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The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. Read more

CONSUMER CONFLICT MANAGEMENT, NEGOTIATION, AND MEDIATION

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School. Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines.

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education.

Visit the website http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/conflict-management.html

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Graduate Certificate Program Consumer Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation

Workplace research indicates that managers and supervisors spend as much as forty percent of the workday resolving nonproductive conflict issues. Conflict that is poorly managed results in burdening costs for both the individual and the organization. Expanding worldwide development, the global economy, and population growth and associated social issues drive the intermingling of cultures and practices that increase the incidence of workplace conflict and destructive disagreement. Interest in and demand for conflict management has consequently risen.

The Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation provides students with the tools to manage, resolve, negotiate, and mediate conflict and to develop intrapersonal and interpersonal skills for living and earning. Conflict management training actively engages the student in self-exploration regarding issues of perception, bigotry, bias, values, beliefs, differences, and culture. The student will learn how to verbally and physically converse without allowing differences to interfere with collaboration. Business, government, and community agencies value these skills to increase productivity and to maximize a positive workplace climate. The ability to creatively manage conflict is a skill that most employers value.

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School (graduate.ua.edu). Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines. See Section 4.3 (services.graduate.ua.edu/catalog/14200.html) of the UA Graduate Catalog.

Application and Admission Criteria

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education.

The required courses for the certificate are as follows:

• CSM 525 Introduction to Consumer Conflict Resolution
• CSM 527 Consumer Mediation, Negotiation and Management/Advanced I/Emotional Intelligence
• CSM 528 Consumer Conflict Mediation, Management, & Negotiation/Advanced II
• CSM 559 Techniques of Consumer Counseling
• CSM 586 Consumer Human Capital Management/Advanced III

Find out how to apply here - https://studentaccounts.ua.edu/

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A master of science degree is offered through the College of Human Environmental Sciences where students may specialize in the Consumer Sciences (CSM) program or the Family Financial Planning and Counseling program. Read more
A master of science degree is offered through the College of Human Environmental Sciences where students may specialize in the Consumer Sciences (CSM) program or the Family Financial Planning and Counseling program.

The College also offers a Master of Science in Human Environmental Sciences with the following areas of specialization: Consumer Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation (also available as a graduate certificate), Consumer Quality Management, Interactive Technology, and Sports Business Management.

More information can be found on the Graduate Required Courses page (http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/graduate-required-courses.html).

Visit the website http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/graduate-programs.html

CONSUMER SCIENCES

Students must complete 30 hours of coursework. A minimum of 24 semester hours of course credit, including HES 509, two courses in statistics, and 15 hours in courses in the area of specialization are required. Students must complete 6 credit hours of thesis research and write a thesis. A final oral examination is required upon completion of the thesis, and a manuscript of publishable quality based on the thesis research is expected of each Plan I degree candidate.

FAMILY FINANCIAL PLANNING AND COUNSELING

In the financial planning specialty within the 30-hour Master of Science degree program, students will study economic and social influences on the family and learn how to help individuals and families achieve their financial goals. Coursework includes 24 hours of financial planning coursework and 6 hours of electives in the area of specialization. By taking two courses each semester, students may complete this M.S. degree in less than two years. The program is offered both in Tuscaloosa and by distance.

- Financial Planning Website (http://financialplanning.ches.ua.edu/)

CONSUMER CONFLICT MANAGEMENT, NEGOTIATION, AND MEDIATION

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School. Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines. See Section 4.3 of the UA Graduate Catalog.

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education (http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/conflict-management.html).

CONSUMER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

Prepare yourself to become a quality management leader by earning your Master of Science in Human Environmental Sciences with a specialization in Consumer Quality Management from The University of Alabama. This 30-hour program is offered completely online to make earning a degree convenient for working adults. If you currently work or would like to work in quality management and would like to develop a deeper understanding of the field, this degree program can help you reach your goals. The CQM specialization will provide you with a comprehensive study of the facilitation skills necessary to lead an organization in continuous improvement.

INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGY

The Institute for Interactive Technology offers a 30-hour asynchronous Master’s degree specialization in Interactive Technology focused on computer-mediated communications (General HES Degree). Students work with professors in adapting course projects to a particular profession. The focus is on how individuals and organizations interact with technology and might be described as “the difference between doing work and going to work,” reflecting the computer-mediated nature of the program.

- Interactive Technology Website (http://iit.ches.ua.edu/)

SPORTS BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Faculty members from the College of Human Environmental Sciences (CHES) have developed a 30 hours graduate level emphasis in Sports Business Management (Sport, Hospitality, and Entertainment Operations) at The University of Alabama. The CHES Sports Business Management program, preparing students for employment and careers in the sport, hospitality and entertainment operation settings, can be viewed on-line at sportmanagement.ches.ua.edu. The mission of this master’s degree program is to provide students with a quality graduate education and fellowship experiences for entry and career employment in the sport industry. CHES Sports Business Management program is designed to educate students to manage in a wide variety of sport arenas (sport, hospitality and entertainment operation). The Keys to “Success in the Sport Industry” is quality fellowship experiences, advanced level knowledge, and ability to connect the theory to practice.

- Sports Business Management Website (http://www.sportmanagement.ches.ua.edu/)

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview. The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Read more
See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview

The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Designed to provide students with a strong background in psychological foundations, the program develops professional skills and competencies in assessment, counseling, consultation, and program evaluation.

A school psychologist works with young children (birth to age five); elementary, junior high, and high school students; teachers and administrators; parents; and professionals to offer services that lead to the amelioration of existing student difficulties and attempts to prevent school problems. Through diagnostic testing, counseling, consultation, and intervention, school psychologists help students deal with learning and behavioral difficulties and help improve students’ adjustment to school and their community.

The master of science degree is awarded after students have completed all course work, an internship, and have passed a portfolio review.

Plan of study

A minimum of 66 semester credit hours are required for completion of the program. Before registering for the internship, students must pass a portfolio review. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above is required.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in school psychology, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university,

- Have a minimum undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0,

- Have completed at least 18 semester hours in behavioral sciences with a grade of B (3.0) or above,

- Have completed prerequisite undergraduate courses in general psychology, elementary statistics, child or developmental psychology, and abnormal psychology,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE),

- Submit letters of reference,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit an essay outlining the candidate's goals and related experience that shows evidence of a professional commitment and the potential for developing effective relationships with children, youth, and adults,

- Complete an individual interview, and

- Complete an application for graduate study.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 580 (paper-based) is required. This requirement is waived for native speakers of English and those submitting transcripts from American universities.

All credentials must be submitted and reviewed before the student completes 9 semester credit hours of graduate work in the program. Applications are due by February 1. Later applications will be reviewed on a space-available basis.

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Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission. Read more

State Authorizations

Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission.

Visit the website http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=184

Transfer of Graduate Credit for MSN:

Acceptable graduate credit of up to twelve credit hours, earned in a regionally accredited institution in which the student was enrolled in that institution’s graduate school, may be transferred and applied to the requirements for a master’s degree if approved by the CCN and Graduate School.

Consideration of credit does not guarantee transfer. Evaluation of credit for transfer will not be made until after the student has enrolled in the Graduate School of The University of Alabama.

Further information can be found in the UA Graduate Student Catalog (http://graduate.ua.edu/academics/doctoral.html#credit).

Admission Requirements for MSN:

Admission requirements are consistent with those of the Graduate School. Applicants for the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) will be considered on a competitive basis.

- Nurses who are interested in the Case Management Program, NP Concentration, and CNL Program are encouraged to contact the Capstone College of Nursing (CCN) Graduate Recruitment and Retention Liaison. Currently only residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for the Nurse Practitioner Concentration.

Note: Currently, only baccalaureate prepared registered nurses who are residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for admission to the NP concentration. There is no post-master’s certificate option. Please check this site in the future for changes in the residency requirement.

Application Process for MSN:

Enrollment into the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program is available for fall semester each year. Your completed application must be received by the April 1st deadline.

MSN Application Process

1. Begin your graduate application at the Graduate School’s Application Center.

2. Request transcripts following the Graduate School’s transcript instructions.

3. Submit supporting documents. Within 48 hours of submitting the initial part of your application, you will receive an e-mail with your Campus-Wide Identification (CWID) number. It is very important that you safeguard this number. Once you have received this e-mail, you will need to submit the following documents through Manage Supporting Documents.

- Statement of purpose
- Resume or curriculum vitae
- Contact information for two references – The references should be professionals who can provide insight regarding your potential for success in the doctoral program. The Graduate School will contact these references via e-mail.
- Copy of active RN license from every state in which you are licensed. Note: Licensure must be maintained throughout the program.

Additionally, we may require the following:

- Official MAT or GRE score – If your grade point average (GPA) is lower than a 3.0, based on a 4.0 sytem, either overall or in your last 60 hours, an acceptable Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or must be submitted by the testing service to the Graduate School, Box 870118, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487. Test scores may not be older than 5 years of the application date. Use school code 1012 for MAT and 1830 for GRE.

- English proficiency exam score – Whether an international or a permanent resident, if your first language is not English, you must submit an official score report from one of the following proficiency examinations: Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS), or Pearson Test of English (PTE).

Upon admission, you will receive written notification of admission from the Dean of the Graduate School. You will also receive a letter from the Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs at CCN outlining requirements for entry into the MSN program.

Documents Required Prior to Registration (after admitted)

Documents below should be completed and signed where appropriate and sent to Christina Horen at or faxed to 205-348-6674. A hold will be placed on your student record until all documents have been received. You are responsible for keeping all documents current throughout enrollment including annual health requirements (see CCN Graduate Student Handbook).

- Current RN license verification
- Current CPR certification for healthcare professionals
- Program of Study
- OSHA Training for Infection Control, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Safety
- HIPAA Privacy and Security Training
- Information Literacy for the 21st Century Training
- Nursing Student Health and Physical Exam Form
- Graduate Student TB Test and Immunization Form
- Substance Abuse Policy and Drug/Alcohol Testing Policy
- Academic Dishonesty Form
- Progression Policy
- Consent to Release and Disclose Form

MSN Degree Requirements:

The MSN will be awarded to the student who has met the following requirements:

- GPA of 3.0 or higher
- Good standing at the time of graduation
- Successful completion of the required coursework

In addition for CNL only:

- Completion of CNL Self-assessment Exam and CNL Certification Exam

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. Read more

Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. With increases in the application and uses of information technology in the medical industry, there is an unprecedented need for professionals who can combine their knowledge of computing and health care to improve the safety and quality of care delivery, as well as to help control costs.

The MS degree in health informatics applies the creative power of information technology to the information and data needs of health care. This includes the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of patient data, as well as access to electronically maintained medical knowledge for use in patient care, research, and education. Professionals in the field require computing expertise; an understanding of formal medical terminology, clinical processes, and guidelines; and an understanding of how information and communication systems can be used to successfully deliver patient information in various health care settings. The program is offered online only.

The program offers two tracks: the clinician track and analyst track.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission into the MS program in health informatics, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college (MD, RN, or other professional degree).
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a professional essay describing relevant employment or other experience and career plans (recent undergraduate students without extensive employment experience should discuss their career plans as well as any courses they have completed that are relevant to medical informatics, health care, or information technology).
  • Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals who are able to assess the applicant’s potential for success in the program.
  • Have completed at least one year of computer programming in a current object-oriented language or have equivalent work experience.*
  • Have knowledge of medical terminology/vocabulary, clinical processes, and information systems that are used to support health care activities and processes.
  • Have a familiarity with anatomy and physiology, including the major systems of the human body, including the skeletal system, muscle tissue physiology, muscular system, nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, urinary system, and histology.
  • Have completed the equivalent of one statistics course that covers the fundamental statistical principles necessary to interpret data and present results, including descriptive statistics, random sampling, normal distribution, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. (This prerequisite may be completed post-admission if necessary.)
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.

International Applications

  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 88 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.
  • Applicants without previous graduate study and with an undergraduate GPA that is less than 3.0 may be considered for admission, but will be required to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores. Applicants from international universities are required to submit GRE scores.
  • An interview with the program’s admissions committee may also
  • be required.


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Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. Read more

Program overview

Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. The curriculum, leading to a master of science degree in color science, educates students using a broad interdisciplinary approach. This is the only graduate program in the country devoted to this discipline and it is designed for students whose undergraduate majors are in physics, chemistry, imaging science, computer science, electrical engineering, experimental psychology, physiology, or any discipline pertaining to the quantitative description of color. Graduates are in high demand and have accepted industrial positions in electronic imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic and applied research. Companies that have hired graduates include Apple Inc., Benjamin Moore, Canon Corp., Dolby Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Co., Hallmark, Hewlett Packard Corp., Microsoft Corp., Pantone, Qualcomm Inc., Ricoh Innovations Inc., Samsung, and Xerox Corp.

The color science degree provides graduate-level study in both theory and practical application. The program gives students a broad exposure to the field of color and affords them the unique opportunity of specializing in an area appropriate for their background and interest. This objective will be accomplished through the program’s core courses, selection of electives, and completion of a thesis or graduate project.The program revolves around the activities of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory within the College of Science. The Munsell Laboratory is the pre-eminent academic laboratory in the country devoted to color science. Research is currently under way in color appearance models, lighting, image-quality, color-tolerance psychophysics, spectral-based image capture, archiving, reproduction of artwork, color management, computer graphics; and material appearance. The Munsell Laboratory has many contacts that provide students with summer and full-time job opportunities across the United States and abroad.

Plan of study

Students must earn 30 semester credit hours as a graduate student to earn the master of science degree. For full-time students, the program requires three to four semesters of study. Part-time students generally require two to four years of study. The curriculum is a combination of required courses in color science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background, and either a research thesis or graduate project. Students require approval of the program director if they wish to complete a graduate project, rather than a research thesis, at the conclusion of their degree.

Prerequisites: The foundation program

The color science program is designed for the candidate with an undergraduate degree in a scientific or other technical discipline. Candidates with adequate undergraduate work in related sciences start the program as matriculated graduate students. Candidates without adequate undergraduate work in related sciences must take foundation courses prior to matriculation into the graduate program. A written agreement between the candidate and the program coordinator will identify the required foundation courses. Foundation courses must be completed with an overall B average before a student can matriculate into the graduate program. A maximum of 9 graduate-level credit hours may be taken prior to matriculation into the graduate program. The foundation courses, representative of those often required, are as follows: one year of calculus, one year of college physics (with laboratory), one course in computer programming, one course in matrix algebra, one course in statistics, and one course in introductory psychology. Other science courses (with laboratory) might be substituted for physics.

Curriculum

Color science, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Principles of Color Science
-Computational Vision Science
-Historical Research Perspectives
-Color Physics and Applications
-Modeling Visual Perception
-Research and Publication Methods
-Electives
Second Year
-Research
-Electives

Other admission requirements

-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Complete an on-campus interview (when possible).
-Have an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Have completed foundation course work with GPA of 3.0 or higher (if required), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants who native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 94 (internet-based) are required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.

Additional information

Scholarships and assistantships:
Students seeking RIT-funded scholarships and assistantships should apply to the Color Science Ph.D. program (which is identical to the MS program in the first two years). Currently, assistantships are only available for qualified color science applicants to the Ph.D. program. Applicants seeking financial assistance from RIT must submit all application documents to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. Read more

Program overview

Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. HCI research is driven by technological advances and the increasing pervasiveness of computing devices in our society. With an emphasis on making computing technologies more user-friendly, HCI has emerged as a dynamic, multifaceted area of study that merges theory from science, engineering, and design––as well as concepts and methodologies from psychology, anthropology, sociology, and industrial design––with the technical concerns of computing.

The master of science degree in human-computer interaction provides the knowledge and skills necessary for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and evaluating software applications and computing technologies for the benefit of the user, whether the user is an individual, a group, an organization, or a society. Human, technological, and organizational concerns are interwoven throughout the curriculum and addressed in team- and project-based learning experiences.

Plan of study

The program is comprised of four required core courses, up to three program electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), two application domain courses, and a capstone project or thesis.

Core courses

The core courses provide knowledge and skills in the conceptual and methodological frameworks of HCI and HCI research. Emphasis is on understanding human cognition as it applies to information systems plus interaction design, interface prototyping, and usability evaluation.

Electives

Student choose up to three electives, depending on which capstone option they choose to complete.

Program electives

Students will select two courses from the program electives list. In select cases, students can petition for approval to include a course complementray to the degree program as a program elective. See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Application domain courses

To gain breadth in a technical area to which HCI concepts can be applied, students complete two courses in any of the following application domain areas. A special topics option is also available, with faculty approval, for individuals with interest in other HCI-related areas. See website for further details of available domain courses: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Thesis/Capstone project

Students may complete a thesis or capstone project. (Student who choose the capstone will complete one additional elective.) This experience is meant to be an empirical study of a HCI problem, which can be the development of a software product through user-centered design processes. The results are either published in a peer-reviewed journal or publicly disseminated in an appropriate professional venue.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to selected thesis/project option, see website for further details of a particular option's modules and electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0* (B average).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have prior study or professional experience in computing; however, study in other disciplines will be given consideration.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.
-Applicants with undergraduate degrees from foreign universities are required to submit GRE scores.

*Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered, but are required to submit standard Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
The program requires strong technical and social science skills. Knowledge of quantitative statistical methodologies is important since students review research studies as well as analyze the results of their own usability evaluations. Students are also expected to have a solid background in computer programming. These competencies may be demonstrated by previous course work, technical certifications, or comparable work experience. Bridge courses are available to fulfill any gaps in an applicant's qualifications. Applicants will be made aware of any areas where additional course work may be necessary.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Online option:
The program can be completed on campus or online.

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The Department of Geoscience provides excellent opportunities for research in most areas of geology, geophysics, and hydrology. The varied research interests of the faculty provide opportunities for a wide range of graduate research topics as well as collaborative projects with faculty who have different specialties. Read more
The Department of Geoscience provides excellent opportunities for research in most areas of geology, geophysics, and hydrology. The varied research interests of the faculty provide opportunities for a wide range of graduate research topics as well as collaborative projects with faculty who have different specialties.

The MSc thesis based program allows a maximum of 4 years to completion but it is encouraged that students finish in 2 years.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Course-based

Degree requirements:
-Nine half course equivalents including GLGY or GOPH 701
-GLGY OR GOPH 701 project course, submitted after all other course requirements are fulfilled
-Minimum GPA: 3.0 (base used: 4.0 point)
-Residence requirement: Yes
-Foreign language(s): No
-Computer language: No
-Comprehensive exam: No

Geoscience offers non-thesis Master's degrees in both Geology and Geophysics. The course-based M.Sc. program provides B.Sc. graduates with advanced academic training. If the student has an employer, the course-based M.Sc. program can be done in collaboration with an industrial partner and industrial capstone project. The program is suitable for both full-time and part-time mature students who may already be in the workforce with relevant work-experience, but wish to obtain an advanced degree without taking a leave of absence. The department provides no funding for course-based M.Sc. students and for admission a faculty member must agree to supervise the student's program.

Master's (MSc) Thesis-based

Degree requirements:
-Two full-course equivalents
-Number of hours: 12 hours per week per 12-week semester
-Minimum GPA: 3.0 (base used: 4.0 point)
-Residence requirement: Yes
-Foreign language(s): No
-Computer language: No
-Comprehensive exam: No
-Other requirements: Thesis proposal

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We are very fortunate to be able to provide this high quality programme as Brunel University London has one of the largest and most highly qualified occupational therapy staff groups in the world; the expertise is there to teach and supervise at Master’s and Doctoral levels. Read more

About the course

We are very fortunate to be able to provide this high quality programme as Brunel University London has one of the largest and most highly qualified occupational therapy staff groups in the world; the expertise is there to teach and supervise at Master’s and Doctoral levels.

Every module assignment can be focused on a topic you or your manager wants to investigate. The assignments are practically useful – write an evidence-based protocol or care pathway for your clients, plan how to improve the effectiveness of your service, evaluate and debate research in order to decide if the evidence is worth incorporating into practice, reflect on how central occupational engagement is for enhancing the health of your clients, or take a topic of interest to you.

The course does not further clinical skills, nor does it lead to registration from the UK professional governing bodies, but rather focuses on developing the occupational therapist’s ability to evaluate and enhance professional practice. Up to 60 credits of academic taught module exemptions can be offered for students holding a postgraduate certificate in Occupational Therapy, relevant postgraduate modules from other universities, or substantial relevant post professional periods of study – for example, AMPS or Sensory Integration.

Aims

Master's level study is essential if you want to gain the skills to evaluate your interventions, build professional confidence and seek out and develop existing theories, which inform your practice.

This course is aimed at occupational therapists wanting to continue their professional development and develop evidence-based practice – and will broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of the value of occupational therapy in today's changing world.

Each module’s content is embedded in practice and overall the programme aims to develop your skills in analysing evidence, implementing and evaluating occupational therapy research.

Course Content

Key Features:

Encourages a theoretical underpinning of occupation, occupational therapy and research.
Nationally recognised for excellence in teaching and research.
Meets the needs of occupational therapists who wish to enhance their current practice in their workplace.
Provides academic learning experiences in a supportive environment.
A modular programme that can be studied full-time, part-time or as an associate student. (Associate enrolment: studying a one off-module – this is very appropriate for continuing professional development.)
Facilitates reflective practice.
Develops research competencies for using and developing evidence-based practice.

This course will broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of the value of occupational therapy in today's changing world. Each module’s content is embedded in practice and overall the programme aims to develop your skills in analysing evidence, implementing and evaluating occupational therapy research.

Compulsory modules:

Occupational Science
Evidence-Based Occupational Therapy
The Art of Professional Practice
Research Design
Approaches to Research
Dissertation

Optional modules (choose two):

Occupational Therapy for Children, Young People and Families
Occupational Therapy for Mental Health
Functional Neuroscience for Rehabilitation
Occupational Therapy for Active Ageing
Specialist Practice in Occupational Therapy
Cognitive and Behavioural Issues in Neurorehabilitation

Assessment

A variety of assessments allow students to become proficient in evaluating and questioning their chosen area of practice. Active and adult learning principles are used throughout the course.

Special Features

This Brunel Master's is one of the few in the UK specialising in occupational therapy, and it has been especially designed to meet your needs as a practising therapist, helping you to gain greater mastery in your chosen area of occupational therapy.

The programme has been praised by the University validating committees as a model Master's degree for professional practitioners, for it brings theory to the workplace.

Based on a sound approach to adult education, the course invites students to bring issues from practice to analyse in class.

The programme was rated top out of all postgraduate programmes at Brunel University with regard to its capacity to promote personal development.

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The MSc in Financial Economics aims to offer the knowledge and expertise needed for a career as a professional economist working in the public or private sector or alternatively, in fund management, stock-broking, investment banking, corporate treasury and other financial sector roles. Read more
The MSc in Financial Economics aims to offer the knowledge and expertise needed for a career as a professional economist working in the public or private sector or alternatively, in fund management, stock-broking, investment banking, corporate treasury and other financial sector roles.

The course includes modules covering the working of the markets for bonds, stocks, currencies and derivatives (futures and forwards, options and swaps), as well as microeconomics, advanced macroeconomics and econometrics.

Much of the material is extremely challenging, both analytically and sometimes technically, but attention is given at all times to the practical questions of how to interpret financial data for research purposes; how to identify and exploit trading opportunities; and how to measure and manage risk.

Distinctive features:

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.
• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).
• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).
• You will be exposed to recent developments in research and will develop a sophisticated understanding of modern theories and research findings.
• Our facilities include a fully functioning trading room giving you access to the latest market data.

Structure

You will undertake a range of core and optional modules across two semesters which are designed to give you an in-depth understanding of a range of areas relevant to the financial sector.

In the first semester you will undertake four core modules.

In the second semester you will take three core modules as well as one optional module from the selection available.

Upon successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is designed to enable you to apply the knowledge, understanding and skills learnt in the taught modules to individual independent research under academic supervision.

Core modules:

Principles of Finance
Macroeconomics
Microeconomics: Economics of Uncertainty
Quantitative Methods
Financial Derivatives
Empirical Finance
Corporate Finance
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Asset Pricing
International Trade
Economic Forecasting
International Finance
Mathematical Finance
Investment and Electronic Trading

Methods of teaching

Most modules involve a mixture of lectures and small group teaching (called classes, seminars, workshops or tutorials).

In a lecture, the lecturer will mainly be giving an overview of a particular aspect of the module content (as well as opportunities for you to ask questions and be reflective), while in classes and workshops you will have an opportunity to practice techniques, discuss ideas, apply concepts and consolidate your understanding in the topic

Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of your studies. Normally, your personal tutor will teach on your own degree course and you will keep the same personal tutor throughout your course.

Your personal tutor will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor should always be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate. You are required to meet with your personal tutor at three points during each academic year but you are also encouraged to get in touch with them at any other point if you need help or advice.

For day-to-day information, the staff of our Postgraduate Student Hub are available, in person, by telephone or by email, from 8am to 6pm each weekday during term time to answer your questions.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with regular feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback, personalised feedback on written work, and generic written feedback.

You will be given general feedback in relation to examinations following all examination periods and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary from module to module but, across your degree scheme as a whole, you can expect a mixture of exams, coursework, essays, practical work, presentations, and individual and group projects.

Career prospects

Our graduates find employment as specialists in financial institutions, corporate treasury departments, central banks and local government.

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The MSc Human Resource Management aims to give you the knowledge, expertise and the professional CIPD qualification needed for a successful career in Human Resources and Personnel. Read more
The MSc Human Resource Management aims to give you the knowledge, expertise and the professional CIPD qualification needed for a successful career in Human Resources and Personnel.

The Programme is both academically challenging, with input from world-leading academics, and practically focused, giving you the opportunity to develop the confidence, knowledge and skills needed for a successful career in Human Resource Management.

You will be equipped with the specialist knowledge and skills to succeed in a career within the Human Resource Management industry and will have the opportunity to study advocacy, debate and negotiation skills. You will learn how to understand and to undertake high-quality research to aid your decision-making within industry.

Opportunities to network with members of the Human Resource industry will be available through our programme of guest speakers and through our links with the CIPD.

As well as learning from the pioneering research of our faculty members, you will work towards a professional qualification, Graduate Membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, a qualification required by most employers for UK Human Resource Management positions.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited by the CIPD. All students on the Programme may register to become a Student Member of the CIPD.

If you pass all modules of the MSc HRM programme with a mark of at least 50% you will be upgraded to Associate Member and may use the designation Assoc CIPD after your name. When you have obtained sufficient professional experience you may apply to the CIPD to upgrade your membership to full Chartered Membership (MCIPD).

Distinctive features:

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.

• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).

• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).

• You will have the chance to attend practical workshops which help you develop your problem solving skills.

• You will study a CIPD accredited programme.

Structure

The Programme is taught from September to June and gives you a thorough grounding in all aspects of Human Resource Management.

You will study eight compulsory modules and complete a project.

The Programme is offered in full-time mode and lasts 12 months. You will take eight modules, each of which is worth 15 credits.

Reflective logs:

You will be required to maintain a reflective log which will record aspects of your learning during the MSc programme. During the programme you will develop study skills, personal effectiveness skills and specific HR skills and write reflective accounts detailing how these skills will be used and developed. The reflection will be used to help you identify links between the different modules and develop the range of skills required to operate successfully in an HR role.

The reflective logs are a requirement of the course and must be completed to an acceptable standard before you can complete the MSc programme.

Upon successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the project. The purpose of the project is to provide you with the opportunity to test the applicability of the knowledge, understanding, methodologies and skills learnt in the taught modules in a piece of independent research with the benefit of individual academic supervision. It will introduce you to the methodology of research, the systematic analysis of ideas, the problems of data collection and the presentation of ideas in a clear way. It also requires reflection on the implications for professional practice from an ethical, professional and continuous professional development standpoint.

Core modules:

Human Resource Management in Context
The Management of Human Resources
Employment Relations
Reward Management
Contemporary Issues in HR Research
Leadership, Work and Organisation
Employment Law
The Practice of HR in the Modern Workplace
The Human Resource Management Project

Methods of teaching

Most modules involve a mixture of lectures and small group teaching (called classes, seminars, workshops or tutorials).

In a lecture, the lecturer will mainly be giving an overview of a particular aspect of the module content (as well as opportunities for you to ask questions and be reflective), while in classes and workshops you will have an opportunity to practice techniques, discuss ideas, apply concepts and consolidate your understanding in the topic

Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of your studies. Normally, your personal tutor will teach on your own degree course and you will keep the same personal tutor throughout your course.

Your personal tutor will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor should always be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate. You are required to meet with your personal tutor at three points during each academic year but you are also encouraged to get in touch with them at any other point if you need help or advice.

For day-to-day information, the staff of our Postgraduate Student Hub are available, in person, by telephone or by email, from 8am to 6pm each weekday during term time to answer your questions.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with regular feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback, personalised feedback on written work, and generic written feedback.

You will be given general feedback in relation to examinations following all examination periods and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary from module to module but, across your degree scheme as a whole, you can expect a mixture of exams, coursework, essays, practical work, presentations, and individual and group projects.

Careers prospects

Graduates have gone on to successful HR careers in a range of industries including public and private sector businesses both nationally and internationally. A number of students have also pursued further learning by undertaking a research degree after completing their masters.

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This programme aims to offer knowledge and expertise for a position of responsibility in an international bank, financial institution, central bank or government agency. Read more
This programme aims to offer knowledge and expertise for a position of responsibility in an international bank, financial institution, central bank or government agency.

The course offers those with a substantial economic or finance background the opportunity to specialise in more depth in the areas of Money, Banking, Finance and Trade. It contains challenging theoretical and applied elements which will equip you for responsible posts in the financial and commercial world.

The course is designed to be relevant to a wide range of students from both developed and developing countries with career aspirations in a wide variety of banking and financial contexts.

It provides excellent preliminary training for those who wish to pursue further research with a view to a career in a research institution or central bank. It will also be of interest to those who are currently working in a financial institution or other private or public sector body, such as a central bank or national treasury.

Distinctive features:

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.

• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).

• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).

• You may also enrol for a module on electronic trading using our Trading Room facility.

Structure

You will undertake a range of core and optional modules across two semesters which are designed to give you an in-depth understanding of a range of areas relevant to the finance, economics and banking sectors.

In the first semester you will undertake four core modules.

In the second semester you will take three core modules as well as one optional module.

Upon successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is designed to enable you to apply the knowledge, understanding and skills learnt in the taught modules to individual independent research under academic supervision.

Core modules:

Principles of Finance
Macroeconomics
Microeconomics: Economics of Uncertainty
Quantitative Methods
Issues in Money Banking and Finance
Principles of Money and Banking
International Banking
Dissertation

Optional modules:

International Trade
Economic Forecasting
International Finance
Marketing of Financial Services
Investment and Electronic Trading

Methods of teaching

Most modules involve a mixture of lectures and small group teaching (called classes, seminars, workshops or tutorials).

In a lecture, the lecturer will mainly be giving an overview of a particular aspect of the module content (as well as opportunities for you to ask questions and be reflective), while in classes and workshops you will have an opportunity to practice techniques, discuss ideas, apply concepts and consolidate your understanding in the topic

Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of your studies. Normally, your personal tutor will teach on your own degree course and you will keep the same personal tutor throughout your course.

Your personal tutor will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor should always be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate. You are required to meet with your personal tutor at three points during each academic year but you are also encouraged to get in touch with them at any other point if you need help or advice.

For day-to-day information, the staff of our Postgraduate Student Hub are available, in person, by telephone or by email, from 8am to 6pm each weekday during term time to answer your questions.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with regular feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback, personalised feedback on written work, and generic written feedback.

You will be given general feedback in relation to examinations following all examination periods and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary from module to module but, across your degree scheme as a whole, you can expect a mixture of exams, coursework, essays, practical work, presentations, and individual and group projects.

Career prospects

Graduates have a good employment rate with alumni working in the European Commission, Eurobank, Bank of England and Chinese financial institutions amongst many others.

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The programme offers ESRC accredited training in language-based area studies, as well as advanced training in qualitative and quantitative methods; specialised area studies research training; and language training in one of the region’s languages. Read more
The programme offers ESRC accredited training in language-based area studies, as well as advanced training in qualitative and quantitative methods; specialised area studies research training; and language training in one of the region’s languages.

Why this programme

-The programme is intended for those who wish to pursue a research-based career in the region, with or without the completion of a PhD.
-Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russia. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.
-Annual scholarships are available for the language-based area studies pathways on a 2+3 (MRes + intensive language training to advanced level + PhD), 1+3 (MRes or intensive language training to advanced level + PhD) and +3 (PhD only) models, depending on your prior qualifications.
-The University Library holds one of the best Russian, Central and East European collections in the world.
-We have active postgraduate training links with thirteen overseas partner institutions in eleven countries. They visit to provide research master classes and participate in seminars.

Programme structure

You will take five core courses and submit a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation.

Semester 1
-Social science statistics 1
-Qualitative methods
-Language (Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Russian)

Semester 2
-Research methods for studying Russia and Central and Eastern Europe
-Advanced qualitative methods or Social science statistics 2
Language (Czech, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Russian, Slovak or Hungarian)
Dissertation (12,000–15,000 words)

Note: Some languages and courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences. Language training is offered over a range of levels from beginners to advanced. If you are a native speaker or have a degree in one of the region’s languages, you will take an additional course instead.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to establish careers as lecturers and researchers at universities in the UK, Norway, Greece, Italy and Poland or have become secondary school teachers. Some have also gone on to pursue research and policy-making careers with government, business and international organisations.

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This programme offers an outstanding learning experience in a great city, in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians. Read more
This programme offers an outstanding learning experience in a great city, in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians. Core training in historical skills and methods is combined with a wide range of specialist taught options. These include theory, cover all periods from medieval to late modern, and focus predominantly on Scotland, Britain, Europe and America, although our geographical coverage is steadily expanding.

Why this programme

◾History staff also contribute to the Masters programmes in American Studies, War Studies and Global Security, and you can take taught options from these and other programmes, enhancing student choice.
◾The learning and research environment is dynamic and supportive because of the critical mass of staff and postgraduate students, grouped in clusters and centres which sponsor seminar programmes and other research-led initiatives. You are positively encouraged to participate.
◾Glasgow is an outstanding resource hub for the study of history. On campus, the University Library holds superb printed and manuscript collections from the medieval to the present. You can also use the Baillie Collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The University’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery provides access to primary source materials in fields such as fine art, numismatics and ethnography. The city is home to world-class museums and galleries, the Mitchell Library and Glasgow Women’s Library.

Programme structure

You will take 1 core and 5 optional courses, taught over two semesters, September to March. Teaching in history courses is overwhelmingly seminar and discussion-based. From April onwards you concentrate on your dissertation, submitted in September at the end of the programme.

Our pathway structure allows you to take either our generic Masters History, or to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following:
◾Gender History*
◾Scottish History
◾Medieval History
◾Early modern History
◾Late modern History
◾History of Medicine*

(*with two bespoke core courses)

Core course

Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH)

Optional courses

A very wide selection is available. We positively encourage you to explore options within and without History.

Career prospects

As well as continuing to PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, the media and teaching.

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