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Masters Degrees (Global Food Security)

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This online distance learning Global Food Security (Food Safety) postgraduate programme will be delivered by leading research active staff within the internationally recognised Institute for Global Food Security (IGFS) based at Queen’s University Belfast. Read more
This online distance learning Global Food Security (Food Safety) postgraduate programme will be delivered by leading research active staff within the internationally recognised Institute for Global Food Security (IGFS) based at Queen’s University Belfast.

The programme will comprise modules focused on food safety and health, global food standards and legislation, analytical methods for food security, food integrity and fraud. Awards will be available at Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) level, and to Masters level following completion of a dissertation-based module.

This programme will be suitable for anyone who wants to know more about this increasingly important area, those working within the wider Agri-food industry sector including food production, processing and retail, regulatory and governmental control agencies, and research organisations.

Awards will be available at Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) level, and to Masters level following completion of a dissertation-based module.

Modern online technology and dynamic advanced audio and video tools will be employed to achieve a stimulating teaching and learning experience. This programme offers learners the opportunity to study this exciting and rapidly changing area taught by world experts within the field at their own pace (60 CATS per year) and within their chosen environment.

PgCert will cover the following modules:
- Food safety and health (30 CATS)
- Advanced analytical tools for food security (30 CATS)

PgDip will include modules in:
- Global food standards and legislation (30 CATS)
- Food integrity, fraud and traceability (30 CATS)

MSc Students will complete a research programme:
- Dissertation (60 CATS)

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This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as:

• Almost one in eight people around the world are chronically undernourished;
• Recurrent food price spikes;
• Socio-political unrest;
• Climate change;
• Land degradation;
• Scarcity of natural resources; and
• Decline in rural communities and livelihoods.

Why study Global Food Security and Development at NTU?

• Staff expertise in global agriculture, food security, environmental management, sustainability, international relations and geography
• International links with organisations such as the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly family atmosphere
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus within the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences – a leading land-based education provider for over 60 years

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This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as:

• Almost one in eight people around the world are chronically undernourished;
• Recurrent food price spikes;
• Socio-political unrest;
• Climate change;
• Land degradation;
• Scarcity of natural resources; and
• Decline in rural communities and livelihoods.

Why study Global Food Security and Development at NTU?

• Staff expertise in global agriculture, food security, environmental management, sustainability, international relations and geography
• International links with organisations such as the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly family atmosphere
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus within the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences – a leading land-based education provider for over 60 years

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• Identifying the processes and dynamics of technological and non-technological innovations in agrifood systems and assessing the impacts of such innovations on food security Dr Mofa Islam.
• Assessing the demands for emerging agrifood technologies Dr Mofa Islam.
• Analysing the characteristics of global agrifood trade networks and their role in food security Dr Mofa Islam.
• Statistical modelling of food purchasing, consumption, and waste management behaviour Dr Mofa Islam.
• Assessing the vulnerability and resilience of agrifood systems and identifying the contributing factors Dr Mofa Islam.
• Assessing the roles of social, economic and political institutions in food security Dr Mofa Islam.
• Discourse analysis of media representations of food security issues Dr Mofa Islam.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

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In this century, food security and the need to develop sustainable agriculture will become dominant issues affecting the whole world. Read more
In this century, food security and the need to develop sustainable agriculture will become dominant issues affecting the whole world. The global population is projected to increase dramatically from 7 to 9 billion in the next 30 years, causing an unprecedented demand for food and increased pressure on land. The aim of this Food Security Degree is to provide you with knowledge and skills relating to the broad topic of food security, incorporating socio-economic, animal and crop aspects.

Why this programme

-This exciting Food Security MSc is taught through collaboration between academics with world class expertise in diverse aspects of food security.
-It discusses the demographic, social and economic issues, the challenges of achieving sustainable agriculture and presents the factors affecting food production from crops and animal sources.
-The programme will include guest lectures on a range of topics and site visits.
-Students will acquire knowledge of technology transfer and commercialisation.
-Students will gain practical laboratory skills in molecular biology and in genetic modification.
-Students will undertake a project that will develop their investigative skills and their ability to critically appraise and integrate information from different sources.
-A key feature of this Food Security Degree is that it provides a very broad perspective on Food Security.

Programme structure

We welcome students from diverse educational backgrounds and we anticipate that many will be unfamiliar with all the topics in this programme. Therefore the courses will provide a general introduction to each topic and, in addition, we offer optional lectures to bring students with different backgrounds ‘up to speed’ in subjects they may not have encountered previously.

The programme starts with a discussion of fundamental issues in food security and subsequently expands on key topics, including animal food, crop improvement and the importance of insects in agriculture. You will acquire practical laboratory skills as well as the ability to critically evaluate publications and will learn about commercial issues relating to food production. Finally, you will undertake an investigative project.

The Programme comprises 11 courses:
-Introduction to Food Security
-Food Security Fundamentals: food of animal origin
-Food Security Fundamentals: crops
-Role of Insects in Food Security
-Molecular Lab Skills
-Global Animal Production
-Quantitative Methods
-Plant Genetic Engineering
-Crop Biotechnology Applications
-Technology Transfer and Commercialisation
-Food Security Project

Teaching Methods
Most courses are taught through lectures and tutorials, in which there will be discussion of key concepts and training in the critical appraisal of published information. In addition, some courses include guest lectures and site visits. The course on Technology Transfer and Commercialisation of Bioscience Research will include workshop sessions. Two courses provide training in laboratory skills: Molecular Lab Skills and Plant Genetic Engineering. The project will involve an independent investigation of a selected topic in food security under supervision from an expert in the field.

Career prospects

Food security is a major challenge of this century and hence there will be opportunities to develop careers in several areas. Career prospects includeworking in Agri-industry, research institutes, government advisory, international advisory, media and research positions.

The breadth of knowledge, understanding and skills you will acquire in this Masters Programme will help you obtain employment or undertake research in the food security sector.

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This degree focuses on food analysis and food microbiology as well as product development and quality control. You'll be taught by members of staff who are active within the Institute of Food Science and Technology, and are regularly involved in the food industry as expert consultants. Read more
This degree focuses on food analysis and food microbiology as well as product development and quality control. You'll be taught by members of staff who are active within the Institute of Food Science and Technology, and are regularly involved in the food industry as expert consultants. You'll also learn from our food business development colleagues to gain experience in the industry through work placements. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

This food science degree provides advanced study opportunities that build on your previous experience in an appropriate first degree course enabling the upgrade of existing qualifications, while also developing knowledge and skills.

The course team has particular expertise in food analysis, food microbiology and including food safety, spoilage and fermentations, product development and quality control, as well as an excellent understanding of food sustainability, food policy and nutrition.

This expertise is reflected in the range of modules offered in the MSc with analytical facilities available for study and research, and opportunities to be involved in food analysis, food product development and food manufacturing projects.

The Microbiology Research Unit team provides vital support and research topics for the dissertation element of the course and other staff members are involved in food manufacturing consultancy. London Metropolitan University has an excellent research profile, with food science staff publishing in highly rated journals and supervising PhD students appearing on radio and television as experts.

The structure of the course gives you the essential knowledge and skills for your future career. You can choose to emphasise laboratory-based subjects such as food microbiology and food analysis or areas such as quality assurance or food production and development including sensory analysis. The course develops your knowledge of food manufacturing and processing, analysis and testing packaging, storage, distribution, legal aspects, sustainability and food security.

You'll ultimately become an independent researcher or potential manager, with the ability to critically evaluate food science and apply it to new situations, following either an academic or an industrial related career path.

The assessment strategy for this course not only assesses your knowledge, understanding and abilities but provides a wide range of experience particularly in key skill areas to prepare you for your future career in different areas of the food industry.

You'll gain experience in critical analysis, literature searches, poster presentations, data handling, and analysis and practical skills. Assessments comprise of written assignments, laboratory logs and poster presentations, and there are two exams. Students undertake a research project and submit a final dissertation that is defended in an oral exam.

Professional accreditation

The course is fully accredited by the Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST). Students are encouraged to join the IFST as associate members and to attend meetings or industrial visits that the Institute organises. They may transfer to full membership after graduation and a period of professional experience. Membership of IFST allows access to specialist publications, meetings and an international network of food scientists and technologists.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Food Analysis (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Food Processing (core, 20 credits)
-Food Microbiology and Safety (core, 20 credits)
-Food Product Development and Sensory Analysis (core, 20 credits)
-Food Safety and Quality Management (core, 20 credits)
-Food Science Research Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Scientific Research Methodology (core, 20 credits)
-Food Science Industrial Placement (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The food industry is the UK’s largest manufacturing sector and there is a massive demand for qualified professionals. The skills and knowledge developed in your MSc will enhance your career opportunities in food and related industries including manufacturing, product development, marketing, environmental health, consultancy, research or education. Graduates are also well prepared for research and for postgraduate study (PhD). Interview practice with industry support and CV development is also integrated into the course.

Our recent MSc graduates have gone on to join the following positions and companies:
-Food technologist – Haydens Bakery
-Technical legislation coordinator – United Biscuits
-Process development – Bakkavor
-Technical team member – Food Partners Group
-Quality control – Nestlé
-Nutritionist and quality analyst – Krush Global
-Business development manager – Kerry Group
-Consumer technologist – Wealmoor Ltd
-Microbiology technician – GlaxoSmithKline
-Confectionary development – Sainsbury’s
-Technical team manager – Nature’s Way Foods
-Lecturers and researchers – London Metropolitan University, Coventry University, Kyushu University, University of Trinidad and Tobago, University of Melbourne

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. Read more

Local food security in a globalising world

Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. rising/falling temperatures, droughts and floods, diseases and pests), market tendencies, insufficient access to food for households, unequal distribution of resources and opportunities and inadequate food distribution channels, prevent the realisation of this idealistic and often oversimplified term.

Despite a growing number of large-scale, high-external input farms and enough food production to feed the world, post-harvest losses result in less optimal yields and (locally) produced foods are often used for other purposes, such as animal feed or biofuel. Consequentially, 795 million1 undernourished people around the globe do not have access to this lost and wasted food.

Ensuring access to food for everyone is the key to ending hunger, which will require improved collaboration between various stakeholders - producer (organisations), the private sector, governments, traders and development organisations. Structures, policies and programmes must be continuously adapted to a variety of external factors, such as the economy, environment and current social structures. Rethinking of informal rules and habits is another essential step in attaining food security, considering even members of the same household are not guaranteed equal access to food. In light of these external factors and challenges, this specialisation presents various interventions needed to combat hunger and ensure food security for everyone.

Competences

At graduation, you will have the ability to:
• define the economic, commercial and marketing needs, constraints and opportunities of those in rural communities who produce for local and regional markets
• analyse food security at a local and global level
• apply tools for diagnosing food security
• analyse the livelihoods of farmers who produce for local and regional markets and understand farmers' coping strategies
• select, explain and design an appropriate development intervention leading to food security
• develop support programmes for farmers, producers and other groups
• mainstream food security within Agricultural and rural development programmes
• define the economic, commercoal and marketing needs, constraints and oppertunities for small-scale producers in rural communities
• formulate and recommend any organisational adjustments that are needed within service-delivery organisations.

Career opportunities

Rural Development and Food Security specialists explore effective responses to mal- and undernourishment, by defining needs, constraints, coping strategies and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities. In selecting appropriate context-specific interventions, which reflect understanding of the local context in its wider context, they consider stakeholder relationships and how collaboration could be organised to each stakeholder’s benefit while helping farmers to safeguard their ability to ensure local food security. In the face of globalisation, slow economic growth and political instability, specialists may design and implement responses for (non-)governmental organisations or partners in the private sector, in the form of projects, programmes, market structures or policies.

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Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century. Read more

Programme description

Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century.

This programme is not suitable for applicants pursuing a career in food science or food safety/hygiene or related areas. Please read the programme description and ensure you understand the nature of the programme before you apply. Applicants who do not show a clear understanding of the programme will not be accepted.

Food security has become a critically important issue for societies around the globe. Interactions between demographics, changes in diet, trade liberalisation, an increased focus on conservation, technological innovations including GM crops, the impact of climate change and new responses to climate change resource limitations (particularly in terms of energy, water and nutrients) all affect food security.

With such a rapid growth in this area, there is an increasing demand for qualified experts to contribute to policy creation and legislation in food production and the supply chain.

This unique MSc offers students the scope and multidisciplinary approach to address all of these issues, as well as an understanding of the technical, agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security.

This programme is run in collaboration with Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC).

Programme structure

This MSc programme consists of six taught courses over two semesters, and an individual dissertation project of about 12,000 words.

Compulsory courses typically include*:
•Frameworks to Assess Food Security
•Sustainability of Food Production
•Interrelationships in Food Systems
•Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses*. We particularly recommend:
•Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
•Ecosystem Services 1: Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
•Foundations in Ecological Economics
•Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
•Integrated Resource Management
•Principles of Environmental Sustainability
•Soil Protection and Management
•Understanding Environment and Development
•Marine Systems and Policies
•Applications in Ecological Economics
•Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
•Integrated Resource Planning
•Interrelationships in Food Systems
•Land Use/Environmental Interactions
•Case Studies in Sustainable Development
•Ecosystem Services 2: Ecosystem Values and Management
•Environmental Impact Assessment
•Soil Science Concepts and Application

*Please note: courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change each year.

Field trip

Provisionally in Italy, the field trip provides an opportunity to apply some of the principles of food security to real world scenarios.

Learning outcomes

Students will be able to:

•Provide a broad understanding of agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security
•Apply scientific information and methods in the analysis of complex problems
•Formulate a research problem and independently carry out the research needed to produce an appropriate solution in a range of scientific or policy contexts
•Enhance their skills in specialist topics related to food security

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme typically go on to work in government and non-governmental agencies as well as international bodies and businesses where they can utilise the invaluable, and highly prized, skills they have acquired on the programme, such as food security assessment.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.
https://edingeoscistudents.wordpress.com/

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Our staff are active researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. That research informs our masters courses. As well as the usual lectures and seminars, there are practicals, lab classes, field trips and research projects. Read more

How we teach

Our staff are active researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. That research informs our masters courses. As well as the usual lectures and seminars, there are practicals, lab classes, field trips and research projects.

Facilities and equipment

A new £1m Sediment-Solute Systems lab enables geochemical analysis of aqueous and solid phases, especially in the context of biogeochemistry. We have equipment for chromatography, UV spectrometry and flow injection/auto analysis.

Our sample preparation facilities enable digestion, pre-concentration by evaporation under vacuum, and tangential flow filtration. There are alpha and gamma counters, a laser particle sizer and a luminescence dating lab. Field equipment includes automatic water samplers, weather stations, data loggers and environmental process characterisation sensors.

We have high-quality petrological microscopes for examining geological samples. We have labs for spectrometry and for palaeontological preparation, and you’ll also have access to specialist facilities in other departments at the University.

Laptops, camcorders, tape recorders and transcribers are available for your fieldwork. Our postgraduate computer labs have networked workstations for GIS research and climate modelling, ARC/INFO, ERDAS software and specialist software for remote sensing. GIS facilities are also provided by the £5m Informatics Collaboratory for the Social Sciences.

Our new postgraduate media GIS suite has facilities for Skype, video conferencing, web design, video editing and creative media.

Fieldwork

Most of our courses involve fieldwork. The MPH, MSc and MA International Development take students on a 10-day field trip where they put their research skills into practice. Recent classes visited the West Pokot region of Kenya, urban and rural areas of Nepal, the suburbs of Cairo and India.

Core modules

Theory and Debates in Food Security and Food Justice; Research Design and Methods; Food Security and Food Justice Field Course – 2015/16 Hong Kong; Dissertation with Placement; Professional Skills for Food Security and Food Justice.

Examples of optional modules

Ideas and Practice in Development; Policy and Practice; Global Politics of the Environment and Climate Change; Understanding Environmental Change; Poverty, Place and Inequality; Soil and Sustainability; Global Justice; The Politics of International Law,

Cities of Diversity; Planning for informality; Governance and Participation in the Global South; Global Social Policy and Governance; Disaster and Emergency Management; Advanced Languages 2; Open Source GIS and Spatial Data Analysis.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is delivered through a combination of workshops, lectures, seminars and practicals.

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This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. Read more
This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. You will gain an in-depth understanding of regional, national, and international standards in regulatory processes, and the role of public institutions and policy makers in delivering safe, quality foods to consumers.

This course is designed for graduates and those working in the agri-food industries who are seeking to advance their knowledge and understanding of food safety and quality management, and progress their professional careers.

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two years.

You will study eight modules, followed by the Research Project, carried out over the summer to be submitted in September. It will be presented as a review paper and as a research paper.

If you do not wish to undertake the Research Project may choose to take a Postgraduate Diploma following successful completion of eight modules.

You will learn through a combination of lectures, guest speakers, group workshops and seminars, case studies, individual and student-led research, group projects, and field studies

Students are encouraged to participate in the RAU Enterprise Scheme where they can develop their entrepreneurial skills towards starting their own business.

This course is available to start in either September or January.

September entry

Students will study four modules in the autumn term followed by four modules in the spring term, and complete their Research Project by the end of September.

January entry

Students will study four modules in the spring term, complete their Research Project by the end of September, and study four modules in the autumn term.

Modules

• 4014 Food Chain
• 4075 Research Project
• 4206 Fundamentals of Food Science
• 4207 Systems for Food Safety Management
• 4209 Sustainability and the Food industry
• 4228 New Product Development (NPD) in the Agri-Food Industry
• 4237 The Politics and Policies of Food Assurance

Plus choice of TWO modules, selected from:

• 4040 Sustainable Management of Soil and Water
• 4084 Tourism and Development
• 4110 Fisheries and Aquaculture Management
• 4201 Poverty and Food Security
• 4211 Global Red Meat Chains
• 4212 Global White Meat Chains
• 4213 Global Dairy Food Chain
• 4238 Integrated Organic Systems

Modules will be taught in 10 week blocks.

Assessment

Modules are assessed through written examinations and coursework, including case study analysis, essay writing, oral and poster presentations, and assessed seminars. For the new product development (NPD) module, students are assessed against a food product which they develop and produce in small teams. To complete this module, students are given training in the CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety for Manufacturing, which is beneficial to them post-graduation.

Career prospects

Graduates will be equipped with the education and industry experience to progress their career and become food safety and quality management professionals within:

• An international institution – UN (World Food Programme), IFAD, FAO, IFPRI etc.
• Government and statutory bodies – Defra, DflD, FSA etc.
• Business and industry – major agricultural and food supply companies, consultancy
• NGOs – local food associations, aid and development organisations
• Academia and research – lecturer, PhD

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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Food security is of critical concern globally, and the development of food systems that provide food of high quality and quantity in a sustainable way, is now a research and policy priority. Read more
Food security is of critical concern globally, and the development of food systems that provide food of high quality and quantity in a sustainable way, is now a research and policy priority.

The MSc in Agroecology and Food Security is designed to equip professionals and graduates with the knowledge to critically analyse and assess the relationships between agroecological food production and management, farming systems, climate change economics and the environment.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Run by Coventry University's Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR) whose mission is to create resilient food systems worldwide:
-Draws on the outstanding range of academic and practical expertise of CAWR staff plus world-renowned guest lecturers
-Is designed for students from a variety of different academic and professional backgrounds and from the natural and social sciences (e.g. previous experience of agriculture not necessary)
-Provides unique content in terms of its cutting edge focus on transforming the food system through alternative paradigms, concepts, and methodologies to enable real and equitable change
-Is based at the UK’s national centre for organic horticulture in 10 acres oforganic gardens

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The course will provide you with the knowledge of the major agricultural production systems found in different parts of the world and the main theoretical approaches to understanding contemporary food systems.

The course covers a range of subject areas including:
-Food security
-Agroecological production systems
-Clean energy, climate and carbon
-Agroecological techniques and practices
-Stabilisation agriculture
-Management of natural and environmental hazards
-Environmental impact assessment
-Ecological management and assessment
-International environmental law
-Remote sensing and digital image analysis
-Project management

For each module, teaching normally takes the form of weekly 'face-to-face' contact at the University (including lectures, workshops, seminars and exercises) throughout each semester, with associated directed and self directed study, which may be undertaken off-campus.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

All students undertake an individual research project, which may be associated with an appropriate organisation or company in the UK or overseas. Equipped with a detailed understanding of food systems and a range of appropriate practical skills your potential for employment will be strong.

Opportunities present themselves in national and international government agencies, non governmental policy, research and development organisations, the private sector including food companies and the farming sector.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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Delivering global food security is one of the critical challenges of the 21st century. Each nation needs to balance local and national production with imports and consider the environmental and economic impact of their policies. Read more
Delivering global food security is one of the critical challenges of the 21st century. Each nation needs to balance local and national production with imports and consider the environmental and economic impact of their policies. This MSc draws together critical components such as the contribution of climate change, biodiversity, water, soil, land use, labour, nutrition transition and urbanisation. The course will appeal if you want to influence global food security and enjoy contributing to cutting-edge research.

The course is science-led, but includes options in business, social sciences and international environmental law, which provide insight to contemporary food production systems. You’ll undertake seven core modules (Crop Physiology & Production; Advances in Crop Protection; Soil, Water & Plant Mineral Nutrition; Climate Change; Environmental Accounting; Organic & Low Input Systems; Challenges of Global Food Security) and up to three further optional modules. You’ll also undertake a laboratory- or desk-based project or a placement at a host organisation.

You’ll leave prepared for a career in a wide range of public and commercial enterprises such as government agencies, NGOs, food businesses and consultancies related to food production and the supply chain.

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There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. Read more

Food security: a global concern

There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. The Royal Society report Reaping the Benefits: science and the sustainable intensification of global agriculture published in October 2009, provided the clearest evidence of the challenge of ensuring global food security during the next 50 years. Crop yields need to rise significantly, but in a manner that requires much lower dependency on chemical intervention and fertilisers.

Meeting the challenge of sustainable agriculture

This programme was developed in collaboration with the agricultural industry, government agencies including Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), and farmers and food manufacturers, to provide a multi-disciplinary training in sustainable agriculture and global food security. Research-led teaching in molecular plant pathology, plant sciences and microbiology is strongly supplemented by Rothamsted Research, North Wyke expertise in grassland management, soil science and sustainable farming systems. Leading social scientists also provide valuable input in rural land use and the rural economy. The combination of expertise in both arable and pastureland systems ensures a truly rounded learning experience.

The curriculum takes account of the key skills shortages in the UK to train highly skilled individuals who can enter government agencies, agriculture and food industries and fulfil very valuable roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security. The programme provides opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences including field trips.

Expert teaching

Teaching is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry. Scientific staff from Fera provide specialist lectures as part of the Crop Security module, members of the Plant Health Inspectorate cover field aspects of plant pathology, and a LEAF1 farmer addresses agricultural systems and the realities of food production using integrated farm management. In addition, teaching staff from the University and BBSRC Rothamsted-North Wyke will draw on material and experiences from their academic research and scientific links with industry.

Industrial and practical experience

All students will have opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences. Teaching visits will be made to the Plant Health Inspectorate in Cornwall to see quarantine management of Phytophthora, and to a local LEAF farm to review the challenges and approaches to food production in integrated farm management systems. You will gain specialised experience in practical science or policy making through a dissertation or project placement with external agencies. Defra and Fera, for example, are offering five dissertation and/or project placements annually.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of modules. The list of modules may include the following; Professional Skills; Research Project; Sustainable Land Use in Grassland Agriculture; Crop Security; Sustainable Livestock and Fisheries; Political Economy of Food and Agriculture and Research and Knowledge Transfer for Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. Please see the website for an up to date list (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/biosciences/foodsecurity/#Programme-structure)

Addressing a skills shortage to tackle global food security

The MSc Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture curriculum has been designed in collaboration with the agricultural industry to tackle the skills shortage that exists in this vital interdisciplinary area. This programme will provide the highly skilled individuals required in government agencies, agriculture and food industries for critical roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security.

Global horizons

With food security and sustainable agriculture a global concern, opportunities for specialists in the areas of agronomy, plant pathology, plant disease and plant improvement will be worldwide. By combining expertise across the natural, social and political sciences, this programme provides valuable interdisciplinary knowledge and skills in both arable and pastureland systems. Graduates will be prepared to take on the global challenges of food security and sustainable agriculture, being able to adapt to farming systems across the world and identify cross-disciplinary solutions to local agricultural problems.

Learning enhanced by industry

The programme is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry, with specialist lectures, teaching visits to observe the practical application of techniques, and industrial placement opportunities for project work or dissertations in practical science or policy making.

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The MSc Advanced Food Safety programme at QUB is tailored towards students who aim to or currently work within the agri-food sector. Read more
The MSc Advanced Food Safety programme at QUB is tailored towards students who aim to or currently work within the agri-food sector. It will offer the opportunity to obtain a unique qualification in the field of food safety delivered by research-active scientists within the Institute for Global Food Security.

The major focus of the programme will be on new and emerging issues within the diverse field of food safety and it will concentrate on developments in analytical approaches used to monitor and regulate food safety with the view to protect human health.

Key topics covered will include: food fraud and traceability and the analytical methods used to detect fraud and ensure food safety and authenticity; the links between environmental chemical contaminants and biological hazards present in animal feed and human food - highlighting new emerging technologies that enable rapid and early detection of food safety incidents and diagnosis of animal diseases.

QUB MSc Advanced Food Safety Video: http://www.mediator.qub.ac.uk/ms/Food/FoodSec.wmv

Content

Advanced Food Bioanalysis
Bio-entrepreneurship and Advanced Skills
Agri-food Traceability and Fraud
Food Safety, Health and Disease
Foundations for Research in the Biosciences
Literature Review
Research Project (triple module)

Assessment

Continuous assessment of coursework, examinations, and assessment of modules based solely on submitted work related to private individual study. A MSc will be awarded with Distinction to students who achieve a dissertation and average mark both exceeding 70 per cent, and with Commendation for marks over 60 per cent.

Opportunities for Careers

Excellent opportunities exist within agri-food companies, diagnostic research companies and regulatory testing laboratories. Graduates will also be in a position to progress to further PhD level research study.

Special Features

A major component will include the completion of a laboratory-based, food safety related research project within the Institute for Global Food Security, offering the opportunity to gain practical experience in the use of conventional and emerging bioanalytical technology platforms.

Facilities and capabilities include:
Biosensor instrumentation
Cell culture and microbiological suites
GC, HPLC and UPLC systems
Proteomic and metabolomic profiling
ICP, GC, qToF and QqQ mass spectrometers
Spectroscopic analysis
Real time PCR and surface plasmon resonance biosensor technology

Additional information for International students

http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/StudyatQueens/InternationalStudents/

Applicants who are non-EEA nationals must satisfy the UK Border Agency (UKBA) immigration requirements for English language for visa purposes, by providing evidence of an IELTS* score of 6.0, with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University.

*Taken within the last 2 yrs.

Please see http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs for more information on English Language requirements for EEA and non-EEA nationals.


Up to date information on course fees can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/finance/TuitionFees/

The University provides information on possible sources of awards which is available at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/PostgraduateCentre/PostgraduateFunding/

Information on the Institute for Global Food Security at Queen’s University Belfast can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/InstituteforGlobalFoodSecurity/



Visit the MSc Advanced Food Safety page on the Queen’s University Belfast web site for more details! (http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/InstituteforGlobalFoodSecurity/Education/PostgraduateStudies/MScAdvancedFoodSafety/)

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The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. It tackles policy and regulatory change, the historical and technological evolution of energy sources, energy markets and their participants, the global governance of climate change as well as the challenges associated with transitioning to a low-carbon economy.

The programme specifically addresses the requirements of those wishing to deepen their theoretical and practical understanding of how energy and climate policies are designed, shaped, advocated and implemented and by whom across a multitude of cases drawn from the Global North and South and across multiple levels of political organisation from global to local arenas.

The MSc is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy. It prepares for a multitude of careers in public and private contexts, including in public administration and government departments, strategic policy and risk advisory, government relations and public affairs, policy advocacy, think tanks and academia.

Guest speakers on the programme's modules have included Angus Miller (Energy Advisor, UK Foreign Office), Tom Burke (Founding Director, E3G and Environmental Policy Advisor, Rio Tinto), Jonathan Grant (Asst. Director Sustainability and Climate Change, PwC), Kash Burchett (European Energy Analyst, IHS Global Insight), Chris Dodwell (AEA Technology, former Head of International Climate Policy, UK Department of Energy and Climate Change) and Andrew Pendleton (Head of Campaigns, Friends of the Earth).

The programme draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. In particular, students will be able to benefit from the expertise located at the Centre for Environment, Development and Policy (CEDEP), the Law School's Law, Environment and Development Centre (LEDC), the Centre on the Politics of Energy Security (CEPES), the Centre for Water and Development, and the SOAS Food Studies Centre.

In addition to the three core modules of Global Energy and Climate Policy (1 unit), Applied Energy and Climate Studies (0.5 units) and Global Public Policy (0.5 units) students choose a fourth module to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Paris and Brussels.

Programme objectives

- Excellent understanding of the nature and development of global energy and climate policy, drawing on a variety of contributing disciplines

- Excellent knowledge of regulatory challenges and their impact on public and private stakeholders in both the Global South and North

- Ability to critically contribute to contemporary policy debates about reforms of international energy and climate governance architectures and their interaction with national and sub-national policy and regulatory frameworks

- Development of practical skills including policy analysis and policy advocacy, risk analysis, strategic communication and media

We welcome applications from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds. It is not necessary to have a degree in a discipline directly related to global energy and climate policy.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Listen to the MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy and CISD's 1st Annual Energy and Climate Change Conference (May 2011) podcast (http://www.4shared.com/mp3/EdRUc-qq/CISD_Energy_and_Climate_Change.html), organised by students.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/2016 (pdf; 172kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/file80890.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full time employment. Participants may choose a combination of courses to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the courses for Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) accessible to part time students. The majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00 where possible however lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some courses (between evening and daytime slots) so that part time students will have access to as many courses as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each GECP course taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:

- Theory and practice of global energy and climate change policy as intertwined global issues

- Practical toolkit including policy analysis and planning, risk analysis, strategic communication, policy advocacy and negotiation skills

- Interaction with policymakers and government officials, energy industry and NGO representatives, and other practitioners

- An elective from a wide range: International Relations, International Law, International Economics, International Security, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a course offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law)

Further activities:

Also included in the degree programme:

- Week-long study trip to energy and climate change related organisations in Brussels and Paris
- Advanced media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Participation in workshops attended by public and private sector stakeholders
- Opportunity to organize and run the Centre’s annual Energy and Climate Policy conference
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners (visit the CISD website (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/all-audios/1) to listen to the podcasts)

This course is also available online and is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy and who wish to study in a flexible way. Please click here to view more information http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy-online/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The course will provide students with a detailed understanding of the principles and processes of sustainable food production, including its social and environmental contexts. Read more
The course will provide students with a detailed understanding of the principles and processes of sustainable food production, including its social and environmental contexts. It will equip students who already have work experience in the food supply chain to implement the latest research into sustainable systems thinking, and will facilitate cutting edge careers for those who want to enter the food production and supply chain.

The Food Security in the Changing Environment MSc has been created with funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the Advanced Training Partnership (ATP). Please visit the ATP website. Please also visit the Aberystwyth MSc website offering the MSc in Sustainable and Efficient Food Production. Modules from the Bangor MSc and the Aberystwyth MSc can be interchangeable between the two programmes. Bursaries are available for those employed in the UK agri-food industry.

Students studying the course will:

Examine the environmental, economic and social responsibility of farming in the context of food security and the changing environments.
Study how selected management practices can improve the resource-efficiency and overall sustainability of food production.
Gain a global perspective to question whether and how growing demand for food from limited land resources can be met through sustainable intensification.
Students will have the opportunity to study from 3 to 6 modules per year, depending on their status as part time or full time students. For the Masters degree, students will complete a total of 6 modules of study, detailed below, and a dissertation project.

Students may begin their study at the beginning of any module, either at the end of September, the end of January or the middle of May.

In the event of compulsory modules changing from year to year, existing students may choose from either the compulsory modules extant at the time of registration, or the new ones, and are advised to discuss their options with the Course Director.

Professionals in the agri-food industry, conservation and environment, farmers, and agricultural policy decision makers may be interested in the modules of this degree, as will full-time students wishing to pursue a post graduate degree that culminates in employability in these sectors.

Teaching and learning is supported by study guides with journal articles, online lectures, podcasts, and discussion forums. The wide range of backgrounds and expertise of staff and students make a hugely enriching learning experience.

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