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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The MA in Environmental Education and Communication is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Graduates of the program have gone on to advance in a variety of fields, from creating schools within the public and private education systems, to leading communications sections within major national and international non-profit organizations, to advising senior government ministers and Premiers, to gaining their PhD degrees with one alumni recently taking on a professorial position in a North American university.

Financial Awards

Royal Roads University has a variety of awards, scholarships, and bursaries available to help offset your tuition fees. The MA in Environmental Education and Communication program has a comparatively high success rate in Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant competitions and many of the program’s students win significant financial awards. The SSHRC award at the MA level often aids the competitiveness of students for future grants, and grant writing is a marketable skill The unique advising structure and ability to gain one-to-one aid in grant writing are important features of RRU that help account for this success.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Graduates will be able to:
-Develop and implement programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with up-to-date, reputable scientific and technological information, as well as traditional knowledge, about current environmental issues and opportunities
-Apply the best current knowledge of learning and cognition to the design, development, and implementation of programs about environmental education and communication
-Design, develop and implement environmental communications and education programs using a range of formats and incorporating relevant current technologies and media
-Evaluate the status of public information and prior knowledge concerning environmental values, issues and opportunities
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the range of perspectives (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values) towards the environment and human activity in the environment
-Evaluate environmental information and education programs
-Develop and implement strategies to foster conflict resolution, constructive dialogue and community knowledge construction concerning environmental issues
-Develop approaches to nurture effective and responsible environmental actions on the part of corporations, governmental and non-governmental organizations and citizens' coalitions
-Provide up to date information about innovations in environmental communication and education
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the nature of contemporary human-environment issues and their implications for education and communications programs
-Develop a systems perspective on problems in environmental education and communications
-Develop an understanding of environmental education and communication functions within organizational contexts

Delivery Method

Combining the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction, the MA in Environmental Education and Communication program allows both busy working professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences allows students to benefit from the intensity of the program while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

Participants in the MA program take 11 courses (41 credits) including the thesis course. Six courses are taken on-campus, and five are delivered at a distance through Internet-based technologies.

Certificate students take the first three courses in the schedule for a total of 9 credits. Diploma students take the first nine courses for a total of 24 credits.

We will utilize a range of educational methodologies, including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules. RRU has become a leader in the delivery of web-based interactive distance education courses, and these will be of great value during non-residential periods.

Residency
Over two years, MA students attend two separate three-week residencies and one final two-week residency. The first residency introduces the cohort of students to each other, the faculty, and the RRU style of education as they participate in their first two courses. The middle residency incorporates two courses, may have a more directed field-based orientation, and helps prepare students for their thesis research. The final residency allows completing students to present their thesis findings to the larger environmental education and RRU community and incorporates their final courses, preparing them to be leaders in the field.

Students should expect to be fully occupied during the residency period. The regular classroom schedule is Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. with homework, readings, and team meetings done outside of these hours. There are activities during the regular workday and in the evenings. In addition to educational activities, there are a number of planned field trips and recreational events.

Online Courses
Online courses are delivered through the innovative use of internet technologies. Students draw on a range of learning resources, while using online discussion groups and drop boxes to develop and complete the electronic submission of both individual and team assignments.

Students take one nine-week distance course at a time. Each distance course requires an average time commitment of 10 - 20 hours per week.

Program Laddering
The structure of the program is laddered so that individuals are able to complete a Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, or full Master's degree.

-The Graduate Certificate program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the Diploma or Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication. The Certificate would be awarded upon successful completion of a residency and one distance-based semester (approximately five months). Students may apply for transfer to the Diploma or MA stream during the Graduate Certificate program, or apply to the Diploma or MA program once they have completed the Certificate
-The Graduate Diploma program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the MA in Environmental Education and Communication. The Diploma would be awarded upon successful completion of two residencies and one distance-based semester (approximately 12 months). Students may apply for transfer to the MA stream during the Graduate Diploma program, or apply to the MA program once they have completed the Diploma
-The full two-year program leading to the MA is delivered through a combination of three residential periods, three distance-based semesters, and a thesis

Read less
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The MA in Environmental Education and Communication is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Applicants who do not have the formal academic education to qualify for admission may be assessed on the basis of both their formal education and their informal learning, in accordance with the Flexible Admission Process.

Graduates of the program have gone on to advance in a variety of fields, from creating schools within the public and private education systems, to leading communications sections within major national and international non-profit organizations, to advising senior government ministers and Premiers, to gaining their PhD degrees with one alumni recently taking on a professorial position in a North American university.

Financial Awards

Royal Roads University has a variety of awards, scholarships, and bursaries available to help offset your tuition fees. The MA in Environmental Education and Communication program has a comparatively high success rate in Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant competitions and many of the program’s students win significant financial awards. The SSHRC award at the MA level often aids the competitiveness of students for future grants, and grant writing is a marketable skill The unique advising structure and ability to gain one-to-one aid in grant writing are important features of RRU that help account for this success.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Graduates will be able to:
-Develop and implement programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with up-to-date, reputable scientific and technological information, as well as traditional knowledge, about current environmental issues and opportunities
-Apply the best current knowledge of learning and cognition to the design, development, and implementation of programs about environmental education and communication
-Design, develop and implement environmental communications and education programs using a range of formats and incorporating relevant current technologies and media
-Evaluate the status of public information and prior knowledge concerning environmental values, issues and opportunities
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the range of perspectives (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values) towards the environment and human activity in the environment
-Evaluate environmental information and education programs
-Develop and implement strategies to foster conflict resolution, constructive dialogue and community knowledge construction concerning environmental issues
-Develop approaches to nurture effective and responsible environmental actions on the part of corporations, governmental and non-governmental organizations and citizens' coalitions
-Provide up to date information about innovations in environmental communication and education
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the nature of contemporary human-environment issues and their implications for education and communications programs
-Develop a systems perspective on problems in environmental education and communications
-Develop an understanding of environmental education and communication functions within organizational contexts

Delivery Model

Combining the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction, the MA in Environmental Education and Communication program allows both busy working professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences allows students to benefit from the intensity of the program while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

Participants in the MA program take 11 courses (41 credits) including the thesis course. Six courses are taken on-campus, and five are delivered at a distance through Internet-based technologies.

Certificate students take the first three courses in the schedule for a total of 9 credits. Diploma students take the first nine courses for a total of 24 credits.

We will utilize a range of educational methodologies, including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules. RRU has become a leader in the delivery of web-based interactive distance education courses, and these will be of great value during non-residential periods.

Read less
The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Read more

Overview

The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Not only do students benefit from the inclusion of such specialist practitioners onto our teaching programmes, but could also be offered highly competitive research opportunities working within the hospital itself.

This MSc programme builds on this wealth of experience and best practice to enable well-qualified students to develop their scientific training and employability skills within a Biomedical context. The need for innovation and a multidisciplinary approach to Biomedical Science has never been more important. The teaching strategies embedded within this programme embrace these principles in its pursuit of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

IBMS Accreditation

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) as the professional body of Biomedical Scientists within the United Kingdom. The IBMS aims to promote and develop the role of Biomedical Science within healthcare to deliver he best possible service for patient care and safety.

Accreditation is a process of peer review and recognition by the profession of the achievement of quality standards for delivering Masters level programmes.

Individuals awarded a Masters degree accredited by the Institute are eligible for the title of Chartered Scientist and the designation CSci if they meet the other eligibility criteria of corporate membership and active engagement in Continued Professional Development. A Masters level qualification is also one of the entry criteria for the Institute’s Higher Specialist Examination and award of the Higher Specialist Diploma, a pre-requisite for the membership grade of Fellowship and designation FIBMS.

The aim of IBMS accreditation is to ensure that, through a spirit of partnership between the Institute and the University, a good quality degree is achieved that prepares the student for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, critical thinking, personal responsibility and initiative in complex and unpredictable professional environments.

The Institute lists 10 advantages of IBMS accreditation:
1. Advances professional practice to benefit healthcare services and professions related to biomedical science.

2. Develops specific knowledge and competence that underpins biomedical science.

3. Provides expertise to support development of appropriate education and training.

4. Ensures curriculum content is both current and anticipatory of future change.

5. Facilitates peer recognition of education and best practice and the dissemination of information through education and employer networks.

6. Ensures qualification is fit for purpose.

7. Recognises the achievement of a benchmark standard of education.

8. The degree award provides access to professional body membership as a Chartered Scientist and for entry to the Higher Specialist Diploma examination.

9. Strengthens links between the professional body, education providers employers and students.

10. Provides eligibility for the Higher Education Institution (HEI) to become a member of HUCBMS (Heads of University Centres of Biomedical Science)

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomedicalbloodscience/

Course Aims

The main aim of the programme is to provide multidisciplinary, Masters Level postgraduate training in Biomedical Blood Science. This will involve building on existing, undergraduate knowledge in basic science and applying it to clinical, diagnostic and research applications relevant to Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme reflect what successful students should know, understand or to be able to do by the end of the programme. Programme specific learning outcomes are provided in the Programme Specification available by request, but to summarise the overarching course, aims are as follows:

- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of different theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, research interests and practical applications within Blood Science

- To explore and explicitly critique the clinical, diagnostic and research implications within the fields of Clinical Biochemistry,

- Medical Immunology and Haematology, and to place this in the context of a clinical laboratory, fully considering the potential implications for patients, health workers and research alike

- To develop a critical awareness of Biomedical ethics and to fully integrate these issues into project management including grant application and business planning

- To support student autonomy and innovation by providing opportunities for students to demonstrate originality in developing or applying their own ideas

- To direct students to integrate a complex knowledge base in the scrutiny and accomplishment of professional problem-solving scenarios and project development

- To enable student acquirement of advanced laboratory practical competencies and high level analytical skills

- To promote and sustain communities of practice that allow students to share best practice, encourage a multidisciplinary approach to problem-solving and to develop extensive communication skills, particularly their ability to convey complex, underpinning knowledge alongside their personal conclusions and rationale to specialist and nonspecialist listeners

- To provide students with a wide range of learning activities and a diverse assessment strategy in order to fully develop their employability and academic skills, ensuring both professional and academic attainment

Course Content

This one year programme is structured so that all taught sessions are delivered in just two days of the working week. Full-time students are expected to engage in independent study for the remaining 3 days per week. Consolidating taught sessions in this way allows greater flexibility for part-time students who will be expected to attend one day a week for two academic years, reducing potential impact in terms of workforce planning for employers and direct contact for students with needs outside of their academic responsibilities.

Semester 1 will focus on two main areas, the first being Biomedical ethics, grant application and laboratory competencies. The second area focuses on the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Clinical Biochemistry.

Semester 2 will also focus on two main themes; firstly, business planning methodological approaches, analytical reasoning and research. Secondly, the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Haematology and Immunology.

Compulsory Modules (each 15 credits) consist of:
- Biomedical Ethics & Grant Proposal
- Project Management & Business Planning
- Advanced Laboratory Techniques*
- Research Methodologies *
- Case Studies in Blood Science I
- Case Studies in Blood Science II
- Clinical Pathology I
- Clinical Pathology II

*Students who have attained the IBMS Specialist Diploma and are successfully enrolling with accredited prior certified learning are exempt from these two modules.

Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project (60 credits)

This research project and final dissertation of 20,000 words is an excellent opportunity for students to undertake laboratory based research in their chosen topic and should provide an opportunity for them to demonstrate their understanding of the field via applications in Biomedical Science. Biomedical Science practitioners are expected to complete the laboratory and data collection aspects of this module in conjunction with their employers.

Requirements for an Award:
In order to obtain the Masters degree, students are required to satisfactorily accrue 180 M Level credits. Students who exit having accrued 60 or 120 M Level credits excluding the ‘Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project’ are eligible to be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate (PgC) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) respectively

Teaching and Learning Methods

This programme places just as much emphasis on developing the way in which students approach, integrate and apply new knowledge and problem-solving as it is with the acquisition of higher level information. As such, particular emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking, innovation, reflective writing, autonomous learning and communication skills to prepare candidates for a lifetime of continued professional development.

The teaching and learning methods employed throughout this programme reflect these principles. For example, there is greater emphasis on looking at the subject from a patient-orientated, case study driven perspective through problem-based learning (PBL) that encourages students to think laterally, joining up different pieces of information and developing a more holistic level of understanding.

Assessment

The rich and varied assessment strategy adopted by this programme ensure student development of employability
and academic skills, providing an opportunity to demonstrate both professional and academic attainment. Assessment design is
largely driven by a number of key principles which include: promotion of independent learning, student autonomy, responsibility for personal learning and development of innovation and originality within one’s chosen area of interest. Note that not all modules culminate in a final examination.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Molecular chemistry is a creative science, where chemists synthesize molecules with new biological or physical properties to address scientific or societal challenges. Read more

Chemistry: Molecular Chemistry

Molecular chemistry is a creative science, where chemists synthesize molecules with new biological or physical properties to address scientific or societal challenges. Think of new catalytic conversions, lead compounds for future medicines or the next generation of conducting polymers. The specialisation Molecular Chemistry offers education in connection with top-level research in the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM), enabling you to develop in-depth knowledge of the design, synthesis and characterization of unprecedented functional molecular structures.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/chemistry/molecular

Why study Molecular Chemistry at Radboud University?

- The IMM at Radboud University hosts an internationally renowned cluster of molecular chemistry groups, where you will participate in challenging research projects.
- The IMM Organic Chemistry department was recently awarded a 27 million euro NWO Gravity programme grant. Among the teaching staff are two ERC advanced grant and two ERC starting grant winners.
- Teaching takes place in small groups and in a stimulating, personal setting.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Chemistry, Science or a related area
In general, you are admitted with the equivalent of a Dutch Bachelor's degree in Chemistry, Science with relevant subjects, or a related programme in molecular science. In case of other pre-education, students must have passed preliminary examinations containing the subject matter of the following well-known international textbooks (or equivalent literature). Any deficiencies in this matter should be eliminated before you can take part in this specialisation. If you want to make sure that you meet our academic requirements, please contact the academic advisor.
- Organic chemistry: e.g. Organic Chemistry (Bruice)
- Biochemistry: e.g. Biochemistry (Lehninger)
- Physical chemistry: e.g. Physical chemistry (Atkins)
- 30 EC of chemistry or chemistry-related courses at third year Bachelor's level

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- A TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >232 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)
- A IELTS score of >6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

Approximately 40% of our graduates take up a PhD position, either in Nijmegen or elsewhere in the world. Our research institutes, in particular the Institute for Molecules and Materials, have vacancies for PhD projects every year. Our graduates also find work as researchers and managers in the chemical industry, or in one of our spin-off companies. A small proportion will not work in science, but for instance as a policymaker at a governmental organisation.

Our approach to this field

The Master's specialisation in Molecular Chemistry offers main stream chemistry courses and research topics, for those students that aim to deepen their knowledge and experimental skills in the heart of chemistry. The Institute for Molecules and Materials offers a state-of-the-art research infrastructure and hosts world-class research groups where you can conduct independent research, under the personal guidance of a researcher. Often, this leads to a scientific publication with you as a co-author.

Besides an internship in fundamental science, you can also chose to perform research in an industrial environment. Approximately one third of our students do one of their internships in a chemical company, both large (e.g. DSM, Synthon, AkzoNobel) and small (e.g. MercaChem, FutureChemistry, Chiralix).

Interested in going abroad? Contact one of our researchers, they can easily connect you to top groups elsewhere in the world. In the past few years, molecular chemistry students did internships in Oxford (UK), Princeton (US), Berkeley (US), Karolinska Institute (Sweden), ETH Zurich (Switzerland), etc.

Our research in this field

In the Master's specialisation Molecular Chemistry, the unique research facilities that Radboud University has to offer are coupled with the top level research within the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). A selection of research groups for this specialisation are:
- Synthetic organic chemistry (Prof. Floris Rutjes): The group focuses on the development of new and sustainable synthetic (multistep)reactions by using bio-, organo- or metal-catalysts or combinations thereof, synthesis of druglike compound libraries, synthesis of bio-orthogonal click-reactions and chemical synthesis in continuous flow microreactors

- Analytical chemistry (Prof. Lutgarde Buydens): Research involves new chemometric methodologies and techniques for the optimisation of molecular structures. The research programme is designed around four areas: Methodological chemometrics, spectroscopic image analysis, molecular chemometrics, and analysis of genomics, metabolomics and proteomics data.

- Bio-organic chemistry (Prof. Jan van Hest): This groups uses Nature as inspiration for the design of functional molecules. Research lines that fit in this specialisation include: design and synthesis of modified peptides to alter their biological function, hybrid polymers containing biomolecules for use as antibacterial materials, and smart compartmentalisation strategies to enable multi-step reactions in a single reaction flask.

- Molecular materials (Prof. Alan Rowan): The aim of the group is the design and synthesis of novel polymers, self-organising molecules and ordered crystals and the subsequent investigation of their properties. Research topics related to his specialisation are: functional systems for application in catalysis, new OLEDS (organic LEDS), and liquid crystals.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/chemistry/molecular

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The MPhil in African Studies offers a taught course with a substantial research component, and provides an excellent foundation for students wanting to develop their knowledge of Africa. Read more
The MPhil in African Studies offers a taught course with a substantial research component, and provides an excellent foundation for students wanting to develop their knowledge of Africa. It is designed for students who wish to enhance their historical and contemporary understanding of Africa’s societies, politics, economies, and cultures, as well as for those who wish to apply for advanced research degrees. The degree thus offers a highly regarded postgraduate qualification relevant to a wide range of professional careers, as well as intensive research and language training for students planning to prepare a doctoral dissertation.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsafmpafs

Course detail

The course introduces the latest research approaches and methodologies in African studies at an advanced level. Students have the advantage of developing an interdisciplinary approach to critical thinking and academic writing, the opportunity to develop skills in an African language, and also receive specialist research training.

By the end of the course, students should have acquired:

1. A deeper knowledge and understanding of African studies and its critical debates.
2. A conceptual and contextual understanding enabling the evaluation of past and present research on Africa and its methodologies.
3. The knowledge and technical skills required for pursuing original research in their chosen area.
4. The ability to situate their own research within current and past methodological and interpretative developments in the field.
5. Increased proficiency in speaking an African language and/or in using an African language for academic purposes.

Format

The MPhil in African Studies is structured by four key elements: a core course, an option course, a dissertation and language training.

African Language Training is also not a formal part of the degree assessment, but all students are required to demonstrate that they have attended language teaching and have made good progress at language acquisition. The language element of the MPhil course is jointly managed by the University of Cambridge Language Centre and the Centre of African Studies. All students are enrolled for Swahili Basic 1 at the University of Cambridge Language Centre, which is taught over 15 weeks during Michaelmas and Lent terms.

Assessment

Formal assessment consists of two parts: coursework essays (submitted for the Core Course and the Option Course) and a dissertation (submitted at the end of the course). You are also required to submit a ‘practice essay’ on a topic related to your dissertation research, and also a formal dissertation proposal, but these are not formally assessed.

The dissertation must be submitted on the last day of Easter full term, and should be between 15,000 and 20,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography). It counts for 60% of the final mark. If the examiners consider it necessary, they may conduct an oral examination on the dissertation before the final MPhil Examiners' meeting in early July.

The Core Course is assessed by means of an essay of no more than 5,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) on a topic chosen from a prescribed list of questions, which is distributed by the MPhil Office in the first week of Lent Term. The Option Courses are also assessed by means of an essay of not more than 5,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography). The Core Course essay and Option Course essay each count for 20% of the final mark and are submitted in Lent Term.
A compulsory practice essay on a topic related to the dissertation is to be submitted in Lent term. This essay does not count towards the final mark but a 'pass' mark is a progression requirement.

All students are enrolled for Swahili Basic 1 at the University of Cambridge Language Centre, which is taught over 15 weeks during Michaelmas and Lent Terms. Formal assessment consists of coursework (2 pieces of homework, 10% each) and two exams at the end of the course in Reading Comprehension (30%) and Listening Comprehension (20%) as well as one Oral Presentation (30%).

Progression requirement to proceed to examined coursework essays: 'Pass' mark for the compulsory practice essay submitted in Lent term (candidates are permitted one resubmission of the practice essay).

Continuing

The Centre of African Studies does not offer a PhD course, but every year several of our MPhil students go on to study for a PhD in Cambridge or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

UAC Nigeria Fund (departmental grant for fieldwork)

Centre for History and Economics Prize Research Grant (grant for fieldwork)

The Charlie Bayne Travel Trust (travel grants for students with a disability)

For more information http://www.african.cam.ac.uk/fellowship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Students entering the Structured Postgraduate Programme in Biology will be under the supervision of an experienced researcher. All academic staff members in the Biology Department are experienced and active researchers and can supervise research students. Read more

Overview

Students entering the Structured Postgraduate Programme in Biology will be under the supervision of an experienced researcher. All academic staff members in the Biology Department are experienced and active researchers and can supervise research students. Information about their research can be found on the Biology Department Website (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/biology/our-research) and interested students should initially contact researchers directly to discuss potential MSc projects.

In most but not all instances, your stipend, university fees, consumable, equipment and travel costs will be paid from a research grant from a national or international grant agency or charity. Your supervisor usually competitively obtains this grant, but students can also obtain their own scholarships.

Upon entering the programme each student will be assigned two additional mentors, an Advisor and an Assessor. The Advisor provides additional mentorship for the student throughout the programme and is someone the student can discuss issues with in addition to their supervisor. The Assessor is a member of staff who will provide an annual constructive critique of the students work programme and will aid, together with the Advisor, in outlining possible future research plans.
In addition to the research project, training is provided through compulsory attendance of a variety of generic and transferable skills as well as subject specific modules. For example, the established Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching and Learning will provide research students with experience in practical class demonstrating and teaching and learning methodologies. Training in subject specific skills is provided through modules offered either through the Biology Department or as part of the Dublin Region Higher Education Alliance (DRHEA). Advanced modules in many life science topics are already established within the Biomedical Sciences and Chemistry strands of the DRHEA provides a variety of to students on the programme. Finally, research students will be encouraged to attend at least one international conference during their programme, at which they will be expected to present an oral or poster presentation.

Course Structure

Students must take a minimum of 10 credits in taught modules (at least 5 in generic/ transferable modules and at least 5 in subject specific/advanced specialist modules).

Career Options

Career Options include PhD research in academic research labs in Ireland or worldwide, positions in the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries, Teaching, Scientific writing, etc. Modules available for postgraduate students at Maynooth University provide transferrable skills for careers in both academic and industry settings.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/biology/our-courses/msc-biology#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This one-year, full time programme provides an excellent grounding for PhD or other academic study in the Biomedical Sciences. You will learn valuable research skills, biomedical laboratory techniques and a wide range of other transferable skills that will give you an advantage for the rest of your career. Read more

Research profile

This one-year, full time programme provides an excellent grounding for PhD or other academic study in the Biomedical Sciences. You will learn valuable research skills, biomedical laboratory techniques and a wide range of other transferable skills that will give you an advantage for the rest of your career. You can also choose two themes that best suit your interests and career goals.

The programme includes seminars, taught modules and two research projects in our world-recognised research laboratories. We will also cover a range of valuable transferable skills including critical analysis of research papers, learning how to write a project grant application and literature review, and data presentation and statistical analysis.

Programme structure

The programme includes core skills, seminars, taught modules and laboratory projects in our well-resourced laboratories which are at the cutting-edge of Biomedical research.

Students will carry out two 20-week long research projects selected from the themes available. An assessed research proposal is also required for the second project.

Project 1 (September to February)

Cardiovascular Biology
Cell Communication
Genomics & Biological Pathways
Mechanisms of Inflammatory Disease
Reproductive Science 1
Infectious Diseases
Stem Cells, Tissue Injury and Regenerative Medicine - new theme for September 2017

Project 2 (April to August)

Biomedical Imaging
Genes & Disease
Genomic Technologies
Molecular & Cellular Mechanism of Inflammation
Reproductive Science 2
Cancer Biology
Biological Architecture

Students may also be able to undertake projects in Integrative Neuroscience or in other areas of Biomedical Sciences, with the permission of the Programme Director. These students would be required to attend the taught element of one of the above Themes as appropriate.

Research proposal

In March, students submit a research proposal based on the work performed for Project 2. This takes the form of a grant application, as would be prepared for a research organisation, and is assessed.

Career opportunities and 'Follow-on PhDs'

This programme is an excellent stepping-stone to a PhD, or a career in Biomedical research or industry.

In addition, every year there are vacancies for PhD studentships in the School of Biomedical Sciences and staff are always on the lookout for the outstanding postgraduate students who are on this Programme to encourage them to apply.

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This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Read more
This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Documentary stories are now being told via telecommunications, in cinemas, on TV, and online.

In this contemporary course you will be provided tuition in the technological, ethical and intellectual developments in this recent boom in theatrical, broadcast and cross platform documentary. You will be taught by award winning documentary filmmakers and high profile TV, film and cross platform commissioners. Tutors Marc Isaacs , Helen Littleboy and Victoria Mapplebeck, are all active filmmakers with excellent industry contacts and through collaborating with them on work in progress you will gain a unique learning opportunity that will provide genuine vocational experience. We also welcome regular guest lecturers, giving students a direct link to industry professionals and the opportunity to learn from their substantial experience and expertise.

On graduating, our students are skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have gone on to become award-winning filmmakers and journalists.

This is a split campus course, taught in both Egham and Bedford Square in central London.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/madocumentarybypractice.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We have had regular lectures from award winning filmmaker Marc Isaacs, Channel 4 commissioner Kate Vogel and Emily Renshaw Smith, commissioner of Current TV. Forthcoming guest lectures include BBC Director Adam Curtis, feature director Chris Waitts and Matt Locke, Commissioning Editor for New Media and Education at Channel 4.

- Guest commissioners provide students with knowledge of and links to current commissioning strategies. Several of our invited commissioners have subsequently worked with our students on developing their projects.

- You will have exclusive 24-7 access to six purpose-built editing rooms equipped with Final Cut Studio 2 on Mac Pro editing systems. Our Location Store provides an equipment loan and advisory support service with a lending stock that includes twenty Sony HVR-V1E cameras, twenty Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

- With access to the latest digital recording and editing equipment, and covering areas from authorship to authenticity, this course offers you an in-depth study of creative production, taking you from conception through commissioning to research, composition and exhibition.

- You will be provided with excellent tuition in self-shooting documentary filmmaking techniques. You will be able to meet the growing demand for self-shooting directors and producers in both the independent and commercial documentary industries.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

Course content and structure

You will study three core units during the year.

Core course units:
- From Idea to Screen
From Idea to Screen introduces the practice of documentary film making - exploring eclectic notions of the genre, from the conventional to those more associated with fine art. The course tutors also use their own work which is deconstructed across all its constituent parts idea, conception, pre-production planning, and research, shooting and post-production. Ideas to Screen will explore ways of translating observations and ideas into imagery – both visual and aural. There will be an emphasis on experimental forms of narrative – at time crossing the boundaries between fine art and documentary. For the final and assessed project in this unit, each student will be asked make a video ‘portrait’ of a character.

- Foundations of Production
Contemporary documentary production requires managerial and business skills as well as creative ones. This unit will instruct you in the industrial skills required for the production of video, television and multimedia documentary. These include researching the market, writing proposals, acquiring funding for development and production, drafting contracts, drawing up budgets, copyright clearance, and marketing.

- Major Documentary Production – Dissertation
Developing out of study, research and practice from previous units, you will direct and produce a substantial documentary production. This is the largest assignment in the course and is appropriately weighted. The unit is tutorial based.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- gained invaluable experience of both authored and commercial documentary production

- the ability to develop their own ideas, preparing them for the documentary industry but also finding ways to reinvent it

- an understanding of documentary film genre and its changing boundaries as well as the changing technologies and their impact on the genre

- an advanced understanding of the processes of making a documentary film from initial concept to final form and the various stages of production.

- an awareness of the institutions and mechanisms of the UK film and television industry

- a critical knowledge of the current and changing platforms for documentary film, from cinema to television and the internet.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including project work, photo essays and written production papers.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, our students will be skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have become award-winning filmmakers and BBC journalists; recently one of our alumni Charlotte Cook was appointed Strand Co -Coordinator of BBC’s prestigious Documentary Strand Storyville.

Our graduate students have won and been nominated for many awards including, The One World Broadcasting Trust Award and The Jerwood First Cuts Documentary. In 2009 two of our students, Aashish Gadhvi and Michael Watts won the One World Student Documentary Fund which funds challenging international documentary projects.

Syed Atef Amjad Ali has recently had his film The Red Mosque previewed at The Amsterdam International Documentary Festival. The Red Mosque was made with production funds Syed received from The Jan Virijman Fund and also from the One World-Broadcasting Award.

Chung Yee Yu has won the Cinematography Award at Next Frame (A Touring Festival of International Student Film and Video) Chung Yee Yu has also won the Silver Award of Open Category of IFVA (The Hong Kong Independent Short Film & Video Awards)

Recent graduate Suzanne Cohen has just has her work selected for the BBC’s Film Network website; an interactive showcase for ‘new British filmmakers, screening three new short films in broadband quality every week, adding to a growing catalogue of great shorts’.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. Read more
From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. The producer’s role has been transformed by the advent of globalization, digital technology and the multi-channel environment.

This course offers aspiring producers an opportunity to acquire the creative entrepreneurial skills required to enter a rapidly changing film and television universe. The course concentrates on developing creative, managerial, financial and legal capabilities for a successful career in production.

This Master’s degree reflects the global nature of the contemporary media marketplace but its main focus is UK film and television fiction, rather than factual production. It is targeted at those who want to follow a career path as producers, rather than as directors.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/maproducingfilmandtelevision.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course benefits enormously from close links with the film and television industry. Tony Garnett (producer of Cathy Come Home and This Life), whose company World Productions has built up a reputation for challenging and innovative drama, was a guiding force in designing the course and has played a great part in the course's success.

- Professor Jonathan Powell (former Controller of BBC 1, Head of Drama for the BBC and Controller of Drama at Carlton TV), one of this country's most respected and experienced drama producers, now delivers the 'Role of the Producer' and ‘Script Development’ lectures as well as providing you with support and advice.

- You will normally undertake a full-time internship in a production company. In most cases this internship lasts about four weeks. You will be offered guidance and assistance in an effort to obtain industry internships.

- Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

- Regular networking events are arranged where former alumni can make contact with each other and with the current group of students.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of film and television production; how the role of the producer impacts on the production as the creative and managerial driving force, and how the producer communicates meaning to the writer, director, film crew and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the process of producing a film and/or TV programme, from initial concept through distribution and sales

- advanced understanding of script development

- advanced understanding of the various stages of the production process and how to write a pitch, a treatment, business plan, make a deal, write a financial plan, re-coupment schedule and budget as well as all relevant production contracts and documents

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of film and television production and how the roles played by the key players shape and influence the creative as well as business outcomes of a project

- a clear understanding of management structure within the production company and film crew, hands-on experience of production in

- a professionally equipped television studio working with industry professionals as well as fellow students

- a broad understanding of health and safety, industry codes of ethics, best practice and legal undertakings

- an introduction to high quality industry software for budgeting and scheduling, and post production editing

- an understanding of film and television history

- an understanding of what creative and business skills are needed to be successful in the media industries.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, script reports, treatments, pitching exercises, studio exercises, production papers, business reports and presentations.

Employability & career opportunities

Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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MRes in Cancer Biology. Imperial College London. Dept of Histopathology. COURSE CODE. A3CB. http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/teaching/postgraduate/taughtcourses/mrescancerbiology/. Read more
MRes in Cancer Biology
Imperial College London
Dept of Histopathology
COURSE CODE: A3CB
http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/teaching/postgraduate/taughtcourses/mrescancerbiology/

Imperial College is ranked in the top five universities of the world, according to the 2007 Times Higher Education Supplement league tables.

This MRes is a 1-year full-time postgraduate course run by the Faculty of Medicine, Dept of Oncology at the Hammersmith Hospital Campus of Imperial College London.

This course is designed both for BSc graduates with a suitable first degree in subjects such as Life Sciences or Biomedical Sciences and clinicians specializing in cancer related fields including medical or clinical oncology wishing to undertake a research degree to further their career in academic medicine.

Course objectives:
1) To provide science or medical graduates with an excellent introduction to the cellular and molecular biological basis of cancer.
2) To enable students to experience some of the most technologically advanced and diverse approaches currently being applied in the broad field of cancer biology through two independent 19-week research projects within the Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College.
3) To introduce students to the research environment, develop the experimental expertise required to embark on an independent research career and provide training in key transferable skills including bioinformatics, and grant writing.
4) To facilitate interactions between clinical and non-clinical scientists, enabling the cross-fertilisation of ideas and approaches bringing about greater understanding and future productive collaboration between scientists with differing backgrounds.

Structure of the MRes in Cancer Biology:
The course comprises an initial eight week taught component in which the cellular and molecular basis of cancer biology are covered plus an introduction to the clinical and pathological aspects of carcinogenesis. Within this period will also be a series of workshops covering key transferable skills such as statistics, bioinformatics and grant writing. This is followed by two separate 19-week research placements in the Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London.


Career opportunities:
The course is primarily designed to prepare students for an academic or industrial research career, with those students successfully completing the course ideally placed to apply for fellowships and register for a Ph.D.

Entrance requirements:
Applications are welcomed from candidates with a first degree in an appropriate medical or science subject. Candidates are normally expected to hold a good first degree (upper second class or better) from a UK university or an equivalent qualification if obtained outside the UK. In line with Imperial College policy, students for whom English is not their first language will be expected to pass the British council IELTS test at grade 6.0 or above, with a score of 5 or above I each component. An alternative is the TOEFL Internet Based Test (minimal score of 90 overall, with required scores of 20 in Speaking and 24 in Writing).

To apply for a place, go to
https://apply.embark.com/grad/imperial/
For application forms & information regarding course fees:
The Registry, Sherfield Building, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ

Places are extremely limited

For informal enquiries please see the course website below or contact the Course Organizer Dr Ernesto Yague at

http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/teaching/postgraduate/taughtcourses/mrescancerbiology/

Valuing diversity and committed to equality of opportunity
-----------------------------------------------
Home, EU and Overseas applicants hoping to start this course in October 2014 are eligible to apply for the Imperial Faculty of Medicine Master’s Degree Scholarships. This scheme offers a variety of awards, including full tuition payment and a generous stipend. For more information, please visit our website: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/prospectivestudents/mastersdegreescholarships/

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As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners. Read more
As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

How do individuals and groups react to different environmental situations (home, office, hospital, street, shop, and so on)? What psychological processes are triggered by our environment, and how do they affect our perception, attitude and actions?

How can individuals and groups change their environment so that it provides a more stimulating, less stressful and more enabling setting in which to live? How are our identities tied up with place? How might sustainability in environmental policy be better informed by current research?

Our MSc Environmental Psychology programme will help you gain advanced knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in environmental psychology.

You will also acquire a range of research skills that will give you the confidence and ability to undertake environmental psychology research in a professional setting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Ergonomics and Human Factors
-Inquiry and Design
-Dissertation
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Quantitative Research Methods
-Key Questions in Environmental Psychology: People and Place
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Conducting Health Psychology Research
-Social Change and Influence
-Maintaining Health Throughout the Lifespan
-Psychological Neuroscience: Electrophysiology

FUNDING

Funding is now linked to continuation funding for a PhD – that is, successful applicants to the Economic and Social Research Council will be given a grant for the MSc year and then further support (subject to satisfactory progress) to enable them to undertake a PhD.

Occasionally students receive financial support from industry through sponsorship. This would involve students undertaking a piece of research for their dissertation which would be of interest and value to industry or commerce, in return for which they will be given a grant by the commissioning company.

In the past, this sponsorship has ranged from £500 to £6,000. This is mutually beneficial to both the student and sponsor, and allows the student to undertake a ‘real’ piece of research that has practical or policy implications, whilst receiving a sum of money to assist with fees and subsistence costs.

ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey was the first in the world to establish an MSc in Environmental Psychology, in 1973. Since then there have been well over 250 graduates of the programme from over 25 countries worldwide.

It remains one of a few such postgraduate programmes in the world and the only one in the UK.

The MSc Environmental Psychology programme is part of a larger modular programme, thereby providing a flexible teaching and learning structure. The School of Psychology has a reputation for developing professional and innovative programmes reflecting contemporary societal concerns and employment opportunities.

Environmental Psychology at Surrey has always sought to be a multidisciplinary research activity. We are driven by psychological theories and methodologies, but draw on other social sciences, as well as the environmental and design disciplines.

We investigate environment behaviour relationships at every spatial scale and environment, from personal space and office design, through neighbourhood renewal, to the public understanding of global climate change.

PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey is one of the most active and highly regarded psychology departments in the country. We specialise in applied and policy-oriented teaching and research within a strong theoretical context. The international, interdisciplinary, policy and applied strengths of the School mean that students’ theoretical and methodological research puts them at the cutting edge of the discipline.

We are one of the highest ranked Schools in the country for graduates entering employment, and also one of the largest providers of postgraduate training in the UK.

The University of Surrey’s School of Psychology has been the centre for many cross-national studies and has attracted funding from research councils and local and national government departments, such as:
-ESF
-Defra
-The Ministry of Defence
-Home Office
-The Environment Agency
-The Countryside Agency
-Surrey County Council
-The EU

If you choose to study psychology at the University of Surrey, you will be provided with a combination of opportunities that would be hard to match elsewhere. We offer you a degree that provides a thorough grounding in the theories, methods and practice of contemporary psychology.

Our programmes lay particular emphasis on the application of psychology to real-world problems, and also consider issues related to professional practice in preparation for your career as a professional psychologist.

The basis of good postgraduate programmes is the research activity of staff, the incorporation of current research programmes in teaching material and a reciprocal relationship between theory development and applied research in everyday contemporary issues.

We believe in involving all postgraduate students in the research life of the School through active participation in one of the research groups, attendance at research seminars and, where possible, an attachment to ongoing research projects.

As a student of the School of Psychology, you will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

COLLABORATIONS

Environmental psychology researchers have always enjoyed collaboration with other disciplines.

Current and recent research collaborations include an EPSRC funded research project on energy technologies in homes (REDUCE) with colleagues of environmental sciences (CES) and communications technology (CCSR), a DEFRA/ESRC-funded research programme on lifestyles in transition (SLRG) and a major ESRC funded research program on sustainable lifestyles (RESOLVE: research on lifestyles, values and the environment) both with colleagues from sociology, economics and environmental sciences.

We have long-established links with national and international academic institutions including the Department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde, the Centre for Transport Studies at the University of West England and the Department of Psychology at Bath University.

The environmental psychology community is strongly international and this is reflected in the long-term active teaching and research collaboration we enjoy with the universities of Groningen, Madrid, La Coruña, Umeå and Rome.

Students on the MSc programme are encouraged to take advantage of these links during their dissertations.

MSc students are actively encouraged to participate in ongoing research projects. Our recent research clients include:
-Building Research Establishment
-Surrey County Council
-Eden Project
-Defra
-Environment Agency
-Forestry Commission
-European Commission
-Rentokil Initial
-King Sturge

RESEARCH

The Environmental Psychology Research Group (EPRG), of which students on the MSc in Environmental Psychology are automatically members, has been undertaking research for more than 30 years and has gained an international reputation.

Research undertaken by the EPRG is both ‘fundamental’ (that is, contributing to the development of the discipline and our understanding ofpsychological processes) and ‘applied and policy-oriented’.

Both government and business are concerned with effective policy development and delivery, and it is increasingly recognised that these can only be successfully achieved by informed evidence.

Students on the MSc Environmental Psychology programme are encouraged to make their research not only useful, but useable.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Recent graduates have progressed into careers in central and local government, undertaking policy-oriented research on a variety of environment behaviour (E-B) issues. Many of our graduates have become practice consultants, using their E-B research skills.

This could be a specialist E-B practice or an architecture, planning, design or engineering practice where graduates with a sensitivity to people-environment issues and a training in E-B research can provide an important and unique set of skills and expertise.

Those who have a background in architecture, landscape architecture, planning or design often return to their profession, but with an enhanced range of skills.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The aims of the programme are as follows:
-To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct environmental psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
-To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social and environmental issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
Knowledge and understanding
-Contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to environmental psychology
-The practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-The principles of research design
-Quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
-Ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to environmental psychology
-Critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of environmental psychological theories and research methods in environmental behaviour issues
-Evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-Design, conduct and evaluate environmental psychological research
-Apply insights from environmental psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills
-Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
-Apply problem solving techniques to environmental and psychological topics effectively
-Use effective learning strategies
-Analyse and interpret environmental psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate theories and methods in relation to environmental psychology by oral and written means
-Use information technology effectively
-Manage own personal development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This MSc develops the knowledge and analytical skills needed for a successful career in banking, finance and related areas. It is aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds, including students with no previous training in economics or accountancy. Read more

Introduction

This MSc develops the knowledge and analytical skills needed for a successful career in banking, finance and related areas. It is aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds, including students with no previous training in economics or accountancy.
The course is taught by Economics and Accounting & Finance in the Stirling Management School.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Siobhán Lucey

Course objectives

The overall objective of the course is to impart the knowledge and skills needed for a successful career in banking and finance, or a related field. Developments in banking and finance are occurring rapidly, and with growing complexity. So people working in this area must be able to understand and analyse current developments, and also be able to anticipate future developments. The course is designed for students from a variety of backgrounds, and does not require any previous training in economics or accountancy.

The specific objectives of the course are:
- to provide knowledge and understanding of the nature of financial systems, and the particular roles of banks and the central bank
- to develop the capacity to appraise and compile economic and financial reports
- to understand those aspects of economics that are most relevant for a career in banking and finance
- to develop an appreciation of the international dimension of financial systems
- to develop the ability to apply appropriate risk management techniques
- to develop the capacity to understand, assess and comment on company accounts
- to develop the facility to use spreadsheets and econometric techniques to analyse corporate performance, and to identify trends in financial markets
- to develop the ability to appraise investment projects with capital budgeting techniques
- to develop an understanding of the key financial decisions made by corporations, and their use of the equity and bond markets to raise finance
- to provide knowledge and understanding of different types of banking and financial systems, including those in emerging countries and countries in transition
- to provide an understanding of the theory, methodology and techniques of research in banking and finance, and also of the potential limitations of this research

Learning outcomes:
The general learning outcomes in terms of knowledge and understanding that apply to the course as a whole are:
- a systematic understanding of knowledge in banking and finance
- a critical awareness of current problems and new insights in banking and finance
- a practical understanding of the techniques of enquiry and research used in banking and finance, and of how they are used to - create and interpret knowledge
- a conceptual understanding for evaluating current research and scholarship in banking and finance
- a conceptual understanding for evaluating methodologies and (where appropriate in a dissertation) for formulating hypotheses

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Modules are taught by a combination of lectures and small group teaching, in the form of seminars, workshops or computing labs. Assessment in most modules includes coursework, often a mid-semester test, and an end-of-semester examination. Resit examinations are available.
Successful completion of the taught element of the course leads to the award of the Diploma or allows you to continue for the award of the MSc by completing dissertation based on an original research question agreed by yourself and your supervisor. The project should reflect your own understanding and knowledge of selected topics learnt during taught modules.

Career opportunities

There is an excellent employment record among graduates, many of whom now work in financial institutions in the UK and abroad.
MSc Banking & Finance graduates are currently working around the world in countries such as Kenya, Indonesia, China, India, Norway, Ghana, Turkey, Greece and Malta. They are actively contributing to the performance of the following organisations: Alpha Bank, Ministry of Finance, Greece, Citibank, Santander, Ernst & Young, HSBC, Jones, Lang LaSalle, Grant Thornton UK LLP, Bank of China, Vodaphone, CITIC Trust, Emporiki Asset Management.

Graduates entering into employment in the past three years are currently working as:
- Associate, David Griscti & Associates (Malta)
- Banker, Bank of China
- Client Services Officer, JPMC (Vietnam)
- Audit Associate, Grant Thornton UK LLP

Alumni of the MSc Banking & Finance degree who graduated between five and ten years ago have since advanced into some of the following positions:
- Finance Manager, ActivTrades PLC (UK)
- Senior Auditor, Ernst & Young (Malta)
- Relationship Manager, Alpha Bank (Greece)
- Audit Officer, Banking Bureau (Taiwan)
- Business Development Manager, Jones Lang LaSalle (India)
- Debt Management Advisor, HSBC (UK)

Some of our more established alumni are currently leading and shaping the strategy of global financial organisations – here is an example of how a few former Banking & Finance students have advanced in their careers:
- Head of Banking Trends, Egnatia Bank (Greece)
- Principal Finance Officer, Teachers Service Commission (Kenya)
- Management Associate, Citibank (UK)
- Credit Partner, Santander Corporate Banking (UK)
- Head BPA Region, Novartis (Switzerland)
- Anti-Evasion Tax Force Officer, Ministry of Finance (Greece)

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The Centre for Digestive and Gut Health at Imperial College London has developed this unique MRes stream course, which provides core training in microbiology, nutrition, hepatology and microbial signalling, as well as analytical technologies. Read more

Course Overview

The Centre for Digestive and Gut Health at Imperial College London has developed this unique MRes stream course, which provides core training in microbiology, nutrition, hepatology and microbial signalling, as well as analytical technologies. Students will learn about multidisciplinary approaches to systemic understanding of the gut microbiome and developing new targets for disease prevention and treatment.

This course exposes students to the latest developments in the field through two mini-research projects of 20 weeks' lab time, supplemented by lectures and journal clubs. The MRes course provides specific Gut Health teaching in microbiology, nutrition, microbial signaling and liver and gastrointestinal diseases, as well as analytical technology teaching aligned with the MRes in Biomedical Research. In addition to structured teaching, the MRes year consists of two 5-month laboratory research attachments.

Course Objectives

Students will gain experience in applying technologically advanced approaches to biomedical questions. Individuals who successfully complete the course will have developed the ability to:
• Perform novel laboratory based research and exercise critical scientific thought in the interpretation of results
• Undertake two research projects in line with the multidisciplinary culture of the Centre
• Demonstrate practical and intellectual dexterity in the research project elements
• Develop an appreciation of cutting edge technologies discovering host-microbial communication and current understanding of this association in human health and disease by attending the taught course elements
• Be able to interpret and present scientific data
• Be able to interrogate relevant scientific literature and develop research plans
• Be able to write a grant application, through the taught grant-writing exercise
• Be able to write and defend research reports through writing, poster presentations and seminars
• Exercise a range of transferable skills by taking a minimum number of short courses taught through the Graduate School

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For more information about the Centre for Digestive and Gut Health, please visit http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/centrefordigestiveandguthealth/

For more course information, please contact Dr. Jia Li (see the contact details above)

For online application, please visit https://apply.embark.com/grad/imperial/

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