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The stand alone Graduate Entry Medicine Programme (MB BCh) in Swansea is unique in Wales, and one of a small group of similar programmes of medical study in the UK. Read more
The stand alone Graduate Entry Medicine Programme (MB BCh) in Swansea is unique in Wales, and one of a small group of similar programmes of medical study in the UK. It is an innovative, 4-year accelerated medical degree open to graduates of any discipline.

The Graduate Entry Medicine Programme is a fully independent four-year programme based primarily in Swansea and West Wales, although students may undergo placements in other parts of Wales if they wish. We have designed an integrated medical curriculum, where the basic biomedical sciences are learnt in the context of clinical medicine, public health, pathology, therapeutics, ethics and psycho-social issues in patient management. This, together with a high emphasis on clinical and communication skills, will provide you with everything you'll need to practise medicine competently and confidently.

The curriculum, with its learning weeks and clinical placements, is intentionally not structured in a conventional ‘body systems’ approach but is designed to reflect the way in which clinicians approach patients and how patients present to doctors.

This innovative approach will help you to develop a way of thinking and of engaging with information that mimics that used in clinical practice. As you work your way through learning weeks, clinical placements and practical sessions, you will acquire knowledge and build up your repertoire of clinical understanding and skills. Themes and strands, which run longitudinally throughout the Medicine (Graduate Entry) programme, will help you make links with other aspects you are learning, and with things you have previously considered, as well as how all this relates to clinical practice.

The Medicine (Graduate Entry) programme consists of Phase I (Years 1 + 2) and Phase II (Years 3 + 4). Each year is mapped onto GMC Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009 (TD09), where three modules reflect the TD09 outcome areas:

• Scholar and Scientist
• Practitioner
• Professional

The Medicine (Graduate Entry) programme involves a spiral, integrated curriculum structured around 6 body system ‘themes’ – Behaviour, Defence, Development, Movement, Nutrition and Transport – with 96 clinical cases presented in 70 ‘learning weeks’ (65 in Phase I and 5 in Phase II).

There is a high level of clinical contact:

• 39 weeks Clinical Apprenticeships
• 35 weeks Specialty Attachments
• 11 weeks Community Based Learning
• 6 weeks Elective, 6 weeks Shadowing

Phase I
Learning Weeks (Case based, includes Integrated Clinical Method)
Community-Based Learning (CBL) in General Practice for one day every third week
LOCS - Learning Opportunities in the Clinical Setting
Early Apprenticeships (1-3)

Phase II
Case of the Week (Case Based Learning Weeks)
Clinical Apprenticeships
Intermediate Apprenticeships (4-6)
Assistantships (7-9) (Medicine, Surgery and Primary Care)
CBL in Year 3
Specialty Attachments in Years 3 and 4 – Seven 5 Week placements in Acute Medicine, Acute Surgery, Rehabilitation and General Medicine, Women’s Health, Child Health, Mental Health, Sub-Specialities of Medicine and Surgery
Elective at end of Year 3 (6 Week Clinical Placement mostly taken overseas)
Shadowing period at end of Year 4 prior to F1 (6 Week Clinical Placement where students “shadow” F1 doctors in their allocated post in Wales or join the all-Wales ‘shadow’ programme)

How to Apply

All applications are made via UCAS. For Home/EU applicants, this is twelve months in advance of the intended study period. International applications will be welcome during early May 2016.

All applications are scrutinised and considered on their own merits and selection is based upon three main factors:

Your academic achievements
GAMSAT score
Performance at interview

You must sit the GAMSAT in advance of applying through UCAS. Only those who meet the eligibility criteria explained above are eligible for consideration.

About the Medical School

Established in 2001, Swansea University Medical School aims to be an internationally-recognised centre of excellence in research and medical education. It is dedicated to equipping tomorrow's doctors and life scientists with the necessary skills and experience to address the major healthcare challenges faced globally.

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Travel medicine focuses on the prevention and management of the health issues of international travellers. This course is for those entering or working in the field of travel medicine. Read more

What is travel medicine?

Travel medicine focuses on the prevention and management of the health issues of international travellers.

Who is this course for?

This course is for those entering or working in the field of travel medicine. It is particularly useful for health professionals who provide travel health advice. The program is accredited as an approval qualification by the Faculty of Travel Medicine of the Australasian College of Tropical Medicine for their fellowship program.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Certificate of Travel Medicine will be able to:
*Integrate and apply specialist knowledge in the disciplines of travel and tropical medicine and related areas, with depth in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation complications, differential diagnosis, investigation and management of travel‐related communicable and non‐communicable diseases across diverse contexts
*Review, analyse, synthesise and evaluate information, data and evidence to undertake risk assessment and prioritise potential clinical interventions for communicable and non-communicable diseases
*Promote and optimise the health and welfare of travellers and populations impacted by travel
*Deliver and facilitate safe and effective collaborative patient‐centred travel‐related health outcomes within relevant accepted national and international practices and guidelines
*Communicate theoretical knowledge, risk assessment, concepts of therapeutic interventions, treatment options and clinical decisions using a high level of oral and written English language and where appropriate, numeracy skills to a variety of audiences
*Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for continuing professional development requirements based on reflection on current skills, knowledge and attitudes and their application to travel, tropical and geographical medicine and health.

This course is available to International students via external or distance education only.

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF TRAVEL MEDICINE (GCertTravM)

Course articulation

Candidates who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Master of Public Health or Master of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under this course

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University provides several programs unique to Australia:
*The Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine, which is one of the leading tropical research facilities in the world
*teaching staff awarded the Australian Learning Teaching Councils’ National Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning
*cutting-edge teaching laboratories and research facilities.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Rural and remote communities in northern Australia and the tropics face unique health issues. We are committed to equipping health professionals with the capabilities to practice in rural and remote settings. Read more

What is rural and remote medicine?

Rural and remote communities in northern Australia and the tropics face unique health issues. We are committed to equipping health professionals with the capabilities to practice in rural and remote settings.

Who is this course for?

This course is for medical practitioners and graduates who want to specialise in rural practice.

Course learning outcomes

The Graduate Diploma of Rural and Remote Medicine enables doctors working in rural and remote Australia to complete a postgraduate qualification to enhance their clinical, academic and research skills. They will develop knowledge, skills and attitudes to contribute to clinical, academic work and research relating to rural and remote medicine. Graduates will work to foster their practice through professional development and the application of evidence-based practice.
Graduates of the Graduate Diploma of Rural and Remote Medicine will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced and contemporary knowledge of medicine in the rural and remote context, particularly focusing on cultural, social and management concepts for rural and remote patients and communities
*Demonstrate advanced and current strategies and skills in health profession education in the rural and remote context
*Critically analyse and evaluate community, population, legislative and funding factors that influence health and health care delivery in rural and remote communities
*Examine policies, professional and legal statutory requirements applicable to rural medical practitioners
*Design, implement and communicate a minor research project in an area of relevance to rural and remote practice
*Evaluate and apply new and existing evidence in the chosen specialty area of relevance to rural and remote medicine
*Interpret principles, theories and methods of medical/health professional education for a variety of audiences through high-level written and spoken English
*Demonstrate personal autonomy and accountability for own professional development.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF RURAL AND REMOTE MEDICINE (GDipRurRemM)

Course articulation

Students who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Master of Rural and Remote Medicine and may be granted advanced standing for relevant subjects completed under this course.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

The School of Medicine and Dentistry teaches this course. The School is a recognised leader in rural and remote health, tropical medicine and health in Australia and the wider Asia-Pacific region. We have:
*New teaching facilities including a medical research laboratory
*research partnerships with Indigenous Australian communities and international organisations
*clinical schools in Cairns, Mackay, Atherton and the Northern Territory.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The overall aims of the programme are to. - provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research in an integrated clinical and research environment;. Read more
The overall aims of the programme are to:

- provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research in an integrated clinical and research environment;
- develop and create a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine able to pursue and develop their roles in a rapidly-changing and challenging environment of genomic medicine;
- prepare healthcare professionals for the adoption of genomic technologies and the increasing use of genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway;
- develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with the confidence to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care, and with the required knowledge, skills and capability to have a positive personal impact on the work of others;
- develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with an understanding of research methodologies and clinical opportunities relevant to genomic medicine;
- encourage a commitment to intellectual challenge and evidence-based clinical practice informed by the latest conceptual and theoretical knowledge of genomic medicine;
- develop students' intellectual, practical and transferable skills related to genomic medicine;
encourage critical thinking related to genomic medicine;
- conduct systematic research relevant to their professional practice.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvmgmpgnm

Learning Outcomes

The over-arching learning outcomes are:

- Knowledge and understanding -

- To enhance the students’ knowledge and critical understanding of recent developments in genomic medicine relevant to their present and future roles.
- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of genomic medicine informed by research in a rapidly-changing integrated clinical and research environment.
- To enable deployment of new knowledge in their clinical practice, and to have a positive personal impact on the work of others in their clinical team and wider service.
- To develop an understanding of genomic technologies and to be able to use genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway.
- To develop students’ knowledge so that they have the confidence to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care.
- To update and extend students’ understanding of research methodologies and clinical opportunities.
- To demonstrate knowledge, abilities and skills to engage in focused, professionally-relevant, independent learning, and through the production of a dissertation.

- Skills and other attributes -

- The skills necessary to locate, read, interpret and analyse primary and secondary sources of material enabling the development of a conceptual and theoretical understanding of recent developments in genomic medicine.
- Skills to evaluate current scholarship and research critically and to place this knowledge within the context of their own situation and practice as clinical leaders.
- The ability to formulate a research topic relevant to their clinical context, to collect and analyse primary and/or secondary sources of data, and to undertake professionally relevant research.
- The facility to communicate the results of their ideas, research and its conclusions in a written form acceptable as a work of scholarship potentially publishable in a professional or academic journal.

Format

The MPhil comprises either:

- eight modules, plus a research project and associated dissertation of 10-12,000 words, or
- ten modules, plus a literature-based research project and associated dissertation of 5-6,000 words.

Students must complete seven Core Modules and one/three further modules chosen from a range of Option Modules, with additional between-module reflection, study and assignment work.

The modules are structured as follows:

- Core Module 1: An introduction to human genetics and genomics
- Core Module 2: Omics techniques and the application to genomic medicine
- Core Module 3: Genomics of common and rare disease
- Core Module 4: Molecular pathology of cancer and application in cancer diagnosis, screening, and treatment
- Core Module 5: Application of genomics to infectious disease
- Core Module 6: Pharmacogenetics and stratified healthcare
- Core Module 7: Bioinformatics, interpretation, and data quality assurance in genome analysis

Option modules will be selected from the following list. Not all options may be offered every year.

- Option Module 1: Ethical, Legal and Social Implications in applied genomics (ELSI) **
- Option Module 2: Counselling skills for genomics
- Option Module 3: Professional and research skills
- Option Module 4: Advanced Bioinformatics – from genomes to systems
- Option Module 5: Epigenetics and epigenomics
- Option Module 6: Expanding the content of the MPhil in genomic medicine with a workplace-based module

Each core module will involve around 30 hours of contact time, including lectures, group work and online teaching.

Placements

The research project element of the course may be undertaken in a number of scientific institutions, within and without the University. This may include the University's School of Clinical Medicine, the School of Biological Sciences, the European Bioinformatics Institute, Welcome Trust Sanger Institute and, subject to approval, other suitable research institutions.

Assessment

Students must submit a dissertation of 5-6,000 words or 10-12,000 words, depending on the options selected. This will be worth 1/6th or 1/3rd of the overall mark for the course, respectively.

For each of the taught modules, students must complete summative assignments of 2500-3500 words or equivalent (except where other methods of module assessment are indicated in individual module descriptions)

Each student is allocated a named supervisor, who will meet regularly with the student to discuss progress and provide feedback and support as required. Written supervision reports are accessed via the online supervision system. Students are given feedback on the assessments conducted at the end of each module.

All students will meet with the programme director on a termly basis to discuss progress and to provide their feedback on the course.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding is available from Health Education England to pay course fees for NHS employees wishing to apply for this course. Prospective students wishing to apply for HEE funding should refer to the application process published by HEE at http://www.genomicseducation.hee.nhs.uk/msc-funding-info/and ensure that access to this funding is approved before applying for the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course is designed for health professionals with a suitable undergraduate degree or recognised professional qualification in a relevant discipline. Read more

Who is this course for?

This course is designed for health professionals with a suitable undergraduate degree or recognised professional qualification in a relevant discipline. It offers a broad range of electives enabling you to specialise in health issues relevant to tropical Australia and its near neighbours.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Diploma of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene will be able to:
*Integrate and apply an advanced body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the disciplines of tropical medicine and hygiene with depth in epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, complications, differential diagnosis, investigation and management of tropical diseases
*Review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise information, data and evidence to devise appropriate strategies to detect, prevent and control communicable and non-communicable diseases ensuring safe and healthy environments for tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Critically reflect upon and engage in professional tropical medicine and hygiene practice based on ethical decision-making and an evidence based approach, including consideration of recent developments in the field
*Communicate theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and numeracy skills to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Demonstrate personal autonomy and accountability for their own future personal and professional development and contribute to the professional development of others, by engaging in critical reflective practice in relation to knowledge, skills and attitudes and their application to the specialty of tropical medicine and hygiene.

Award title

Graduate Diploma of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (GDipTMH)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

The School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences teaches this course. The School provides several programs unique to Australia. We have:
*The Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine is one of the leading tropical research facilities in the world
*teaching staff awarded the Australian Learning Teaching Councils’ National Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning
*brand new Mosquito Research Facility
*cutting-edge teaching laboratories.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The broad range of elective subjects available gives the opportunity for specialised focus on tropical Australia, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, or in Australia’s tropical neighbours. Read more
The broad range of elective subjects available gives the opportunity for specialised focus on tropical Australia, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, or in Australia’s tropical neighbours.

Who is this course for?

This course is designed for health professionals with a suitable undergraduate degree or recognised professional qualification in a relevant discipline. It enables you to specialise in public health issues relevant to tropical Australia and its near neighbours.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Diploma of Public Health and Tropical Medicine will be able to:
*Integrate and apply an advanced body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the disciplines of public health and tropical medicine with depth in epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, complications, differential diagnosis, investigation and management of tropical diseases
*Review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise information, data and evidence to devise appropriate strategies to detect, prevent and control communicable and non-communicable diseases ensuring safe and healthy environments for tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Critically reflect upon the socio-ecological nature of health promotion and its application in optimising the health and wellbeing of tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Critically reflect upon and engage in professional public health practice based on ethical decision-making and an evidence based approach, including consideration of recent developments in the field
*Apply advanced human project and organisational management skills within a public health and policy context to effect efficient and equitable gains in public health
*Communicate theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and numeracy skills to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for continuing professional development requirements based on reflection on current skills, knowledge and attitudes and their application to the specialty of public health and tropical medicine.

Award title

Graduate Diploma of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (GDPHTM)

Course articulation

Students who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Master of Public Health or Master of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under this course.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

The School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences teaches this course. The School provides several programs unique to Australia. We have:
*The Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine, which is one of the leading tropical research facilities in the world
*teaching staff awarded the Australian Learning Teaching Councils’ National Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning
*cutting-edge teaching laboratories and research facilities.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The Department of Medicine is within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia. The Department of Medicine has an active research program with investigators conducting research in all experimental aspects of medicine. Read more

Background of the Experimental Medicine Program

The Department of Medicine is within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia. The Department of Medicine has an active research program with investigators conducting research in all experimental aspects of medicine. The Department and Faculty originated and developed this program for graduate studies in Experimental Medicine, and the first students were accepted into the program at the University of British Columbia in September 1987.

Experimental Medicine is the study of the pathogenesis and treatment of disease. Modern experimental medicine represents a rapidly growing body of knowledge involving the determination of diseases processes and the development of appropriate therapies.

The Experimental Medicine Program is intended for individuals seeking a career in research. The Department of Medicine offers opportunities and facilities for advanced studies in Experimental medicine, leading toward the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. Members of the Department direct research programs in a wide range of basic and clinically relevant areas. There are a variety of special interest areas of national and international stature.

Specialties within the Experimental Medicine Program include: Cardiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Hematology, Infectious Diseases, Medical Immunology, Medical Oncology, Molecular Biology, Nephrology, Neurology and Respiratory Medicine.

Students may work with investigators located on the main campus of the University of B.C., or they may work in laboratories located off campus (Vancouver General Hospital, Jack Bell Research Centre, Terry Fox Laboratory, St. Paul’s Hospital, Biomedical Research Centre, BC Children’s Hospital).

Objectives of the Experimental Medicine Program

The objectives of the program are:
1. To teach the student the application of modern techniques in research.
2. To develop within the student the ability to read and criticize scientific literature, and to know the current state of knowledge in their particular field.
3. To teach the student to accurately define a problem and to design experiments which solve problems according to scientific standards.
4. To teach the student to conduct research on an independent basis.
5. To develop in all students the ability to communicate results of their research to the scientific community.

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The MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Read more
The MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Students will acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests, as well as a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the sciences in society. Those intending to go on to doctoral work will learn the research skills needed to help them prepare a well planned and focused PhD proposal. During the course students gain experience of presenting their own work and discussing the issues that arise from it with an audience of their peers and senior members of the Department; they will attend lectures, supervisions and research seminars in a range of technical and specialist subjects central to research in the different areas of History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine.

The educational aims of the programme are:

- to give students with relevant training at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in History, Philosophy of Science and Medicine under close supervision;
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- to enable students to acquire a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the sciences in society; and
- to help students intending to go on to doctoral work to acquire the requisite research skills and to prepare a well planned and focussed PhD proposal.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmpstm

Course detail

The MPhil course is taught by supervisions and seminars and assessed by three research essays and a dissertation.

The topics of the essays and dissertation should each fall within the following specified subject areas:

1. General philosophy of science
2. History of ancient and medieval science, technology and medicine
3. History of early modern science, technology and medicine
4. History of modern science, technology and medicine
5. History, philosophy and sociology of the life sciences
6. History, philosophy and sociology of the physical and mathematical sciences
7. History, philosophy and sociology of the social and psychological sciences
8. History, philosophy and sociology of medicine
9. Ethics and politics of science
10. History and methodology of history, philosophy and sociology of science, technology and medicine

Format

The MPhil seminars are the core teaching resource for this course. In the first part of year these seminars are led by different senior members of the Department and focus on selected readings. During the rest of the year the seminars provide opportunities for MPhil students to present their own work.

Students are encouraged to attend the lectures, research seminars, workshops and reading groups that make the Department a hive of intellectual activity. The Department also offers graduate training workshops, which focus on key research, presentation, publication and employment skills.

The MPhil programme is administered by the MPhil Manager, who meets all new MPhil students as a group in early October, then sees each of the students individually to discuss their proposed essay and dissertation topics. The Manager is responsible for finding appropriate supervisors for each of these topics; the supervisors are then responsible for helping the student do the research and writing needed for the essays and the dissertation. Students will see each of their supervisors frequently; the MPhil Manager sees each student at regular intervals during the year to discuss progress and offer help and advice.

Supervisions are designed to provide students with the opportunity to set their own agenda for their studies. The supervisor's job is to support the student's research, not to grade their work – supervisors are formally excluded from the examination process.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmpstm

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- Knowledge and Understanding -

- developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen areas of History, Philosophy of Science and Medicine and of the critical debates within them;
- acquired a conceptual understanding that enables the evaluation of current research and methodologies;
- formed a critical view of the roles of the sciences in society.

- Skills and other attributes -

By the end of the course students should have:

- acquired or consolidated historiographic, linguistic, technical and ancillary skills appropriate for research in their chosen area;
- demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research;
- presented their own ideas in a public forum and learned to contribute constructively within an international environment.

Assessment

- A dissertation of up to 15,000 words. Examiners may request an oral examination but this is not normally required.
- Three essays, each of up to 5,000 words.

Students receive independent reports from two examiners on each of their three essays and the dissertation.

Continuing

The usual preconditions for continuing to the PhD are an overall first class mark in the MPhil, a satisfactory performance in an interview and agreement of the PhD proposal with a potential supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Rausing Studentships
- Raymond and Edith Williamson Studentships
- Lipton Studentships
- Wellcome Master's Awards

Please see the Department's graduate funding page for more information: http://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/studying/graduate/funding.html

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. Read more
The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. The program fulfills these objectives by educating a leadership corps of health professionals and scholars from the humanities and social sciences who will imbue patient care and professional education with the skills and values of narrative understanding.
Health care and the illness experience are marked by uneasy and costly divides: between those in need who can access care and those who cannot, between health care professionals and patients, and between and among health care professionals themselves. Narrative medicine is an interdisciplinary field that challenges those divisions and seeks to bridge those divides. It addresses the need of patients and caregivers to voice their experience, to be heard and to be valued, and it acknowledges the power of narrative to change the way care is given and received.

Program structure

The Narrative Medicine graduate degree requires 38 points to complete. Those studying full-time can complete the program in one academic year plus the following summer, and for a few students, in one academic year. Students electing to study on a part-time basis can complete the degree in two years. The part-time option is designed to accommodate the professional obligations of students who are employed. This is a rigorous and concentrated program that demands a serious commitment of time and energy. Students are expected to devote significant time to completing reading assignments, class assignments, and term projects outside of class.
Degree requirements include the five Core Courses in Narrative Medicine (22 points) and the Research Methodology course (4 points), which is required for all students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research. The remaining 12 to 16 points may include any combination of (1) additional Topics in Narrative Medicine courses; (2) elective courses chosen from other departments (up to six points: note that many graduate courses in other departments are three points each); Independent Study (one to four points) and/or (4) a Capstone (two to four points).
The core curriculum of this pioneering M.S. in Narrative Medicine combines intensive exposure to narrative writing and close reading skills, literary and philosophical analysis, and experiential work, with the opportunity to apply this learning in clinical and educational settings. Core courses provide the conceptual grounding for work in narrative medicine, and introduce the direct practice of teaching narrative competence to others. Students combine core curriculum work with more focused study of important and current topics in the field. Focused seminars draw on the resources of more than one discipline. Courses rotate to reflect the current concerns, methodologies, and analytic approaches of narrative scholars and practitioners. To allow students to individualize their professional education in narrative medicine, they may choose electives from among a wide range of offerings at the University, with advice and approval of the faculty adviser. Electives enable students to gain knowledge in academic disciplines they wish to pursue (e.g., medical anthropology) or in subject areas of special professional interest (e.g. aging).The optional Capstone Project offers a wide range of opportunities for supervised or mentored work: a clinical placement, a program development and/or evaluation project, a scholarly thesis, or a writing project. It may combine independent work with a summer intensive workshop, such as the Columbia University Oral History summer workshop or an intensive writing workshop. The requirement can also be satisfied by clinical practicums that may include teaching, witnessing, or serving as a teaching assistant.

For more information on the courses please visit the website: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/courses

Research Methodology

All students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research, are required to take our Research Methods in Narrative Medicine course

Funding and Financial Resources

We want to make sure that the cost of your continuing education and professional studies do not stand in the way of your goals.
Most students at the School of Professional Studies use a combination of savings, scholarships, loans, outside grants, sponsors, or employer tuition benefits to cover the cost of attendance. However you choose to finance your education, consider it an investment in your future, and know that we, in conjunction with the Office of Student Financial Planning, are here to help and advise you along the way.

You can find more information on the funding available here: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/tuition-and-financing/financial-resources

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This MSc is designed to give clinicians and practitioners a deeper understanding of sports medicine, sports injuries and exercise medicine. Read more
This MSc is designed to give clinicians and practitioners a deeper understanding of sports medicine, sports injuries and exercise medicine. The programme covers the evidence-based management of sports medicine and musculoskeletal injuries, and emphasises the vital role of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease. This MSc can be taken full time over one year, part-time over two years, or via flexible distance learning.

Degree information

The programme focuses on sports injuries and their prevention and treatment, and provides a thorough grounding in relevant areas of anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology and psychology, as well as the fundamentals of exercise in maintaining and improving health. Students develop essential research skills through an independent research project.

All students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project (60 credits). Clinical sessions are spread over the year: commitment is equivalent to one half-day per week over three 12-week semesters. Clinic options include sports injury, physiotherapy and podiatry, exercise testing, and team visits.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

Core modules
-Exercise Physiology
-Health and Physical Activity
-Sports Injuries I – Lower Limb
-Sports Injuries II – Upper Limb
-Sports Injuries III – Head, Neck and Spine
-Advanced Sports Injury and Injury Prevention
-Research Methods

Optional modules
-Team and Event Medicine
-Rehabilitation of Sports Injuries

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project from a diverse range of available topics, which culminates in a dissertation, an oral examination and a presentation.

Teaching and learning
Teaching is delivered through a combination of formal lectures, hands-on practical sessions, small group seminars, clinics and field trips, and will be delivered by lecturers who are highly experienced in their field. Up-to-date, evidence-based practice will be emphasised throughout and students' contribution through discussion is considered key. Assessment is through written examination, presentations, coursework and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), as well as the dissertation and viva voce (oral) examination.

Careers

Graduates of the programme will gain a deeper understanding and valuable insights into the key areas of sports injury prevention and management, health and physical activity, and will be able to prescribe exercise safely for a range of medical conditions. This will prepare them for potential work in many areas from elite sports medicine to NHS sports and musculoskeletal clinics and exercise medicine services.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Physiotherapist, Josephine Lawson Physiotherapy Clinic
-Sports Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist, Princess Grace Hospital
-Doctor, NHS Health Education East Midlands
-Rotational and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
-Project Manager, Weight Management Centre

Employability
A Master's-level degree in Sports Medicine, Exercise & Health from UCL will open many doors in the sports and exercise medicine world, from sports injury clinics to developing exercise medicine programmes for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease, and working with sports teams. UCL's MSc in Sports Medicine, Exercise & Health is led by local experts with active involvement in NHS and elite sports and exercise medicine settings. A distinct feature of the programme is the wide variety and large number of distinguished external guest speakers, all experts in their own fields locally, nationally and internationally. Students have unrivalled access to our guest speakers for career advice and potential opportunities.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is one of the world's very best universities, consistently placed in the global top 20 in a wide range of world rankings. The UCL Division of Surgery & Interventional Science is part of one of the most prestigious medical schools in Europe, with a team of nearly 400 people, from surgeons and oncologists to clinical trials specialists and researchers. This programme is based at the Institute of Sport Exercise and Health (ISEH). Our aim is to understand the causes of human disease and develop innovative therapies and technology to improve quality of life.

The MSc in Sports Medicine, Exercise and Health at UCL places a strong emphasis on improving health through exercise alongside the management of sports and musculoskeletal injury. The programme has significant clinical content and students benefit from attendance at numerous specialist clinics and opportunities for field visits to sports teams and events.

Graduate students on the MSc in Sports Medicine, Exercise and Health at UCL are from diverse backgrounds reflecting the true multidisciplinary nature of sports and exercise medicine.

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Upon graduation from the Master’s Programme in Translational Medicine (TRANSMED) you can be expected to. -Be fluent in medical sciences and clinical practice from the point of view of a researcher. Read more
Upon graduation from the Master’s Programme in Translational Medicine (TRANSMED) you can be expected to:
-Be fluent in medical sciences and clinical practice from the point of view of a researcher.
-Be familiar with up-to-date translational research methodologies.
-Be adept at scientific reasoning and critical analysis of scientific literature.
-Acknowledge the regulatory and ethical aspects of biomedical and clinical research.
-Have mastered scientific and medical terminologies.
-Have excellent communication and interpersonal skills, enabling you to find employment in an international and interdisciplinary professional setting.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The TRANSMED studies are built upon three core educational themes:
Development of Research Skills
These include an introduction to current methodologies, which are further developed during a training period in a research group; research ethics: principles of clinical investigation; and writing of research or grant proposals.

Studies in Human Disease
These range from normal human physiology and anatomy, and basic biomedical courses, to more specialised studies covering various topics pertinent to the specialist option. You supplement these studies with clinical rounds, during which you have an opportunity to study selected patient cases in hospital wards, under the supervision of a clinician mentor.

Development of Communication Skills
These are promoted throughout the curriculum, through utilisation of interactive approaches and discussions, problem-based learning and oral presentations. The multidisciplinary TRANSMED community encompasses a wide range of educational backgrounds and provides ample opportunities for direct interactions with medical students, science and clinical teachers to enable you to practice and adopt interdisciplinary communication skills. At the end of the course of study, your communication skills will be evaluated in the final exam, during which you will orally present your research plan to expert examiners.

Selection of the Majors

The major of the programme is Translational medicine. During your first study year you can choose any of the five available specialisation options. These options and their specific goals are:
Neuroscience and Psychobiology
-To acquire knowledge on research methodology and state-of-the-art information in systems and cognitive neuroscience, as well as in clinical neuropsychology.
-To learn to produce new scientific information in the fields of psychobiology of human life, health, and stress, and to transfer the results between basic research and clinical settings.

Cancer
-To acquire basic knowledge of the principles of neoplastic growth, cancer progression and dissemination.
-To acquire basic understanding of the interplay between different cell types during neoplastic growth.
-To acquire knowledge of major research methodologies and disease models in cancer biology.

Regenerative Medicine
-To understand the principles of developmental and stem cell biology and regenerative pharmacology as the basis of regenerative therapies.
-To be familiar with the major technologies applied in regenerative medicine, including tissue engineering, cell and organ transplantation and transplantation immunology.
-To understand the ethical principles of clinical translation of basic research and application of regenerative medicine therapies.

Metabolic Disorders
-To be able to understand the basic metabolic pathways.
-To understand the pathophysiology of metabolic disorders such as diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and obesity.
-To be able to use genetic knowledge as a basis for prediction, diagnosis and treatment of metabolic disorders.

Cross-Disciplinary Translational Medicine
-To achieve a broad understanding of topics and methods in the field of Translational medicine.

Programme Structure

The scope of the programme is 120 credits (ECTS) and can be completed within two academic years (60 ECTS / year).

The Master of Science in Translational medicine degree includes 60 ECTS of advanced and 60 ECTS of other studies. Both of these include both obligatory and optional studies.

The majority of the advanced studies are related to the chosen specialist option and include:
-Master’s thesis (30 ECTS)
-Placement in a research group for learning advanced methods in your selected field of study
-Methodological and human health and disease-related courses
-Clinical rounds in Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH) clinics
-Final examination in your field of specialisation

The other studies include e.g.
-Article analysis, scientific writing and presentation
-Biomedicine and introductory courses in research methods
-Career planning and orientation
-Individual study coaching and personal study plans
-Research ethics

You can select the optional courses based on your personal interests, or to support your chosen specialisation option. You can also include courses from other suitable Master’s programmes at the University of Helsinki, such as:
-Life Science Informatics
-Genetics and molecular biosciences
-Neuroscience
-Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour

You can also include studies in other universities under the flexible study right-agreement (JOO).

Career Prospects

The Master of Science in Translational medicine degree provides excellent opportunities to apply for and attend postgraduate studies. Currently, 50% of TRANSMED graduates are continuing their studies in doctoral programmes, either at the University of Helsinki or abroad.

TRANSMED graduates are also highly valued in the private sector. Around 35% of graduates have been employed directly by bioindustry, pharma or other health sector enterprises either in Finland or abroad. Titles include product manager, product specialist, personalised health care manager etc. All such enterprises usually recruit both at the graduate (MSc) and postgraduate (PhD) levels.

The health and health technology sectors represent a rapidly emerging field, and one of the areas with a growing importance as the population ages and the costs of new therapies steadily increase. Thus, the demand for well-trained specialists in the field of translational medicine is likely to increase in the near future, providing excellent career prospects globally.

Internationalization

The Translational Medicine major is only available in this international programme, making the programme attractive to both Finnish and international students. Indeed, opportunities for personal interaction with students from different cultures are an integral feature of the studies. During your studies, you can also volunteer to act as a tutor for the incoming international students.

The international research community in The Academic Medical Centre Helsinki actively participates in teaching in TRANSMED. You complete the research group practice for your Master’s thesis in multicultural research groups.

It is also possible to complete your Master’s thesis work or research group placement abroad, or to include coursework done at a foreign university.

Research Focus

The specialisation options of the programme – Neuroscience and psychobiology, Cancer, Regenerative medicine, Metabolic disorders, and Cross-disciplinary translational medicine – are closely aligned with the research focus areas of the Faculty of Medicine: malignancy, inflammation, metabolism, degenerative processes as well as psychiatric disorders and their mechanisms. You therefore have an opportunity to learn from, and be supervised by, the leading experts and professors in their fields.

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The Graduate Entry Medicine course is delivered by the University of Nottingham in partnership with Derby Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and is based in a purpose built medical school on the Royal Derby Hospital’s site. Read more

Overview

The Graduate Entry Medicine course is delivered by the University of Nottingham in partnership with Derby Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and is based in a purpose built medical school on the Royal Derby Hospital’s site.

The four-year medical course commenced in September 2003 and is open to graduates of any discipline. There is an annual intake of 87 home/EU students who are based in Derby for the first 18 months of their course. For the Clinical Years, these students will combine with the students from the five-year course and whilst on placement will rotate around many of the teaching hospitals in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Lincolnshire, and in the community. Experiencing different sites across the counties is an educational and desirable feature of your training. Currently our students are on placements at the following hospitals:

Nottinghamshire

Queens Medical Centre, City Hospital and Highbury Hospital, Nottingham
Kingsmill Hospital and Highbury Hospital, Mansfield
Newark Hospital, Newark-on-Trent
Derbyshire

Royal Derby Hospital, Derby
Chesterfield Royal Hospital, Chesterfield

Lincolnshire
Lincoln County Hospital, Lincoln
Grantham Hospital, Grantham
Pilgrim Hospital, Boston
The course aims to widen access to a broader range of applicants than school leavers with A levels. It is intended to build on the intellectual skills acquired by students who have undertaken a first degree.

After successful completion of the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (BM BS) degree, graduates are required to undergo a further two years of foundation doctor training. Full registration is granted by the GMC at the end of the first year of this training. Non-British nationals graduating from UK medical schools are subject to work-permit restrictions.

Eligibility

Graduates will need a minimum of a lower second-class degree and must apply through UCAS, course code A101.

In addition you must have sat the GAMSAT examination (which is designed to ensure the entrants have the requisite knowledge and reasoning skills) in either September 2014 or September 2015.

NB: registration for GAMSAT and application to the School of Medicine via UCAS are separate processes and both are required for admission to the graduate entry course.

A great deal of emphasis is placed on work experience, as we want to ensure that you are making a well-informed choice about your future career, something which a few days shadowing would not provide. Relevant experience could include volunteering in a care home, working as a healthcare assistant within a hospital.

You also need to complete a satisfactory health check and criminal records checks - for more information see our "Fitness to Practise" information.

English language requirements

IELTS 7.5 (no less than 7.0 in any element)
Pearson Test of English (Academic) 74
Certificate of Proficiency in English: Grade B
Further help

If you require any further help, please contact:

Derby Course and Student Centre,
Graduate Entry Medicine, Royal Derby Hospital,
Uttoxeter Road,
Derby DE22 3DT
t: +44 (0)1332 724 900
e:

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The MSt in Genomic Medicine is part of the suite of postgraduate courses in Genomic Medicine and designed to educate suitably qualified NHS healthcare professionals from across the multi-professional team to prepare for the future adoption of genomic technologies and the increasing use of genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway. Read more
The MSt in Genomic Medicine is part of the suite of postgraduate courses in Genomic Medicine and designed to educate suitably qualified NHS healthcare professionals from across the multi-professional team to prepare for the future adoption of genomic technologies and the increasing use of genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway.

The programme has been developed by the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education and Cambridge University Hospitals in partnership with Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and European Bioinformatics Institute.

See the website https://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-genomic-medicine

Aims of the programme

- To provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research in an integrated clinical and research environment;
- To develop and create a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine able to pursue and develop their roles in a rapidly-changing and challenging environment of genomic medicine;
- To prepare healthcare professionals for the adoption of genomic technologies and the increasing use of genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway;
- To develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with the confidence to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care, and with the required knowledge, skills and capability to have a positive personal impact on the work of others;
- To develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with an understanding of research methodologies and clinical opportunities relevant to genomic medicine;
- To encourage a commitment to intellectual challenge and evidence-based clinical practice informed by the latest conceptual and theoretical knowledge of genomic medicine;
- To develop students' intellectual, practical and transferable skills related to genomic medicine;
- To encourage critical thinking related to genomic medicine;
- To conduct systematic research relevant to their professional practice.

Format

Eight modules, as described by the Postgraduate Diploma, plus a 60-credit research project and associated dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words on an agreed topic in genomic medicine;

or

Ten modules, comprising the eight modules as described by the Postgraduate Diploma plus two additional Option Modules, plus a 30 credit literature-based research project and associated dissertation of 5,000-6,000 words on an agreed topic in genomic medicine.

Assessment

- Students are assessed formatively throughout the taught modules of the programme using a variety of techniques and interrelated strategies including evidence of regular reflection, demonstration of active participation in the programme will also be required. There may also a requirement for the students to take part in peer review of other students.

- For each of the four taught modules comprising the Postgraduate Certificate, students must complete summative assignments of 2500-3500 words or equivalent.

- For the Postgraduate Diploma, students must complete assignments of 2500-3500 words for each of the taught modules (except where other methods of module assessment are indicated in individual module descriptions)

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Funding is available from Health Education England for NHS employees wishing to apply for this course. Prospective students wishing to apply for HEE funding should refer to the HEE website and ensure that access to this funding is approved before applying for the course. Apply for HEE funding: http://bit.ly/1rRqZA9

You may be interested to know that from 2016/17, Student Finance England (SFE) is introducing a postgraduate loans scheme for full-time and part-time Master’s courses. Information on eligibility, the amount of the loan and the level of repayment can be found in SFE’s The Student Room: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/content.php?r=5659-Student-Finance

Please note that SFE is planning to take applications via its main Student finance website, from summer 2016: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance

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Acupuncture is now well known as a system of medicine that involves the insertion of needles to specific points on the body. However, traditional practice also utilises other techniques such as moxibustion and cupping. Read more
Acupuncture is now well known as a system of medicine that involves the insertion of needles to specific points on the body. However, traditional practice also utilises other techniques such as moxibustion and cupping. The Chinese word for acupuncture is zhenjiu; literally needle and moxibustion. It originated In China around three thousand years ago and soon spread to other countries in Asia such as Japan and Korea. Acupuncture is now widely used around the world.

This course provides a strong foundation in the theory and application of acupuncture, as well as extensive clinical experience and a grounding in Chinese language and culture. Over the four year course, you'll also gain a thorough understanding of western bio-medical sciences and the skills to be a reflective and professional practitioner. Research will play an important role in the future development of the profession of acupuncture and this programme is designed to equip you with excellent research skills.

Modules covering Chinese medicine, language and culture will be taught by experienced lecturers from China. You'll benefit from this wealth of clinical experience and extensive knowledge of the various traditions and historical developments in Chinese medicine. You'll also learn from practitioners based in the UK to gain a more complete picture and understanding of the skills required to be a professional acupuncturist in the West.

Clinical experience is central to understanding and good practice of acupuncture. You'll train throughout the course at our teaching clinic. You'll also undertake an extended clinical placement in a Chinese hospital and study at our partner institution the Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine.

All this combined will help you to develop the skills to be a reflective and professional acupuncturist.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/chinese-medicine-acupuncture-masters-m-mac

Modules

Year 1:
- Chinese medicine 1: basic principles
- Concepts of inter-professional practice in health and social care
- Tuina and Jingluo 1
- Clinic 1: observation 1
- Chinese language 1
- Biomedicine 1: anatomy and physiology
- History of Chinese medicine
- Concepts of inter-professional practice in health and social care

Year 2:
- Tuina and Jingluo 2
- Clinic 2: observation 1
- Biomedicine 2: pathophysiology and pharmacology
- Sociology of health
- Chinese language 2
- Chinese medicine 2: pattern differentiation
- Running a practice

Year 3:
- Expertise, evidence and research: Informing clinical practice
- Clinic 3: Patient management 1
- Chinese medicine 3: integration
- Biomedicine 3: diagnosis and treatment
- Research in health and social care

Year 4:
- Clinic 4: Patient management 2

Dissertation:
Option 1: China trip
- Chinese hospital placement
- Chinese language 3
Option 2: Remain in the UK
- Chinese Medicine 4: Plurality and classics
- Chinese language 3

Employability

- Acupuncture as a career
With acupuncture becoming increasingly popular in the UK and western countries, there's a growing amount of opportunities available on graduation – whether you want to be an acupuncturist, or go into teaching, research or another side of healthcare. Our emphasis on a vocational approach to teaching and extensive clinical practice means that when you successfully graduate in Acupuncture you will be able to work as a professional acupuncturist and many recent graduates from this course have gone onto be professional clinical practitioners in acupuncture.

- Role and responsibilities
Acupuncturists spend much of their time working with clients: speaking to them, diagnosing and treating them. Usually working from a clinic, or at a client's home – sometimes on evenings and weekends, acupuncturists tend to be self-employed. This means a good understanding of business and marketing are key skills you would need to develop. A steady hand and empathetic attitude are also important qualities.

- Salary
Incomes vary considerably, however working full-time, acupuncturists may earn between £18,000 and £35,000 a year. (National Careers Service)

- Career progression
This course will enable you to work as a professional acupuncturist, and many recent graduates from this course have gone onto be professional clinical practitioners in acupuncture.

As a graduate from this course, you will be able to apply for further study at postgraduate level.

- LSBU Employability Services
LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

This course is accredited by the British Acupuncture Accreditation Board (BAAB). BAAB accredits courses on behalf of the British Acupuncture Council (BAcC).

This course is run in partnership with London South Bank University, the Confucius Institute at LSBU, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine and Harbin Normal University. All students on the course are eligible to apply for scholarships through the Confucius Institute to undertake studies in Chinese medicine and language in China.

The British Acupuncture Accreditation Board (BAAB) is the Accreditation board for courses in acupuncture.

The BAAB fosters and monitors high quality educational standards to assure the general public that all new graduates from BAAB-accredited acupuncture programmes are knowledgeable, reflective, competent and safe practitioners.

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This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine. Read more
This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine.

You learn from experts working in these diverse fields, being taught how different societies, cultures, and races have conceptualised disease, reacted to changes in environment and created different technological artefacts and scientific knowledge. You are introduced to the major and recent historiographical and methodological approaches, become familiar with the main archives in the UK and encouraged to approach the history of medicine, science, environment and technology from past as well as contemporary concerns.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/83/history-of-science-medicine-environment-and-technology

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI878 - Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)
HI866 - Science and Medicine in Context (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI827 - Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)
HI857 - Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)
HI881 - Museums, Material Culture and the History of Science (30 credits)
HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)

Assessment

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- place the study of texts, images and documentaries in their historical contexts, at the centre of student learning and analysis

- ensure that students of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology acquire a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the historical modes of theory and analysis

- enable you to understand and use concepts, approaches and methods of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology in different academic contexts and develop an understanding of the differing and contested aspects between, and within, the relevant disciplines

- develop your capacities to think critically about past events and experiences

- encourage you to relate the academic study of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology to questions of public debate and concern

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to your vocational and personal development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of Propaganda and War, which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history
Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history
Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine
Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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