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Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. Read more

Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. With increases in the application and uses of information technology in the medical industry, there is an unprecedented need for professionals who can combine their knowledge of computing and health care to improve the safety and quality of care delivery, as well as to help control costs.

The MS degree in health informatics applies the creative power of information technology to the information and data needs of health care. This includes the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of patient data, as well as access to electronically maintained medical knowledge for use in patient care, research, and education. Professionals in the field require computing expertise; an understanding of formal medical terminology, clinical processes, and guidelines; and an understanding of how information and communication systems can be used to successfully deliver patient information in various health care settings. The program is offered online only.

The program offers two tracks: the clinician track and analyst track.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission into the MS program in health informatics, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college (MD, RN, or other professional degree).
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a professional essay describing relevant employment or other experience and career plans (recent undergraduate students without extensive employment experience should discuss their career plans as well as any courses they have completed that are relevant to medical informatics, health care, or information technology).
  • Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals who are able to assess the applicant’s potential for success in the program.
  • Have completed at least one year of computer programming in a current object-oriented language or have equivalent work experience.*
  • Have knowledge of medical terminology/vocabulary, clinical processes, and information systems that are used to support health care activities and processes.
  • Have a familiarity with anatomy and physiology, including the major systems of the human body, including the skeletal system, muscle tissue physiology, muscular system, nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, urinary system, and histology.
  • Have completed the equivalent of one statistics course that covers the fundamental statistical principles necessary to interpret data and present results, including descriptive statistics, random sampling, normal distribution, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. (This prerequisite may be completed post-admission if necessary.)
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.

International Applications

  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 88 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.
  • Applicants without previous graduate study and with an undergraduate GPA that is less than 3.0 may be considered for admission, but will be required to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores. Applicants from international universities are required to submit GRE scores.
  • An interview with the program’s admissions committee may also
  • be required.


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The ERASMUS MUNDUS M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration is a specialised academic training programme. Read more

About the programme

The ERASMUS MUNDUS M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration is a specialised academic training programme. The objective is to develop competences in the core subjects of the Programme for European and third country economists with career aspirations in universities, government and international organisations, and in research departments of large banks and economic research departments of large industrial or commercial corporations. Third country students will especially profit from an increased awareness of the place of the EU in the world economy in general, and with respect to worldwide globalisation and international trade in particular.

Content

in the field of economics of globalisation, international trade and European economic integration. It provides a profound insight into the current scientific knowledge in this field and is supported by scientific research at the partner universities, both at these universities individually and in a network context. The Programme leads to an in-depth understanding in the following core fields: Advanced Microeconomics, Advanced Macroeconomics, Open Economy Macroeconomics and International Finance, Economics of Globalisation, Economics of European Integration, and International Trade: Theory and Policy. As a master degree in economics should also include a strong quantitative component, Applied Econometrics is taught as an additional core discipline.

Added value

The M.A. focuses on conveying the new insights that come from recent economic research with respect to the impact on the relations with the emerging economies in East Asia and Latin America of social evolutionary processes like trade globalisation, globalisation on international financial markets, globalised governance and the ‘knowledge economy’. In doing so, the M.A. programme adds to university excellence and yields European added value, thereby, at least indirectly, contributing to European competitiveness.

The M.A. programme also creates specific European added value and is completely in line with the Bologna declaration, the Berlin Communiqué and with EUA Joint Master Recommendations through 6 specific features:
- European integration is one of the two core subjects of the Master Programme Economics of Globalisation and European Integration;
- a joint European degree: 7 European universities from 6 EU countries, together with 2 universities from BRICS countries, jointly award a consortium diploma;
- ECTS: the joint degree programme in entirely conceived within the philosophy and practice of the ECTS grading system;
internal and external quality control is in place in accordance with ENIC-NARIC recommendations;
- mobility: students move during the academic year as a group over three locations to three different countries, at least two of which are European; there is also teacher mobility;
- language: students stay during the year in three different language environments and they are offered the possibility to receive free and credited language courses in the corresponding countries.

Structure

The study-programme is full-time and runs over one year. The language of instruction is English. Courses are taught by professors from all partner universities. Professors from all partner universities act as supervisors and evaluators of the final dissertation.
The Programme consists of 60 ECTS credits, the taught part of the programme consisting of 45 credits and the dissertation having a weight of 15 credits. One credit is roughly equivalent to 25 working hours (lectures, assignments and study time).
Optional, but credited, language courses are offered in each of the languages of the countries involved in the Consortium (English excepted).

More details on http://www.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.EGEI&n=96030

Degree awarded

The programme leads to a master degree called M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration.
The diplomas are certified jointly by the partners and are signed by the Rector, President or Vice-chancellor of each partner university.

Student profile

The programme is aimed at students with career aspirations in research, in government and international organisations, and in research departments of large banks and industrial and commercial corporations.

Admission requirements

The programme is open to students who have earned 240 ECTS credits in an economics or applied economics university study programme or have a bachelor degree in these areas that is considered by the Joint Studies Board to be equivalent.
Applicants who are enrolled in the final year of their academic programme should submit an official letter in English from their university confirming that they are expected to finalise their course at the end of the current academic year, and submit up-to-date authenticated transcripts with the results of the previous years.

The proficiency in English of the students of the participating universities is checked by the local academic co-ordinators. Students from other universities should submit proof of an internet-based TOEFL level of minimum 90 (or its equivalent in another TOEFL score system), or a IELTS grade of at least 6.5, or should submit proof of having studied at least one academic year in an English-language programme.

The selection procedure of all students (with and without an EM scholarship) is a common one. After having passed the eligibility check (see above) the candidates are first ranked according to their study results (GPA and/or class of degree). The weights used to differentiate those applicants who passed the eligibility tests, are the following: 30% for the type of diploma, 30% for the GPA average, 20% for fluency in English and 20% for the reputation of the home university based on the Shanghai ranking. This ‘reputation’ criterion is applied in conjunction with the requirement to strive for regional balance in the student population. The global intake of new students (with and without a scholarship) is limited to 45.

Application form: http://www.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.EGEI&n=93777

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The IOA Diploma in Acoustics and Noise Control is widely recognised as the educational qualification of choice for professional practitioners in acoustics, noise and vibration. Read more
The IOA Diploma in Acoustics and Noise Control is widely recognised as the educational qualification of choice for professional practitioners in acoustics, noise and vibration. It can help you securing a career in related disciplines including environmental health, mechanical engineering, building services engineering, architecture, urban planning, health and safety and the music industry.

The Diploma provides sufficient specialist academic training to satisfy the educational requirements for membership of the Institute of Acoustics, the most highly regarded professional membership in the acoustics, noise and vibration industry. The Diploma has been taught since 1975 and is well-known for providing a high level training in acoustics and noise control.

This is a professionally focused qualification and practical work is an essential part of the course, giving you direct experience of modern practices and measurement equipment.

The course runs part-time (one day a week) over one year, so you can manage your studies around existing work commitments. You'll have access to our extensive on-site and electronic library and Learning Resource Centre to support your learning.

LSBU has been offering courses in Acoustics for over 35 years, and houses the only centre for study in the South-East with full-size reverberant and anechoic chambers as well as an exceptionally well equipped and staffed laboratory, with access to the very latest instrumentation and technology.

Members of the teaching team are all highly-experienced and award-winning. In addition, all are actively involved in research and consultancy, which enables staff to draw on the latest industry developments in both lectures and practical work.

Successful completion of IOA Diploma exempts you from five out of eight modules of the LSBU MSc Environmental and Architectural Acoustics, if you decide to continue studying onto Masters-level.

Modules

General Principles of Acoustics (GPA)
Laboratory
Building Acoustics
Noise and Vibration control
Project

The GPA Module involves around 120 study hours including coursework and tutorials and each Specialist Module about half of this study time.

Teaching and learning

Students learn through a combination of tutorials, lectures, and off-site visits. The Laboratory module consists entirely of hands-on experiments, and the Project module is practical investigative work, conducted under the supervision of a tutor where necessary.

Members of the teaching team are all highly-experienced and award-winning lecturers. Senior IOA Diploma teacher Bob Peters is a member of the IOA education committee and author of book Acoustics and Noise Control (3rd edition), widely used by students studying the Diploma.

Professional links

This course meets the educational requirements for membership of the Institute of Acoustics (IOA). Membership of this professional body can provide you with contacts and networking opportunities, and it's a good platform on which to build your career.

The department has extensive links with industry. This means students have the opportunity to go on site visits, receive guest lectures, take part in research initiatives, go to networking events and collaborate on projects with professionals working in the field.

Teaching makes extensive use of industry case studies, consultancy and research to demonstrate theory and best practice. Some of our industrial links include:

• Sharpsredmore Partnership
• Brookfield Europe
• Anne Kyyro Quinn Design
• Peter Mapp Associates
• Vanguardia Consultants
• RBA Acoustics
• Capita Symonds
• London Philharmonic Orchestra
• Royal Academy of Music
• Sound Research Labs
• Telent Technical Services

Employability

This course provides the specialist academic training needed to satisfy the educational requirements for corporate membership of the Institute of Acoustics (IOA) and it is recognised as a valid qualification towards achievement a Chartered Engineer status (CEng).

The Diploma is well regarded in other countries including the USA, Canada and Australia.

Graduates are particularly sought after in the acoustics, noise and vibration control related industries. Other industry sectors such as Architectural, Building Services Engineering, Sound Engineering, Health and Safety, Environmental Health and Civil Engineering seek this qualification for some of their employees and projects.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. Read more
The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. It is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry.

We continuously and extensively consult with construction companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant for the modern construction manager.

The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/construction-project-management/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts an applied learning approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a broad range of management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients.

- Students are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most construction project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.

- There are four intensive study periods during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- The course is directly tailored to students with a background in the construction industries who want to develop their careers as Construction Managers. Whether you have a degree in a construction related discipline such as Civil Engineering or Architecture, or have a strong background working in construction, if you want to be a Construction Project Manager this is the course for you.

- Our graduates have an exemplary employment record and now span the globe, working in countries including India, Pakistan, South Africa, Canada, Australia, Peru, Middle East and China.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

- Our staff have strong links with local companies and sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field-trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. For the open-learner, the virtual learning environment is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations. Students will normally hold degrees in fields within the realm of the built environment including Civil Engineering, Construction, Architecture and Building, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing construction projects.

Our students hail from as far afield as Nigeria, Russia and India, with backgrounds ranging from recently graduated at undergraduate level, to working with small local companies, to fully established managers in large international construction companies. This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the applied learning approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the open-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that Construction Project Managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in construction project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

How this course helps you develop

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house-builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

Careers

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector. Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module
Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014), our Unit of Assessment (UoA 16) ranked 4th within the University in terms of its Grade Point Average (GPA). We hold the 11th position in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

Research areas and clusters

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- Building Information Modelling (BIM)
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

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This course is run by the School of the Built Environment. Read more
This course is run by the School of the Built Environment

This programme has been designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the built environment sector in respect to the emergence of Building Information Modelling (BIM) as a working practice, the MSc in Buiding Information Modelling and Management , through its intelligent use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), is designed to deliver a flexible and innovative programme of study.

The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode that is normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years). The course consists of four core modules plus research methods and a final dissertation. As each of these core modules is entirely self-contained students may enter the program in either September or January.

Prior to September 2016 entry, this programme was named Construction Project Management and BIM.

Why choose this course?

- We use an ‘applied approach’ to teaching, and our students work on real-life or reality based problems as experienced within the construction sector and its associated industries, consultants and clients.

- You are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most construction project managers only experience when their careers are well-advanced.

- This provides a more interesting and engaging learning environment than the traditional ‘study and examination’ approach to learning.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are largely determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students working through problems together. These are often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and content intact, using published resources or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

Full-time mode: new material is delivered weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern.

Open learning mode: the virtual learning environment (VLE) is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open learning students is supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off campus.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on campus and open learning students to remain in contact with each other.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of the field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing you to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

About our students

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations. They normally hold degrees in fields relating to built environment including civil engineering, construction, architecture and building, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing construction projects.

Our students come from as far afield as Nigeria, Russia and India, with backgrounds ranging from recently graduated at undergraduate level, to working with small local companies, to fully established managers in large international construction companies. This diverse group brings with them individual responses to the applied learning approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the open learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that construction project managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop to perform successfully.

Our full time students benefit from contact with the open learning students engaged in construction project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

Careers

Graduates of our postgraduate construction programmes have an outstanding employment record. Our graduates are recognised as having excellent levels of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills. Consequently, our students go on to be project managers right across the broad spectrum of the construction industries both locally and internationally.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions as Assistant project managers whilst all of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014), our Unit of Assessment (UoA 16) ranked 4th within the University in terms of its Grade Point Average (GPA). We hold the 11th position in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

Research areas and clusters

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- Building Information Modelling (BIM)
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

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Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. Read more

Program overview

Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. The curriculum, leading to a master of science degree in color science, educates students using a broad interdisciplinary approach. This is the only graduate program in the country devoted to this discipline and it is designed for students whose undergraduate majors are in physics, chemistry, imaging science, computer science, electrical engineering, experimental psychology, physiology, or any discipline pertaining to the quantitative description of color. Graduates are in high demand and have accepted industrial positions in electronic imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic and applied research. Companies that have hired graduates include Apple Inc., Benjamin Moore, Canon Corp., Dolby Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Co., Hallmark, Hewlett Packard Corp., Microsoft Corp., Pantone, Qualcomm Inc., Ricoh Innovations Inc., Samsung, and Xerox Corp.

The color science degree provides graduate-level study in both theory and practical application. The program gives students a broad exposure to the field of color and affords them the unique opportunity of specializing in an area appropriate for their background and interest. This objective will be accomplished through the program’s core courses, selection of electives, and completion of a thesis or graduate project.The program revolves around the activities of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory within the College of Science. The Munsell Laboratory is the pre-eminent academic laboratory in the country devoted to color science. Research is currently under way in color appearance models, lighting, image-quality, color-tolerance psychophysics, spectral-based image capture, archiving, reproduction of artwork, color management, computer graphics; and material appearance. The Munsell Laboratory has many contacts that provide students with summer and full-time job opportunities across the United States and abroad.

Plan of study

Students must earn 30 semester credit hours as a graduate student to earn the master of science degree. For full-time students, the program requires three to four semesters of study. Part-time students generally require two to four years of study. The curriculum is a combination of required courses in color science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background, and either a research thesis or graduate project. Students require approval of the program director if they wish to complete a graduate project, rather than a research thesis, at the conclusion of their degree.

Prerequisites: The foundation program

The color science program is designed for the candidate with an undergraduate degree in a scientific or other technical discipline. Candidates with adequate undergraduate work in related sciences start the program as matriculated graduate students. Candidates without adequate undergraduate work in related sciences must take foundation courses prior to matriculation into the graduate program. A written agreement between the candidate and the program coordinator will identify the required foundation courses. Foundation courses must be completed with an overall B average before a student can matriculate into the graduate program. A maximum of 9 graduate-level credit hours may be taken prior to matriculation into the graduate program. The foundation courses, representative of those often required, are as follows: one year of calculus, one year of college physics (with laboratory), one course in computer programming, one course in matrix algebra, one course in statistics, and one course in introductory psychology. Other science courses (with laboratory) might be substituted for physics.

Curriculum

Color science, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Principles of Color Science
-Computational Vision Science
-Historical Research Perspectives
-Color Physics and Applications
-Modeling Visual Perception
-Research and Publication Methods
-Electives
Second Year
-Research
-Electives

Other admission requirements

-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Complete an on-campus interview (when possible).
-Have an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Have completed foundation course work with GPA of 3.0 or higher (if required), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants who native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 94 (internet-based) are required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.

Additional information

Scholarships and assistantships:
Students seeking RIT-funded scholarships and assistantships should apply to the Color Science Ph.D. program (which is identical to the MS program in the first two years). Currently, assistantships are only available for qualified color science applicants to the Ph.D. program. Applicants seeking financial assistance from RIT must submit all application documents to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

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See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview. The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Read more
See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview

The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Designed to provide students with a strong background in psychological foundations, the program develops professional skills and competencies in assessment, counseling, consultation, and program evaluation.

A school psychologist works with young children (birth to age five); elementary, junior high, and high school students; teachers and administrators; parents; and professionals to offer services that lead to the amelioration of existing student difficulties and attempts to prevent school problems. Through diagnostic testing, counseling, consultation, and intervention, school psychologists help students deal with learning and behavioral difficulties and help improve students’ adjustment to school and their community.

The master of science degree is awarded after students have completed all course work, an internship, and have passed a portfolio review.

Plan of study

A minimum of 66 semester credit hours are required for completion of the program. Before registering for the internship, students must pass a portfolio review. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above is required.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in school psychology, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university,

- Have a minimum undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0,

- Have completed at least 18 semester hours in behavioral sciences with a grade of B (3.0) or above,

- Have completed prerequisite undergraduate courses in general psychology, elementary statistics, child or developmental psychology, and abnormal psychology,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE),

- Submit letters of reference,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit an essay outlining the candidate's goals and related experience that shows evidence of a professional commitment and the potential for developing effective relationships with children, youth, and adults,

- Complete an individual interview, and

- Complete an application for graduate study.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 580 (paper-based) is required. This requirement is waived for native speakers of English and those submitting transcripts from American universities.

All credentials must be submitted and reviewed before the student completes 9 semester credit hours of graduate work in the program. Applications are due by February 1. Later applications will be reviewed on a space-available basis.

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Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. Read more

Program overview

Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. HCI research is driven by technological advances and the increasing pervasiveness of computing devices in our society. With an emphasis on making computing technologies more user-friendly, HCI has emerged as a dynamic, multifaceted area of study that merges theory from science, engineering, and design––as well as concepts and methodologies from psychology, anthropology, sociology, and industrial design––with the technical concerns of computing.

The master of science degree in human-computer interaction provides the knowledge and skills necessary for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and evaluating software applications and computing technologies for the benefit of the user, whether the user is an individual, a group, an organization, or a society. Human, technological, and organizational concerns are interwoven throughout the curriculum and addressed in team- and project-based learning experiences.

Plan of study

The program is comprised of four required core courses, up to three program electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), two application domain courses, and a capstone project or thesis.

Core courses

The core courses provide knowledge and skills in the conceptual and methodological frameworks of HCI and HCI research. Emphasis is on understanding human cognition as it applies to information systems plus interaction design, interface prototyping, and usability evaluation.

Electives

Student choose up to three electives, depending on which capstone option they choose to complete.

Program electives

Students will select two courses from the program electives list. In select cases, students can petition for approval to include a course complementray to the degree program as a program elective. See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Application domain courses

To gain breadth in a technical area to which HCI concepts can be applied, students complete two courses in any of the following application domain areas. A special topics option is also available, with faculty approval, for individuals with interest in other HCI-related areas. See website for further details of available domain courses: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Thesis/Capstone project

Students may complete a thesis or capstone project. (Student who choose the capstone will complete one additional elective.) This experience is meant to be an empirical study of a HCI problem, which can be the development of a software product through user-centered design processes. The results are either published in a peer-reviewed journal or publicly disseminated in an appropriate professional venue.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to selected thesis/project option, see website for further details of a particular option's modules and electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0* (B average).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have prior study or professional experience in computing; however, study in other disciplines will be given consideration.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.
-Applicants with undergraduate degrees from foreign universities are required to submit GRE scores.

*Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered, but are required to submit standard Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
The program requires strong technical and social science skills. Knowledge of quantitative statistical methodologies is important since students review research studies as well as analyze the results of their own usability evaluations. Students are also expected to have a solid background in computer programming. These competencies may be demonstrated by previous course work, technical certifications, or comparable work experience. Bridge courses are available to fulfill any gaps in an applicant's qualifications. Applicants will be made aware of any areas where additional course work may be necessary.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Online option:
The program can be completed on campus or online.

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The Department of Geoscience provides excellent opportunities for research in most areas of geology, geophysics, and hydrology. The varied research interests of the faculty provide opportunities for a wide range of graduate research topics as well as collaborative projects with faculty who have different specialties. Read more
The Department of Geoscience provides excellent opportunities for research in most areas of geology, geophysics, and hydrology. The varied research interests of the faculty provide opportunities for a wide range of graduate research topics as well as collaborative projects with faculty who have different specialties.

The MSc thesis based program allows a maximum of 4 years to completion but it is encouraged that students finish in 2 years.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Course-based

Degree requirements:
-Nine half course equivalents including GLGY or GOPH 701
-GLGY OR GOPH 701 project course, submitted after all other course requirements are fulfilled
-Minimum GPA: 3.0 (base used: 4.0 point)
-Residence requirement: Yes
-Foreign language(s): No
-Computer language: No
-Comprehensive exam: No

Geoscience offers non-thesis Master's degrees in both Geology and Geophysics. The course-based M.Sc. program provides B.Sc. graduates with advanced academic training. If the student has an employer, the course-based M.Sc. program can be done in collaboration with an industrial partner and industrial capstone project. The program is suitable for both full-time and part-time mature students who may already be in the workforce with relevant work-experience, but wish to obtain an advanced degree without taking a leave of absence. The department provides no funding for course-based M.Sc. students and for admission a faculty member must agree to supervise the student's program.

Master's (MSc) Thesis-based

Degree requirements:
-Two full-course equivalents
-Number of hours: 12 hours per week per 12-week semester
-Minimum GPA: 3.0 (base used: 4.0 point)
-Residence requirement: Yes
-Foreign language(s): No
-Computer language: No
-Comprehensive exam: No
-Other requirements: Thesis proposal

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The Alberta Haskayne Executive MBA aims to transform Canada’s future by educating the next generation of business and public sector leaders. Read more
The Alberta Haskayne Executive MBA aims to transform Canada’s future by educating the next generation of business and public sector leaders.

In the context of increasing complexity, competitiveness and uncertainty, experienced professionals are recognizing the need to enrich their skills and deepen their professional networks. The Executive MBA, jointly offered by the Haskayne School of Business and the University of Alberta, is designed to meet your needs.

Extensive Support

Our team is committed to providing extensive support to allow you to get the most out of your learning experience.

Resources for the Executive MBA program include:
-Library resources: the dedicated MBA librarian helps you plan and execute your research; in addition the librarian offers tutorials to
help you develop good study habits and research skills.
-Tutorials: throughout the program faculty members and / or teaching assistants will provide additional support when needed to help practice challenging concepts and prepare for exams.
-Recorded lectures: classroom sessions are recorded and made available to students to allow you to recap topics or view a session you missed.
-Catering: breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided throughout the semester to allow you to meet with your study team before or between classes.
-Parking: parking is provided for all greyed out weekends on the calendar during the semester.
-Study space: there are many spaces for individual or group study available to Executive MBA students within the Graduate Lounge and elsewhere within Scurfield Hall; study rooms can also be reserved at the University of Calgary’s downtown campus.
-Executive coach: our executive coach can help guide you to maximize your Executive MBA experience in the context of your broader personal and professional goals.
-Career counselling: dedicated MBA career advisors are available to support you if you are looking to make a career transition during the program.

Leadership Focus

Leadership is a central theme across the core curriculum, from the first course, “The Manager as Strategist”, to applied leadership in the Capstone project course.

The executive speaker series is an opportunity for students to connect in a meaningful way with Canadian business leaders, many of whom are alumni of the Haskayne School of Business. Previous speakers have included:
-Gregg Saretsky, President and CEO , WestJet Airlines
-Anne Merklinger, CEO, Own the Podium
-W. Brett Wilson, Entrepreneur and Philanthropist
-Naheed Nenshi, Mayor, City of Calgary
-Jeff Gustavson, President, Chevron Canada Ltd.
-Bob Sartor, President and CEO, Big Rock Brewery
-Dick Haskayne, former Chairman, TransCanada Pipelines

Entrepreneurial Perspective

The Executive MBA program is targeted at experienced professionals who are leaders within their organizations or expect to be within the next few years. In an increasingly complex and globalized business environment, leaders need to find new ways of solving business challenges to maintain a competitive advantage. Entrepreneurial thinking, focused on equipping students with the skills, processes and toolkit to lead innovation in any context, is therefore a core course for students in the Executive MBA Program.

Diverse Cohort

Executive MBA Class of 2017 Profile
-3.1 average GPA
-575 average GMAT
-14 years’ average work experience
-30% female and 70% male
-40% of the class has an international background or work experience
-85% of the class have undergraduate degrees, with engineering and business majors being most common
-50% of the class work in the energy sector and 20% in not-for-profit
-35% of the class work in an operational function, 30% in general management, 15% in sales / marketing and 15% in accounting / finance / planning

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This programme is intended for students who hold a BA (Honours) degree (UK 2:1 or equivalent, for example, a GPA of 3.7 on a scale of 4.0 scale) in another discipline, but who wish to acquire a knowledge of Theology and Religion at a level which would permit them to undertake further study in the subject. Read more

This programme is intended for students who hold a BA (Honours) degree (UK 2:1 or equivalent, for example, a GPA of 3.7 on a scale of 4.0 scale) in another discipline, but who wish to acquire a knowledge of Theology and Religion at a level which would permit them to undertake further study in the subject.

Course structure

Five or six optional modules

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

2 choices from:

  • Landscapes of Worship in Contemporary South Asia
  • Literature and Theology of the Old Testament
  • New Testament Theology
  • Topics in Christian Ethics
  • Death, Ritual and Belief 
  • The Making of Modern Christianity: Medieval and Reformation Europe
  • Christian Theology: Essential Questions I 
  • Christian Theology: Essential Questions II
  • God, Freedom and the Soul
  • Philosophy and the Christian Tradition
  • One further 20 credit module offered by the Department of Theology & Religion at Levels 1 or 2

Plus 3 or 4 choices from:

  • Aramaic
  • Biblical Theology
  • Advanced Greek Texts
  • New Testament Ethics
  • Issues in Old Testament Studies
  • The First Urban Churches
  • Religion and Film
  • Emotion and Identity in Religion
  • The Sociology of Conservative Protestantism
  • The Postmodern God
  • 1 Peter and the Petrine Tradition (English)
  • 1 Peter and the Petrine Tradition (with Greek)
  • Christian Tradition and the Practice of Politics
  • The Letters of John and the origins of Gnosticism (English)
  • The Letters of John and the origins of Gnosticism (Greek)
  • The Historical Jesus
  • Reading Greek Sources about the Historical Jesus
  • Jesus Christ in the Twentieth Century
  • Faith and the Experience of War in the Christian World
  • Religions in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Religious Difference in the Reformation World
  • Thomas Aquinas: Background, context and Legacy
  • Religion, Media and Popular Culture
  • Graduate Diploma Dissertation

Course Learning and Teaching

As a student on the Graduate Diploma, you will receive on average 7.5 hours of timetabled contact per week. This will include a combination of lectures, seminars, and tutorials. Timetabled contact is only the beginning of your learning. It provides a starting point for your development as an independent learner. Typically, classroom teaching and learning will form nearly 25% of the time you will spend on your studies; you will be expected to spend the remaining 75% of your time on independent research.

You can opt to write a Dissertation (40 credits), a large research project that would count for one third of your marks. This gives you the opportunity to engage at an advanced level with creative cutting-edge research at the forefront of the discipline, working on a topic of your choice. For the dissertation you will have a supervisor who will guide and discuss your research with you.

In addition to all this the Department also has an extensive programme of research-related activities that you are warmly encouraged to attend. These include several research seminar series and public lectures from high-profile guest speakers and visiting scholars; the University also frequently hosts eminent and well-known visiting speakers.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world.

Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



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Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. Read more

What is Digital Humanities?

Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. It is methodological by nature and multidisciplinary in scope involving the investigation, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of information in electronic form.

Digital humanists do not only create digital artefacts, but study how these media affect and are transforming the disciplines in which they are used. The computational tools and methods used in Digital Humanities cut across disciplinary practice to provide shared focal points, such as the preservation and curation of digital data, the aesthetics of the digital (from individual objects to entire worlds), as well as the creation of the born-digital.

Why Take this Course?

This M.Phil. provides a platform for a technically innovative research path within the humanities giving students the opportunity to engage with a new and dynamic area of research. It provides them with the technologies, methodologies, and theories for digitally-mediated humanities providing a framework for new and bold research questions to be asked that would have been all but inconceivable a generation ago.

Course Outcomes

Those who complete this course will have highly specialised IT skills combined with an advanced understanding of how these skills can be applied to a wide variety of digital objects (text, image, audio, and video). It will also provide students with the theories and perspectives central to the field, including the aesthetics implicit in digital creation and migration, best practice in terms of the standards used for a number of data formats, as well as the growing concerns of digital curation and preservation. Through the internship programme students will get real world experience working with cultural heritage partners or digital humanities projects. Moreover, several modules will integrate content from these partners in their learning outcomes, providing opportunities for students to engage with cutting-edge issues and technologies.

What's on the course?

This MPhil consists of three core modules and three optional modules. There is also a dissertation module in which a research topic is chosen in agreement with your supervisor.

Core modules

Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities
Web Technologies
Internship at cultural heritage institution, library, or project
Optional modules (for the 2012-13 academic year):
Cyberculture/Popular Culture
Computational Theories of Grammar and Meaning
Corpus Linguistics
From Metadata to Linked Data
Programming for Digital Media (Full year module)
Contextual Media (Full year module)
Visualising the Past
Heritage Visualisation in Action
NB: Some optional modules require prerequisites

How is it taught and examined?

The taught component of the course begins in September and ends in April. Contact hours depend on the modules you take. Theory-based modules meet for two hours a week (such as 'Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities' and 'Cyberculture/Popular Culture'); practice based modules (such as 'Web Technologies' and 'Digital Scholarly Editing') typically meet for three hours a week to include lab time. Modules are assessed through a combination of essays, in-class presentations, assignments, and projects (either individual or group), depending on the module. There are no examinations. The supervised dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words is submitted by 31 August.

Applicants should have a good honours degree (at least an upper second, GPA of at least 3.3) in any of the disciplines of the humanities. The admissions process will be carried out in two stages. In stage I candidates will apply online and have the opportunity of submitting a sample of their own critical writing (3,000-5,000 words) and a cover letter. Those candidates passing this initial assessment will go onto to stage II that will take the form of interviews (either in person, telephone, video, or skype) which will be arranged by a member of the admissions subcommittee. Taken together, these stages will allow the admissions committee to assess the candidates' general suitability for postgraduate work as well as clarifying my query re on line application]

Applications are also welcome from professionals in the library and cultural heritage sectors. Those already in employment may opt to take the degree over two years: the first year all coursework is taken and the second year the dissertation is written.

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A minimum GPA of 3.0 in all undergraduate coursework in mathematics. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum GPA of 3.0 in all undergraduate coursework in mathematics.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Two letters must be from mathematics faculty with whom the applicant has taken courses.
• Resume or curriculum vitae.

E-mail:
Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application

The Master of Arts program in Mathematics is designed to develop the student’s ability to work independently and to obtain basic knowledge in algebra, real and complex variables, and topology so that mathematics literature can be read with understanding and enjoyment. The successful completion of this program should prepare a student to enter a second-year doctoral program in mathematics, to begin a career as an industrial mathematician or as a faculty member at a junior or community college. Program start dates: Fall or Spring (in certain cases).

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 30 credit hours
MATH 661, Topology I ...................................................3 credits
MATH 671, Abstract Algebra I ..........................................3 credits
MATH 672, Abstract Algebra II .........................................3 credits
MATH 681, Complex Variables I .......................................3 credits
MATH 691, Real Variables I .............................................3 credits
MATH 698, Seminar .....................................................3 credits

One of the following:

MATH 662, Topology II ...............................................3 credits
MATH 682, Complex Variables II ...................................3 credits
MATH 692, Real Variables II ........................................3 credits
Mathematics Electives ..................................................9 credits

Success Stories

SUNY Potsdam Mathematics graduates are employed by com-panies such as Aetna, AT&T, IBM, General Electric, Kodak, the National Security Agency and Hewlett Packard. Others have received assistantships and fellowships at reputable universities, and many have earned Ph.D. degrees in mathematics or statistics.

Uniqueness of the Program

The MA Mathematics program develops rigorous mathematical thinking and offers a spectrum of well-taught courses in pure and theoretical mathematics.

Testimonials

"I was accepted to all but three Ph.D. programs I applied to. I feel very fortunate to be in this position, [with] so many great offers from excellent schools. I would recommend a stats program to any BA/MA student interested in furthering their education through a degree that’s not math as they’ll be highly qualified and prepared. That stance has only been further confirmed as I talk to faculty in different statistics departments." — Justin J. Raimondi, Class of 2014

"As a somewhat sheltered student through high school, I found that the mathematics faculty at SUNY Potsdam nurtured me carefully, providing the support I needed to develop confidence in the content area, and to deepen my love of mathematics. After graduating from the BA/MA program, I have taught successfully at the high school and college levels for nearly 30 years." —Donald C. Straight, Class of 1988

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A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the major. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the major.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Teaching Adolescence Education program in English is designed to meet the teacher education regulations of the New York State Education Department, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) stan- dards, the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), as well as Advisory Board recommendations and alumni feedback. The program leads to Initial/Professional Adolescence Education, English (Grades 7-12) certification. This program is nationally recognized by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). Program start date: Summer.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 47 credit hours
(Prerequisite coursework may be required prior to, or concurrent with, program studies.)

GRED 549, Adol Lit and Teaching of Reading/Literacy .............3 credits
GRED 550, Intro to Teaching ELA, Grades 7-12 ....................3 credits
GRED 555, Classroom Mgmt/Leadership, Middle/Sec Schools .....3 credits
GRED 582, Teaching Writing/Lang/Comm, Grades 7-12 ..........3 credits
GRED 584, Teaching Literature and Literacy, Grades 7-12 ........3 credits
GRED 588, Practicum I, Teaching ELA in Sec Schools..............2 credits
GRED 589, Practicum II, Teaching ELA in Sec Schools ............2 credits
GRED 600, Philosophical Foundations of Education ................3 credits
GRED 671, Dev Prof Portfolio: Culminating Experience ...........3 credits
GRED 677, Development and Learning in Adolescence .............3 credits
SPED 505, Introduction to Special Education .........................3 credits

HLTH 530, School Health (certification requirement) ..............3 credits

Education elective ........................................................3 credits

GRED 676, Student Teaching Seminar ................................2 credits
GRED 692, Student Teaching in Jr High School (7-9) ..............6 credits
GRED 697, Student Teaching in Sr High School (10-12) ..........6 credits

GRED 677 is required if the candidate’s undergraduate work does not include a course in developmental, adolescent, or educational psychology. If the psychology requirement is fulfilled through un- dergraduate course work, a second education elective shall be taken.

Full or conditional admission is available.

Testimonial

“I made the tough decision to apply for graduate school after a fruitful career in social work because I desperately needed a change. After this epiphany, I resigned from my position, and soon after applied to the MST program at SUNY Potsdam. As it turned out, it was a decision that not only changed my life, but altered the course of my family’s as well. The MST program prepared me for teaching in ways that I couldn't have imagined, and continues to mold me into the teacher I am well on my way to becoming.” —Johnny Dundon

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

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A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the social science major. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the social science major.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Teaching Adolescence Education program in Social Studies is designed to meet the New York State Education Department’s regulations on Teacher Education, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) standards, and the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), along with Advisory Board recommendations and alumni feedback. This program is nationally recognized by the NCSS and leads to Initial Adolescence Education, Social Studies (Grade 7-12) with an extension for Middle Childhood Social Studies Education (Grade 5-6) certification. Program start date: Summer.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 51 credit hours
(Prerequisite coursework may be required prior to, or concurrent with, program studies.)

GRED 556, Reading in the Middle/Secondary School ...............3 credits
GRED 557, Writing in the Middle/Secondary School ...............3 credits
GRED 590, Special Soc St Education Content Topic ................3 credits
GRED 600, Philosophical Foundations of Education ................3 credits
GRED 606, Adv Secondary Social Studies Education ...............3 credits
GRED 670, Social Studies Culminating Experience .................3 credits
GRED 681, Soc St Curr in Middle and Secondary School ..........3 credits
GRED 682, Research in Social Studies Education ....................3 credits
GRED 684, Social Studies Content Portfolio ............................1 credit
GRED 688, Soc St Instruction in Middle and Sec School ...........2 credits
GRED 689, Practicum in Middle/Sec Soc St Instruction ............4 credits
SPED 505, Introduction to Special Education .........................3 credits

HLTH 530, School Health (certification requirement) ..............3 credits

Technology Elective: 3 credit hours

Additional Elective: 3 credit hours

GRED 676, Student Teaching Seminar ................................2 credits
GRED 694, Student Teaching in Mid/Jr High School (7-9) ........6 credits
GRED 697, Student Teaching in Sr High School (10-12) ..........6 credits

Testimonial

“Coming out of my undergraduate program, I had a lot of experience with subject material but didn't have the first clue about teaching. Potsdam’s graduate program provided a great mix of theory and practice; the 100 hour practicum, as well as graduate level theory and research courses, allows you to try to mix some of the things you've learned into your curriculum as you work in the classrooms. A personal highlight for me was the degree of interest that the staff and faculty took in making sure the students got the most out of their education.” —Colin French

The GRE Exam (or equivalent, such as the MAT) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

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