

Teaching and Learning Methods

This programme places just as much emphasis on developing the way in which students approach, integrate and apply new knowledge and problem-solving as it is with the acquisition of higher level information. As such, particular emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking, innovation, reflective writing, autonomous learning and communication skills to prepare candidates for a lifetime of continued professional development.

The teaching and learning methods employed throughout this programme reflect these principles. For example, there is greater emphasis on looking at the subject from a patient-orientated, case study driven perspective through problem-based learning (PBL) that encourages students to think laterally, joining up different pieces of information and developing a more holistic level of understanding.

Assessment

The rich and varied assessment strategy adopted by this programme ensure student development of employability
and academic skills, providing an opportunity to demonstrate both professional and academic attainment. Assessment design is
largely driven by a number of key principles which include: promotion of independent learning, student autonomy, responsibility for personal learning and development of innovation and originality within one’s chosen area of interest. Note that not all modules culminate in a final examination.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Chemistry. Molecular Chemistry. Molecular chemistry is a creative science, where chemists synthesize molecules with new biological or physical properties to address scientific or societal challenges. Read more

Chemistry: Molecular Chemistry

Molecular chemistry is a creative science, where chemists synthesize molecules with new biological or physical properties to address scientific or societal challenges. Think of new catalytic conversions, lead compounds for future medicines or the next generation of conducting polymers. The specialisation Molecular Chemistry offers education in connection with top-level research in the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM), enabling you to develop in-depth knowledge of the design, synthesis and characterization of unprecedented functional molecular structures.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/chemistry/molecular

Why study Molecular Chemistry at Radboud University?

- The IMM at Radboud University hosts an internationally renowned cluster of molecular chemistry groups, where you will participate in challenging research projects.

- The IMM Organic Chemistry department was recently awarded a 27 million euro NWO Gravity programme grant. Among the teaching staff are two ERC advanced grant and two ERC starting grant winners.

- Teaching takes place in small groups and in a stimulating, personal setting.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Chemistry, Science or a related area

In general, you are admitted with the equivalent of a Dutch Bachelor's degree in Chemistry, Science with relevant subjects, or a related programme in molecular science. In case of other pre-education, students must have passed preliminary examinations containing the subject matter of the following well-known international textbooks (or equivalent literature). Any deficiencies in this matter should be eliminated before you can take part in this specialisation. If you want to make sure that you meet our academic requirements, please contact the academic advisor.

- Organic chemistry: e.g. Organic Chemistry (Bruice)

- Biochemistry: e.g. Biochemistry (Lehninger)

- Physical chemistry: e.g. Physical chemistry (Atkins)

- 30 EC of chemistry or chemistry-related courses at third year Bachelor's level

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

- A TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >90 (internet based)

- An IELTS score of ≥6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

Approximately 40% of our graduates take up a PhD position, either in Nijmegen or elsewhere in the world. Our research institutes, in particular the Institute for Molecules and Materials, have vacancies for PhD projects every year. Our graduates also find work as researchers and managers in the chemical industry, or in one of our spin-off companies. A small proportion will not work in science, but for instance as a policymaker at a governmental organisation.

Our approach to this field

The Master's specialisation in Molecular Chemistry offers main stream chemistry courses and research topics, for those students that aim to deepen their knowledge and experimental skills in the heart of chemistry. The Institute for Molecules and Materials offers a state-of-the-art research infrastructure and hosts world-class research groups where you can conduct independent research, under the personal guidance of a researcher. Often, this leads to a scientific publication with you as a co-author.

Besides an internship in fundamental science, you can also chose to perform research in an industrial environment. Approximately one third of our students do one of their internships in a chemical company, both large (e.g. DSM, Synthon, AkzoNobel) and small (e.g. MercaChem, FutureChemistry, Chiralix).

Interested in going abroad? Contact one of our researchers, they can easily connect you to top groups elsewhere in the world. In the past few years, molecular chemistry students did internships in Oxford (UK), Princeton (US), Berkeley (US), Karolinska Institute (Sweden), ETH Zurich (Switzerland), etc.

Our research in this field

In the Master's specialisation Molecular Chemistry, the unique research facilities that Radboud University has to offer are coupled with the top level research within the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). A selection of research groups for this specialisation are:

- Synthetic organic chemistry (Prof. Floris Rutjes): The group focuses on the development of new and sustainable synthetic (multistep)reactions by using bio-, organo- or metal-catalysts or combinations thereof, synthesis of druglike compound libraries, synthesis of bio-orthogonal click-reactions and chemical synthesis in continuous flow microreactors

- Analytical chemistry (Prof. Lutgarde Buydens): Research involves new chemometric methodologies and techniques for the optimisation of molecular structures. The research programme is designed around four areas: Methodological chemometrics, spectroscopic image analysis, molecular chemometrics, and analysis of genomics, metabolomics and proteomics data.

- Bio-organic chemistry (Prof. Jan van Hest): This groups uses Nature as inspiration for the design of functional molecules. Research lines that fit in this specialisation include: design and synthesis of modified peptides to alter their biological function, hybrid polymers containing biomolecules for use as antibacterial materials, and smart compartmentalisation strategies to enable multi-step reactions in a single reaction flask.

- Molecular materials (Prof. Alan Rowan): The aim of the group is the design and synthesis of novel polymers, self-organising molecules and ordered crystals and the subsequent investigation of their properties. Research topics related to his specialisation are: functional systems for application in catalysis, new OLEDS (organic LEDS), and liquid crystals.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/chemistry/molecular

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The MPhil in African Studies offers a taught course with a substantial research component, and provides an excellent foundation for students wanting to develop their knowledge of Africa. Read more
The MPhil in African Studies offers a taught course with a substantial research component, and provides an excellent foundation for students wanting to develop their knowledge of Africa. It is designed for students who wish to enhance their historical and contemporary understanding of Africa’s societies, politics, economies, and cultures, as well as for those who wish to apply for advanced research degrees. The degree thus offers a highly regarded postgraduate qualification relevant to a wide range of professional careers, as well as intensive research and language training for students planning to prepare a doctoral dissertation.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsafmpafs

Course detail

The course introduces the latest research approaches and methodologies in African studies at an advanced level. Students have the advantage of developing an interdisciplinary approach to critical thinking and academic writing, the opportunity to develop skills in an African language, and also receive specialist research training.

By the end of the course, students should have acquired:

1. A deeper knowledge and understanding of African studies and its critical debates.
2. A conceptual and contextual understanding enabling the evaluation of past and present research on Africa and its methodologies.
3. The knowledge and technical skills required for pursuing original research in their chosen area.
4. The ability to situate their own research within current and past methodological and interpretative developments in the field.
5. Increased proficiency in speaking an African language and/or in using an African language for academic purposes.

Format

The MPhil in African Studies is structured by four key elements: a core course, an option course, a dissertation and language training.

African Language Training is also not a formal part of the degree assessment, but all students are required to demonstrate that they have attended language teaching and have made good progress at language acquisition. The language element of the MPhil course is jointly managed by the University of Cambridge Language Centre and the Centre of African Studies. All students are enrolled for Swahili Basic 1 at the University of Cambridge Language Centre, which is taught over 15 weeks during Michaelmas and Lent terms.

Assessment

Formal assessment consists of two parts: coursework essays (submitted for the Core Course and the Option Course) and a dissertation (submitted at the end of the course). You are also required to submit a ‘practice essay’ on a topic related to your dissertation research, and also a formal dissertation proposal, but these are not formally assessed.

The dissertation must be submitted on the last day of Easter full term, and should be between 15,000 and 20,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography). It counts for 60% of the final mark. If the examiners consider it necessary, they may conduct an oral examination on the dissertation before the final MPhil Examiners' meeting in early July.

The Core Course is assessed by means of an essay of no more than 5,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) on a topic chosen from a prescribed list of questions, which is distributed by the MPhil Office in the first week of Lent Term. The Option Courses are also assessed by means of an essay of not more than 5,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography). The Core Course essay and Option Course essay each count for 20% of the final mark and are submitted in Lent Term.
A compulsory practice essay on a topic related to the dissertation is to be submitted in Lent term. This essay does not count towards the final mark but a 'pass' mark is a progression requirement.

All students are enrolled for Swahili Basic 1 at the University of Cambridge Language Centre, which is taught over 15 weeks during Michaelmas and Lent Terms. Formal assessment consists of coursework (2 pieces of homework, 10% each) and two exams at the end of the course in Reading Comprehension (30%) and Listening Comprehension (20%) as well as one Oral Presentation (30%).

Progression requirement to proceed to examined coursework essays: 'Pass' mark for the compulsory practice essay submitted in Lent term (candidates are permitted one resubmission of the practice essay).

Continuing

The Centre of African Studies does not offer a PhD course, but every year several of our MPhil students go on to study for a PhD in Cambridge or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

UAC Nigeria Fund (departmental grant for fieldwork)

Centre for History and Economics Prize Research Grant (grant for fieldwork)

The Charlie Bayne Travel Trust (travel grants for students with a disability)

For more information http://www.african.cam.ac.uk/fellowship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Students entering the Structured Postgraduate Programme in Biology will be under the supervision of an experienced researcher. All academic staff members in the Biology Department are experienced and active researchers and can supervise research students. Read more

Overview

Students entering the Structured Postgraduate Programme in Biology will be under the supervision of an experienced researcher. All academic staff members in the Biology Department are experienced and active researchers and can supervise research students. Information about their research can be found on the Biology Department Website (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/biology/our-research) and interested students should initially contact researchers directly to discuss potential MSc projects.

In most but not all instances, your stipend, university fees, consumable, equipment and travel costs will be paid from a research grant from a national or international grant agency or charity. Your supervisor usually competitively obtains this grant, but students can also obtain their own scholarships.

Upon entering the programme each student will be assigned two additional mentors, an Advisor and an Assessor. The Advisor provides additional mentorship for the student throughout the programme and is someone the student can discuss issues with in addition to their supervisor. The Assessor is a member of staff who will provide an annual constructive critique of the students work programme and will aid, together with the Advisor, in outlining possible future research plans.
In addition to the research project, training is provided through compulsory attendance of a variety of generic and transferable skills as well as subject specific modules. For example, the established Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching and Learning will provide research students with experience in practical class demonstrating and teaching and learning methodologies. Training in subject specific skills is provided through modules offered either through the Biology Department or as part of the Dublin Region Higher Education Alliance (DRHEA). Advanced modules in many life science topics are already established within the Biomedical Sciences and Chemistry strands of the DRHEA provides a variety of to students on the programme. Finally, research students will be encouraged to attend at least one international conference during their programme, at which they will be expected to present an oral or poster presentation.

Course Structure

Students must take a minimum of 10 credits in taught modules (at least 5 in generic/ transferable modules and at least 5 in subject specific/advanced specialist modules).

Career Options

Career Options include PhD research in academic research labs in Ireland or worldwide, positions in the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries, Teaching, Scientific writing, etc. Modules available for postgraduate students at Maynooth University provide transferrable skills for careers in both academic and industry settings.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHD04 Full-time
MHD05 Part-time

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all non-NUI Maynooth qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-NUI Maynooth students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Important: Before applying to PAC, you must contact the head of the laboratory you wish to apply to.
Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/biology/our-courses/msc-biology#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The MSc Clinical Research is designed to recruit students who wish to learn about research methods and evidence based practice in a clinical setting and to develop a career in clinical academia or research with a potential to embark on further training such as a doctoral programme. Read more
The MSc Clinical Research is designed to recruit students who wish to learn about research methods and evidence based practice in a clinical setting and to develop a career in clinical academia or research with a potential to embark on further training such as a doctoral programme. Students will receive training in qualitative and quantitative research methods to develop research competency, research skills and critical judgment in an area of clinical practice.

The programme is well suited for qualified Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Allied Health Care Professionals, Dentists, Pharmacists, Health Science Professionals or Clinical Psychologists who have experience in a clinical setting.

This exciting and stimulating MSc Clinical Research is delivered by the established Centre for Research in Primary and Community Care (CRIPACC) within the School of Health and Social Work at the University of Hertfordshire. CRIPACC is a dedicated, enthusiastic and friendly research centre with a national and international reputation, offering an excellent opportunity to learn.

Aims of the MSc Clinical Research

-Develop a student's academic research career by advancing their research and leadership skills in a clinical area and provide outstanding preparation for future research training, including progression to doctoral studies
-Equip the student with a core set of skills and knowledge of relevant theory and research methodologies in clinical research as well as a thorough understanding of the research process from planning, conducting, analysing and disseminating, to develop them into an independent researcher in their clinical setting
-Enhance skills and knowledge that are transferable across a diversity of healthcare settings at an individual and organisational level, such as critical thinking, project management, use of IT and problem solving skills
-Provide a supportive and stimulating blended learning environment, including small group teaching, Master classes, and a variety of e-learning teaching methods, and delivered by experienced and dedicated researchers in the internationally renowned research centre

Why choose this course?

-Highly rated by past students as a positive experience and well organised course. Evidence Based Practice and Patient and Public Involvement in Research modules were particularly popular
-Experienced multi-disciplinary lecturers with established track records in health-related research such as Adolescent, Child and Family Health; Older People’s Health and Complex Conditions; Food and Public Health; Patient Experience and Public Involvement; and Evidence Based Practice
-Furthering the student’s academic career through personalised mentorship in line with the HEE/NIHR integrated academic career pathway. CRIPACC has a strong track record of mentoring having led the NIHR/CNO Health Research Training Fellow mentorship scheme and the local scheme developed in response to the Athena Swan Charter
-Excellent opportunities to disseminate the student’s work through publication and presentation at conferences
-A unique Clinical Research Dissertation where the student produces a ready-to-use research grant application for application in their clinical setting or a doctoral fellowship
-In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, the School of Health and Social Work of which CRIPACC was a major contributor demonstrated an outcome of 82% of research quality being rated as 3* and 4*, with an impact and environment outcome of 100% at 3* and 4*
-Two state-of-the-art Learning Resources Centres open 24/7 to meet modern integrated learning resources and services

Careers

On completion of the course, students will be well placed to carry out primary research, promote evidence-based practice by delivering and integrating research findings into their clinical practice and thereby improving health outcomes in their clinical settings. Students will be confident in publishing papers and presenting for conferences. Students will be prepared to apply for research grant funding and/or furthering their clinical academic career by pursuing a Doctorate degree.

Teaching methods

The programme is taught through a combination of innovative lectures, seminars, small group teaching, face-to-face tutorials, workshops, online teaching and individual supervision. Training is flexible and teaching is provided in blocks of two full days, which allows students to organise their time effectively to manage the demands of clinical practice and academic study.

Different assessment methods are used, including coursework and practicals. Coursework includes essays, short pieces of writing work, blogs, critical review, whereas practicals include oral presentations.

In addition, the University has an excellent reputation in blended learning and is supported by the Learning and Teaching Innovation Centre (LTIC). The MSc programme team collaborate with the LTIC and benefit from their expertise in incorporating effective learning, teaching and assessment methods into their modules.

The course is supported by a dedicated Information Manager and the two state-of-the-art Learning Resource Centres, which provide information, computing, study and coursework support. A versatile online inter-active learning environment, StudyNet, allows every student to access information relevant to their studies online through a web browser both on and off campus available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Structure

Core Modules
-Clinical Research Dissertation
-Clinical Trials, Design and Management
-Evidence Based Practice - Distance Learning
-Patient and Public Involvement in Research
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Quantitative Research Methods

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Our MSc Advanced Midwifery Practice and Leadership course gives registered midwives the knowledge and skills they need to enhance their practice and prepare for leadership roles. Read more

Our MSc Advanced Midwifery Practice and Leadership course gives registered midwives the knowledge and skills they need to enhance their practice and prepare for leadership roles.

The course is aimed at midwives registered with a relevant professional, statutory or equivalent regulatory body. You will study content that reflects professional, UK-wide government and international benchmarks for advanced level practice in health and social care, enhancing your suitability for revalidation.

This includes contemporary knowledge and skills in clinical and direct care practice, leadership and collaborative practice, improving quality and developing practice, and developing self and others.

You will learn how to develop efficient and ethical ways of working that offer a better quality of life and care by placing service users and carers at the centre of decision-making and service redesign. 

Special features

Flexible learning

Study this course full-time over one year or part-time for a maximum of five years depending on your other commitments.

Tailor your course

Choose from a wide range of course units to suit your own interests, with midwifery-specific units including Leadership and Managing Change.

Teaching and learning

We use a range of teaching and learning methods, including face-to-face, blended and online learning.

The course focuses on an active learning approach and is designed to prompt the discovery, processing and application of knowledge through collaboration and cooperation.

You will draw on your own experiences - both academic and work-based - when learning. The course will promote the construction of understanding through task-related activities and reflection.

We have extensive experience and good practice in online learning, with dedicated e-learning technologists to support you and our staff in making the most of the e-learning platform.

Find out more by visiting the postgraduate teaching and learning page.

Coursework and assessment

You can undertake standalone units as short courses for professional development purposes only, or build up a selection of optional and compulsory course units to complete a PGCert or PGDip academic award and, on completion of a dissertation unit, an MSc.

The dissertation unit enables you to consolidate your learning by completing a piece of work from a range of options:

  • research grant proposal;
  • full or adapted systematic review;
  • report-based dissertation including:
  • public health report/health needs assessment;
  • service development/organisational change audit;
  • evaluation of service delivery/policy.

We use a range of assessments throughout the course to assess your knowledge and understanding and to develop your intellectual and practical skills.

Course unit details

You can study individual units as standalone short courses or build up units of study towards a PGCert or PGDip award, and undertake a dissertation to complete the MSc award. See the  CPD Units  page for more information.

Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) (60 credits)

You will initially develop your specialist knowledge and clinical practice relating to midwifery, particularly in relation to leadership and management.

Recognising your key role in practice, these clinically-focused units of study will enable you to enhance practice and service delivery.

45 credits can be undertaken from a variety of optional course units to best suit your professional specialism.

15 credits will comprise one core unit on Developing Practice and Managing Change.

Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) (120 credits)

You will further explore and develop advanced clinical practice in midwifery by selecting further optional units from the portfolio of units available.

30 credits can be undertaken from a variety of optional course units to best suit your professional specialism.

30 credits comprising two compulsory course units - Research Design and Critical Appraisal and Evidence Synthesis - will also be taken.

Master of Science (MSc) (180 credits)

After successfully completing the 120 credits for the PGDip, you may be eligible to undertake a dissertation from a range of options:

  • research grant proposal;
  • full or adapted systematic review;
  • report-based dissertation.

Course collaborators

Some course units are delivered in partnership with the Christie and the Central Manchester NHS Foundation Trust , which are National Centres of Excellence.

Facilities

The University of Manchester offers extensive library and online services to help you get the most out of your studies.

Disability support

For those students who declare a disability, practical support and advice is available from the Disability Support Office. Email: 

CPD opportunities

You can take individual units from this course as standalone courses for continuing professional development (CPD). See the nursing, midwifery and social work CPD page for further information.

Career opportunities

Our course is structured around the real challenges facing advanced level practitioners, and each unit will draw from, and build on, your own professional experience.

This will enable you to apply your new knowledge to midwifery and mould the course to best suit your learning requirements.

Accrediting organisations

The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) has validated the following units:

  • Multiprofessional Support of Learning and Assessment in Practice (Mentorship)
  • Preparation of Supervisors of Midwives (POSOM)

The General Pharmaceutical Council has also validated the Independent Prescribing unit, which is also available as a standalone short course



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Our MSc Advanced Nursing Practice and Leadership course gives registered nurses the knowledge and skills they need to enhance their practice and prepare for leadership roles. Read more

Our MSc Advanced Nursing Practice and Leadership course gives registered nurses the knowledge and skills they need to enhance their practice and prepare for leadership roles.

The course is aimed at nurses registered with a relevant professional, statutory or equivalent regulatory body. You will study content that reflects professional, UK-wide government and international benchmarks for advanced level practice in health and social care, enhancing your suitability for revalidation.

This includes contemporary knowledge and skills in clinical and direct care practice, leadership and collaborative practice, improving quality and developing practice, and developing self and others.

You will learn how to develop efficient and ethical ways of working that offer a better quality of life and care by placing service users and carers at the centre of decision-making and service redesign. 

Special features

Flexible learning

Study this course full-time over one year or part-time for a maximum of five years depending on your other commitments.

Tailor your course

Choose from a wide range of course units to suit your own interests, with nursing-specific units including Leadership and Managing Change.

Teaching and learning

We use a range of teaching and learning methods, including face-to-face, blended and online learning.

The course focuses on an active learning approach and is designed to prompt the discovery, processing and application of knowledge through collaboration and cooperation.

You will draw on your own experiences - both academic and work-based - when learning. The course will promote the construction of understanding through task-related activities and reflection.

We have extensive experience and good practice in online learning, with dedicated e-learning technologists to support you and our staff in making the most of the e-learning platform.

Find out more by visiting the postgraduate teaching and learning page.

Coursework and assessment

You can undertake standalone units as short courses for professional development purposes only, or build up a selection of optional and compulsory course units to complete a PGCert or PGDip academic award and, on completion of a dissertation unit, an MSc.

The dissertation unit enables you to consolidate your learning by completing a piece of work from a range of options:

  • research grant proposal;
  • full or adapted systematic review;
  • report-based dissertation including:
  • public health report/health needs assessment;
  • service development/organisational change audit;
  • evaluation of service delivery/policy.

We use a range of assessments throughout the course to assess your knowledge and understanding and to develop your intellectual and practical skills.

Course unit details

You can study individual units as standalone short courses or build up units of study towards a PGCert or PGDip award, and undertake a dissertation to complete the MSc award. See the  CPD Units  page for more information.

Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) (60 credits)

You will initially develop your specialist knowledge and clinical practice relating to nursing, particularly in relation to leadership and management.

Recognising your key role in practice, these clinically-focused units of study will enable you to enhance practice and service delivery.

45 credits can be undertaken from a variety of optional course units to best suit your professional specialism.

15 credits will comprise one core unit on Developing Practice and Managing Change.

Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) (120 credits)

You will further explore and develop advanced clinical practice in nursing by selecting further optional units from the portfolio of units available.

30 credits can be undertaken from a variety of optional course units to best suit your professional specialism.

30 credits comprising two compulsory course units - Research Design and Critical Appraisal and Evidence Synthesis - will also be taken.

Master of Science (MSc) (180 credits)

After successfully completing the 120 credits for the PGDip, you may be eligible to undertake a dissertation from a range of options:

  • research grant proposal;
  • full or adapted systematic review;
  • report-based dissertation.

Career opportunities

Our course is structured around the real challenges facing advanced level practitioners, and each unit will draw from, and build on, your own professional experience.

This will enable you to apply your new knowledge to nursing and mould the course to best suit your learning requirements.

Accrediting organisations

The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) has validated the following units:

  • Multiprofessional Support of Learning and Assessment in Practice (Mentorship)
  • Preparation of Supervisors of Midwives (POSOM)

The General Pharmaceutical Council has also validated the Independent Prescribing unit, which is also available as a standalone short course .



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Our MSc Advanced Social Work Practice and Leadership course gives registered social workers the knowledge and skills they need to enhance their practice and prepare for leadership roles. Read more

Our MSc Advanced Social Work Practice and Leadership course gives registered social workers the knowledge and skills they need to enhance their practice and prepare for leadership roles.

The course is aimed at social workers registered with a relevant professional, statutory or equivalent regulatory body. You will study content that reflects professional, UK-wide government and international benchmarks for advanced level practice in health and social care, enhancing your suitability for revalidation.

This includes contemporary knowledge and skills in clinical and direct care practice, leadership and collaborative practice, improving quality and developing practice, and developing self and others.

You will learn how to develop efficient and ethical ways of working that offer a better quality of life and care by placing service users and carers at the centre of decision-making and service redesign. 

Special features

Flexible learning

Study this course full-time over one year or part-time for a maximum of five years depending on your other commitments.

Tailor your course

Choose from a wide range of course units to suit your own interests, with social work-specific units including Leadership and Managing Change.

Teaching and learning

We use a range of teaching and learning methods, including face-to-face, blended and online learning.

The course focuses on an active learning approach and is designed to prompt the discovery, processing and application of knowledge through collaboration and cooperation.

You will draw on your own experiences - both academic and work-based - when learning. The course will promote the construction of understanding through task-related activities and reflection.

We have extensive experience and good practice in online learning, with dedicated e-learning technologists to support you and our staff in making the most of the e-learning platform.

Find out more by visiting the postgraduate teaching and learning page.

Coursework and assessment

You can undertake standalone units as short courses for professional development purposes only, or build up a selection of optional and compulsory course units to complete a PGCert or PGDip academic award and, on completion of a dissertation unit, an MSc.

The dissertation unit enables you to consolidate your learning by completing a piece of work from a range of options:

  • research grant proposal;
  • full or adapted systematic review;
  • report-based dissertation including:
  • public health report/health needs
  • service development/organisational change audit;
  • evaluation of service delivery/policy.

We use a range of assessments throughout the course to assess your knowledge and understanding and to develop your intellectual and practical skills.

Course unit details

You can study individual units as standalone short courses or build up units of study towards a PGCert or PGDip award, and undertake a dissertation to complete the MSc award. See the CPD units  page for more information.

Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) (60 credits)

You will initially develop your specialist knowledge and clinical practice relating to social work, particularly in relation to leadership and management.

Recognising your key role in practice, these clinically-focused units of study will enable you to enhance practice and service delivery.

45 credits can be undertaken from a variety of optional course units to best suit your professional specialism.

15 credits will comprise one core unit on Developing Practice and Managing Change.

Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) (120 credits)

You will further explore and develop advanced clinical practice in social work by selecting further optional units from the portfolio of units available.

30 credits can be undertaken from a variety of optional course units to best suit your professional specialism.

30 credits comprising two compulsory course units - Research Design and Critical Appraisal and Evidence Synthesis - will also be taken.

Master of Science (MSc) (180 credits)

After successfully completing the 120 credits for the PGDip, you may be eligible to undertake a dissertation from a range of options:

  • research grant proposal;
  • full or adapted systematic review;
  • report-based dissertation.

Course collaborators

Some course units are delivered in partnership with the Christie and the Central Manchester NHS Foundation Trust , which are National Centres of Excellence.

Facilities

The University of Manchester offers extensive library and online services to help you get the most out of your studies.

Disability support

For those students who declare a disability, practical support and advice is available from the Disability Support Office. Email: 

CPD opportunities

You can take individual units from this course as standalone courses for continuing professional development (CPD). See the nursing, midwifery and social work CPD page for further information.



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Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies. Read more

Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies.

You will learn how to master experimental cancer through a combination of traditional teaching and hands-on learning, spending a year as a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Team at The Christie while also taking four structured taught units.

The taught units will see you learn the details of designing and delivering Phase 1 clinical studies, understanding the pre-clinical data required before a clinical programme can commence, and how to optimise early clinical studies to provide evidence for progressing a promising drug into Phase II/III clinical testing.

Alongside the taught elements, you will be allocated to one or more clinical trials that are being conducted by The Christie experimental cancer medicine team. You will have a named trainer and be exposed to tasks required in the setup, delivery, interpretation and audit of a clinical study.

Nursing and physician students will be expected to participate in patient care, including new and follow-on patient clinics, treatment and care-giving episodes with patients.

For clinical trials coordinators, no direct patient contact is envisaged and duties will involve clinical trial setup, protocol amendments, database setup, data entry, costing and billing for clinical research.

You will be able to choose two aspects of your direct clinical trial research experience to write up for your two research projects in a dissertation format. This will give you the skills and knowledge required to critically report medical, scientific and clinically related sciences for peer review.

Aims

The primary purpose of the MRes in Experimental Cancer Medicine is to provide you with the opportunity to work within a premier UK Phase 1 cancer clinical trials unit and, through a mix of taught and experiential learning, master the discipline of Experimental Cancer Medicine.

Special features

Extensive practical experience

You will spend most of your time gaining hands-on experience within The Christie's Experimental Cancer Medicine Team.

Additional course information

Meet the course team

Dr Natalie Cook is a Senior Clinical Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie. She completed a PhD at Cambridge, investigating translational therapeutics and biomarker assay design in pancreatic cancer.

Professor Hughes is Chair of Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Strategic Director of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team at The Christie. He is a member of the research strategy group for Manchester Cancer Research Centre. He serves on the Biomarker evaluation review panel for CRUK grant applications.

Professor Hughes was previously Global Vice-President for early clinical development at AstraZeneca, overseeing around 100 Phase 0/1/2 clinical studies. He was previously Global Vice-President for early phase clinical oncology, having been involved in over 200 early phase clinical studies.

Dr Matthew Krebs is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie.

He has a PhD in circulating biomarkers and postdoctoral experience in single cell and ctDNA molecular profiling. He is Principal Investigator on a portfolio of phase 1 clinical trials and has research interests in clinical development of novel drugs for lung cancer and integration of biomarkers with experimental drug development.

Teaching and learning

Our course is structured around a 2:1 split between clinical-based research projects and taught elements respectively.

Taught course units will predominantly use lectures and workshops.

For the research projects, teaching and learning will take place through one-to-one mentoring from a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team.

The clinical and academic experience of contributors to this course will provide you with an exceptional teaching and learning experience.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed through oral presentations, single best answer exams, written reports and dissertation.

For each research project, you will write a dissertation of 10,000 to 15,000 words. Examples of suitable practical projects include the following.

Research proposal

  • Compilation of a research proposal to research council/charity
  • Writing a protocol and trial costings for sponsor
  • Research and write a successful expression of interest selected by grant funder for full development

Publication-based/dissertation by publication

  • Writing a clinical study report
  • Authoring a peer-review journal review/original article

Service development/professional report/ report based dissertation

  • Public health report/outbreak report/health needs assessment/health impact assessment
  • Proposal for service development/organisational change
  • Audit/evaluate service delivery/policy
  • Implement recommended change from audit report

Adapted systematic review (qualitative data)

  • Compiling the platform of scientific evidence for a new drug indication from literature
  • Review of alternative research methodologies from literature

Full systematic review that includes data collection (quantitative data)

  • Referral patterns for Phase 1 patients

Qualitative or quantitative empirical research

  • Design, conduct, analyse and report an experiment

Qualitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing quantitative data

  • Compilation, mining and analysis of existing clinical data sets

Quantitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing qualitative data/theoretical study/narrative review

  • Policy analysis or discourse analysis/content analysis
  • A critical review of policy using framework analysis

Facilities

Teaching will take place within The Christie NHS Foundation Trust , Withington.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course is relevant to physician, nursing and clinical research students who are considering a career in Phase 1 clinical studies.

The course provides a theoretical and experiential learning experience and offers a foundation for roles within other experimental cancer medicine centres within the UK and EU, as well as careers in academia, the pharmaceutical industry, clinical trials management and medicine.

The MRes is ideal for high-calibre graduates and professionals wishing to undertake directly channelled research training in the clinical and medical oncology field.



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The School of Design offers a practice-based MRes pathway built on the wide range of our design research exploring the space between society and technology supported by expertise spanning Innovation Design Engineering, Global Innovation Design, Design Products, Healthcare Design, Service Design, Vehicle Design and Intelligent Mobility. Read more

The School of Design offers a practice-based MRes pathway built on the wide range of our design research exploring the space between society and technology supported by expertise spanning Innovation Design Engineering, Global Innovation Design, Design Products, Healthcare Design, Service Design, Vehicle Design and Intelligent Mobility.

The pathway welcomes a broad approach to design research and encourages experimentation in practice-based methods supported by experienced researchers. Approaches can range from User Centred Design, Ethnographic, Anthropological, Action Research, Participatory Design Research, Cybernetics, Grounded Theory, to Transformation Design, Speculative, and Critical Design. We encourage diverse candidates who want to focus on commercial research, to prepare for doctoral studies and a future career in academic research or use the programme for career change to develop new skills and identify new research interests. Students will be introduced to relevant design research tools, methods, methodologies, theories and epistemologies aimed at supporting the development of a personal research approach. Applicants to the MRes Design pathway will benefit from an advanced practice-based design research culture and enjoy the freedom and autonomy that a self-directed research journey allows.

The School of Design has a long history of design research that can be traced back to Bruce Archer and the NHS hospital bed design in the 1960s through to today’s researchers who are internationally engaged in a broad range of areas from intelligent mobility through to citizen science, the future of making, socio-cultural design, experimental design, design for safety, design policy, service design and artificial intelligence and robotics as well as providing strategic advice to government and agencies. Recent commercial research funding partners have included Huawei, Tata, Airbus, Microsoft, and Intel amongst others with grant-maintained funding from the AHRC, EPSRC and the Lloyds Register Foundation.

We also have an excellent set of visiting experts and a global network of research collaborators that we draw on in our integrated School-wide research culture. These also bring strong synergies with the other RCA Schools and expertise areas including the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design combined with a strong local set of collaborations with the Science Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Design Museum and Imperial College London with whom we share three of our master’s programmes.The pathway encourages experimentation in practice-based research, supported by experienced researchers working on both commercial and grant maintained projects across the School’s major research themes, in areas including mobility, healthcare and the future of making. The training we provide through designing research and researching through design will be suitable for both commercial and academic careers as a stand-alone qualification and act as an accelerator to prepare for doctoral studies.

The School has an excellent set of commercial partners and a global network of research collaborators that we draw on in our integrated School-wide research culture. These also bring strong synergies and collaborations with the other RCA Schools and expertise areas including the Helen Hamlyn Centre and Sustain. Commercial research projects include working with Huawei, Tata, Airbus, Microsoft and Intel amongst others. We also have a strong local network that includes collaborations with the Science Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Design Museum and Imperial College London, with whom we share two of our masters programmes. Applicants to the MRes Design pathway will benefit from an advanced practice-based design research culture and enjoy the freedom and autonomy of a self-directed research journey.



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The dynamics of the contemporary international environment, complex and interconnected as it is, presents an array of challenges for policy analysts, decision makers and scholars alike. Read more

The dynamics of the contemporary international environment, complex and interconnected as it is, presents an array of challenges for policy analysts, decision makers and scholars alike. This situation is especially relevant to the Middle East and Mediterranean regions as areas fraught with chronic tension, domestic and international conflict, and which face several acute social and economic issues.

Against this backdrop, the new graduate program in Diplomacy Studies is intended to elucidate the role of diplomacy as a main vehicle and mechanism for systematically addressing the broad cluster of issues that affect the entire region, and which can no longer be effectively dealt with exclusively from a narrow unilateral or bilateral vantage point.

The program is primarily intended for practitioners who are employed in a range of public and private international, transnational and multilateral organizations, as well as for future diplomats, researchers, and academics abroad and in Israel.

What you will study

The focus of the program is such that it will bring to the fore the fundamental role of collaborative diplomatic mechanisms and as such is designed to provide students with new insights, concepts and analytical tools for fully understanding the enhanced functions of diplomacy in this new setting. The program is intended to enable students to identify effective solutions for a broad range of political, cultural and economic issues with which they will be faced, and for their continued involvement as bureaucrats, officials and decision makers in the context of complex negotiating situations and policy implementation. The full curriculum can be viewed here.

The one-year program is taught in English over three consecutive semesters from October to August. Exceptional students wishing to apply to the thesis track will need, upon acceptance, to submit a research thesis within one year of completing their coursework.

Upon completion of the program, students will be awarded an MA in Political Science, with a specialization in Diplomacy Studies from the School of Political Sciences and the Division of International Relations.

Careers

Graduates of the program will be well placed to pursue careers in the field of foreign relations at their home countries and with international institutions. Graduates will also be well placed within international NGO’s who act as points of contact between different countries, both in the capacity of mediators and of educators

Courses

Core Courses

  • The New Diplomacy: Structure, Technology And Processes
  • Theories of Diplomacy
  • Human Rights, Ethics and Diplomacy
  • Foreign Policy and Diplomacy in Practice (Workshop)* 
  • Diplomatic simulation (Workshop)

Elective courses

Every year a set of elective courses is being reviewed and revised. Please contact the program coordinator to obtain further details. 

For a comprehensive list of courses and curriculum please click here

* Foreign diplomats serving in Israel may participate

Faculty

The School of Political Sciences faculty staff hold a range of specializations that cover a broad range of fields, including international proliferation, Israel’s foreign policy, strategic studies, theories of international relations, public rhetoric of war and peace, and specializations on the USA, Russia and the Caucuses, South and East Asia. For a full list of faculty staff and their fields please visit us here.

Scholarships

This program is eligible for MASA grant. For a full list of scholarships available please click here.

To Israeli students who have started their studies, we offer a Ruderman Excellence Scholarship. The scholarship includes a $5,000 dollar grant and a 10-day study tour at New York University (NYU). For further inquiries please contact the program coordinator. 

Practicum

Students will have an opportunity to experience the practices of diplomatic processes first-hand via practicum, designed to help integrate the insights and lessons drawn from the courses into a sophisticated and analytics perspective in the real world. Within the framework of this practicum, students will participate in an internship under the auspices of institutions and organizations, which address issues and predicaments that are relevant to diplomatic initiatives and processes (both unilateral, bilateral and multilateral), with emphasis on the Middle-East and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Read more.



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The Melbourne Law Masters is a graduate law program of the highest quality, available to law and non-law graduates. Melbourne Law School’s specialisation in intellectual property (IP) is one of the largest and most respected specialist IP law programs in the world. Read more

The Melbourne Law Masters is a graduate law program of the highest quality, available to law and non-law graduates.

Melbourne Law School’s specialisation in intellectual property (IP) is one of the largest and most respected specialist IP law programs in the world. Its extensive range of challenging, cutting-edge subjects covers the spectrum of IP protection regimes, and are practically focused and theoretically rigorous. Many of the specialisation's subjects are accredited by the Trans-Tasman IP Attorneys Board (TTIPAB). This program is ideal for those seeking accreditation as a patent and/or trade marks attorney in Australia and New Zealand, as well as for those seeking to develop or expand their expertise in intellectual property law generally.

PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

By satisfactorily completing appropriate subjects, a suitably qualified person may be accredited with satisfying all of the topic groups necessary for registration as a trade marks attorney and for registration as a patent attorney under the trans-Tasman regime. Applicants seeking registration as a patent attorney and/or trade marks attorney should seek advice from the TTIPAB and the Law School on subject selection at the time of enrolment. For more information, please see the Trans-Tasman IP Attorneys Board.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Graduates of the Master of Intellectual Property Law will:

  • Have an advanced and integrated understanding of the complex body of knowledge in the field of Australian and New Zealand intellectual property law, including the international context and:
  • the requirements that need to be satisfied to establish entitlement to the grant of intellectual property rights in both jurisdictions
  • the procedures by which grant of intellectual property rights are obtained
  • the requirements that need to be satisfied to establish infringement of those rights
  • the exceptions, limitations and defences to infringement that apply to these rights
  • the means for, and constraints on, enforcement and commercialisation of these intellectual property rights.
  • Have expert, specialised cognitive and technical skills that equip them to independently:
  • analyse, critically reflect on and synthesise complex information, concepts and theories in the field of intellectual property law
  • research and apply such information, concepts and theories to the relevant body of knowledge and practice; and
  • interpret and transmit their knowledge, skills and ideas to specialist and non-specialist audiences, including clients
  • Apply their knowledge and skills to demonstrate autonomy, expert judgment, adaptability and responsibility as a practitioner and learner in the field of intellectual property law generally.

SUBJECT TIMING AND FORMAT

  • Subjects are taught in an interactive seminar style.
  • Around 90% of subjects in the Melbourne Law Masters are offered on an intensive basis.
  • Semester-length subjects are offered throughout the semester.
  • Class sizes normally range from 20 to 30 students. All subjects have a quota. This ensures class sizes are suitable to provide an optimal learning environment.

Intensive subjects

Intensive subjects are ideal for busy professionals and provide an excellent opportunity to immerse in the subject content.

Subjects are typically taught over five days, either from Monday – Friday or Wednesday – Tuesday, excluding the weekend. This format enables students from interstate or overseas to fly to Melbourne to attend class.

Semester-length subjects

Semester-length subjects are generally taught for two hours in the evening each week during the semester.

Subject materials

Comprehensive reading materials are provided approximately four weeks prior to the commencement of an intensive class. It is expected that students undertake substantial reading before classes begin. Teachers and students are likely to be in contact with each other electronically from the time reading  materials are released to the time assessment is due.



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