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The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe. ‌This course is for people who want to develop a specialism in glass, making use of the outstanding facilities at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland. Read more
The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe.

Course overview

‌This course is for people who want to develop a specialism in glass, making use of the outstanding facilities at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland. We don’t require previous study of glass, but most students have experience in a subject related to art and design.

This course will help you develop a synergy of creative ideas and technical skills. You might focus on one of the three main areas: hot glass, kiln glass, or architectural glass - or combine approaches, and in doing so establish yourself as a professional glass artist. You will be using world-class facilities, and have access to 26 glass kilns, a state-of-the-art water-jet cutter, a hot glass workshop, two cold working studios, a glass mould-making workshop, architectural glass studio and glass and ceramics print studio.

We do not have a ‘house style’; instead, you will be encouraged and supported to develop your own focus. You will be encouraged to develop your independent creativity, improve your technical skills through expert support, and develop academic skills in research and communication.

During the course, we encourage you to develop your personal practice through studio work, critical studies, professional practice, research, critiques, analysis and questioning.

You’ll be joining the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe, made up of an international team of creative and experienced educators and practitioners. All academic staff on this course are engaged in professional practice or research, and tutors’ specialisms include glassblowing, print for glass, kiln forming, and digital fabrication methods.

Sunderland also hosts the Institute for International Research in Glass (IIRG), which promotes and facilitates glass research, develops new working methods and informs teaching. The IIRG has a lively visiting speaker programme of invited professional artists and curators, and also organises conferences, master classes, exhibitions and specialist training.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/glass-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Glass 1
-Glass – Self-negotiated Project (20 Credits)
-Studio Work (20 Credits)
-Critical Studies (20 Credits)

Glass 2
-Glass – Self-negotiated Project (20 Credits)
-Studio Work (20 Credits)
-Critical Studies (20 Credits)

Glass 3
-Glass - Exhibition and Contextual Report (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques, workshops and practical demonstrations. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

We organise field trips so that you can experience international work in your field. Destinations include cities such as Prague, Berlin and New York.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe, with one of the world’s best-equipped studios for creative glassmaking.

Facilities for this course include:
-26 glass kilns, including a large glass casting kiln
-Hot glass workshop with international-quality equipment
-Glass mould-making workshop
-Cold working studio for sandblasting, cutting, grinding and polishing
-Architectural glass studio
-Printing facility for glass, ceramics and other surfaces
-Water-jet machine/Computer Aided Design
-Lampworking workshop
-Computer suite and project space
-Project and exhibition space
-Multi-function creative and social space
-Arts and Design Library

Journals and research
We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources for your course are:
-Key Glass and Ceramics magazines and journals
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for arts information
-Design and Applied Arts Index, which covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences

National Glass Centre
The Glass and Ceramics Department is based in the National Glass Centre, a nationally recognised glass production and exhibition centre with a world-class programme of creative projects.

Studying here puts you at the heart of an international network of professionals in the glass sector. You will be exposed to the latest ways of working through visiting artists and designers, and you can become involved in exhibitions that help launch your career.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles throughout the creative industries.

Many recent Sunderland glass graduates are now working as independent artists with their own workshops and are successful practitioners of glass art around the world.

Our graduates exhibit in venues such as the British Glass Biennale, SOFA Chicago, the European Glass Context, COLLECT at Saatchi Gallery, and the Bombay Sapphire Prize in Milan, and they have been published in texts including Contemporary Glass (Black Dog) and Corning Museum of Glass’s New Glass Review.

Some graduates have moved on to lecturing positions at universities around the world or have chosen to move into other areas, including ceramics, painting, sculpture, jewellery, architecture, interior design, engineering and photography.

During the course we encourage you to gain industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability. This experience can take the form of working on live commissions, entering competitions and exhibiting work in public exhibitions.

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Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Read more
Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Recent technological advances provide continuing opportunities for creative application. Its unique properties of transparency and interaction with light gives MA Glass students the opportunity to explore new possibilities and build specialist knowledge as a material for the future.

Course Overview

The MA Glass programme within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Master's Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork.

In this century, glass as a material offers a unique place in design and architecture and there are very few institutions that offer the opportunity to explore this material, with particular reference to its applications in architecture. Swansea glass department has a long established reputation for glass and strong industrial links help underpin the educational experience for students. The history of the department enables a broad spectrum of approaches that draw on the historical, cultural and technological uses of this material. Glass in its many forms; mosaic, glaze, enamel and window façade covers a broad association of surfaces, which offers for the maker a rich and varied pallet. This is a hands-on course!

The main strands of the programme are: design and philosophy, material innovation and glass design. These themes are considered in the context of glass for the environment, to fulfill the need to develop innovative, sustainable and possibly universal solutions for a variety of architectural, public and private spaces.

The programme prides itself in newly equipped workshops that provide excellent specialist facilities including sandblasters, acid etching bay, cold working machinery, screen printing facilities for glass and an extensive range of glass and ceramic kilns for casting and decorative processing. Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suites and workshops in other areas within the art school such as wood, metal, ceramics, 3D printing and water jet and laser cutting.

The teaching team consists of highly experienced glass artists and designers who are either engaged in professional practice or are research active, supported by industrially trained technical staff. This ensures that the course delivers a qualification and experience that is highly relevant to the changing needs of the industry and wider architectural glass community.

The department works closely with the Architectural Glass Centre, which often supports and advises the students on live commissions and commercial work. We also work with the CIRIC research centre within the faculty, with 2 members of this research centre specialising in glass. This provides research opportunities and access to high technology resources giving the students opportunities to link with creative industries infrastructure in the region as a potential starting point for future employment.

With an eighty year history the glass department benefits from strong support from Alumni and the local glass community as well as networks and connections from world-renowned glass artists.

Assessment

The main modes of assessment used on this programme are; studio projects, written assignments and seminar presentations.

Assessment at postgraduate level is reflected by your ability to reformulate and use relevant methodologies and approaches to address problematic situations that involve many interacting factors. It includes taking responsibility for planning and developing courses of action that initiate or underpin substantial change or development, as well as exercising broad autonomy and judgement. It should also reflect an understanding of the relevant theoretical and methodological perspectives and how they affect your area of study or work.

Career Opportunities

Students from the Master's Programme have gone on to many varied careers within the Architectural Glass Industry, Glass Studios, teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Many have continued to practice as designers and artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

Possible career pathways have included:
-Establishing yourself as an artist, designer or maker
-Setting up a studio as a sole supplier or in a partnership with others
-Employed in specialist glass studios
-Engaging in freelance work on architectural and interiors projects
-Designing for industry or working in the glass industry
-Working on private and public commissions
-Working on art projects and community projects
-Other opportunities include arts administration, curating, teaching and mentoring, community work and arts editorial
-Continuation of studies to postgraduate level on our MA programme
-Further academic research leading to MPhil, or PhD is available

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MA Design – Glass is concerned with the development of advanced craft and design practice. Glass activity within a contemporary context should be considered as a prospective and not prescriptive pursuit so the question ‘What can a contemporary glass practice be?’ is particularly relevant. Read more
MA Design – Glass is concerned with the development of advanced craft and design practice. Glass activity within a contemporary context should be considered as a prospective and not prescriptive pursuit so the question ‘What can a contemporary glass practice be?’ is particularly relevant.

The flexible nature of the programme not only allows the development of advanced practice within a discreet glass related area but also and importantly, encourages the cross fertilisation of ideas, preoccupations and practices.

Course Content

he MA Design: Glass is made up of four units totalling 180 credits.

The programme is designed to help you acclimatise to the challenges of MA level research and practice, enabling you to identify and describe a clear direction for your postgraduate design study.

You will be encouraged to develop design propositions that encompass key design issues and have complexity and ambition, taking full consideration of the relative contextual drivers.

You will also be encouraged and supported to extend your experience in the professional sphere either through a practical project, research context, exchange, work experience, or other negotiated professional set of interactions with an external partner, groups of students and creative industry.

Towards the end of the programme you will undertake a major project to consolidate your past research and practice into fully realised collections, pieces, proposals, business plans, or exhibitions – what ever means is appropriate to the work. You will also have developed a strategy for the continuation of your practice located and contextualised to the profession or discipline.

If you choose to progress to MFA Design: Glass award you will study a further two units of 60 credits each.

This route is focused on the continuation of your practice aligned to the research and selection of appropriate public or professional venues and platforms to disseminate a significant body of work. You will be required to produce work for a public audience in the most relevant and appropriate form along with any implicit publicity and dissemination material.

Special Features

Access to an extensive range of glass studios and workshops and to a broad range of other three dimensional design and craft cultures, including those related to the design and/or making of domestic products, furniture, glass and jewellery.

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Glass is a medium that crosses a range of disciplines and is used by artists, craftspeople and designers alike. This award-winning programme explores glass as a design tool that encourages process-led risk and play, in parallel with the prototyping and resolution of designed objects. Read more

Programme description

Glass is a medium that crosses a range of disciplines and is used by artists, craftspeople and designers alike. This award-winning programme explores glass as a design tool that encourages process-led risk and play, in parallel with the prototyping and resolution of designed objects.

Courses cover contemporary design issues including material narratives, interdisciplinary crossover and post-digital practices, as well as studio and client-based projects.

You will focus on the materiality of glass, explore new boundaries through the integrated relationship between process and theory, and be encouraged to position yourself within and beyond the disciplines of glass.

This programme is unique in Scotland and ECA is one of the few centres of excellence in this discipline in the UK. Comprehensive glass and plaster workshops are complemented by state-of-the-art digital fabrication labs, woodwork, metalwork and bronze foundry, enabling you to experience the complete design journey from conception to the production of glass at the highest level.

You will benefit from visiting professional practitioners and lecturers and will have the opportunity to participate in live projects and competitions. The curriculum combines programme and student-led activity, delivered through workshops, group seminars and individual tutorials.

You will negotiate and develop a programme of study based on personal areas of practice-based research. We foster interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments creating a unique student experience and rich opportunities for learning.

Programme structure

This programme combines directed and self-directed practice-based studio projects with theoretical and written studies, including professional practice elements to prepare you for employment in the industry, and a lecture/seminar series to examine the wider context of your studies.

The programme focuses on providing the tools of craft and design through comprehensive professional practice workshops, focused on the specific requirements of the designer maker. You will produce a body of practical and written work on an agreed, self-initiated project. MFA students produce an additional extended body of work.

Career opportunities

As a graduate you will discover a diverse range of career opportunities. Alumni have worked within the production of individual designed objects, as lead designers within industry, as gallery representation, on commissioned major public artworks, and in teaching and leading positions within creative practices.

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-glass. The MFA in glass is a two-year program of study that develops students personal creative voice through intensive research, discussion, critique, and experimentation. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-glass

The MFA in glass is a two-year program of study that develops students personal creative voice through intensive research, discussion, critique, and experimentation. Students are provided full access to a complete glass facility and individual studio space to strengthen their technique and to practice designing pieces that flourish their personal expression of the medium. Graduate studio courses, seminar courses, and in-depth critiques are offered in conjunction with thesis planning and implementation to provide students with a deep understanding of this personal craft. Students are exposed to a broad range of critical issues related to the conception and production of art, to inspire and provoke critical reflection and facilitate the development of a thesis exhibition and supporting documentation.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in glass, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of arts, sciences, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (the undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses),

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) will be accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. Applicants coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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This innovative programme, the first of its kind in the English-speaking world, offers an integrated study of stained glass and its conservation, meeting a perceived need internationally for a qualification in this field. Read more
This innovative programme, the first of its kind in the English-speaking world, offers an integrated study of stained glass and its conservation, meeting a perceived need internationally for a qualification in this field. Our graduates are now leading figures in the discipline in the UK, Germany, Belgium and the USA.

The programme is taught in partnership with the Department of Archaeology.

Aims

Our aim is to offer training for a variety of employment in stained glass conservation, but also in cultural heritage management, arts administration, museums, and the administration of historic buildings.

The programme may also be preparation for higher research degrees.

Curriculum

This is a two-year programme, including four terms of taught courses, with two modules per term, a sixteen-week placement, and a five-month dissertation. Modules are devoted to basic and advanced techniques of glass conservation. Other fields of study include the history, ethics and the philosophy of conservation, international issues in conservation, art and architectural history, archaeology, conservation and the impact of climate change, and heritage and business administration. There will be a free choice of art-historical or archaeological modules in the spring term of the second year. In each taught term a masterclass addressing current issues and new research will be conducted by a visiting lecturer.

Placements

Leading conservation studios, museums and heritage institutions in Britain, Europe and the United States host placements, providing invaluable work experience, and networks for future careers.

Study tour

Every other year, usually in the Easter vacation, students will have the chance to join a European study tour, visiting major stained glass sites, and leading conservation practices.

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Our MA Glass course is a project led and studio based course with tutorial guidance, where you'll create individual excellence through rigorous research including practical and theoretical investigation. Read more
Our MA Glass course is a project led and studio based course with tutorial guidance, where you'll create individual excellence through rigorous research including practical and theoretical investigation. We encourage a wide range of approaches, from the traditional specialist trades to the contemporary influences of art, craft, design and technology.

Our course guides design professionals and graduates in the further development of their skills and experience within the crafts and design industries. Taught alongside our MA Ceramics, MA Metalwork and MA Jewellery courses, these courses are for highly motivated and talented people who wish to work at the forefront of their creative discipline.

On our MA Glass course you'll benefit from teaching by leading specialist designers, artists and crafts people. And you'll receive the opportunity to make objects, experiment with a range of materials and processes, and develop your creative thinking.

Throughout the course, you'll also get to work closely alongside other fields such as textiles, jewellery, metalwork and ceramics. This enables you to broaden your knowledge and incorporate elements from other disciplines into your work.

Our Farnham campus provides extraordinary facilities with extensive workshops and equipment to support your study. It's also home to the Crafts Study Centre - a purpose-built museum, research centre and gallery dedicated to crafts.

Facilities

UCA Farnham provides first-rate facilities with extensive workshops and equipment to support your study. It's also home to the Crafts Study Centre - a purpose-built museum, research centre and gallery dedicated to crafts.

Industry Partners

Our course has excellent links with industry specialists, and can assist with the provision of work placements.

Our connections include:
-Bullseye Glass Company
-The New Ashgate Gallery Trust (based in Farnham)

Careers

This course will equip you with a host of valuable and transferable skills. Upon successful completion, you might decide to become a self-employed artist or forge a career within the craft and design industries, for example.

Recent graduates work as:
-Artists
-Designers
-Makers
-Arts administrators
-Gallery curators
-Teachers
-Writers

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The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe. ‌This course is for people who want to develop a specialism in ceramics, making use of the outstanding facilities at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland. Read more
The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe.

Course overview

‌This course is for people who want to develop a specialism in ceramics, making use of the outstanding facilities at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland. We don’t require previous study of ceramics, but most students have experience in a subject related to art and design.

This programme is for individuals who wish to develop both their practice and critical understanding with regards to ceramics. The subject is explored and contextualized in its widest sense through both practical and theoretical investigation and application, where a deeper knowledge and understanding of ceramics is developed from its vernacular sensibilities to the expanded field of possibilities.

We do not have a ‘house style’; instead, you will develop your own focus with expert support from both academic and technical staff. You will be encouraged to develop your independent creativity, improve your technical and theoretical skills, and develop academic skills in research and communication.

You’ll be joining the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe, made up of an international team of creative and experienced educators and practitioners. All academic staff on this course are engaged in professional practice or research and are at the forefront of their discipline.

Sunderland is a thriving research hub and hosts the Ceramics Arts Research Centre (CARCuos), which aims to develop, support and disseminate new knowledge and scholarly activity whilst also providing a platform both practically and theoretically for discussion aligned to the ceramic arts.

Graduates from Sunderland have gone on to work throughout the creative industries. MA graduates have also wished to extend their work through a research degree either at MPhil or PhD level and continue studies within CARCuos the ceramic arts research centre at the University.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/ceramics-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Ceramics 1 (60 Credits)
-Ceramics – Self-negotiated Study 1
-Studio Work and Critical Studies

Ceramics 2 (60 Credits)
-Ceramics – Self-negotiated Study 2
-Studio work and Critical Studies

Ceramics 3 (60 Credits)
-The final stage of the course is focused on a public exhibition of work

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques, workshops and practical demonstrations. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

Facilities & location

Facilities for this course include:
-13 ceramic kilns and two large gas kilns
-Ceramics mould-making and glaze workshops
-Printing facility for ceramics, glass and other surfaces
-Decal printer
-Project and exhibition space
-Multi-function creative and social space
-Lampworking and future light workshop
-Computer suite and project space
-Arts and Design Library
-Journals and research

We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources for your course are:
-Key Glass and Ceramics magazines and journals
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for arts information
-Design and Applied Arts Index, which covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences

National Glass Centre
The Glass and Ceramics Department is based in National Glass Centre, a nationally recognised glass production and exhibition centre with a world-class programme of creative projects.

Studying here puts you at the heart of an international network of professionals in the ceramics sector. You will be exposed to the latest ways of working through visiting artists and designers, and you can become involved in exhibitions that help launch your career.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course you will be equipped for roles throughout the creative industries.

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working as self-employed practitioners as well as being employed in arts administration and education.

During the course we encourage you to gain professional industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability.

The University has close links with arts organisations including Arts Council England, the BALTIC, Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art, Tyne and Wear Museums Service and Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art. We also have international links in USA, China and Czech Republic.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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The focus of postgraduate study in Design and Applied Arts is to consider your current and past practice and recognise the opportunities that exist for research, material investigation and professional development. Read more
The focus of postgraduate study in Design and Applied Arts is to consider your current and past practice and recognise the opportunities that exist for research, material investigation and professional development.

The aim is to provide a framework that will guide your enquiry within your subject specialism.

Subject specialisms:

Ceramics

Glass

Interior Design

Fashion

Textiles

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Scientific analysis is a key tool in the interpretation of archaeological artefact and assemblages. Read more
Scientific analysis is a key tool in the interpretation of archaeological artefact and assemblages. This MSc offers detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of archaeological and heritage materials, and a solid background in the archaeology and anthropology of technology allowing students to design and implement archaeologically meaningful scientific projects.

Degree information

This degree aims to bridge the gap between archaeology and science by integrating both a detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of inorganic archaeological materials and a solid background in the anthropology of technology. By the end of the degree, students should have a good understanding of the foundations of the most established analytical techniques, practical experience in their application and data processing, as well as the ability to design research projects that employ instrumental analyses to address archaeological questions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Laboratory and instrumental skills in archaeological science

Optional modules - you are then able to choose further optional modules to the value of 75 credits. At least 15 credits must be made up from the following:
-Technology within Society
-Archaeological Data Science

At least 30 credits must be made up from the following list below:
-Technology within Society
-Archaeological Data Science
-Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Archaeometallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Metallurgy
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Geoarchaeology: Methods and Concepts
-Interpreting Pottery
-Working with Artefacts and Assemblages

In order to allow for a flexible curriculum, students are allowed to select up to 30 credits from any of the postgraduate courses offered at the UCL Institute of Archaeology under other Master's degrees.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations and laboratory work. A popular aspect of this programme is its extensive use of analytical facilities. Assessment is through essays, practicals, projects, laboratory reports and oral presentations depending on the options chosen, and the dissertation.

Careers

Given our strong emphasis on research training, many of our MSc graduates take up further research positions after their degree, and over half of our MSc students progress to PhD research. Their projects are generally concerned with the technology and/or provenance of ceramics, metals or glass in different regions and periods, but most of them involve scientific approaches in combination with traditional fieldwork and/or experimental archaeology.

Some of our graduates are now teaching archaeometry or ancient technologies at different universities in the UK and abroad. Others work as conservation scientists in museums and heritage institutions, or as finds specialists, researchers and consultants employed by archaeological field units or academic research projects.

Employability
Due largely to an unparalleled breadth of academic expertise and laboratory facilities, our graduates develop an unusual combination of research and transferable skills, including critical abilities, team working, multimedia communication, numerical thinking and the use of advanced analytical instruments. On completion of the degree, graduates should be as comfortable in a laboratory as in a museum and or an archaeological site. They become acquainted with research design and implementation, ethical issues and comparative approaches to world archaeology through direct exposure to an enormous variety of projects. The range of options available allows students to tailor their pathways towards different career prospects in archaeology and beyond.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK. Its specialist staff, outstanding library and fine teaching and reference collections provide a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The excellent in-house laboratory facilities will provide direct experience of a wide range of techniques, including electron microscopy and microphone analysis, fixed and portable X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy, petrography and metallography under the supervision of some of the world's leading specialists.

The institute houses fine teaching and reference collections that are extensively used by MSc students including ceramics, metals, stone artefacts and geological materials from around the world. In addition, the institute has a wide network of connections to museums and ongoing projects offering research opportunities for MSc students.

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The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science course. It'll allow you to qualify as a court-going forensic scientist, as well as preparing you for many alternative careers that require problem-solving and analysis. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science course. It'll allow you to qualify as a court-going forensic scientist, as well as preparing you for many alternative careers that require problem-solving and analysis.

You’ll graduate with relevant practical skills combined with analytical and investigative thinking.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/forensicscience/

You’ll study:

- crime investigation and legal processes
- criminalistics (eg shoe marks)
- forensic chemistry (fires, explosives, glass, paint)
- toxicology and drugs of abuse (cannabis, heroin cocaine etc)
- forensic biology (body fluid analysis, blood pattern interpretation)
- trace evidence and fibre examination
- questioned documents
- interpretation of evidence

You’ll become an effective analyst, develop strong written and verbal communication skills and develop knowledge of:
- common separation techniques (thin layer, HPLC and gas chromatography)
- modern spectroscopic methods (infra-red, ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence)
- DNA profiling
- crime scene investigation


MSc students will undertake a three-month project.

The eight-month Postgraduate Diploma course is similar to the MSc, but does not include the three-month project.

Facilities

Teaching takes place in the Centre for Forensic Science. It’s a modern purpose-built laboratory for practical forensic training, designed and equipped for ultra-clean working for the avoidance of cross contamination.

Teaching staff

Staff are experienced researchers in forensic science who are internationally recognised. The Centre for Forensic Science offers a unique learning experience, combining ‘case-based’ learning with research-led teaching.

- Practitioner Lecture Series
This course offers the unique experience of gaining first-hand accounts of forensics in action through our practitioner and forensic related professionals lecture series.

Well renowned practitioners and professionals providing these lectures include:
- Professor Peter Gill, Professor of Forensic Science, University of Oslo
- PD Dr rer nat Marielle Vennemann, Institute of Legal Medicine, University of Münster
- Dr Cerys Rees, Fellow, CB Analysis and Attribution, DSTL
- Dr John Jenner, Principal Toxicologist, DSTL
- Ciara Holland, Consultant Fire Investigator at BRE (Building Research Establishment Global Ltd)
- Jim Govan a retired Firearm Examiner at the Scottish Policing Authority and Terminal Ballistic Consultant to Deer Commission Scotland (now Scottish Natural Heritage)
- Alan Gall, Former Chief Superintendent and Divisional Commander, Strathclyde Police
- Graham Cairns, Former Chief Superintendent and Divisional Commander, Strathclyde Police

Accreditation

The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences is a professional body with members in over 60 countries and is one of the oldest and largest forensic associations in the world.

Its aim is to set high educational standards through the review and accreditation of courses that contain forensic science.

Additional MSc requirements

- IELTS 6.5 is required for all non-English speakers
- entry is competitive and students are selected on the basis of academic ability and previous experience
- final selection decisions are made by the academic selector and successful applicants will be notified
- in the course of forensic examinations, there is a potential for exposure to body fluids from hepatitis sufferers and prospective students should consider hepatitis immunisation (this takes from four to six months to be effective)

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Assessment

Assessment consists of written submission, practical work assessments and oral presentations. Practical work is continually assessed and counts towards the award of the degree.

The award of MSc is based upon 180 credits, while the award of PgDip is based upon 120 credits.

Careers

Most forensic scientists in the UK are employed by the police, government bodies such as Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST) and private companies who provide forensic science services to the police.

Most of the work is laboratory-based but experienced forensic scientists may have to attend crime scenes and give evidence in court.

How much will I earn?

Starting salaries are around £20,000 a year and can increase to £35,000 with experience. Senior forensic scientists can earn £45,000 or more*

*information is intended only as a guide.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Medieval Art and Medievalisms pathway

If you select the Medieval Art and Medievalisms pathway you can work on a wide range of media, from stained glass to manuscripts and architecture. In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Medieval Art and Medievalisms. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Medieval Art and Medievalisms, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Medieval Art and Medievalisms) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

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Targeted action. there is more to it than you think. How do you pick out your own glass of beer out of all the other glasses on the bar? How do you find your way in a building? How do you walk from one room to the other - and how do you do that with your eyes closed?. Read more

Master's specialisation in Perception, Action and Control

Targeted action: there is more to it than you think
How do you pick out your own glass of beer out of all the other glasses on the bar? How do you find your way in a building? How do you walk from one room to the other - and how do you do that with your eyes closed?
How do you perceive colour under constantly changing lighting conditions? How does a tennis player prepare himself to return a ball which yet has to be played? And what role do eye and head movements play in this? How are we able to write?
Catching a ball, grabbing a cup, writing down a sentence: these are all targeted actions that you often perform without thinking about them. Performing perceptuomotor tasks as a team such as in sports, understanding the actions of others, joint action in collaborative and competitive contexts: these are examples of hot topics in social neurocognition in which Nijmegen scientists are highly interested.
To patients who suffered a brain haemorrhage automatic actions come not so naturally any more. They find it extremely difficult to perform them. Why is that? Which neurocognitive processes play a role in these actions? That is what researchers who study perception and action want to discover.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cns/perception

General requirements:

- Bachelor's degree
The graduation date of the last attained BA/BSc degree relevant for this programme must be within five years of applying to the programme.

- English skills
The Cognitive Neuroscience Master's programme (MSc CNS) is an English programme: all courses and examinations are taught in English. For the general language requirements of the Radboud University click here. Foreign students please note that the MSc CNS programme requires the following minimum scores: TOEFL: 600 (paper-based test), 250 (computer-based test), 100 (internet-based test); IELTS 7.0 or higher.

- Mathematics & Physics
Students who did not follow physics in their high school curriculum and/or who have not been trained in mathematics at level B (including concepts such as matrix algebra, differentiation, integration, complex numbers), are advised before the start of the programme to work on the assignment in Chapters 1, 2, 7, 8 and 11 (three chapters on physics and two on mathematics) of R.K. Hobbie: "Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology", Springer Verlag, New York, 1997; third edition, ISBN 1-56396-458-9).

Career prospects

If you have successfully completed the specialisation Perception, Action and Control you will have ample experience in current research and analysis techniques in perception, three-dimensional motor research, psychophysiological studies, neuroimaging and electromyographical studies. You will also be able to apply formal theories on and models of perceptive functions, sensomotor functions, and complex actions in your research.
With this educational background you may find a position with one of the industrial or non-industrial research institutes in the Netherlands or abroad (e.g. traffic research, man-machine interaction, etc.). Also in health care there is an increasing demand for cognitive neuroscientists, for example, in rehabilitation centres.

Our approach to this field

Perception, Action & Control is a central research area within different faculties of Radboud University. It is aimed at the three basic components of current Cognitive Neuroscience: modelling (e.g. in physics), designing and conducting behavioural studies (e.g. in psychology) and measuring the neurobiological foundations of behaviour. The various research groups of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour that study these processes use a wide range of modern research facilities which enables them to provide natural stimuli and measure complex everyday behaviour. The close cooperation between the various disciplines also characterises the content of the courses in this specialisation.

Our research in this field

Researchers working on Perception Action and Control study sensorimotor mechanisms, their cognitive and social components, their clinical implications, and their relevance for robotics.

The PAC theme is closely integrated with the RadboudUMC themes Disorders of movementand Stress-related disorderslead by Bas Bloem and Aart Schene respectively. An overview of RadboudUMC themes can be found here https://www.radboudumc.nl/Research/Themes/Pages/default.aspx .

Research methods include theoretical analysis, psychophysical and behavioural studies, neurophysiological techniques, neuroimaging, clinical and pharmacological interventions, developmental and genetic approaches.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cns/perception

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The 21st century calls for graduates with an interdisciplinary training and problem-solving competence in the fields of ecology, energy, resources etc. Read more
The 21st century calls for graduates with an interdisciplinary training and problem-solving competence in the fields of ecology, energy, resources etc. Process engineering, for example, with such fields as environmental- and energy engineering, is now seen as one of the key disciplines. It deals with the engineering required for a wide range of processes and the transformation of materials, in which raw materials are converted in a series of unit operations into salable intermediate and final products.

One focus of training within the discipline relates to the development and application of various environmental and energy technologies. Both environmental- and energy engineering are classified as green technologies, which have developed at an above-average rate in the last few years. That is due to growing social awareness for sustainability and the finite nature of our resources on the one hand and legal constraints on the other. The latter in particular call for innovative processes and technologies in response to today’s challenges. The Master program in Environmental, Process & Energy Engineering is designed to communicate the knowledge, methodology and problem-solving competence needed to tackle a very wide range of engineering problems in the above mentioned fields. With its commitment to bridge-building between the academic and the business worlds, Management Center Innsbruck also provides essential teaching in the increasingly important horizontal disciplines of law and economics, and the skills needed for today’s labor market.

Major Energy Engineering

In the light of dwindling energy resources and volatile energy prices, energy engineering has become an integral economic factor with enormous potential for growth, especially in such fields as energy generation from non-fossil primary energy sources, energy distribution and energy savings. MCI graduates with a specialization in Energy Engineering typically deal with a wide variety of processes, from conventional power plant engineering to the conversion of energy carriers and their various precursors, and decentral energy supply systems. The major in Energy Engineering caters for these market requirements by communicating the relevant knowledge and skills with a combination of in-depth teaching and practical applicability.

Given their interdisciplinary training and the program’s strong practical orientation, graduates are particularly well qualified to work as engineers at the interface with business and management with special reference to the following areas:

Energy trading, energy management & natural resources
Renewable energies
Glass industry
Oil industry
Consulting engineers, consulting & engineering
Paper and paper products
Chemicals
Gas and heating supply industries

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The 21st century calls for graduates with an interdisciplinary training and problem-solving competence in the fields of ecology, energy, resources etc. Read more
The 21st century calls for graduates with an interdisciplinary training and problem-solving competence in the fields of ecology, energy, resources etc. Process engineering, for example, with such fields as environmental- and energy engineering, is now seen as one of the key disciplines. It deals with the engineering required for a wide range of processes and the transformation of materials, in which raw materials are converted in a series of unit operations into salable intermediate and final products.

One focus of training within the discipline relates to the development and application of various environmental and energy technologies. Both environmental- and energy engineering are classified as green technologies, which have developed at an above-average rate in the last few years. That is due to growing social awareness for sustainability and the finite nature of our resources on the one hand and legal constraints on the other. The latter in particular call for innovative processes and technologies in response to today’s challenges. The Master program in Environmental, Process & Energy Engineering is designed to communicate the knowledge, methodology and problem-solving competence needed to tackle a very wide range of engineering problems in the above mentioned fields. With its commitment to bridge-building between the academic and the business worlds, Management Center Innsbruck also provides essential teaching in the increasingly important horizontal disciplines of law and economics, and the skills needed for today’s labor market.

Major Environmental Engineering

Graduates of this study program, with its strong practical orientation, typically work with a variety of Environmental technologies processes, from air and water pollution control and residual waste treatment to alternative energy carriers. They are capable of analyzing environmental pollutants and employing the results to develop technical solutions to reduce the impacts on soil, air and water. They may also be responsible for controlling, optimizing and monitoring plants and ensuring compliance with the relevant laws.

Graduates tend to work as process and environmental engineers in the following fields:

Environmental engineering
Natural resources
Renewable energies
Glass industry
Oil industry
Waste and waste water management
Consulting engineers
Paper and paper products
Chemicals

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