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The MA Global Media Management is designed to meet the growing demand for intelligent, innovative thinkers to work within the media sector. This programme is the ideal way to progress in a career in the media sector, and will also offer students that have previously studied degrees in media, culture and the creative industries the chance to advance their specialism further. Read more

The MA Global Media Management is designed to meet the growing demand for intelligent, innovative thinkers to work within the media sector. This programme is the ideal way to progress in a career in the media sector, and will also offer students that have previously studied degrees in media, culture and the creative industries the chance to advance their specialism further.

What's covered in the course?

The MA Global Media Management is designed to meet the growing demand for intelligent, innovative thinkers to work within the media sector. This programme is the ideal way to progress in a career in the media sector, and will also offer students that have previously studied degrees in media, culture and the creative industries the chance to advance their specialism further.

You will learn about global business strategy and leadership and how this can advance the interests of media brands, reflecting on innovation and entrepreneurship challenges, which are emerging as significantly important skills for media managers all over the world. The programme is global in its outlook and reflects business systems, standards and practices from around the world, drawing upon international case studies and fostering intercultural fluency among students.

The MA Global Media Management is based on the philosophy that management education should provide a thorough grounding in the disciplines related to the functional aspects of management, and the interaction with contextual forces that impact on organisations. This knowledge and understanding is then further contextualised to provide integrative strategic themes. The impact of globalisation on business in all disciplines is a coherent theme throughout the programme.

Drawing on the strengths and expertise across Birmingham City University, this programme includes modules from both the Faculty of Arts, Design and Media (ADM) and the Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences (BLSS).

Why Choose Us?

  • Links to industry and regular contact with media professionals
  • International field trip opportunities to key media events
  • Supportive staff with many years of industry experience




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See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview. The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Read more
See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview

The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Designed to provide students with a strong background in psychological foundations, the program develops professional skills and competencies in assessment, counseling, consultation, and program evaluation.

A school psychologist works with young children (birth to age five); elementary, junior high, and high school students; teachers and administrators; parents; and professionals to offer services that lead to the amelioration of existing student difficulties and attempts to prevent school problems. Through diagnostic testing, counseling, consultation, and intervention, school psychologists help students deal with learning and behavioral difficulties and help improve students’ adjustment to school and their community.

The master of science degree is awarded after students have completed all course work, an internship, and have passed a portfolio review.

Plan of study

A minimum of 66 semester credit hours are required for completion of the program. Before registering for the internship, students must pass a portfolio review. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above is required.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in school psychology, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university,

- Have a minimum undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0,

- Have completed at least 18 semester hours in behavioral sciences with a grade of B (3.0) or above,

- Have completed prerequisite undergraduate courses in general psychology, elementary statistics, child or developmental psychology, and abnormal psychology,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE),

- Submit letters of reference,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit an essay outlining the candidate's goals and related experience that shows evidence of a professional commitment and the potential for developing effective relationships with children, youth, and adults,

- Complete an individual interview, and

- Complete an application for graduate study.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 580 (paper-based) is required. This requirement is waived for native speakers of English and those submitting transcripts from American universities.

All credentials must be submitted and reviewed before the student completes 9 semester credit hours of graduate work in the program. Applications are due by February 1. Later applications will be reviewed on a space-available basis.

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Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. Read more

Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. With increases in the application and uses of information technology in the medical industry, there is an unprecedented need for professionals who can combine their knowledge of computing and health care to improve the safety and quality of care delivery, as well as to help control costs.

The MS degree in health informatics applies the creative power of information technology to the information and data needs of health care. This includes the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of patient data, as well as access to electronically maintained medical knowledge for use in patient care, research, and education. Professionals in the field require computing expertise; an understanding of formal medical terminology, clinical processes, and guidelines; and an understanding of how information and communication systems can be used to successfully deliver patient information in various health care settings. The program is offered online only.

The program offers two tracks: the clinician track and analyst track.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission into the MS program in health informatics, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college (MD, RN, or other professional degree).
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a professional essay describing relevant employment or other experience and career plans (recent undergraduate students without extensive employment experience should discuss their career plans as well as any courses they have completed that are relevant to medical informatics, health care, or information technology).
  • Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals who are able to assess the applicant’s potential for success in the program.
  • Have completed at least one year of computer programming in a current object-oriented language or have equivalent work experience.*
  • Have knowledge of medical terminology/vocabulary, clinical processes, and information systems that are used to support health care activities and processes.
  • Have a familiarity with anatomy and physiology, including the major systems of the human body, including the skeletal system, muscle tissue physiology, muscular system, nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, urinary system, and histology.
  • Have completed the equivalent of one statistics course that covers the fundamental statistical principles necessary to interpret data and present results, including descriptive statistics, random sampling, normal distribution, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. (This prerequisite may be completed post-admission if necessary.)
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.

International Applications

  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 88 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.
  • Applicants without previous graduate study and with an undergraduate GPA that is less than 3.0 may be considered for admission, but will be required to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores. Applicants from international universities are required to submit GRE scores.
  • An interview with the program’s admissions committee may also
  • be required.


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We are very fortunate to be able to provide this high quality programme as Brunel University London has one of the largest and most highly qualified occupational therapy staff groups in the world; the expertise is there to teach and supervise at Master’s and Doctoral levels. Read more

About the course

We are very fortunate to be able to provide this high quality programme as Brunel University London has one of the largest and most highly qualified occupational therapy staff groups in the world; the expertise is there to teach and supervise at Master’s and Doctoral levels.

Every module assignment can be focused on a topic you or your manager wants to investigate. The assignments are practically useful – write an evidence-based protocol or care pathway for your clients, plan how to improve the effectiveness of your service, evaluate and debate research in order to decide if the evidence is worth incorporating into practice, reflect on how central occupational engagement is for enhancing the health of your clients, or take a topic of interest to you.

The course does not further clinical skills, nor does it lead to registration from the UK professional governing bodies, but rather focuses on developing the occupational therapist’s ability to evaluate and enhance professional practice. Up to 60 credits of academic taught module exemptions can be offered for students holding a postgraduate certificate in Occupational Therapy, relevant postgraduate modules from other universities, or substantial relevant post professional periods of study – for example, AMPS or Sensory Integration.

Aims

Master's level study is essential if you want to gain the skills to evaluate your interventions, build professional confidence and seek out and develop existing theories, which inform your practice.

This course is aimed at occupational therapists wanting to continue their professional development and develop evidence-based practice – and will broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of the value of occupational therapy in today's changing world.

Each module’s content is embedded in practice and overall the programme aims to develop your skills in analysing evidence, implementing and evaluating occupational therapy research.

Course Content

Key Features:

Encourages a theoretical underpinning of occupation, occupational therapy and research.
Nationally recognised for excellence in teaching and research.
Meets the needs of occupational therapists who wish to enhance their current practice in their workplace.
Provides academic learning experiences in a supportive environment.
A modular programme that can be studied full-time, part-time or as an associate student. (Associate enrolment: studying a one off-module – this is very appropriate for continuing professional development.)
Facilitates reflective practice.
Develops research competencies for using and developing evidence-based practice.

This course will broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of the value of occupational therapy in today's changing world. Each module’s content is embedded in practice and overall the programme aims to develop your skills in analysing evidence, implementing and evaluating occupational therapy research.

Compulsory modules:

Occupational Science
Evidence-Based Occupational Therapy
The Art of Professional Practice
Research Design
Approaches to Research
Dissertation

Optional modules (choose two):

Occupational Therapy for Children, Young People and Families
Occupational Therapy for Mental Health
Functional Neuroscience for Rehabilitation
Occupational Therapy for Active Ageing
Specialist Practice in Occupational Therapy
Cognitive and Behavioural Issues in Neurorehabilitation

Assessment

A variety of assessments allow students to become proficient in evaluating and questioning their chosen area of practice. Active and adult learning principles are used throughout the course.

Special Features

This Brunel Master's is one of the few in the UK specialising in occupational therapy, and it has been especially designed to meet your needs as a practising therapist, helping you to gain greater mastery in your chosen area of occupational therapy.

The programme has been praised by the University validating committees as a model Master's degree for professional practitioners, for it brings theory to the workplace.

Based on a sound approach to adult education, the course invites students to bring issues from practice to analyse in class.

The programme was rated top out of all postgraduate programmes at Brunel University with regard to its capacity to promote personal development.

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The MSc in Financial Economics aims to offer the knowledge and expertise needed for a career as a professional economist working in the public or private sector or alternatively, in fund management, stock-broking, investment banking, corporate treasury and other financial sector roles. Read more
The MSc in Financial Economics aims to offer the knowledge and expertise needed for a career as a professional economist working in the public or private sector or alternatively, in fund management, stock-broking, investment banking, corporate treasury and other financial sector roles.

The course includes modules covering the working of the markets for bonds, stocks, currencies and derivatives (futures and forwards, options and swaps), as well as microeconomics, advanced macroeconomics and econometrics.

Much of the material is extremely challenging, both analytically and sometimes technically, but attention is given at all times to the practical questions of how to interpret financial data for research purposes; how to identify and exploit trading opportunities; and how to measure and manage risk.

Distinctive features:

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.
• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).
• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).
• You will be exposed to recent developments in research and will develop a sophisticated understanding of modern theories and research findings.
• Our facilities include a fully functioning trading room giving you access to the latest market data.

Structure

You will undertake a range of core and optional modules across two semesters which are designed to give you an in-depth understanding of a range of areas relevant to the financial sector.

In the first semester you will undertake four core modules.

In the second semester you will take three core modules as well as one optional module from the selection available.

Upon successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is designed to enable you to apply the knowledge, understanding and skills learnt in the taught modules to individual independent research under academic supervision.

Core modules:

Principles of Finance
Macroeconomics
Microeconomics: Economics of Uncertainty
Quantitative Methods
Financial Derivatives
Empirical Finance
Corporate Finance
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Asset Pricing
International Trade
Economic Forecasting
International Finance
Mathematical Finance
Investment and Electronic Trading

Methods of teaching

Most modules involve a mixture of lectures and small group teaching (called classes, seminars, workshops or tutorials).

In a lecture, the lecturer will mainly be giving an overview of a particular aspect of the module content (as well as opportunities for you to ask questions and be reflective), while in classes and workshops you will have an opportunity to practice techniques, discuss ideas, apply concepts and consolidate your understanding in the topic

Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of your studies. Normally, your personal tutor will teach on your own degree course and you will keep the same personal tutor throughout your course.

Your personal tutor will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor should always be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate. You are required to meet with your personal tutor at three points during each academic year but you are also encouraged to get in touch with them at any other point if you need help or advice.

For day-to-day information, the staff of our Postgraduate Student Hub are available, in person, by telephone or by email, from 8am to 6pm each weekday during term time to answer your questions.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with regular feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback, personalised feedback on written work, and generic written feedback.

You will be given general feedback in relation to examinations following all examination periods and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary from module to module but, across your degree scheme as a whole, you can expect a mixture of exams, coursework, essays, practical work, presentations, and individual and group projects.

Career prospects

Our graduates find employment as specialists in financial institutions, corporate treasury departments, central banks and local government.

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The MSc Human Resource Management aims to give you the knowledge, expertise and the professional CIPD qualification needed for a successful career in Human Resources and Personnel. Read more
The MSc Human Resource Management aims to give you the knowledge, expertise and the professional CIPD qualification needed for a successful career in Human Resources and Personnel.

The Programme is both academically challenging, with input from world-leading academics, and practically focused, giving you the opportunity to develop the confidence, knowledge and skills needed for a successful career in Human Resource Management.

You will be equipped with the specialist knowledge and skills to succeed in a career within the Human Resource Management industry and will have the opportunity to study advocacy, debate and negotiation skills. You will learn how to understand and to undertake high-quality research to aid your decision-making within industry.

Opportunities to network with members of the Human Resource industry will be available through our programme of guest speakers and through our links with the CIPD.

As well as learning from the pioneering research of our faculty members, you will work towards a professional qualification, Graduate Membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, a qualification required by most employers for UK Human Resource Management positions.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited by the CIPD. All students on the Programme may register to become a Student Member of the CIPD.

If you pass all modules of the MSc HRM programme with a mark of at least 50% you will be upgraded to Associate Member and may use the designation Assoc CIPD after your name. When you have obtained sufficient professional experience you may apply to the CIPD to upgrade your membership to full Chartered Membership (MCIPD).

Distinctive features:

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.

• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).

• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).

• You will have the chance to attend practical workshops which help you develop your problem solving skills.

• You will study a CIPD accredited programme.

Structure

The Programme is taught from September to June and gives you a thorough grounding in all aspects of Human Resource Management.

You will study eight compulsory modules and complete a project.

The Programme is offered in full-time mode and lasts 12 months. You will take eight modules, each of which is worth 15 credits.

Reflective logs:

You will be required to maintain a reflective log which will record aspects of your learning during the MSc programme. During the programme you will develop study skills, personal effectiveness skills and specific HR skills and write reflective accounts detailing how these skills will be used and developed. The reflection will be used to help you identify links between the different modules and develop the range of skills required to operate successfully in an HR role.

The reflective logs are a requirement of the course and must be completed to an acceptable standard before you can complete the MSc programme.

Upon successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the project. The purpose of the project is to provide you with the opportunity to test the applicability of the knowledge, understanding, methodologies and skills learnt in the taught modules in a piece of independent research with the benefit of individual academic supervision. It will introduce you to the methodology of research, the systematic analysis of ideas, the problems of data collection and the presentation of ideas in a clear way. It also requires reflection on the implications for professional practice from an ethical, professional and continuous professional development standpoint.

Core modules:

Human Resource Management in Context
The Management of Human Resources
Employment Relations
Reward Management
Contemporary Issues in HR Research
Leadership, Work and Organisation
Employment Law
The Practice of HR in the Modern Workplace
The Human Resource Management Project

Methods of teaching

Most modules involve a mixture of lectures and small group teaching (called classes, seminars, workshops or tutorials).

In a lecture, the lecturer will mainly be giving an overview of a particular aspect of the module content (as well as opportunities for you to ask questions and be reflective), while in classes and workshops you will have an opportunity to practice techniques, discuss ideas, apply concepts and consolidate your understanding in the topic

Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of your studies. Normally, your personal tutor will teach on your own degree course and you will keep the same personal tutor throughout your course.

Your personal tutor will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor should always be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate. You are required to meet with your personal tutor at three points during each academic year but you are also encouraged to get in touch with them at any other point if you need help or advice.

For day-to-day information, the staff of our Postgraduate Student Hub are available, in person, by telephone or by email, from 8am to 6pm each weekday during term time to answer your questions.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with regular feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback, personalised feedback on written work, and generic written feedback.

You will be given general feedback in relation to examinations following all examination periods and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary from module to module but, across your degree scheme as a whole, you can expect a mixture of exams, coursework, essays, practical work, presentations, and individual and group projects.

Careers prospects

Graduates have gone on to successful HR careers in a range of industries including public and private sector businesses both nationally and internationally. A number of students have also pursued further learning by undertaking a research degree after completing their masters.

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This programme aims to offer knowledge and expertise for a position of responsibility in an international bank, financial institution, central bank or government agency. Read more
This programme aims to offer knowledge and expertise for a position of responsibility in an international bank, financial institution, central bank or government agency.

The course offers those with a substantial economic or finance background the opportunity to specialise in more depth in the areas of Money, Banking, Finance and Trade. It contains challenging theoretical and applied elements which will equip you for responsible posts in the financial and commercial world.

The course is designed to be relevant to a wide range of students from both developed and developing countries with career aspirations in a wide variety of banking and financial contexts.

It provides excellent preliminary training for those who wish to pursue further research with a view to a career in a research institution or central bank. It will also be of interest to those who are currently working in a financial institution or other private or public sector body, such as a central bank or national treasury.

Distinctive features:

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.

• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).

• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).

• You may also enrol for a module on electronic trading using our Trading Room facility.

Structure

You will undertake a range of core and optional modules across two semesters which are designed to give you an in-depth understanding of a range of areas relevant to the finance, economics and banking sectors.

In the first semester you will undertake four core modules.

In the second semester you will take three core modules as well as one optional module.

Upon successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is designed to enable you to apply the knowledge, understanding and skills learnt in the taught modules to individual independent research under academic supervision.

Core modules:

Principles of Finance
Macroeconomics
Microeconomics: Economics of Uncertainty
Quantitative Methods
Issues in Money Banking and Finance
Principles of Money and Banking
International Banking
Dissertation

Optional modules:

International Trade
Economic Forecasting
International Finance
Marketing of Financial Services
Investment and Electronic Trading

Methods of teaching

Most modules involve a mixture of lectures and small group teaching (called classes, seminars, workshops or tutorials).

In a lecture, the lecturer will mainly be giving an overview of a particular aspect of the module content (as well as opportunities for you to ask questions and be reflective), while in classes and workshops you will have an opportunity to practice techniques, discuss ideas, apply concepts and consolidate your understanding in the topic

Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of your studies. Normally, your personal tutor will teach on your own degree course and you will keep the same personal tutor throughout your course.

Your personal tutor will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor should always be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate. You are required to meet with your personal tutor at three points during each academic year but you are also encouraged to get in touch with them at any other point if you need help or advice.

For day-to-day information, the staff of our Postgraduate Student Hub are available, in person, by telephone or by email, from 8am to 6pm each weekday during term time to answer your questions.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with regular feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback, personalised feedback on written work, and generic written feedback.

You will be given general feedback in relation to examinations following all examination periods and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary from module to module but, across your degree scheme as a whole, you can expect a mixture of exams, coursework, essays, practical work, presentations, and individual and group projects.

Career prospects

Graduates have a good employment rate with alumni working in the European Commission, Eurobank, Bank of England and Chinese financial institutions amongst many others.

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The programme offers ESRC accredited training in language-based area studies, as well as advanced training in qualitative and quantitative methods; specialised area studies research training; and language training in one of the region’s languages. Read more
The programme offers ESRC accredited training in language-based area studies, as well as advanced training in qualitative and quantitative methods; specialised area studies research training; and language training in one of the region’s languages.

Why this programme

-The programme is intended for those who wish to pursue a research-based career in the region, with or without the completion of a PhD.
-Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russia. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.
-Annual scholarships are available for the language-based area studies pathways on a 2+3 (MRes + intensive language training to advanced level + PhD), 1+3 (MRes or intensive language training to advanced level + PhD) and +3 (PhD only) models, depending on your prior qualifications.
-The University Library holds one of the best Russian, Central and East European collections in the world.
-We have active postgraduate training links with thirteen overseas partner institutions in eleven countries. They visit to provide research master classes and participate in seminars.

Programme structure

You will take five core courses and submit a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation.

Semester 1
-Social science statistics 1
-Qualitative methods
-Language (Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Russian)

Semester 2
-Research methods for studying Russia and Central and Eastern Europe
-Advanced qualitative methods or Social science statistics 2
Language (Czech, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Russian, Slovak or Hungarian)
Dissertation (12,000–15,000 words)

Note: Some languages and courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences. Language training is offered over a range of levels from beginners to advanced. If you are a native speaker or have a degree in one of the region’s languages, you will take an additional course instead.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to establish careers as lecturers and researchers at universities in the UK, Norway, Greece, Italy and Poland or have become secondary school teachers. Some have also gone on to pursue research and policy-making careers with government, business and international organisations.

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Our History Masters covers all periods from medieval to late modern, focusing on Scotland, Britain, Europe and America. You’ll study historical skills and methods and produce a research dissertation based on primary sources. Read more

Our History Masters covers all periods from medieval to late modern, focusing on Scotland, Britain, Europe and America. You’ll study historical skills and methods and produce a research dissertation based on primary sources. History at Glasgow rates joint 4th in the UK for research excellence and impact. Our research directs our postgraduate teaching so that you'll explore cutting-edge topics.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow is an outstanding resource hub for the study of History. On campus, the University Library holds superb printed and manuscript collections from the medieval to the present. You can also use the Baillie Collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history.
  • The University’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery provides access to primary source materials in fields such as fine art, numismatics and ethnography. The city is home to world-class museums and galleries, the Mitchell Library and Glasgow Women’s Library.
  • History staff contribute to the Masters programmes in American Studies, War Studies and Global Security, and you can take taught options from these and other programmes, enabling you to tailor the programme to your interests.
  • We are a dynamic and supportive research community, where you’re encouraged to take part in many research-led initiatives such as seminar programmes.

Programme Structure

You’ll take:

  • One core course
  • Five optional courses

You’ll also produce a dissertation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Two (or three) optional courses

Semester 2: January to March

  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Three (or two) optional courses

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is mainly seminar and discussion-based, in small classes. Technical skills are taught through lectures and workshops associated with the core course, while the conceptual foundations for gender history are taught through the weekly seminars. Independent and self-reflective critical work is fostered through written assignments and seminar presentations, culminating in the dissertation.

Career prospects

The research skills and methods you’ll gain on this programme give you the transferable skills for positions in the public and private sectors, including heritage policy and projects, media and teaching. The programme is also a good foundation for a PhD. 



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An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences. Read more

An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences.

Why this programme

  • This MLitt aims to challenge, educate and engage by exposing you to a wide range of different ideas about war. It is specifically designed to broaden and deepen your understanding of the nature of war in theory and practice, and its place in history.
  • The University of Glasgow is home to the Scottish Centre for War Studies. You will be able to participate in regular research seminars on critical themes related to conflict as well as to related conferences.
  • All courses are designed to expose you to detailed research topics, source criticism and current debate, and are led by internationally acknowledged experts.

Programme structure

You will spend the first semester studying on the degree’s core course which covers both the major thinkers on warfare and the practice and conduct of war.

Core topics may include

  • Jomini, aggressive warfare and the Confederate States of America at war
  • The evolution of Military Thought between the two World Wars
  • Europe’s ‘small wars’, 1800–present
  • Vegetius and ‘Vegetian strategy’ in medieval warfare.

In the second semester, you will take three optional courses which delve in greater detail into a particular aspect of military or strategic history.

Optional courses may include

  • Chivalry and warfare in later medieval Europe, 1300–1450
  • The American way of warfare; from the Revolution to the War on Terror
  • Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
  • Western intelligence in an age of terror.

You will complete the programme by writing a dissertation based on your own research. This requires you to engage in original research guided by an expert in the field.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

Positions held by recent graduates include Development Director, Professor, Correspondent, and Freelance Journalist.



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This programme is designed to deepen your understanding of education so that you can critically analyse education practice, provisions and policy in your own current or future professional context. Read more
This programme is designed to deepen your understanding of education so that you can critically analyse education practice, provisions and policy in your own current or future professional context. They support you in interrogating research literature and in undertaking educational research in your own areas of study.

Why this programme

◾This programmes offers you the opportunity to explore different perspectives and aspects of education through a variety of optional courses.
◾This programme is for people who are interested in entering the academic field of education. You will study alongside people from a range of backgrounds and stages of educationally focused careers.
◾The programme offerd an opportunity for the advanced study of education within a broad framework of courses. The scope is broad, representing important and influential educational ideas from a range of disciplines.

Programme structure

You will take four core and two optional courses. Courses contribute to your development of research understanding and skills that then support you in conducting your own research based dissertation. You can select areas for professional development from optional courses.

Core courses
◾Advanced educational research
◾Introduction to educational and social research
◾Modern educational thought
◾Seminar on contemporary issues.

Optional courses
◾Curriculum development in adult education
◾Developing literacy
◾Economics for education
◾Education and international development
◾Educational approaches to community learning and development
◾Empowerment and social change
◾Higher education as a field of research, policy and practice
◾Highly able learners
◾Identities, relationships & behaviours
◾Inclusive classrooms, inclusive pedagogies
◾International & comparative education
◾Leadership in implementing education policy
◾Perspectives of youth & young adulthood
◾The evolving concept of inclusion
◾The learner & the curriculum
◾Work-related learning
◾Working with youth: Education and learning for change.

Career prospects

The programme will support your career development as a class teacher, lecturer, policy developer, special education professional, head teacher, education administrator or researcher.

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The MSc in Accounting and Finance has been designed to provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and expertise necessary to cope with the ever-changing financial environment. Read more
The MSc in Accounting and Finance has been designed to provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and expertise necessary to cope with the ever-changing financial environment.

The course is designed to provide you with comprehensive and rigorous training in advanced accounting and finance.

You will gain a solid foundation in both accounting and finance with the ability to select optional modules in the second semester which are tailored to your interests. You will also have the opportunity to focus on international aspects of Accounting and Finance.

This is a modular, research-led degree delivered by experienced academic and professional staff with international research profiles.

This programme provides excellent training for those who wish to pursue doctoral level research with a view to an academic of research-orientated career.

Distinctive features:

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.

• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).

• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).

Structure

There are six core modules and two optional modules. In addition you will undertake a research dissertation to complete your study.

In the first semester you will take four core modules. In the second semester, you will take two further core modules along with two optional modules. The optional modules provide progression from those delivered in the first semester and allow you to expand your current knowledge.

Upon successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation which is designed to enable you to apply the knowledge, understanding and skills learnt in the taught modules to individual independent research.

Core modules:

Advanced Financial Reporting
Research Methods
Management Accounting and the Control of Organizational Performance
Finance and Investment
Research Topics in Accounting
Research Topics in Finance
Dissertation

Optional modules:

International Corporate Finance
Financial Derivatives
International Accounting
Accounting and Finance in China
Asset Pricing

Methods of teaching

Most modules involve a mixture of lectures and small group teaching (called classes, seminars, workshops or tutorials).

In a lecture, the lecturer will mainly give an overview of a particular aspect of the module content (as well as opportunities for you to ask questions and be reflective), while in classes and workshops you will have an opportunity to practise techniques, discuss ideas, apply concepts and consolidate your understanding in the topic.

Support

At the beginning of your studies, you will be allocated a personal tutor who will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor will be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate. You are required to meet with your personal tutors at three points during each academic year but you are also encouraged to get in touch with them at any other point if you need help or advice.

Feedback

During your studies, feedback will be provided on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral, personalised and generic written feedback.

General feedback will be given in relation to examinations following examination periods and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary from module to module. Across your degree scheme as a whole, you can expect a mixture of exams, coursework, essays, presentations, and individual and group projects.

Career prospects

Although this is a specialist programme, you will have a wide range of employment options to choose from, including professional accountancy, the financial services sector, management consultancy or a specialist position in the public sector.

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This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Read more

This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Dealing with art from the early twentieth century to the present, you will investigate concepts such as historical avant-garde, neo-avant-garde, and post-avant-garde, paying close attention to the theorists who have elaborated these ideas.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You are granted privileged access to the extensive collections in our own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.
  • You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
  • If you want to learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge of 20th-century Avant-Gardes, this programme is for you.
  • Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

Closely focused on the visual and historical specificities of the subject, the core teaching will have you examining the politically oppositional and ‘transgressive’ impulses of the avant-garde.

You will interpret ‘transgression’ in the widest sense and in relation to a range of diverse historical contexts, including: the anti-art concerns of Dada; the political tensions arising from conflicts between nationalist and internationalist currents in European art of the early 20th century and the Nietzschian/Bataillean testing of the boundaries of conventional moral positions, particularly regarding sexual identity and the body.

The optional courses available are closely geared to the research interests of our staff. Their content will draw upon current exhibitions and debates. 

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses

  • Research methods in practice
  • Theories of the Avant Garde
  • Readings in Duchamp: anti-art, blasphemy, sexuality
  • Art, embodiment, transgression
  • Dada in Switzerland and Germany.

Optional courses

You may choose from the following options in the College of Arts

  • a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
  • a course from the MLitt Modernities: Modernism, Modernity & Post-Modernity run by English Literature 
  • a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from courses run by History of Art

  • Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
  • Independent study 
  • Work placement.

Study trip

Students on this programme are invited to take part in an optional study trip of approximately one week, which is funded by the student. Previous destinations include Berlin and Dublin.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in curation, digitisation and research within museums and other cultural and heritage institutions. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.



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This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. Read more

This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, including such core areas as metaphysics, ethics, social and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. The MLitt is also exceptional in providing a fast-track route into a PhD in Philosophy.

Why this programme

  • If you have a degree (or equivalent) in any other field, whether science, social science, arts or humanities, but an interest in philosophy, then the Philosophy MLitt will allow you to develop your philosophical interests in a variety of different courses as well as undertake a dissertation on a topic of your choice.
  • If you want to do a PhD in Philosophy but don't already have a Philosophy degree, then the MLitt will allow you to apply straightaway for the PhD.
  • We offer courses to bring you up to speed in a wide variety of philosophical topics, including ethics and politics, the history of philosophy including Russell, Wittgenstein and the Scottish Enlightenment, philosophy of mind - including consciousness, perception, the emotions, pain and pleasure - philosophy of language, metaphysics, epistemology – including virtue epistemology - and philosophy of mathematics.
  • You will work closely with an expert member of staff on a master’s dissertation on a topic of your choice.
  • MLitt students are encouraged to attend and participate in research seminars, workshops, conferences and reading groups hosted by the Centre for the Study of Perceptual Experience and the Forum for Quine and the History of Analytic Philosophy as well as by externally funded events in (among other areas) epistemology, metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. Students will also present their work at the weekly postgraduate seminar where they will receive feedback from postgraduate students and staff. We also host an annual reading party in the Highlands at which students present papers and are coached on their writing and presentation skills.
  • Philosophy at Glasgow University has an illustrious history of original thinkers going against the grain of orthodoxy. Its past professors include such giants of empiricism as Adam Smith and Thomas Reid.

Programme structure

The Philosophy MLitt has three components:

1. Introduction to Analytic Philosophy (40 credits)

2. A choice of four of the following courses (20 credits each):

  • Aesthetics: philosophical questions about art and beauty 
  • Origins of analytic philosophy including Russell and Wittgenstein
  • Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment including Hume and Reid
  • Philosophy of mind: consciousness, emotions, pain and pleasure
  • Moral philosophy: philosophical questions about value and well being
  • Political philosophy: philosophical questions about justice and the state
  • Epistemology: the nature and scope of human knowledge
  • Metaphysics including existence, natural laws and the nature of time
  • Philosophy of language including meaning, translation and truth
  • Philosophy of mathematics: the nature and existence of numbers and sets

3. A dissertation on a topic of your choice guided by individual support from an expert supervisor (60 credits).

Career prospects

Philosophy students at Glasgow receive rigorous and personalised training in problem solving skills, writing skills, presentation and research skills. 

All these skills are widely applicable and recognised to be exceptionally valuable in a wide range of careers, including journalism, teaching, the Civil Service, local government, business, publishing, law, and the arts. 

You will also be well equipped to carry onto a further degree in philosophy such as the PhD.



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This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Read more
This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

Why this programme

-This programme is for those planning careers in major public, commercial and voluntary institutional settings who wish to acquire a specialised knowledge of Central and Eastern Europe and proficiency in one of the region's languages.
-Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russia. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.
-Choose between three specialist pathways: Central and East European Studies, Russian Studies, and Eurasian Studies.
-You will examine the history of communism and why it collapsed. You will learn about the impact of international organisations (e.g. the European Union, NATO) and of major world powers on the region as well as retaining an appreciation of the region’s internal diversity in a variety of spheres (cultural, economic, ethnic, political and social).
-You can participate in our extensive range of conferences, workshops, business days, seminars and networking activities involving representatives of the business, policy-making and third sector communities.
-The University Library holds one of the best Russian, Central and East European collections in the world.

Programme structure

You will take four core and one optional course, as well as complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. You will select a specialist pathway, which includes a specialist core courses and a language. (choices vary depending on pathway).

Core courses
All pathways
-Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies
-Research methods for studying Russia, Eastern Europe & Eurasia

Central and East European Studies
-Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
-Language options: Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian OR Polish

Russian Studies
-Gender and identity in Soviet & Post-Soviet Russia OR Russian foreign policy
-Language: Russian

Eurasian Studies
-Contested states: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian security
-Language options: Russian OR Chinese

Optional courses
-Contested states: The South Caucasus since 1991
-De facto states in the Post-Soviet space
-Developments in Czech society since 1989
-Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
-Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union
-Political modernisation: The Georgian case
-Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating global and local identities
-Post-Soviet Ukraine: a case study in socio-economic and political transformation
-Rethinking Central Asian security
-Russian foreign policy
-Statehood and nationality in Russia, Central and Eastern Europe
-The geopolitics of Central Europe

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to establish careers as lecturers and researchers at universities in the UK, Norway, Greece, Italy, and Poland or have become secondary school teachers. Our graduates have also been very successful in establishing careers with organisations such as BBC World Service, British Army, British Civil Service, British Council, Centre for Defence Information (Moscow), Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers, European Policies Research Centre, University of Strathclyde (Glasgow), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (London), Jamestown Foundation (Washington D.C), KPMG, Ministry of Defence, UK, Open Society Foundation (Bratislava), Open Society Institute (Budapest), Operation Mobilisation, Czech Republic and the Trust for Civil Society in Central & Eastern Europe (Warsaw).

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