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Masters Degrees (Grammar)

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The MA Education is designed to enhance your professional practice and help you make improvements which will make a positive difference either within the classroom or your particular work environment. Read more
The MA Education is designed to enhance your professional practice and help you make improvements which will make a positive difference either within the classroom or your particular work environment.

Highly flexible, it caters for educators with a diverse range of experience, development needs, and study requirements. It is suitable for teachers, those in leadership or policy-making roles, and other practitioners working in education or related settings.

Language and Literacy

The ability to read and write well is fundamental to a learner’s prospects and ultimate career ambitions. This specialism will help you better understand the requirements of your students and to develop strategies to improve their language and literacy skills and assessment outcomes.

The syllabus may include:

* Context and issues - research in reading and writing; learning to read and write; the role of phonics in decoding text; the role of comprehension; international reading standards; writing in the language curriculum; developing as a writer

* Children’s literature - the place of picture books in reading development; the history of literature written for children; classic children’s literature; fiction for the primary school; teen fiction; non-fiction texts; contemporary authors; reading for pleasure

* Comprehension - comprehension strategies; analysing students’ comprehension levels; developing comprehension skills

* Reluctant readers - reading and motivation; understanding readers’ perspectives; gender differences in attitudes to reading; and supporting reluctant readers

* The writing process - theories of writing; students’ composing processes; the writing process in the curriculum; re-thinking classroom processes

* Creative writing - defining creative writing; professional writers’ perspectives; the creative writing workshop; developing students’ critical responses to writing; assessment

* The grammar-writing relationship - the historical grammar debate; prescriptive and descriptive grammar; functionally-oriented grammar; teaching grammar to support writing development

* Writing conversations - the importance of talk in the teaching of writing; generation, formulation, revision; managing effective classroom talk about writing; supporting meta-linguistic conversations.

Modules

The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand, please see the website for a current list of modules available http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/education/educationma/modules/

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The Linguistics MA advances your knowledge of critical theory in theoretical linguistics and the philosophy of language, specifically with regard to the syntax/semantics interface, the semantics/pragmatics interface and grammar. Read more
The Linguistics MA advances your knowledge of critical theory in theoretical linguistics and the philosophy of language, specifically with regard to the syntax/semantics interface, the semantics/pragmatics interface and grammar.

The MRes is designed for students who already have some background in linguistics and intend to progress to PhD study. It is designed as an enhanced route of entry to a PhD programme, giving you an opportunity to develop research skills early in order to be fully prepared for your doctorate.

Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students, with a flexible framework that can fit in with your professional and personal commitments. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester.

In addition, you are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in your subject area. You will be offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.

Areas of study

The Linguistics MA covers semantics, pragmatics (minimalism and contextualism), the philosophy of language, grammar, language variation and attitudes, language and identity (class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks), language in interaction (politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication), feminist theory and linguistic theory, and ethnocentrism/racial prejudices in colonial discourse.

You approach these topics by: analysing and evaluating different approaches to studying the structure of the English language; engaging with theoretical frameworks which attempt to account for meaning in language; and examining the relationship between the philosophy of language and linguistics on one hand, and the influence of philosophical theories on the analysis of language on the other.

Modules:

Grammar and the English Language
Semantics: Word Meaning
Pragmatics, Meaning and Truth
Topics in Sociolinguistics
Research Methods
Dissertation

One from:

Discourses of Culture
Semantics/Pragmatics Interface: Approaches to the Study of Meaning
Cultural and Critical Theory module

Careers and employability

The Linguistics MA prepares you for careers in linguistics, linguistic anthropology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing, English language teaching, politics and sociology.

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The English Linguistics MA provides students with the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to describe modern English, together with appropriate training in academic writing, linguistic argumentation and research methods. Read more

The English Linguistics MA provides students with the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to describe modern English, together with appropriate training in academic writing, linguistic argumentation and research methods. Students have access to the Survey of English Usage, an unparalleled resource for research into grammatical repertoire.

About this degree

The MA introduces students to the core areas of the study of English Linguistics, including morphology, syntax, phonetics, phonology and pragmatics. The programme trains students to use library OPACS, specialised websites, discussion lists, and databases, among them the ICE-GB corpus, based at the Survey of English Usage in UCL English.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core components (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • English Grammar and Methodology
  • Either English Corpus Linguistics or English Language in Use
  • Research Methodology

Optional modules

Students take two optional modules. Different options are offered each year and have included:

  • English Words
  • History of the English Language
  • Literary Linguistics
  • Phonetics and Phonology of English

Dissertation/report

All MA Students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words. Students have access to the Survey of English Usage for this project.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Student assessment is through a portfolio of essays (two 2,000-word essays on English linguistics), two three-hour written papers and the dissertation. 

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: English Linguistics MA

Careers

The programme provides an ideal foundation for those wishing to continue to a research degree in English language or linguistics; students who obtain good results in their MA examinations may be considered for the MPhil/PhD programme at UCL (subject to places being available). Graduates may also become teachers or lecturers of English, or pursue a career in writing, publishing, or editing.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Secondary School Teacher (English Language), Unspecified Middle School, China
  • TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) and SAT Teacher, Unspecified Teaching Company
  • English Teacher, Institute of English
  • Editor, Self-Employed Editor

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The department has exceptional resources for the study of English linguistics. Use of the Survey of English Usage has resulted in many important studies of the grammar, semantics and vocabulary of present-day English.

Excellent library facilities are provided by the UCL Library, Senate House Library and the British Library.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: English Language & Literature

85% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world. Read more
Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world.

If you wish to focus specifically on the linguistics of the English language then our MA English Language and Linguistics should interest you. “Grammar” is the body of knowledge that enables a speaker to produce and understand the language(s) they speak. We study that knowledge, taking a practical approach to our research through analysis of English corpora, recordings and texts.

Our course allows you to cover a wide range of topics related to English, including:
-Dialectal and social variation
-Conversation analysis
-Language change
-Language rights
-Pragmatics

You also have the choice of optional topics including American languages, language and gender, multilingualism and language disorders.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology
-English Syntax 1
-Varieties of English
-English Syntax 2
-Variation in English II
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world. If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence. Read more
This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world.

If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence.

You explore teaching methods and the description of English used in the investigation of language learning and teaching, and study additional topics according to your needs. These might include:
-How second language learners acquire vocabulary, and how vocabulary can be taught
-Computer-assisted language-learning
-Literature and language-learning
-Materials design and evaluation
-Teaching Writing in EFL/ESL

You also gain hands-on teaching experience through our Teaching Practice I and Teaching Practice II modules.

Whether you have no prior teaching experience or are already an English language teacher, this course can be adapted to suit you. If you have little or no previous teaching experience, you receive ‘hands on’ teaching practice throughout the course via TEFL, while if you already have more than two year’s full-time teaching experience, you can undertake specialist study through TESOL instead.

You'll be part of our Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), a unique research centre specialising in all aspects of language learning and development.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned. Florence Myles authored the best-selling Second Language Learning Theories, and Bob Borsley wrote both Syntactic Theory: a Unified Approach and Modern Phrase Structure Grammar.

Other teachers on this course include Christina Gkonou, who has conducted extensive research into the effects of individual factors like anxiety on success in language learning, and Julian Good and Tracey Costley, who have taught English in Europe, the Far East and South America for many years before coming to Essex.

Karen Roehr-Brackin is a leading expert on the relationship between metalinguistic knowledge (conscious awareness of the rules of language) and language learning ability, and Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez is a leading expert on the use of computers and the role that interaction in the classroom plays in language learning.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Takers of our MA TEFL and other courses in English Language Teaching come with the specific intention of entering the ELT/TESOL profession, which they duly go on to do.

Students on these courses often join us after a career in English teaching, to update their expertise and return to the classroom with a career enhancement.

The specialist knowledge you gain enables you to take senior or specialist roles (for example in computer-assisted language-learning, ESP or teaching young learners), not necessarily only in the classroom but also in educational advice and management, programme evaluation, syllabus design and teacher education.

We also work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Teaching Practice I
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL
-Research Methods I
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Research Methods II
-MA Dissertation
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Foundations of Computer Assisted Language Learning (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-Teaching and Learning Grammar (optional)
-Teaching English to Young Learners: Principles and Practice (optional)
-Teaching Practice II (optional)
-Reflective Practitioner (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)

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The course is aimed at experienced teachers of English as a foreign or second language worldwide. Read more
The course is aimed at experienced teachers of English as a foreign or second language worldwide. The programme gives practising teachers the opportunity to explore current issues in ELT, and to deepen their understanding of the theoretical and practical concerns that underlie their teaching.The programme benefits in particular from CLCS's involvement in the development and implementation of two Council of Europe tools that are important in the current debate about language learning, teaching and assessment world-wide: the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages and the European Language Portfolio. Students take six modules and undertake a research project leading to a 15,000 word dissertation. Four core modules are mandatory and two are elective options.

Core modules include:

Describing English Grammar
Language Testing
Pedagogical Grammar of English
Second Language Curriculum Planning and Implementation

The elective modules may include:

History and Globalisation of English
Corpus Linguistics
Technology, Language, and Communication
Language Variation and Change
Linguistic Pragmatics
Bilingualism and the Maintenance of Irish
Second Language Teaching
Multilingualism

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This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. Read more

About the course

This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. We also have expertise in related disciplines including sociolinguistics, critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, and in the field of TESOL we offer particular expertise in Academic Writing, ESP, Materials Design and Testing.

Our graduates go on to advanced careers in TESOL all over the world. They also work in business, publishing, translation and interpreting.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.
Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by either the University or the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Core modules

Introduction to Language and Linguistics; English Grammar and Discourse; Language Teaching Methodology; Second Language Acquisition; Research Methods; Dissertation (MA only).

Examples of optional modules

Corpus Linguistics; Current Issues in Second Language Acquisition; Discourse and Genre Analysis; English for Specific Purposes; Intercultural Communication; Researching Writing in TESOL; Teaching Practice; Theory and Practice of Language Teaching; World Englishes.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught by a dedicated and enthusiastic team of teachers. Our internationally recognised research feeds straight into our teaching, with students sometimes taking a hands-on role in our research activities. The staff are leading figures in their fields, in many cases having written the books and papers you will be studying: Kook-hee Gil (Second Language Acquisition), Nigel Harwood (TESOL Materials), Gabriel Ozon (English Grammar) and Jane Mulderrig (Critical Discourse Analysis).

You’ll spend about eight hours a week in lectures, seminars and workshops.

And there are chances to take part in classroom-based research projects in the UK and overseas.

Assessment depends on the module, but includes essay assignments and classroom coursework tasks. You’ll write your dissertation (MA only) over the summer.

If you don’t complete the dissertation you’ll be awarded a diploma.

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Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate certificate. Read more

Introduction

Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate certificate. Explore visual language, typography, colour and information design through set and self-initiated projects. This course offers an intensive vocational route in the graphic design profession and is an ideal option if you need a bridge to Masters study.

Content

London College of Communication’s vocationally-focussed Postgraduate Certificate will help you to build practice-based and professional skills in the highly diverse field of design for visual communication.

Visual communication is a process by which ideas are made visible and conveyed through media to enhance meaning, experience and understanding. This one-year intensive course re-examines the relationship between design principles, research methodologies and the related theoretical contexts.

The programme is ideal for those from diverse academic backgrounds who wish to extend and develop their prior experiences through visual communication. Students on the course have previously studied subjects from molecular genetics to English, architecture to textiles, micro-biology to fine art and product design to geography. The course is a confidence-building bridge to Masters study as well as providing the foundations for professional career development.

You can expect to become part of a unique learning community made up of staff, guest speakers and fellow students from a diverse range of creative disciplines and cultures. Through tutorials, set and self-initiated projects, workshops and group discussions, you will gain a deeper understanding of the design process that will enhance your practice. Visual language and grammar, typographic hierarchy, symbol design, graphic representation, identity and information visualisation are just some of the areas you will explore.
Personal projects will provide you with a foundation in the principles of visual communication whilst engaging with postgraduate level research methods and conceptual development. Examples of personal projects include: mapping directional devices in the city; the promotion of a typeface; visual analysis of people flow and visual surveys of lettering. Graduates from this course have found employment within high profile international creative agencies, design management, teaching and professional practice. Some have established their own design studios, while others have gone on to achieve highly at Master’s level.

Structure

The Postgraduate Certificate Design for Visual Communication has three components:

Research and Development
Design Resolution
Professional and Academic Context

The course includes: visual language and grammar; typographic hierarchy; narrative and sequential design; symbol design; graphic representation; identity; information visualisation; as well as opportunities to pursue projects of individual interest.

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This is a professionally-oriented higher degree for those who intend to follow a career in English Language Teaching (ELT) and teachers who wish to extend and develop their knowledge of teaching English language learners. Read more

This is a professionally-oriented higher degree for those who intend to follow a career in English Language Teaching (ELT) and teachers who wish to extend and develop their knowledge of teaching English language learners.

The programme enables participants to gain the necessary knowledge and skills to devise and teach effective English language courses, in addition to equipping students with the essential research and analytical skills to keep up with the rapid developments in the field.

One of the key features of the MSc TESOL is the emphasis on learning through interaction; much of the course is organised around class-based data.

Why Choose TESOL at Queen's?

◦As a prestigious Russell Group University, Queen’s is ranked 8th within the UK in relation to research intensity;

◦Education at Queen’s has been ranked 4th within the UK in relation to research intensity with 87% of the research undertaken within the School assessed as ‘internationally excellent or world leading’ (REF, 2014);

◦We provide high quality teaching delivered through face-to-face communication;

◦Supportive academic tutors and staff;

◦Graduates have found the programme very beneficial in gaining employment;

◦If you don’t want or need to study for the research dissertation, flexible exit qualifications (PG Diploma, PG Certificate) are available and individual course modules can also be taken as short courses.

Programme Structure

The MSc in TESOL is awarded to students who have successfully completed 180 CATS points (including 60 CATS points from a Master's dissertation).

Exit qualifications are available. Students may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma by successfully completing 120 CATS points from taught modules or a Postgraduate Certificate by successfully completing 60 CATS points from taught modules.

Modules (all 20 CATS points)

Core Modules include (all 20 CATS):

An Introduction to Research Methods: Children, Young People and Education

This introductory research methods module is compulsory for all Masters students in the School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work and assumes no previous experience or knowledge of research methods. The aim of the module is to provide a general research overview and to contextualize the broad range of approaches and debates that are evident within contemporary educational research.

Language Awareness for TESOL

This module will consider the different systems and skills of the English language (phonology, grammar, lexis, discourse, speaking, listening, reading and writing) and equip course participants with the skills needed to analyse language for teaching purposes. The module will place emphasis on the use of pedagogic grammars and adopt a systemic/ functional approach to grammar. Particular attention will be given to the study of spoken and written discourse.

Language Learning for TESOL

This module will provide an overview of the key theories associated with language learning and language acquisition in the formal context of the classroom. It will offer module participants an opportunity to assess different approaches to the support of learning in a range of TESOL contexts.

Materials Development for TESOL

This module will examine the notion of ‘context’ in relation to the teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages. Beginning with the classroom as context, participants will have an opportunity to develop their own interactional awareness as a means of promoting learning opportunity. The module will then consider the broader notion of ELT contexts in relation to the cultural politics of English as an international language and assess the impact that different contexts has on approaches to teaching and learning, assessment and the design and use of curricula and teaching materials.

TESOL: Principles and Practices

This module will consider the principles and practices of ELT methodology and trace developments over the past 20 years. From the advent of ‘the communicative approach’ to the current ‘post-method’ era, the course will examine a range of pedagogical issues and evaluate their impact on current classroom practice.

Optional module: (20 CATS)

One optional module may be chosen from those offered on the Educational Studies (MEd) programme including the following:

Issues in Language Assessment for TESOL*

This module explores a number of issues in assessment including the relationship between assessment and learning and the impact of assessment and testing on learning. It provides an overview of key assessment concepts of validity and reliability and considers various models of assessment practice. This module examines the notion of language proficiency for TESOL and current methods and practices in second language classroom-based assessment.

*Students cannot take Assessment Issues in Teaching and Learning in Classrooms if taking this module.

Digital Literacy and Communication

The aim of this module is to examine theories of understanding and researching digital literacy. The module begins from a social practice view of literacy, which is then used as a lens to critically examine digital literacy in contemporary society, digital media in education and learning, and TESOL. Course participants will also examine methodologies that have been applied to researching language and literacy in digital environments. The module equips course participants with the skills needed to practically examine and analyse digital literacy in the lives of people, in institutions, and in wider society.

Assessment

There are no written examinations. Modules are assessed through written assignments, including case studies, language analysis and coursebook evaluations.



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The English Language MA gives you the opportunity to investigate language in its social and cultural contexts. Read more
The English Language MA gives you the opportunity to investigate language in its social and cultural contexts.

You will examine theoretical and analytical frameworks that explore issues of language variation, language contact, language and identity; analyse the role of language in social relationships and practices; and look at how linguistic theory can be applied to the analysis of literature and culture.

The programme equips you with high-level research skills that you can apply in your dissertation, which allows you to address an issue of particular interest with the knowledge you have gathered throughout the course.

Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students, with a flexible framework that can fit in with your professional and personal commitments. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester.

In addition, you are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in your subject area. You will be offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.

Areas of study

The English Language MA covers semantics, pragmatics (minimalism and contextualism), the philosophy of language, grammar, language variation and attitudes, language and identity (class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks), language in interaction (politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication), feminist theory and linguistic theory, and ethnocentrism/racial prejudices in colonial discourse.

You approach these topics by: examining theoretical and analytical frameworks that explore issues of language variation; analysing the role of language in social relationships and practices; and examining how linguistic theory can be applied to the analysis of literature and culture.

Modules:

Grammar and the English Language
Semantics: Word Meaning
Pragmatics, Meaning and Truth
Topics in Sociolinguistics
Research Methods
Dissertation

One from:

Discourses of Culture
Semantics/Pragmatics Interface: Approaches to the Study of Meaning
Cultural and Critical Theory module

Careers and employability

The English Language MA prepares you for careers in linguistics, linguistic anthropology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing, English language teaching, politics and sociology.

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This programme for professionals already involved in, or interested in learning about TESOL teacher education, introduces you to current thinking about what language teachers need to know and how they can be helped to learn it. Read more

This programme for professionals already involved in, or interested in learning about TESOL teacher education, introduces you to current thinking about what language teachers need to know and how they can be helped to learn it.

You’ll explore how people learn languages and discover the strategies language teachers use to develop the key skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. You’ll build on this foundation through specialist modules, and examine the goals and processes of teacher education and how to support TESOL teachers’ learning.

You’ll also choose from a wide range of optional modules such as the use of technology in language learning, materials development and issues surrounding assessment.

Taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in TESOL, you’ll benefit from a wide range of resources and support. You’ll gain valuable skills to support and empower TESOL professionals in their own practice.

Research insight

The Language Education team in the School of Education is one of the largest such teams in the UK.

Our members have experience of teaching, teacher education and consultancy work in TESOL, ELT, EFL, ESOL, EAL, Modern Foreign Languages, and Applied Linguistics in many contexts in the UK and around the world, and are nationally and internationally recognised as researchers. 

Course content

You’ll deepen your understanding of TESOL in semester one. You’ll focus on how people learn languages, how to describe and explain language to learners and the approaches you can take to teaching reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.

You’ll then focus on aspects of teacher education in semester two. You will consider the goals and processes of teacher education, ideas about training, development and mentoring, the role of the teacher as a researcher, and the principles underpinning the design and implementation of training programmes for TESOL teachers.

In addition, you’ll choose from a range of optional modules on topics such as the use of technology in language learning, grammar and vocabulary teaching, and issues surrounding the assessment of language learning.

You’ll use the knowledge and skills you develop to carry out a small-scale piece of research related to your own interests within teacher education. To help you develop the necessary research skills for this module, you’ll also take the module Research Methods for TESOL, but this will not be assessed as part of the course.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • The Practice of Supporting Language Teacher Learning 15 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Learning and Teaching in TESOL 30 credits
  • Investigating Language for TESOL 30 credits
  • Teacher Education for TESOL 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Directed Study in Education 1 15 credits
  • Technology Enhanced Language Learning 30 credits
  • Learning and Teaching Vocabulary 15 credits
  • Introducing a Task-Based Curriculum in Classrooms and Systems 15 credits
  • Grammar, Learning and Teaching 15 credits
  • Teaching Academic English 15 credits
  • Corpus Linguistics in the Classroom 15 credits
  • Assessing Language Learning 15 credits
  • Materials Development for TESOL 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (Teacher Education) MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (Teacher Education) MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll generally have around eight to ten hours of classes per week including seminars, tutorials and lectures. However, independent study is an important aspect of this programme, either alone or in a group, as it allows you to develop key research, analysis and communication skills and develop your own ideas.

Assessment

Most of our modules are assessed through written assignments, from which you’ll often be able to choose from a range of topics. To help you prepare, you’ll be able to submit a draft to your tutor for comment beforehand.

Career opportunities

MA TESOL Teacher Education graduates have gone on to take up positions as pre and in-service English language teacher educators within universities or local educational administrations in various parts of the world.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This programme explores how people learn new languages and how to teach the English Language most effectively. Read more

This programme explores how people learn new languages and how to teach the English Language most effectively.

Designed for TESOL professionals, you will consider how to analyse and describe the English language for pedagogic purposes, and examine different approaches and principles to teaching the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking.

You can also choose to specialise in certain aspects of TESOL: for example, teacher education, materials development, curriculum reform, the teaching of grammar and vocabulary, the use of ICT, or language assessment.

MEd TESOL follows the same syllabus as the MA TESOL programme, but asks you to apply a more practical, rather than theoretical, orientation to your final critical study. You will focus upon a professional issue within language education and apply ideas from your reading and a small-scale research study to find solutions to genuine English Language teaching problems.

The Language Education team in the School of Education is nationally and internationally recognised for its range of teaching, research, knowledge transfer and consultancy work in TESOL, ELT, EFL, ESOL, EAL, Modern Foreign Languages, and Applied Linguistics.

We’re one of the largest Language Education teams in the UK. As education practitioners, we have a wide range of experience of teaching and teacher education work in many contexts in the UK and around the world.

As researchers, we have a broad range of expertise across the discipline with ongoing research projects in teacher development, language use in migrant communities, learning with digital technologies, and IELTS preparation courses.

Course content

MEd TESOL is a comprehensive programme that will allow you to develop both academically and professionally.

In semester one, you will deepen your understanding of teaching the English Language. You will focus on how people learn languages, how to describe and explain language to learners, and the approaches you can take to teaching reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.

In semester two, you will expand your knowledge of more specialist areas. You will choose from a range of optional modules to suit your own interests and professional contexts: for example, the development of TESOL materials, teaching young learners, or language learning assessment. Alternatively, you could choose modules from another area of the School’s provision: for example, you may want to study digital learning, international educational management or theories of childhood and youth.

In the final part of the year, you will use your newly-acquired knowledge and skills to carry out a small-scale piece of research. Your critical study can be related to your own interests within the field of education. As a condition of the MEd programme, your study needs to have a practical focus and respond to a real-life professional issue in TESOL education.

To support your work on the project, you will take a non-assessed research methods course. Help with your academic writing is available throughout the year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Learning and Teaching in TESOL 30 credits
  • Investigating Language for TESOL 30 credits
  • Research Methods for TESOL (non-assessed module)

Optional modules

  • Directed Study in Education 1 30 credits
  • Technology Enhanced Language Learning 30 credits
  • The Practice of Supporting Language Teacher Learning 15 credits
  • Learning and Teaching Vocabulary 15 credits
  • Grammar, Learning and Teaching 15 credits
  • Teaching Academic English 15 credits
  • Corpus Linguistics in the Classroom 15 credits
  • Teacher Education for TESOL 15 credits
  • Assessing Language Learning 15 credits
  • Materials Development for TESOL 15 credits
  • Teaching Languages to Young Learners 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages MEd Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages MEd Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You will generally have around eight to ten hours of classes per week including seminars, tutorials and lectures. However, independent study is an important aspect of this programme, either alone or in a group, as it allows you to develop key research, analysis and communication skills and develop your own ideas.

Assessment

We assess most of our modules through written assignments; you will be able to choose from a range of assignment topics. To help you prepare, you’ll be able to submit a draft to your tutor for comment beforehand.

Career opportunities

Our students frequently find that new career opportunities open up for them, either in their home countries or in new international settings.

Some of our graduates have started work in teacher training, materials creation, or curriculum design. Others have started their own private language teaching business or moved from school to university teaching.

We also encourage students who do particularly well on the programme to consider doctoral level study with a view to an academic career. Students who return to their original classrooms often find they have fresh perspectives and their work becomes more rewarding and effective.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The Graduate Diploma in German offers many advantages in that it allows you to study German at your own pace, when and where you like. Read more
The Graduate Diploma in German offers many advantages in that it allows you to study German at your own pace, when and where you like. The Diploma is recognised by the General Teaching Council for Scotland (subject to approval) and carries a credit rating of 120 SCOTCAT points (SCQF levels 9-10).

This is a unique distance-learning course, delivered primarily over the internet, using a virtual learning environment (VLE). You will be part of a 'virtual' learning community, in regular contact with your German tutors and fellow students. Together we explore aspects of the German language and culture and share language teaching expertise.

Experienced staff and native German speakers are responsible for the module design, delivery and student support.
PLEASE NOTE: This course is scheduled to run from September 2014 to June 2016 and it will only run if sufficient numbers of students enrol.

Who can apply?

Are you:
A Secondary Modern Foreign Languages (MFL) teacher who wishes to gain a GTC recognised additional teaching qualification in German?
A Primary, Further or Adult Education teacher who would like to improve their German for teaching purposes?
An advanced student of German (Higher+) who wishes to gain a University Diploma in German for work purposes or for personal interest?

Aims of the course

The course aims to provide the challenge of an undergraduate curriculum in practical German. Learning materials are of wide general appeal as well as of interest to language teachers and are studied in modules of approximately ten weeks duration throughout the course. The choice of assessments and the project allow participants to focus on their own specific interest areas. The course covers the following;

Skills and Topics:
German language, including grammar and communication skills
Culture and society
Themes such as 20th Century literature, education, the environment, and German cinema
Professional studies
Project

Immersion days

Four German Immersion Days per academic session are held at Dundee University, usually on a Saturday. They will provide a chance to meet other course participants, practice oral skills, and participate in a variety of activities in a relaxed and informal atmosphere. We are fortunate to have the support of the German Institute for this course.

Assessment

A wide variety of assessment methods are used throughout the course.
The course project consists of an extended essay and a series of lesson plans or equivalent for non-teachers. At the end of the course there is a two and a half hour written examination and an oral examination, both normally held in Dundee.

Course materials

You will be expected to buy the course textbook, a reference grammar book, a good bilingual German-English dictionary, and occasional literary texts. Please note that you will be required to have Internet and Skype access.

Residence abroad

For those taking the Diploma course as an additional teaching qualification, residence abroad is normally a pre-requisite for GTC(S) registration in French (Secondary). This period of residence has to be arranged by course participants themselves.

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This is an interdisciplinary programme for professionals who want to develop and enhance their practice at postgraduate level. Read more
This is an interdisciplinary programme for professionals who want to develop and enhance their practice at postgraduate level. It is a workbased learning programme designed for participants from a variety of professional settings including the private, public and third sector, for example, health and social care; education; local government; public services; human resources; administrative services; cultural industries or the arts.

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/224/professional-practice#!overview

Course detail

The programme offers you the opportunity to explore your profession further, consider the challenges associated with your professional practice and develop your generic knowledge and skills in the workplace; while being able to focus on a specific area of practice relevant to you and your work. In particular, you develop strategic skills, knowledge of leadership styles and approaches, and critical analysis in the context of multi-agency working and research-based practice.

Purpose

You explore your profession further and consider the professional challenges associated within your specific area of practice, with modules that have been designed to help you review and analyse the current debates relevant to the professional context in which you are working.

Format and assessment

This flexible programme allows you to follow one of our specific accredited pathways or select modules of personal and professional interest from across the University, enabling you to review and analyse the current debates relating to key issues relevant to the professional context in which you are working.

Core modules:
• Learning and Development in Organisations
• Inter-professional Working
• Evidence Based Practice
• Research Skills
• Dissertation

Optional modules:

Students are able to select optional modules from the Centre for Professional Practice module catalogue or the wider University of Kent catalogue.

Assessments can be through:

- Oral presentations
- Written assignments
- Work-based projects
- Portfolio assessments
- Reflecting learning submissions
- Action Learning Sets

In Stage 3 you complete a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words

Careers

A postgraduate degree in professional practice is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as head teachers, head of human resources and organisation development, college and university administration managers. Most recent graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as Great Ormond Street Hospital, Kent Fire and Rescue Service, Kent, Surrey and Sussex Community Rehabilitation Company (KSS CRC), Rochester Grammar School, Chatham Grammar School for Boys and the University of Kent.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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The Philosophy of Language MA is designed for students with a particular interest in philosophy and ways in which its principles and teachings can be applied to the study of language. Read more
The Philosophy of Language MA is designed for students with a particular interest in philosophy and ways in which its principles and teachings can be applied to the study of language.

The study of language has given rise to a number of distinctive philosophical problems that became central to Western philosophy in the nineteenth century and that have dominated research and discussion in the twentieth century.

Our philosophy modules give you a thorough grounding in philosophical insights, as you engage in critical reflection on the relationship between sociopolitical context and philosophical debate. You explore the history of philosophy from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century, examining the variety of critical and analytical traditions that have emerged from those foundations.

Philosophy of language modules examine the influence of philosophical theories on the analysis of language, focusing on the critical analysis of the relationship between the philosophy of language and linguistics.

Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students, with a flexible framework that can fit in with your professional and personal commitments. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester.

In addition, you are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in your subject area. You will be offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.

Areas of study

The Philosophy of Language MA covers semantics, pragmatics (minimalism and contextualism), the philosophy of language, grammar, language variation and attitudes, language and identity (class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks), language in interaction (politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication), feminist theory and linguistic theory, and ethnocentrism/racial prejudices in colonial discourse.

You approach these topics by: analysing and evaluating aspects of philosophy that have had significant influence on the general understanding of what language is and how its use interacts with, and exploits, context; engaging with philosophical frameworks starting with Frege, through to Russell and Wittgenstein, which attempt to account for meaning in language; and evaluating philosophical foundations of critical theory that have contributed to debates on the understanding of history, politics and the nature of meaning.

Modules:

Grammar and the English Language
Semantics: Word Meaning
Pragmatics, Meaning and Truth
Topics in Sociolinguistics
Research Methods
Dissertation

One from:

Discourses of Culture
Semantics/Pragmatics Interface: Approaches to the Study of Meaning
Cultural and Critical Theory module

Careers and employability

The Philosophy of Language MA prepares you for careers in linguistics, linguistic anthropology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing, English language teaching, politics and sociology.

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