• Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Bocconi University Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"geospatial" AND "analysi…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Geospatial Analysis)

We have 35 Masters Degrees (Geospatial Analysis)

  • "geospatial" AND "analysis" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 35
Order by 
There is ever-growing national and international demand for qualified professionals and scientists who have expertise in one or more domains of social and environmental modelling and GIS-based spatial analysis and decision support. Read more
There is ever-growing national and international demand for qualified professionals and scientists who have expertise in one or more domains of social and environmental modelling and GIS-based spatial analysis and decision support. The UCL's Geospatial Analysis MSc provides rigorous scientific and vocational training for the next generation of scientific modelling and decision-support professionals.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/geospatial-analysis-msc

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016
Optional qualifications: This degree is also available as a PG Diploma and a PG Certificate with fees set accordingly.

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Good
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The programme combines a rigorous treatment of underlying theory for, and methods of implementing and exploiting, spatial analysis and decision support. Optional courses provide the opportunity to develop expertise in modelling and analysis in one or more areas of social and environmental science with social and policy dimensions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months, part-time two years) is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, full-time 12 weeks, part-time one year) is offered.

- Core Modules
GIS Principles and Technology
Mapping Science
Principles of Spatial Analysis
Representation, Structures and Algorithms

- Options
Airborne Data Acquisition
Climate Modelling
Geodemographics and Population Geography
GIS Design
Network and Locational Analysis
Spatial Decision Support Systems
Spatio-temporal Analysis and Data Mining
Surface Water Modelling
Terrestrial Carbon: Modelling and Monitoring
Web and Mobile GIS

- Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words and a poster presentation.

Teaching and Learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and laboratory and computer-based practical classes. Assessment is through independent project work, practical-based and written coursework, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site Geospatial Analysis MSc http://www.ucl.ac.uk/gis

Funding

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

Careers

There is a national and international need for scientists with skills in GIS-based analysis and decision support complemented by a deep knowledge of domain-specific models and analytical methods that can be brought to bear on environmental issues and their social consequences. The MSc provides an ideal foundation for PhD research, or for prospective employment within research organisations, consultancies, government departments and a wide range of industries.

- Employability
A student on the first cycle of the course came with work experience in water engineering in several Middle Eastern countries. He took the options in Spatial Decision Support, Network and Locational Analysis, Geodemographics and Population Geography, and Spatio-Temporal Analysis and Data Mining to broaden and add depth to his skills base; his dissertation was undertaken with Kuwait's Environmental Public Authority. He spent a year acting as a consultant on water engineering projects worldwide and returned to UCL in September 2013 to study for a PhD.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Geospatial Analysis MSc is run by UCL Geography, which enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching. The programme brings together the department's strong expertise in spatial science and social and environmental modelling.

Contributions to the programme are also made by UCL Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, providing complementary expertise in geographic information systems.

Students enter a vibrant, enthusiastic, and international research environment in which collaboration and free-ranging debate are strongly encouraged. UCL's location, in central London, provides easy access to many key intellectual venues and resources, such as the British Library.

Student / staff ratios › 43 staff including 15 postdocs › 158 taught students › 70 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The programme is particularly suitable for students with an undergraduate degree in Geography, Earth or Environmental Science, Geomatics, Oceanography, or another relevant discipline. Applicants with relevant professional experience in geographic information systems, spatial analysis or decision support will also be considered.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Geospatial Analysis
- why you want to study Geospatial Analysis at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to this programme
- how your academic and/or professional background meets the demands of a challenging academic environment
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see our Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

Read less
BIM is a growing technology used in the building industry worldwide. It uses digital techniques to create and use intelligent 3D models to communicate building project decisions. Read more

About the course

BIM is a growing technology used in the building industry worldwide. It uses digital techniques to create and use intelligent 3D models to communicate building project decisions. GIS is a technical system to implement the collection, storage, management, calculation, analysis, display and description of geospatial information data. The results help to understand what is happening in a geographical space which can increase efficiency in building planning and design. The current ‘lack of BIM innovation’ and ‘lack of BIM talent’ could delay the progress of Chinese “smart” cities, which aim to reduce resource consumption and cost and use digital technologies to benefit their citizens.

This programme will be run entirely at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC) with internship opportunities in leading BIM companies in China. It is a collaboration between Department of Architecture and Built Environment and Civil Engineering. In particular, research and teaching support will be provided by three leading research laboratories including Geospatial BIM lab, Digital City Infrastructure and technology Innovation Laboratory (D-CiTi Lab), and Big Data and Visual Analytics Lab. These laboratories are working closely with leading AEC consultants (Arup, WSP BP), international professional institutions (RICS, ICES, CIBSE) and leading BIM software vendors (Autodesk, Bentley, Leica, Tekla, Trimble).

Students are able to learn how to use and operate a very wide variety of state-of-the-art software, as well as surveying equipment including servo driven total stations, laser scanners, GNSS, digital and analogue photogrammetry. With extensive project and consultancy experience on the Geospatial Engineering, BIM in the AEC sector in the UK and China, the team is planning to promote the Smart City with multi-dimension BIM applications across China.

Advantages of studying this programme at the University of Nottingham Ningbo:

- Be familiar with BIM related software and surveying device
- The ability to apply their skills directly within the surveying and AEC industry
- React quickly to new technologies and innovations
- Communicate ideas effectively in written reports, verbally and presentations to groups
- Exercise original thought, as well as gain interpersonal, communication and professional skills
- Participate real project work for experience accumulation
- Plan and undertake individual projects

This programme will help:

- Fain a complete understanding of theory, practice and issues of BIM and Geospatial technologies
- Acquire opportunities to use what you have learnt in real project work
- Explore new research methodology to promote development in this field
- Acquire technical skills of software operation, data analysis and design optimization
- Improve team-work ability and communication skill
- Foster individual ability to conduct academic researches

Course structure

The course is studied over 12 months. 60 credits of modules are studied in the autumn and 60 credits of modules are studied in the Spring Semesters. A research project is undertaken in the summer semester, also worth 60 credits.

Compulsory modules:

Geospatial Engineering and BIM Research Project
Introduction to Building Information Modelling and Management
Research Project Literature Review
Fundamentals of Satellite Positioning
Geodetic Reference Systems
Analytical Methods
Photogrammetry and Remote Measurement Techniques
Global Smart City with Integrated BIM
3D Modelling for BIM
Research Project Organization and Planning
Engineering Surveying
BIM and Knowledge Management
BIM+ and its Future

Career options for this degree

In China, BIM has attracted an increasing amount of concern and lots of AEC companies or institutes desire to recruit talented people with relevant BIM skills and experience. Graduates from this program would be expected to find decent jobs in local and international AEC companies. During the academic period, students have opportunities to visit and communicate with large AEC companies, and even enroll as interns after graduation. For those who wish to pursue their academic careers, this postgraduate programme prepares them well for higher level research and to continue onto PhD level.

Our Careers Development Service will work with you to explore your options. They will invite you to attend recruitment events featuring potential employers, and will suggest further opportunities, such as relevant work experience placements and skills workshops.

Read less
The world’s environments have long been threatened by human impact. As pressures on the natural environment intensify, there is a growing need for professionals skilled in conservation and environmental management. Read more
The world’s environments have long been threatened by human impact. As pressures on the natural environment intensify, there is a growing need for professionals skilled in conservation and environmental management. They need a wide range of skills, including biodiversity, survey techniques, environmental management and monitoring systems, geographical information systems and an understanding of relevant ecological principles, legislation and regulatory frameworks, which demands a multidisciplinary approach.

This Masters programme in Wildlife and Conservation Management brings together the physical, chemical, biological, socioeconomic, administrative and legislative aspects of land planning, providing the skills you need for an exciting and rewarding career as an environmental conservation manager. It combines a broad understanding of the science and management of conservation, putting emphasis on integrating specialist knowledge and practical skills with IT and communication.

Our extensive and exciting fieldwork programme will train you in a wide range of environmental survey and assessment techniques.

This Masters degree is accredited by the Environment and Resources Professional Group of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/385-msc-wildlife-and-conservation-management

What You Will Study

Modules include:
- Applied Geospatial Analysis
- Restoration Ecology
- Environmental Management and Legislation
- Wildlife Surveying
- Terrestrial and Aquatic Conservation
- European Field Expedition*
- MSc Project

Optional modules:
- Tropical Ecology*
- Tropical Environmental Monitoring*
- Tools for Sustainable Development
- Work Based Learning Project
- Remote Sensing for Environmental Management

*Please visit our course page on the University of South Wales website for information regarding our Field Trips.

*Please note:* the course structure outlined above is indicative of what you will study and may change from year to year. Consequently there may be a difference between the information shown here and the course when it is delivered.

Learning and teaching methods

Full-time students spend two days at University, usually Wednesday and Thursday, and around 12 hours per week in lectures and practical sessions.

Part-time students attend one day per week. First year part-time students attend on Wednesdays and second years attend on Thursdays.

We teach using a combination of lectures, laboratory sessions, problem solving tutorials, video presentations and practicals. You will also undertake fieldwork excursions within the UK and overseas (additional costs apply). The number of hours of formal teaching will vary depending on your module choice. You will also be encouraged to take responsibility for your own learning by completing guided reading and various interactive computer packages. Based on individual circumstances the MSc Project may be extended into your third year of study and will be agreed as part of a discussion with the course leader.

Please note: some field trips will take place on weekdays besides Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

- Work based learing project:
This optional module enables our students to gain 60 hours work experience under the supervision of an employer. You will also be assigned an academic supervisor who will advise you on a suitable employer based on your area of interest. Recent organisations who have hosted our students include Capita Symonds, Natural Resources Wales, Wales Heritage Coastal Path and Warwickshire Wildlife Trust.

- Employment prospects:
Graduates from our MSc Wildlife and Conservation Management have progressed to careers in the Environment Agency, utility companies, local, national and international conservation organisations, environmental consultancies, and regional and national government. Several others have progressed on to PhD study and into academic careers.

Assessment methods

You will be assessed through a range of methods depending on your module choice, these include: examinations, coursework such as writing reports of field excursions. You will also analyse case studies, undertake presentations, participate in workshops and analyse data.

Field trips

Fieldwork provides unforgettable educational and social experiences, bringing to life the theory and concepts of the lecture theatre. South Wales is a fantastic study location on the edge of rural and urban environments.

Cardiff, Wales’ capital city, the Brecon Beacons National Park and the Glamorgan Heritage Coast are all close to the University. They provide exceptional fieldwork locations that can be explored in a day. We make full use of these locations across our earth and environment courses to cover the practical aspects of our modules.

As part of this degree you will undertake residential fieldwork excursions, typically to Portugal and Mid Wales (additional fees apply). Some fieldwork trips will extend beyond the two days of study, but you will be notified in advance in order to plan appropriately.

If you choose to study the Tropical Ecology module, you will have the opportunity to complete a scientific scuba diving course, either locally or at a tropical location (for an additional fee which is approximately £2000). Previous locations have included Indonesia, Costa Rica, Honduras and Borneo.

The Tropical Environmental Monitoring module, will enable you to undertake studies in Southern Africa in locations such as Botswana for an additional fee which is approximately £2000.

The European Field Expedition module involves studying in Portugal. The fee is approximately £500-£600.

Please note: the exact locations of all overseas field trips may vary each year and is based on the area’s suitability for academic study and the overall cost of the trip. In addition some field trips will take place on weekdays besides Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Important Information

Please be aware of the physical demands of this course which has modules with significant fieldwork elements. If you therefore have a disability which is likely to be affected by these physical demands, please get in touch with the course leader Dr Gareth Powell as soon as possible. We will then investigate the reasonable adjustments that we can make to ensure your Health and Safety. Please note that if any Health & Safety aspects cannot be overcome, we may not be able to offer you a place on the course of your choice.

Read less
visit course pages for more information about the next Open Day at NHM on Wednesday 7 June 2017. Taxonomy and systematics provide the foundation for studying the great diversity of the living world. Read more

Open Day

visit course pages for more information about the next Open Day at NHM on Wednesday 7 June 2017.

Course Overview

Taxonomy and systematics provide the foundation for studying the great diversity of the living world. These fields are rapidly changing through new digital and molecular technologies. There is ever greater urgency for species identification and monitoring in virtually all the environmental sciences, and evolutionary ‘tree thinking’ is now applied widely in most areas of the life sciences.

This course provides in-depth training in the study of biodiversity based on the principles of phylogenetics, evolutionary biology, palaeobiology and taxonomy. The emphasis is on quantitative approaches and current methods in DNA-based phylogenetics, bioinformatics, and the use of digital collections.

Location

This course is a collaboration of Imperial College London (Silwood Park) with the Natural History Museum. This provides an exciting scientific environment of two institutions at the forefront of taxonomic and evolutionary research.

The MSc in Taxonomy and Biodiversity comprises two terms of taught modules, mostly based at the Natural History Museum, and covers core areas in biodiversity, palaeobiology, phylogenetics, molecular systematics, phylogenomics and taxonomic principles. This is followed by a 16-week laboratory or field-based research project at the NHM or Imperial College’s Silwood Park or South Kensington campuses.

Modules

• Taxonomy of major groups and the Tree-of-Life: An introduction of major branches of the Tree, including identification exercises, presented by NHM experts
• Statistics and Computing: A two-week intensive course at Silwood Park
• Field course: trapping and collecting techniques for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems
• Phylogenetic Reconstruction: the principles of building phylogenetic trees
• Molecular Systematics: generating and analysing molecular data; model-based phylogenetics
• Phylogenomics: Genomic techniques for studying evolutionary processes and biodiversity
• Biodiversity (Concepts): speciation, radiation, macroevolution
•Biodiversity (Applied): Measuring biodiversity, geospatial analysis, collection management and biodiversity informatics
• Palaeobiology: Studying the fossil record and what we can learn for biodiversity

Post Study

Students on the course will become the new generation of taxonomists in the broadest sense. They will be familiar with these new tools, as well as the wider concepts of biodiversity science, evolutionary biology and genomics. Most importantly, students gain the abilities to work as an independent scientist and researcher, to be able to solve questions about the future of biodiversity and to communicate them to peers and the public.
Students have many options for future employment in evolutionary and ecological research labs in industry, government and non-governmental organisations, conservation, and scientific publishing and the media. The courses are an excellent starting point for PhD level careers, feeding into various Doctoral Training Programmes available at NHM and Imperial, or elsewhere.

Read less
Branch out and explore UNB’s Forestry and Environmental Management graduate programs. We’ve been teaching the science of forestry for over 100 years, helping countless students manage and protect the planet’s natural resources for generations to come. Read more
Branch out and explore UNB’s Forestry and Environmental Management graduate programs. We’ve been teaching the science of forestry for over 100 years, helping countless students manage and protect the planet’s natural resources for generations to come.

Ranked among the best in North America, our department’s collaborative learning environment gives students the ability to examine environmental problems from both a biophysical and a socioeconomic perspective. Graduates are well-equipped to succeed in a variety of roles in the forestry industry, growing into respected environmental leaders, natural resource managers, conservationists, project coordinators and researchers.

We normally have around 80 graduate students who are working on a variety of projects. Our recent graduates have gone on to work in conservation biology, First Nations consultation, CURA project coordination, geospatial analysis, research and more.

Read less
Why Study with Us?. Join an established course with excellent reputation and feedback. Get support and advice from experienced lecturers, tutors, librarians, e-learning and IT staff. Read more

Why Study with Us?

  • Join an established course with excellent reputation and feedback.
  • Get support and advice from experienced lecturers, tutors, librarians, e-learning and IT staff.
  • Access a wide range of online resources such as e-books, digital lectures and podcasts, discussion boards and video-conference tools all within a dedicated e-learning platform.
  • Develop and improve your employability, professional and academic skills and gain extensive hands-on practice with key software.
  • Obtain free student copies of GIS, remote sensing and statistical software.
  • Be assessed entirely by coursework – there are no formal examinations.
  • Pay your fees by instalments.
  • With a fully online course, you can study from almost anywhere and there is no need to travel to classes.
  • You can enrol to study part-time or full-time and choose the times you study each week to suit yourself.
  • Substantial relevant work experience may be accepted in place of standard entry requirements.
  • Study for a Master’s degree, a PG Diploma, PG Certificate or enrol for individual modules.

Why Study GIS?

The benefits of GIS are increasingly recognised within government, business, education and the voluntary sector, and the applications of geospatial data technologies are steadily growing. Using GIS, it is possible to combine data from a broad range of sources and in a variety of formats, such as paper and digital maps, routinely collected administrative data, censuses and population surveys, satellite imagery, aerial photography, GPS tracking and surveys, LiDAR and crowd-sourcing. The uses of GIS are very diverse, and include mapping, spatial analysis, planning and decision-making within a wide range of disciplines and sectors – common examples include environmental management and conservation, resource management, emergency service planning and humanitarian assistance, health care provision, land use planning and urban development, the utilities, transport, geo-demographics, mineral extraction and retail analysis. Increasing uptake of GIS and associated techniques and technologies means that there is a growing demand for qualified personnel who have the skills to manage spatial data effectively. Strong industry links help ensure that our course is relevant to the needs of employers.

Course Summary

The course is designed to help people gain understanding and experience of GIS concepts, functionality and applications. Content focuses on the representation, acquisition, management, manipulation and analysis of spatial data. It also includes modules on remote sensing, spatial databases, web-GIS and GIS in the commercial environment. Additional optional modules include GIS work experience, spatial analysis and modelling, GIS for environmental management, and Customising GIS.

In addition to acquiring substantial theoretical knowledge of the subject, you will gain extensive practical experience using a variety of software, focusing primarily on ArcGIS but also including ERDAS Imagine, PostgreSQL, PostGIS, MySQL, OpenLayers, Geoserver, QGIS, Excel, SPSS and a number of GIS extensions and plug-ins. One of the core modules provides experience of web-based programming languages such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript, whilst an optional module in customising GIS applications introduces Esri’s ModelBuilder and the Python programming language.

After successfully completing the PgDip modules, you may transfer to the Masters part of the programme. This requires the completion of a substantial independent research project, written in the form of a research journal article (which may, with agreement of your supervisor, be submitted for publication).

As part of the course resources, you will be provided with a free copy of ArcGIS, the remote sensing package ERDAS Imagine, and the data analysis package SPSS.

Work placement / study abroad

Gaining experience in the workplace and being able to apply academic learning within that context is very beneficial for students preparing to enter the workplace, so we offer the option of undertaking a GIS Work Experience module to full-time students. This entails working within an organisation for 2.5 days per week over a six-week period. Placements (which are unpaid) may be in the public sector, private companies, charities or education. Students who take this module find it extremely helpful for both their professional and personal development and refer particularly to benefits such as broadening their technical skills, gaining experience of team-working and of independent problem-solving, improved confidence and of learning about the geospatial industry and employment through exposure to real-world applications of GIS.

Part-time students who are in GI-related employment may opt to undertake the GIS Workplace Project.

Career options

GIS and geospatial technologies underpin a rapidly growing, multi-billion dollar industry, and are becoming increasingly mainstream within both the public and private sectors, resulting in a need for graduates who have a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical skills.

Graduates of this course have secured employment in a variety of GIS-related roles worldwide, in GIS positions including technicians, analysts, scientists, surveyors, data specialists, mapping officers, consultants, project managers, development, sales and marketing, customer support, GIS training, lecturing and research (including funded PhD projects). The breadth of potential uses of GIS ensures a great diversity of job opportunities; for example, our graduates have found employment with mapping agencies, GIS and SatNav companies, environmental consultancies, ecological and marine resource management and environmental agencies, renewable energy companies, forestry, fisheries, town planning departments, heritage agencies, health and emergency services, housing authorities, local government, aid agencies, countryside recreation, rural development, retail analysis, utilities and infrastructure, Further and Higher Education, mining and mineral exploitation and the oil industry, among others. Knowledge and understanding of geo-spatial data is also increasingly required in a variety of jobs outside of the GI profession, making a GIS qualification a valuable asset enhancing employability in a range of fields.



Read less
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
This programme is unique in its focus on the core challenges facing our increasingly 'smart' cities, from their operational functions and planning through to management and control. Read more
This programme is unique in its focus on the core challenges facing our increasingly 'smart' cities, from their operational functions and planning through to management and control. The programme reflects the changes that technology is making to the operation of, and our understanding of, the city, and gives students the technical and theoretical skills needed to make a difference to the cities of today and tomorrow.

Degree information

Students are equipped with key quantitative practical skills such as mathematical and statistical modelling, computer programming, spatial analysis and cartographic visualisation, underpinned by broad theoretical perspectives on the demographics, economics, form, function, network interactions, governance, policy, planning and crucially science of cities across the world.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), is offered.

Core modules
-Geographic Information Systems and Science
-Quantitative Methods
-Smart Cities: Context, Policy and Government
-Urban Systems Theory
-Spatial Data Capture, Storage and Analysis
-Urban Simulation

Optional modules
-Introduction to Programming
-Or any other open 15-credit module from across UCL

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The technical aspects of the programme will be delivered through traditional workshops, lectures and practicals, but we will seek to incorporate novel assessment methods such as blog posts, and shared outputs such as visualisations/maps and web apps. Assessment is through a variety of written coursework assignments and final dissertation, presentation of researched material and practical investigations, and participation in dedicated skills modules.

Careers

This programme gives students the skillset and knowledge base to embark on a professional or academic path through the highly interdisciplinary field of spatial science.

Employability
Students will graduate with an extremely broad range of new transferable practical skills including computer programming, database management, (big) data mining and web-visualistation, along with an understanding of mathematical and statistical analysis methods, geographic information science, spatial analysis and urban modelling. All of these skills are developed in parallel with a wider appreciation of the problems and challenges facing contemporary cities and how the latest data and analysis methods can help address them.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA) is one of the leading research centres in the science of cities, generating new knowledge and insights for use in city planning, policy and design, and drawing on the latest geospatial methods and ideas in computer-based visualisation and modelling.

Smart Cities is a key area of future innovation and investment in the UK, and Smart Cities and Urban Analytics is currently the only UK-based Master’s programme available.

Companies such as Intel, IBM, ARUP and CISCO all have strategies around smart city development, creating a demand for skilled personnel. CASA has well-established links with these companies and the Head of Department sits on the newly-created Smart Cities Board at the Greater London Authority to advise the Mayor on developments.

Read less
This new programme is unique in its focus on the core challenges facing our increasingly 'smart' cities, from their operational functions and planning through to management and control. Read more
This new programme is unique in its focus on the core challenges facing our increasingly 'smart' cities, from their operational functions and planning through to management and control. The programme reflects the changes that technology is making to the operation of, and our understanding of, the city, and gives students the technical and theoretical skills needed to make a difference to the planning of the cities of today and tomorrow.

Degree information

Students are equipped with key quantitative practical skills as mathematical and statistical modelling, computer programming, spatial analysis and cartographic visualisation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of seven core modules (120 credits), and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, seven core modules (120 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Geographic Information Systems and Science
-Quantitative Methods
-Smart Cities: Context Policy and Government
-Urban Systems Theory
-Spatial Data Capture, Storage and Analysis
-Urban Design: Place-making
-Planning Practice

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The technical aspects of the programme will be delivered through traditional workshops, lectures and practicals, but we will seek to incorporate novel assessment methods such as blog posts, and shared outputs such as visualisations/maps and web apps. Assessment is through a variety of written coursework assignments and final dissertation, presentation of researched material and practical investigations, and participation in dedicated skills modules.

Careers

This programme gives students the skills and knowledge base to embark on a professional or academic path through the highly interdisciplinary field of spatial science.

Employability
Students will graduate with an extremely broad range of new transferable practical skills including computer programming, database management, (big) data mining and web visualisation, along with an understanding of mathematical and statistical analysis methods, geographic information science, spatial analysis and urban modelling. All of these skills area developed in parallel with a wider appreciation of the problems and challenges facing planners in contemporary cities and how the latest data and analysis methods can help address them. This degree will lead to full RTPI accreditation for students already holding an RTPI accredited Bachelor's degree from UCL or another accredited planning school, leading to a career in the UK planning system.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Barlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA) is one of the leading research centres in the science of cities, generating new knowledge and insights for use in city planning, policy and design, and drawing on the latest geospatial methods and ideas in computer-based visualisation and modelling.

Smart cities is a key area of future innovation and investment in the UK, and Smart Cities and Urban Analytics is currently the only UK-based Master's programme available.

Companies such, as Intel, ARUP and Cisco all have strategies around smart city development, creating a demand for skilled personnel. CASA has well-established links with these companies and the Head of Department sits on the newly created Smart London Board at the Greater London Authority to advise the Mayor of London on developments.

Read less
The Spatial Data Science and Visualisation MSc teaches cutting-edge data analysis, mining, modelling and visualisation techniques for spatial systems. Read more
The Spatial Data Science and Visualisation MSc teaches cutting-edge data analysis, mining, modelling and visualisation techniques for spatial systems. Students carry out their own research project, supported by academics, researchers and other students in one of the most exciting, interdisciplinary research teams in the field. The programme takes place within The Bartlett, UCL’s Faculty of the Built Environment.

Degree information

Students gain a grounding in the principles and skills of spatial research, data analysis and visualisation, agent-based models and virtual environments, and develop an understanding of research methodology for data collection and analysis. Subject-specific modules provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in spatial analysis and to contribute to current debates in the field. They will learn programming skills in Java/Processing, Python, R, JavaScript and SQL, and the ability to use a range of interactive geospatial and visualisation tools (ArcGIS, Unity, Mapbox and CityEngine).

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), a group mini-project (30 credits), two elective modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
The core modules focus on technical skills, leading to applications in mapping, visualising and analysing spatial data.
- Data Science for Spatial Systems
- Geographic Information Systems and Science
- Introduction to Programming
- Quantitative Methods
- Group Mini Project: Digital Visualisation

Elective modules
Students select two elective modules from a wide range available at UCL, subject to approval.

Dissertation/report
Dissertation

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical-based workshops and classes. The interlinked laboratory research-based mini project with data collection focuses on ‘remote data mining’ rather than fieldwork in the traditional planning/geographical/architectural sense. Assessment is through group and individual projects and the dissertation.

Careers

Recent graduates of our related Spatial Data Science and Visualisation MRes have gone on to work as developers, in spatial analysis, and a number have continued to PhDs. Through our PhD partners, Knowledge Transfer Partnerships and substantial outreach, graduates will be able to take advantage of CASA's links to the world outside academia.

Employability
The Spatial Data Science and Visualisation MSc provides a unique skill set in computation mapping, visualisation and spatial research. Research-led skills are increasingly a key element in our understanding of complex spatial functions, particularly as vast amounts of previously unused data are becoming available either from changes in accessibility regulation or more widely as a result of new mass data collection methodologies.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA) is a research centre specialising in computational and mathematical approaches, with cutting-edge research in GIS, urban simulation, mapping, data visualisation, and 3D environments in cities and space.

Students of this programme will be exposed to a range of programming languages (Java/Processing, R, Python and MySQL), 3D visualisation packages, and be given a substantive grounding in GIS, programming structure, mathematical methods and data design.

The combination of skills involved in this programme is unique – graduates from this programme will be able to lead institutions and companies in new directions and be involved in changing cultures across the sector.

Read less
The father of town planning, Patrick Geddes was a professor of botany at this University hence our strong historical links to the planning profession. Read more
The father of town planning, Patrick Geddes was a professor of botany at this University hence our strong historical links to the planning profession. The University of Dundee has been running town and regional planning programmes for over fifty years with a proud list of its graduates who went on to take up positions of influence in shaping the development of quality cities and spaces across the world. Dundee, the city, is located in an idealistic location for learning planning.

This course attracts students from a wide network of countries and varied professional backgrounds and this a unique environment to collaborate different experiences from other students.

This programme is accredited to the Royal Town Planning Institute and provides options for specialisms in Environmental Assessment, Marine Spatial Planning, Sustainable Urban Design and Urban Conservation. Our academic staff have a strong research and practice background in these specialist areas. The programme has strong links with practitioners so our students have the opportunity to engage with 'live' projects as part of their learning.

The course offers options for part-time study for those in full time employment.

What is so good about this course?

The idealistic location of Dundee enables students to 'live what they learn'. This is made possible by collaborative relations that the programme has with the key planning agencies in and around Dundee and thus allowing students to engage with practitioners through lectures, seminars and fieldwork. The programme has dedicated learning and IT facilities to enhance the students learning experience.

Teaching & Assessment

- How you will be taught

This course can either be taken on a full-time (1 year) or part time basis (2 years). The mode of teaching is generally through class lectures, guest speaker seminars and student-led seminars. Time is allowed to encourage individual study using the library and other facilities.

The course is done over three semesters. The first semester covers core modules in, Statutory Planning, Spatial Analysis and Property Development Processes. The second semester covers two core modules, Concepts of Planning and Sustainability in Contemporary Cities and an optional specialism module.. The third semester is for the dissertation based on the specialist option. Each semester allows for 60 credits leading to a total of 180 credits for the full MSc Award.

- How you will be assessed

This course has a mixed approach to assessment including report writing, essay writing, oral presentations and group-work tasks. The dissertation is an individual investigation researched by the student in line with the selected specialism. All assessments are 100% coursework with no examinations.

What you will study

- Semester 1:

Spatial Analysis has two key components. The first component analyses built and natural environments particularly from a conservation perspective. The second part of the module focuses on socio-economic analysis of data at a city scale and the relevance of this to planning.

Statutory Planning is a practice based approach to learning processes processes of plan-making and the management of development.

Property Development Processes deals with complexities and challenges in the property development sector and the role of different stakeholders involved.

- Semester 2

Concepts of spatial planning introduces students to the role of planning and planning systems. The other part of this module introduces students to various planning theories and their relevance to practice.

Sustainability in Contemporary Cities examines various challenges facing the growth of cities globally and the implications of these to planning of cities and the countryside.

The third second semester module is optional depending on the selected specialism. Students select one specialist module from the following:

Environmental Assessment
Marine Spatial Planning
Sustainable Urban Design
Urban Conservation
Applied Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Data Analysis

- Semester 3:

A 60 credit dissertation in line with the selected specialism

Employability

Our MSc programmes equip our students with a variety of skills required to support spatial planning field such as stakeholder engagement, renewable energies, urban design, urban conservation, property development, housing development, public policy and environmental impact assessments. Most of our graduates take up employment in the UK and beyond. Typical employment is with the public and private sectors involved in a variety of built and natural environments. Generally, students from international destinations either return to their employers to take up new challenges or venture into new opportunities.

The University's Careers Service continues to offer support to our graduates for up to 5 years from completing our programmes.

Read less
The Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) at West Chester University prepares students to enter the workforce as  professional planners and thereby meet the growing demand for urban and regional planners, and related professions in the region. Read more
The Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) at West Chester University prepares students to enter the workforce as  professional planners and thereby meet the growing demand for urban and regional planners, and related professions in the region. Professional planners help to influence the future of neighborhood, local, regional and metropolitan areas. A planner plays a major role in shaping communities, in providing guidance for sustainable development, and in addressing social, economic, environmental and political problems of communities. The urban and regional planning curriculum equips students with the professional knowledge and technical skills to guide the complex processes of a changing world, to utilize geospatial and other technologies to create a sustainable built and natural environment.

Students will understand how to make decisions based on sound knowledge and guided by the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) Code of Ethics. The program has been designed to align with the standards of the Planning Accreditation Board (PAB) of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP).  Students will develop specific competencies for planning research and analysis, plan making, effective communication skills, working with diverse environments and communities, applying ethical principles, advocating for social justice, and employing geospatial technologies for planning applications and decision-making.

Students will develop specific competencies for planning research and analysis, plan making, effective communication skills, working with diverse environments and communities, applying ethical principles, advocating for social justice, and employing geospatial technologies for planning applications and decision-making.

The program utilizes two state-of-the-art GIS labs and a fully-equipped Planning Studio, which are located in the Building and Public Management Center on the 1st floor. Check out some recent media coverage of the building with images of the labs and Studio here: http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2017/03/22/cutting-edge-technology-at-west-chester-u-prepares-students-for-real-world/

Curriculum

The MURP degree is comprised of nine required core courses (27 credits) and six or seven additional elective courses (21 credits)

Required modules:

PLN525 Planning History, Theory & Ethics
GEO509 Quantitative Methods
PLN527 Planning Law
GEO534 Geographic Information Systems
PLN508 Qualitative Methods & Community Engagement Techniques
PLN521 Land Use Planning
PLN536 Environmental Planning
PLN505 Planning Design (Studio A)
PLN605 Planning Design (Studio B)

In consultation with their graduate advisor, students select six or seven courses in their area(s) of interest from a range of course offerings. Students also have an option to complete an internship for course credit. If approved by a thesis committee, students also have an opportunity to complete a graduate thesis.

Read less
OVERVIEW. The Environmental Management MSc degree provides graduates with a range of skills, knowledge and expertise in the field of environmental management. Read more
OVERVIEW

The Environmental Management MSc degree provides graduates with a range of skills, knowledge and expertise in the field of environmental management.

This well-established Environmental Management course allows students to specialise in industrial environment, natural environment, geoinformation systems or law and policy.

Whichever route is selected there is a choice from a tailored selection of modules or for those wanting a broad course it is possible to study modules across disciplines.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

National governments, local authorities, industrial companies, commercial enterprises, conservation agencies as well as environmental consultancies are keen to recruit employees who possess a broad range of environmental skills.

A choice of a tailored selection of modules to study.

Choose the modules best suited to your background and career aspirations.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Indicative Course Content

A wide range of modules are available allowing you to either broaden your experience of environmental management and its applications or to focus on more specific areas.

Many modules are based around case studies, industrial or field visits and extensive laboratory facilities allow practical work in the analysis of soils, airs and waters for physical, chemical and biological properties.

Subjects normally available include:

Energy and environmental management systems,
environmental auditing,
environmental impact assessment,
renewable energy,
climate change – the physical Science basis,
contaminated land,
impacts of oil production,
pollution prevention and control,
environment monitoring laboratories,
ecological management and assessment,
regulation, monitoring and assessment of water pollution,
water and waste water treatment,
environmental law,
international environmental law,
corporate social responsibility,
remote sensing and digital image analysis,
geospatial information analysis,
geographical information Science, systems and services,
the final period of study is based on your own area of interest in environmental management and involves and individual project.

Read less
This master's degree focuses on the multi-disciplinary science concerned with the development and application of geographical information science technologies. Read more
This master's degree focuses on the multi-disciplinary science concerned with the development and application of geographical information science technologies. Geographical information technologies are increasingly used in everyday life, such as Google Earth and geosocial networking. Core geographical information science technologies, including geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing, have had a long history of application in government and private sector environmental agencies, planning, agriculture, forestry, utilities and transportation.

This course will enable you to develop fundamental skills and in-depth knowledge of key application areas.. Students can choose to undertake an applied study unit, which gives a range of work experience skills and can lead to dissertation opportunities working with key local and national employers.

We offer research-led teaching and a range of extra-curricular activities designed to deepen and enhance your learning experience. These include access to additional training resources, educational visits, career talks and alumni presentations. You will gain experience using commercial and open source software and acquire skills in the development of spatial software for both desktop and online platforms.

We have recently revised and updated our course offerings and during 2017 will host the 25 th Geographical Information Science Research UK (GISRUK) conference; the largest national GIS research conference.

Aims

This course will provide you with the theoretical foundation and practical skills that are relevant for pursuing a career in a geographical information science field.

You will have the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of and practical experience in:
-GIS and remote sensing theory and practice
-Advanced techniques for GIS analysis and image processing
-Spatial analysis
-Computer modelling and software development
-Internet and GIS Web technologies
-Databases and database technologies
-Scientific communication of analytical results and their interpretation

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 24 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director first and also seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The dissertation, based on an original research project of your own design, accounts for 60 credits. Dissertation topics can focus on aspects of geographical information science and are supported by researchers who specialise in core areas of GIS, remote sensing or modelling. The remaining 120 credits are based on eight 15-credit course units (four in each semester).

Assessment is primarily coursework-based and includes a variety of project work, essays and presentations. This enables you to gain a significant amount of hands-on experience of applying geographical information science skills to real world environmental applications.

The course has five core course units. You select your remaining four course units from a wide range of options offered by Geography, Planning and Environmental Management and the Global Development Institute (GDI), all within the School of Environment, Education and Development. These optional course units enable you to tailor the course to your unique interests.

Career opportunities

You will have the opportunity to learn from staff with advanced and practical understanding of geographical information science. The taught component of the course, together with the experience of carrying out a postgraduate-level dissertation project, provides you with an excellent foundation for PhD research in numerous fields that involve geospatial data analysis, including physical and human geography, planning, development, and the environmental and earth sciences. There is a high demand worldwide for individuals with these skills.

We provide you with the background knowledge and experience needed for employment in many sectors, especially GIS consultancies, environment agencies, marketing, the oil and gas sector, agriculture and forestry, water authorities, health authorities, and retail.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X