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Masters Degrees (Global Political Economy)

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Who is it for?. The Global Political Economy MA will help you broaden your understanding of the complex contemporary global economic system and its socio-political relationships. Read more

Who is it for?

The Global Political Economy MA will help you broaden your understanding of the complex contemporary global economic system and its socio-political relationships. The course is designed for inquisitive students that want to develop a cutting-edge perspective on global economic and financial relations, inter-state competition, mechanisms of global governance and processes of transformation and change.

You don’t need any formal economics education for this course. Students come from a wide range of subject fields, including Politics, Law, Business Studies, Media Studies, the Humanities and more.

From global inequality and tax evasion to financial regulation and financial crises, the expertise that you develop on this advanced MA will enable you to pursue a wide range of rewarding career options in the public and private sectors.

Objectives

The Global Political Economy MA will help you:

  • Get an advanced specialist education in the field of global political economy.
  • Develop your analytical skills and the ability to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between markets, governments, transnational actors and networks in the setting of the globalising economy.
  • Acquire an advanced conceptualisation of the problems of global capitalism in the
  • 21st century.
  • Critically examine rapid economic change and its socio-political roots in the contemporary world.
  • Analyse and articulate your analysis of complex issues and debates to a high level.
  • Prepare for a diverse range of careers and develop contextual knowledge that will be applicable for life-long learning in a rapidly changing economic environment.

Teaching and learning

You will benefit from our internationally renowned expertise in the field of global political economy, exemplified by:

  • The leading academic staff who deliver the course.
  • The vibrant research culture at the City Political Economy Research Centre.
  • City’s central London location.

The MA in Global Political Economy is taught by internationally renowned, world-leading scholars in the field, including the next-generation of academics engaged in cutting-edge research. As a result, City boasts one of the UK’s best teams in the critical study of global finance.

Our staff includes Ronen Palan, Anastasia Nesvetailova, Stefano Pagliari, Amin Samman and Sandy Brian Hager amongst others.

Student activities

In many modules, you will be encouraged to give presentations. We use group discussions, brain-storming, role-play and mini-roundtables on thematic issues in addition to conventional teaching techniques.

As an MA student, you are also invited to attend PhD workshops organised by doctoral students in the Department.

Assessment

All modules are assessed through a written essay of 4,500 words.

In addition to coursework, you must complete a final MA dissertation of 15,000 words based on your independent research. The dissertation is worth one-third of the overall MA mark. The Global Political Economy MA dissertation is grounded in a specialised stream of the Research Design module (IPM111). During the module, you will receive specialised training in research methodology, tailored for your dissertation in the field of global political economy.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits in total.

The course consists of core modules on the history of global capitalism and contending approaches from across the political economy traditions. You will then develop specialist knowledge through elective modules, which cover issues such as economic and financial crises, international organisations and economic diplomacy, poverty and inequality, regionalisation and globalisation, states and sovereignty, and the rise of new economic powers.

You will take two core modules and a range of electives. Core modules are typically taught as a weekly one-hour lecture and one-hour tutorial, and optional modules as a weekly two-hour seminar session.

Teaching is supported by a personal tutorial and supervision system, as well as organised seminar series with outside speakers, both professional and academic.

Core modules

Elective modules

You choose 60 credits from:

Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:

  • Understanding Security in the Twenty-First Century (15 credits)
  • Development and World Politics (15 credits)
  • Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)
  • The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)
  • Global Governance (15 credits)
  • International Politics and the Middle East (15 credits)
  • Global Financial Governance (15 credits)
  • Strategy, Diplomacy and Decision-Making (30 credits)
  • Economic Diplomacy (15 credits)
  • Foreign Policy Analysis (15 credits)
  • Religion in Global Politics (15 credits

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:

  • International Law and the Global Economy (30 credits)
  • International Tax Law (30 credits)
  • International Trade Law(30 credits)
  • Money Laundering Law (30 credits)
  • International Investment Law (30 credits)
  • International Banking Law (30 credits)

In Term 3 you will complete your dissertation project.

Career prospects

This specialised MA degree will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need to enter a range of careers related to the global political economy. It enables graduates both with and without prior knowledge of economics to engage competently and confidently with economic and financial developments and pursue professional careers in the public and private sectors, including:

  • Finance and banking.
  • Transnational corporations.
  • Civil service and international diplomacy.
  • The media.
  • Development agencies.

Should you want to take your academic studies further, the MA also provides you with a solid foundation to pursue doctoral research in politics and political economy.

International Politics Careers Day

During your MA year you are encouraged to attend the Department's International Politics Careers Day which explores career opportunities and provides:

  • Talks by speakers within the field (including City alumni). Previous speakers have included staff from the Department for International Development, the Ministry of Justice, UNESCO, the EU Commission and the UN Peacebuilding Support Office (PBSO).
  • Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators.
  • CV and application advice, and volunteering drop-in sessions with career professionals.


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Today's global economy is changing faster than ever. To be understood fully, it needs to be considered from a variety of different angles bringing together knowledge and insights from multiple schools of thought across economics, politics and law. Read more
Today's global economy is changing faster than ever. To be understood fully, it needs to be considered from a variety of different angles bringing together knowledge and insights from multiple schools of thought across economics, politics and law.

Why are rich countries rich and poor countries poor? How is the global economy structured? Who are the most powerful players, and can China continue to be the engine of growth?

Delving into these important questions and many others, our MSc in Global Political Economy takes a uniquely interdisciplinary approach, to broaden and deepen your skills in policy negotiation, and equip you for a wide range of careers in international organisations, government and NGOs.

Course detail

Highly practical in nature, the Global Political Economy course places a strong emphasis on real world content, drawing on the extensive experience of our cross-department teaching staff. The economics department at UWE Bristol has become known as a leading centre for pluralist economics education, and many of our tutors advise governments and conduct research for major international institutions such as The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the International Labour Organisation (ILO).

We also bring in guest speakers to guide and support your learning, and you will have access to relevant events in and outside the Faculty and University, alongside focused employability support.

The course is particularly suited to those who have studied international relations, politics, economics, business or law at undergraduate level. It is also suitable for those with relevant professional experience, who wish to deepen their understanding of the theories, ideas and concepts underpinning the global political economy.

Modules

Core modules:

• The Rise of the Global Economy
• The World Trade Organisation and the Global Trading System
• The Rise of the BRICS in Global Trade
• The Politics of Trade Negotiation
• Dissertation

Optional modules:

• Contemporary Policy Analysis
• Globalisation and the Law
• International Financial Crime
• Econometrics
• Political Economy
• Economic Theory and Policy
• Politics of Latin-American Underdevelopment
• Europe in the World
• Global Governance

Format

The Global Political Economy course is delivered through a variety of teaching and learning activities, including lectures, tutor-led and student-led group discussions, seminars, projects, case studies, simulation games, and field trips to conferences. Teaching is based on research literature, professional experience and significant use of debate and discussion.

Assessment

Assessment comprises formal tutor assessment, informal tutor assessment and informal peer review and feedback. We will test your knowledge, and intellectual, subject-specific and transferable skills, through a combination of exams, essays, case studies, presentations, projects and simulation games. We will also test your skills informally through class interaction during work on current academic research, case studies, practical exercises and experiential exercises.

Careers / Further study

This MSc in Global Political Economy provides you with the interdisciplinary analytical tools to tackle the big issues that economies and societies face in an increasingly integrated global economy. You will be equipped with skills and knowledge to go into a wide range of careers in international organisations, government and NGOs.

Successful students may also want to continue in their studies to PhD level, in fields such as economics, development economics, politics, the political economy, development studies, and international studies.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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Focusing on important contemporary issues such as globalisation, governance and inequality as well as other societal challenges, students of this programme will acquire a wide range of quantitative and qualitative research skills enabling a comprehensive assessment of the impact of such issues on the global political economy. Read more

Focusing on important contemporary issues such as globalisation, governance and inequality as well as other societal challenges, students of this programme will acquire a wide range of quantitative and qualitative research skills enabling a comprehensive assessment of the impact of such issues on the global political economy.

This cross-disciplinary Masters degree, with offerings from Management, Economics, Politics, Geography and Accounting, offers students an incredibly diverse and intellectually stimulating perspective on how each area directly impacts on the global political economy. And, utilising new international data sources and methods, students will also learn how to fully comprehend, analyse and address issues affecting the global political and economic landscape.

Ideal for students interested in a variety of careers including government, the private sector, think tanks, policy-making and charities. This new programme is accredited by the Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC) as part of the South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP) and provides students with the opportunity to achieve outstanding career credentials.

Programme Structure

This programme is available for study 12 months full-time or 24 months part time. The course is delivered collaboratively by the University of Exeter, University of Bristol and the University of Bath as part of the South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP). Students can elect to study optional modules at the Universities of Exeter, Bristol or Bath.

During the programme you will study modules (including the dissertation) totalling 180 credits.

Compulsory modules

Recent ecent examples of modules are as follows;

  • International political economy;
  • Research methods;
  • Interdisciplinary research design;
  • Dissertation.

Optional modules

  • Macroeconomics;
  • Principles of international business;
  • The politics of global capitalism;
  • Political economy of food and agriculture;
  • Leading, managing and developing people;
  • Sustainable enterprise economy;
  • Resourcing and talent management;
  • International human resource management;
  • Consumption, markets and culture;
  • Quantitative research techniques 2;
  • International trade and regional integration;
  • Corporate governance, reporting and regulation;
  • Introduction to energy policy and sustainability;
  • Principles of international taxation.

Please note that programme structures may be subject to change.

Learning and teaching

Our postgraduate taught programmes utilise a range of teaching methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials.

Lectures

The aim of lectures is to give you information on ideas that are central to the module and to help you in developing your understanding of complex ideas. Many of the teaching materials for lectures are made available to you electronically to accompany the notes you take during the lecture. Lectures are given by a range of staff members, including leading professors, who integrate their latest research findings into the teaching that you receive. Guest lecturers, including members of industry, also contribute to some modules.

Seminars and tutorials

Seminars and tutorials involve an in-depth exploration of the issues covered in lectures as well as giving you the opportunity to discuss various concepts and theories and receive feedback on your written assignments.

Assessment

Modules are assessed through a mixture of group work, coursework, project work and examinations; the weighting of each of these components will vary according to the academic requirements of the module. Examinations are normally held at the end of the module, in January and May/June.

Read more at https://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/business/globaleconomy/#1m9rtcLBTkZgK8oy.99



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New economic powers are rising. We face a growing number of challenges, including. -Climate change. -Financial instability. -Food, energy and security crises. Read more
New economic powers are rising. We face a growing number of challenges, including:
-Climate change
-Financial instability
-Food, energy and security crises

Can the global political economy cope with these issues? You’ll examine the emergence of the global political economy, what economic crisis means for capitalism, and the distribution of wealth and power. Our unique MA analyses the impacts of these contemporary transformations.

How will I study?

You take taught modules and options. You may also do a research placement. You will be assessed by term papers, and write a supervised 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Meet the people teaching and supervising on your course.

Careers

This MA is ideal for you if you wish to pursue a career in international organisations, development agencies or NGOs, or journalism. Or if you’d like to take up a role in the private sector that requires knowledge of the global political and economic system.

We also offer excellent background and training should you wish to pursue doctoral studies and/or an academic career. We are committed to helping to identify placements for our students.

Our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in:
-Government foreign, economics and trade ministries
-International organisations such as the UN
-NGOs such as Oxfam, CAFOD, Amnesty International and the Red Cross
-International development such as World Bank
-International media or journalism
-Academia and research institutes

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This programme is one of five interdisciplinary pathways that are delivered as part of the South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP). Read more
This programme is one of five interdisciplinary pathways that are delivered as part of the South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP).

This pathway explores the dynamics of global transformation and policy implications, as well as their interrelations with national and regional institutional and social responses to the changing global political and economic order.

The pathway encourages you to analyse the diverse experiences and impact of economic globalisation and examine relationships between global governance and inequality. It will also help you understand that analysis and resolution of many of the key problems confronting humanity in the 21st century require new and interdisciplinary academic approaches, innovative methods and policy agendas, creative thinking and transnationally comparative datasets.

Programme structure

Core units
-Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Design
-Global Transformations - Issues and Trajectories
-Introduction to Qualitative Research
-Introduction to Quantitative Research

Optional units
These can be taken at the University of Bristol, Bath or Exeter. Units can change from year to year but may include the following:

At Bristol:
-International Political Economy
-East Asia and Global Development
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-Sino-US Relations in Global Politics
-Power, Hegemony and the Ordering of the Global Political Economy
-Theories of Development
-Environmental Politics
-International Law VI: International Law and Human Rights
-International Law of Trade and Aid

At Bath:
-The Politics of Policy: Actors, Arenas and Conflict in International Perspective
-International Development and Poverty
-Wellbeing and Human Development: Concepts, Measurements and Policy
-Welfare Economics and Distributive Justice

At Exeter:
-The Politics of Global Capitalism
-Managing in a multinational context
-Sustainable Enterprise Economy

Dissertation
Over the summer you will complete a research-based dissertation of up to 15,000 words, individually supervised by a member of staff from the school.

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One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. Read more
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. The International Studies (Global Political Economy) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies, and in particular applies these to the globalisation of economic relations, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2016/international-studies--global-political-economy-/international-studies-global-political-economy/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers. .

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- Covers issues such as the globalisation of economic relations and the potential challenges it poses for states and the governance of the international system. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of this is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables you to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional Advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by n international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

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Overview. The Master of Research (MRes) in ‘Global Political Economy. transformations and policy analysis’ trains doctoral students who can assess the impacts of globalisation both in the short run and longer term using new international data sources and comparative methods. Read more

Overview

The Master of Research (MRes) in ‘Global Political Economy: transformations and policy analysis’ trains doctoral students who can assess the impacts of globalisation both in the short run and longer term using new international data sources and comparative methods.

On completion of this programme, students will:

- have a deepened and interdisciplinary understanding of social science discourses and methods for analysing global processes of change both generally and in specified policy areas.

- be knowledgeable of key contributions to thinking about social, economic and political aspects of the planet as an interdependent social system.

- have an understanding of how global and national policy processes interact.

The programme aims to equip students for careers as professional researchers in either academic or non-academic environments, by developing core research skills. Students will be encouraged to review and critically evaluate approaches to research and their application, and to identify and investigate their own original research questions.

- South West Doctoral Training Centre

This MRes is accredited by the Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC), specifically, as part of the larger South West Doctoral Training Centre (SWDTC). It is a collaborative, interdisciplinary programme, delivered by two universities (Bath and Bristol), building on the research strengths of each institution through the inclusion of collaborative units (delivered jointly by the two institutions).

The MRes can be taken as a course in its own right, or as part of the 1 + 3 (MRes + MPhil/PhD) pathway, which includes further collaborative elements with the University of Bristol.

Given the interdisciplinary nature of this programme, successful graduates could proceed onto an MPhil/PhD in one of several areas/departments, specifically:

- Department of Economics

- Department of Education

- School of Management

- Department of Social & Policy Sciences

If applying for an MRes/PhD (the 1 + 3 programme) applicants should indicate on the Application Form, their preferred MPhil/PhD route.

Progression from the MRes to the MPhil/PhD stage is dependent on achieving an acceptable level of achievement (typically an overall average of 60% on at least the taught component of the MRes).

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/mres-glob-poli-econ-tran/

About the department

The Department of Social & Policy Sciences (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/) includes academics from social policy, sociology, social work and international development.

The international excellence of our research (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/) was recognised by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011.

We are committed to advancing learning and knowledge through teaching and research. Our Department collaborates with a wide range of users at the local, national, European and global levels.

Postgraduate programmes:

We offer a wide range of postgraduate programmes. Our postgraduate teaching strongly reflects our research and our links to policy-makers and development institutions at the national, European and global level.

Our Department also has an active MPhil/PhD research programme. We take great pride in fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

Seminar series:

We run a lively and well attended postgraduate research seminar series. Each of the Research Centres run seminar series and conferences associated with their research activities. The University of Bath also has a Research in the World public lecture series where key national and international academics are invited to speak.

Careers information:

We are committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their training. Our graduates generally go on to work in a wide variety of organisations, for example:

- social research in universities and research institutes, government, business, voluntary organisations and international organisations

- public policy analysis at local, national and international levels

- public information and campaigning within organisations concerned with wellbeing, sustainability and social justice.

Main areas of research

We are an internationally-recognised research-intensive department with a strong focus on policy and practice and a commitment to contribute to social wellbeing and social justice.

We draw together academic staff with backgrounds in Social Policy, Sociology, Social Work and International Development and work closely with colleagues in Psychology, Economics, and Health.

We also have an active and vibrant community of research students (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/research-students/) undertaking their own research alongside our academic staff.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



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Course description. On this course, you will engage with the most pressing problems in the global political economy. You will explore how the distribution of economic resources is subject to multiple and often competing political pressures, and how the effects of these pressures are experienced. Read more

Course description

On this course, you will engage with the most pressing problems in the global political economy. You will explore how the distribution of economic resources is subject to multiple and often competing political pressures, and how the effects of these pressures are experienced.

You will apply innovative ways of thinking to contemporary policy problems such as unstable capitalism, inequalities and poverty, migration, environmental degradation and climate change, rapid technological change, and emergent new powers.

Teaching

  • Lectures
  • Tutorials
  • Seminars

Assessment

  • Essays
  • Dissertation
  • Presentation
  • Learning log


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Graduate students at. The New School for Social Research. ask the kind of questions that challenge the status quo across the social sciences and humanities. Read more

Graduate students at The New School for Social Research ask the kind of questions that challenge the status quo across the social sciences and humanities.

Guided by rigorous scholarship and a desire to apply academic discourse and discovery to current social problems, they critically examine interdisciplinary fields to become a force of new knowledge and ideas in the world.

All graduate programs at The New School for Social research can be completed full-time or part-time on our New York City campus. Competitive merit-based scholarships are available in all departments -- in recent years, 85% of master’s students have received merit scholarships at The New School for Social Research.

Change begins with a question. What will you ask?

Program Highlights

  • 30-credit specialized graduate economics program.
  • Develop analytical and policy skills through economic and statistical analysis and examination of contemporary global political economy.
  • Prepare for career paths in finance, government, business, labor organizing, international development, and academia.

Why the New School?

The New School for Social Research was founded in 1919 as a home for progressive thinkers, and housed the University in Exile in 1933, providing an academic haven for scholars persecuted in Nazi Europe. The school became the foundation for a comprehensive university – The New School – and continues the legacy of critical thought, civic engagement, and academic freedom today.



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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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Does the growing influence of Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRICs) change the way the global political economy is governed? What are the political roots of global trade and finance? What is the impact of the international economy on inequality and development? Answering these questions requires you to combine economics and political science. Read more

Does the growing influence of Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRICs) change the way the global political economy is governed? What are the political roots of global trade and finance? What is the impact of the international economy on inequality and development? Answering these questions requires you to combine economics and political science. In our Master’s specialisation in International Political Economy (IPE) you will uncover the economic and political dimensions of global issues and power struggles behind policy choices.

Understanding the world

International Political Economy at Radboud University teaches you to go beyond the surface of daily news and to disentangle deeper global structures of economic growth and the distribution of wealth and power that underlie today’s problems of global economic governance. We challenge you to not only understand and explain ‘the world’, but to view and assess it from the perspectives of different stakeholders, while understanding the social and economic structures and institutions enabling or hindering them in pursuing their objectives.

Combined approach

International Political Economy at Radboud University combines approaches from (International) Economics and Political Science. We strongly believe that in order to grasp the complexity of many of today’s global issues it is essential to understand and combine the different approaches political scientists and economists take: the economic and financial crisis; the race for and exploitation of natural resources; attempts of national governments to deal with global change. The programme thus offers courses that combine both disciplines.

Why study International Political Economy at Radboud University?

  • Unique for the Netherlands, our programme is taught by both economists and political scientists.
  • Being active in academic and applied research, our lecturers incorporate the latest academic developments and practical issues.
  • Professors and students interact in small groups, thus strengthening the academic atmosphere and enabling you to actively participate in academic research in your Master’s programme.
  • Combining economics and political science courses, you will acquire the knowledge you need in order to resolve international policy issues and to get a better grip on the underlying political forces.
  • You can do this programme to obtain a Master’s in Political Science or a Master’s in Economics. Our programme integrates traditional economic approaches with perspectives from international relations and political science.
  • Our students rate this Master’s programme 8,4 out of 10 according to the National Student Survey 2017.
  • Best Master’s programme according to the Elsevier magazine’s survey Beste studies 2017.

Career prospects

Alumni from economics and political science have positions as policy makers in businesses, international organisations, political parties, national ministries, market authorities, the European Parliament and the European Commission. They also work as consultants for profit and non-profit organisations and as researchers at think-tanks or universities. In addition alumni are employed by banks, other financial institutions and the media. This is because our graduates have the competences required by employers, such as sound research and analytical skills, excellent written and oral communication skills, and experience in working in teams and working independently.

Visit http://www.ru.nl/masters/iae to find out all the details and start your application



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Goal of the pro­gramme. Global Politics and Communication is an interdisciplinary and innovative Master’s degree programme that addresses the key challenges of globalisation from the perspective of media and communication studies, organisation research and global political economy. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Global Politics and Communication is an interdisciplinary and innovative Master’s degree programme that addresses the key challenges of globalisation from the perspective of media and communication studies, organisation research and global political economy. The programme emphasises developing your critical thinking, a necessary skill in many careers.

The specific objectives of the programme include:

  • Providing you with advanced knowledge of global political economy, relationships between the media and the development of democracy, and linkages between governance, organisations and communication
  • Empowering you to assess how politics and the media are linked to the forces of globalisation
  • Equipping you with conceptual understanding and the theoretical and methodological skills needed to carry out original and relevant research on key societal issues
  • Preparing you to engage in public discussions and develop critical reasoning and argumentation skills that are equally important in academia, public organisations and the private sector

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Programme contents

How do global transformations affect democratic politics? What is the role of the media in the transformation of contemporary democracies? Why do economic activities result in global and national financial crises and inequality instead of in stability and democratisation? How does governance affect organisations and communication, and how do governance and organisations structure communication and political and economic activity?

The Global Politics and Communication programme offers a cutting-edge combination of political science, communication studies and global political economy. You will apply ideas, concepts and methodologies to key societal and political issues such as the changing character of democracy, the role of organisations and governance in the globalising world, and the regulation of global finance and trade.

During the first year, you will study general theoretical and methodological courses and take part in thematic courses offered by the programme’s study tracks. In the second year, you will deepen your knowledge on your selected study track or study tracks by participating in thematic specialization courses. You will also attend the Master’s seminar and write your Master’s thesis.



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How do global economic and political forces shape the lives and future of citizens, business, and civil society? Of political conflict and government? Your Master programme in Political Economy will teach you to answer these questions. Read more

How do global economic and political forces shape the lives and future of citizens, business, and civil society? Of political conflict and government? Your Master programme in Political Economy will teach you to answer these questions. The programme covers the ground from ‘economics for non-economists’ to understanding how the ‘rules of the game’ are shaped, to thinking about ‘winners’ and ‘losers’ of an open global economy and how that gives rise to ‘new’ conflicts and to a surge of anti-globalisation political movements. You will in global and comparative terms address the critical issues facing the developed and developing worlds, from Asia to Europe to the Americas - contemporary challenges such as migration, the struggle for development, or better financial market governance.

Our starting point is that the relationship between ‘politics’ and ‘the economy’ is a two-way street: political contestation shapes economic outcomes and their governance, while economic developments generate political conflicts. The causes and consequences of the on-going economic malaise have brought this highly political ‘who-gets-what’ nature of ‘the economy’ back out into the open. We also confront the social dimension of key political challenges by exploring issues such as social inequalities and corporate power so as better to understand how this plays out in different party political or non-democratic environments. These dynamics cut across a rich terrain of contemporary issues and taps into your interest in both the practical and the ‘big issue’ side of global affairs, crossing over with public policy expertise and business strategy, among which:

  • Powerful emerging economies in Africa and Asia are ‘on the move’, business lobbies push their preferences, and the success of the developing world is a growing challenge to the dominance of the advanced economies in global and regional governance.
  • Technological change and the Internet revolution are transforming the corporate sector, labour markets, and government. New patterns of mass-elite communication and social movement mobilisation are emerging. The world is a shrinking but more politically contentious place than previously thought.
  • Citizens feel vulnerable in the face of cross-border trade, investment, financial markets, and labour market risks. Fearing immigration, rising inequalities, and a changing welfare state, many opt for more ‘populist’ political movements of the radical left or right. 

Our programme also teaches you that the dynamics of change differ starkly across countries: the hopes of a precarious development process poses challenges to authoritarianism in the developing world, while declining trust in business and political elites undermines ‘mainstream’ politics in established democracies.

Student profile

This track is above all a response to vocal demand from students. It draws on a long political economy tradition at the UvA that is second-to-none in Europe. Those of you with a public policy, comparative politics or international relations background often seek to specialise in the economic policy domain yet outside the confines – often ideologically and methodologically constraining – of traditional approaches in economics and business departments. Many who have taken economics, business, or law seek the way our programme ‘brings politics back in’. Many from the humanities can bring their linguistic, cultural and historical knowledge to the programme’s exploration of political-economic interaction. 

Career Prospects

Political Economy taps your interest in issues of practical concern in the economy, business, and policy worlds where expertise leads to elite job opportunities. Above all we help you to think and analyse critically and independently where others merely learn to follow. There is strong demand in the society at large for the training we offer. The programme equips graduates to compete successfully with management, public policy, and economics-trained students for relevant jobs in ministries, think-tanks or consultancy, companies, municipalities, International Organisations, and the media. There is little that a good political economist cannot do. For more information, see the webpage on career prospects.

Why study Political Economy in Amsterdam?

The programme is based at the University of Amsterdam, a major research university, and in one of the highest-ranking departments in continental Europe. The Graduate School of Social Sciences (GSSS) provides a vibrant and international academic community and promotes strong academic and transferable skills development. PE candidates develop a real ‘esprit de corps’ in their year in Amsterdam as we provide you with both academic and professional skills. Our research-oriented MSc in Political Economy taps into your interest in both the practical and the ‘big issue’ side of global affairs, crossing over with public policy expertise and business strategy.

  • How do markets work and how do they intersect with the institutions and governance that have emerged over time, from the local to the global? What are firms, workers, and governments trying to do as they interact and clash? Why is economic integration in some countries heavily politicized and in other countries accepted as a matter of fact?
  • What are the responsibilities of rich societies to the poor, to the environment, to future generations? Is the new radicalism of the ‘losers of globalisation’ a revitalisation of or a threat to democracy?
  • How do the aspirations of ‘ordinary people’ in developed and developing societies fit with the ‘rules of the game’ determined by economic and political elites, and whose interests ought to prevail? Do global markets undermine national democratic choice?

Degree certificate

Political Economy is a track of the accredited degree programme Political Science. After successful completion of this programme, you will receive a legally accredited Master’s degree in Political Science and the title Master of Science (MSc).



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This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a specialist focus on how globalisation, international economic interdependence and the internationalisation of political structures and processes are changing politics globally. Read more

This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a specialist focus on how globalisation, international economic interdependence and the internationalisation of political structures and processes are changing politics globally.

You’ll learn about the experiences and viewpoints of people and nations of the Global South regarding development issues. You’ll also review strategies, programmes and policies in development, including organisations and donors promoting development, and assess the progress made by different development actors towards key international development goals.

You’ll explore debates and controversies at the centre of contemporary development challenges and analyse both the theories and realities of development, to understand the different approaches, practices and discourses involved.

Research insight

MA Global Development has a close working relationship with the Global Development and Justice research group that aims to examine central debates within the field of global development from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The Global Development and Justice research group is also actively involved, amongst others, in the Centre for Global Development, a university-wide network that promotes cross-disciplinary approaches to the field, as well as the Leeds Centre for African Studies.

Course content

Core modules examine key issues surrounding global development, such as markets, inequality, democratisation, gender, health, education, human rights, conflict, violence and crime – with an additional compulsory module focusing on your specialism.

You’ll also learn about various aspects of development practice, like the theoretical and analytical principles of Project Cycle Management. Additionally, you’ll hone your research and writing skills and then showcase them in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on a topic of your choice.

These modules will equip you to analyse, understand and discuss the major changes, problems and opportunities facing societies and people in the Global South. You’ll study some of the broader social, political, and economic causes of the problems, and the achievements and setbacks that people have experienced in their efforts to tackle them at the global, national and local levels and improve their societies and lives. You’ll learn to analyse, understand, and discuss development in the Global South in the 2010s in all its dynamism, complexity and significance.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you, including natural resources struggles, global health, gender and globalisation, education, international political economy or issues related to Africa and China.

If you are a part-time student, you can choose how to spread your studies across two years. However, we recommend that you at least take your compulsory modules in your first year, and you have to take the compulsory dissertation module in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Global Inequalities and Development 30 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • Education in Development 30 credits
  • Research Methodology for Development 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and International Political Economy MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and International Political Economy MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Modules are conducted through a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. Tutors also provide you with individual advice on written work and you should begin to develop expertise in improving your work through face-to-face discussion with your tutors, formative assessment and through detailed feedback. You’ll be expected to carry out a good deal of independent, detailed and considered study.

All part-time students attend exactly the same classes as full-time students which usually take place between 9am and 5pm; there are no evening classes.

Assessment

Each module is assessed separately, through assessments that range from long essays to projects and assignments, offering you the opportunity to work in your particular field of interest within each topic area. You will also carry out a dissertation into a research area of your choice.

Career opportunities

This programme is aimed at students who would like to pursue either a professional career or further research in international development and related fields, and generally have a desire to put their education into practice in the Global South.

You’ll gain a wide range of professional skills on top of your subject knowledge. You’ll have an understanding of project design and management in a development context, as well as being able to analyse quantitative and qualitative data. You’ll be able to construct clear arguments, critically assess different options for action, analyse policy documents, write research reports and give presentations. You’ll also be trained to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations.

Our programme equips you for various career paths. Compatible careers include working in international development agencies, international organisations, governments, politics, NGOs, research organisations, policy making, companies, media, and academia.

Graduates have gone on to work in, for instance, non-governmental organisations in the UK or overseas, research and consultancy firms, international organisations (such as the UN), the Civil Service, the media, or have continued with further study (e.g. PhD research).

We encourage you to seek practical work experience in the international development field, and advise you on how to go about it.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Program Description. The Division of Global Affairs (DGA) offers a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Global Affairs in residence. Read more

Program Description

The Division of Global Affairs (DGA) offers a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Global Affairs in residence. It may be taken on a full-time or part-time basis. It is a multidisciplinary degree concerned with theoretically informed and problem-oriented approaches to transnational issues that interact with local issues. It is designed for practitioners in the Global Arena including business professionals, government employees, security professionals including the military, and those who are presently employed or plan careers with international governmental and non-governmental organizations. Forty (40) credits are required for the M.S. degree in Global Affairs. All students must complete:

  • Seven Areas of Inquiry (AIs) Courses with grades of B (3.0) or higher —21 credits​​​
  • One Research and Methodology Course —3 credits
  • Two Capstone Colloquia Series with grades of Pass (a colloquium is a lecture series of 5 to 6 presentations on a given topic organized by a core DGA faculty, which students must attend and write a 15 page paper on if they want to accumulate credit) —4 credits
  • One Foundation Course - (26:478:508; 26:790:508): Evolution of the Global System —3 credits
  • Three Elective Courses —9 credits; note: three electives may be joined with the applicable AI discipline to qualify for a certificate
  • Language Requirement— no credit; the language requirement is fulfilled by prior coursework, a major/minor, or demonstrated familiarity or fluency in another language. 

8 Areas of Inquiry

Ethics, Security, & Global Affairs

Global Governance

Human Security

Global Political Economy

International Law

History of International Business

Global Development

Human Rights & Mass Atrocities

Core courses

Areas of Inquiry Courses (AIs)

The Division of Global Affairs requires that students complete seven Areas of Inquiry (AI) courses. These courses are geared towards giving students the foundation they will need for future Global Affairs courses and endeavors in the global affairs field. Students must complete seven (7) of the eight courses with a grade of a B or higher, and are encouraged to take the courses early on in their studies. Students who do not receive a grade of B or higher in any AI course must retake the course. All AI requirements must be completed in residence. Transfer credits may not be used in fulfillment of AI requirements. The AI courses are listed below alongside their course number. 

  • Ethics, Security, and Global Affairs 
  • Global Governance 
  • Human Security 
  • Global Political Economy
  • International Law 
  • History of International Business
  • Global Development
  • Human Rights and Mass Atrocities

NOTE #1: M.S. students are strongly encouraged to take both a qualitative and a quantitative methodology course.

NOTE #2: Interested students can consider Internships or Independent Study as additional requirements.

NOTE #3: M.S. students must maintain a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher in all non-language courses taken at Rutgers University. If a student's academic performance falls below the expected standard, the DGA and the Graduate School-Newark may refuse the student the right of future registration and terminate studies. Students with an insufficient grade-point average may submit an appeal to the DGA Director. 

Time Limits

Students must complete their degrees within six years of admission into the M.S. program, regardless of whether students are part time or full time and regardless of whether they entered DGA with or without transfer credits. Students who fail to meet this deadline may be forced to withdraw from graduate studies at DGA.



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