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Masters Degrees (Geophysical Hazards)

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This MSc provides a broad introduction to geohazards, together with advanced courses in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeological hazards and meteorology. Read more

This MSc provides a broad introduction to geohazards, together with advanced courses in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeological hazards and meteorology. A key goal is to provide an essential grounding in quantitative modelling that can be widely applied to several fields, from pure research to the commercial sector.

About this degree

The programme provides an introduction to the spectrum and impact of geophysical hazards, and a focus on quantitative models for hazard forecasting and assessment. Selected case studies illustrate how these models are essential for improving decision-making during emergencies, for raising the awareness of vulnerable populations, and for evaluating and implementing mitigation strategies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (120 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Geological and Geotechnical Hazards
  • Meteorological Hazards
  • Research Methods
  • Earthquake Seismology and Earthquake Hazard
  • Physical Volcanology and Volcanic Hazard
  • Meteorological, Climate and Hydrogeological Hazard

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in geophysical hazards, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading and practical exercises. There are excellent opportunities for field investigations in the UK and abroad. Assessment is through unseen written examinations, practical problem-solving exercises and essays. The independent research report is assessed through the dissertation and an oral presentation.

Fieldwork

Field sites for field trips are normally in Italy. The department pays for accommodation and transport in the field. Students pay to get to the field and subsistence.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Geophysical Hazards MSc

Careers

On graduation from this programme about one-third of students have followed careers in global insurance and re-insurance and another third have pursued research with a PhD in hazard-related studies. The remaining third have developed careers in a wide range of sectors, from non-governmental organisations, through teaching, to the fields of emergency planning and environmental management.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Aggregate and Catastrophe Modeller, Advent
  • Catastrophe Analyst, Talbot Underwriting
  • Graduate Trainee Reinsurance Broker, Aon
  • Catastrophe Model Analyst, Aon Benfield
  • Policy Adviser, Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Employability

The MSc in Geophysical Hazards will provide essential training for careers in hazard assessment and risk evaluation, including: industry, from engineering to insurance; academic research; civil protection agencies and government organisations; and NGOs related to aid and development. 

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Earth Sciences is engaged in world-class research into the processes at work on and within the Earth and planets.

Graduate students benefit from our lively and welcoming environment and world-class facilities. The department hosts UCL Hazard Centre, Europe's leading multidisciplinary hazard research centre, and engages in extensive collaborative work with the Royal Institution and the Natural History Museum.

This MSc aims to include a short field trip to locations that illustrate the impact of natural hazards. Previous trips have included the Neapolitan volcanic district, the Italian Alps and the Po Delta, and the Cádiz region in south-western Spain.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Earth Sciences

92% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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What you will study. The MSc Hazard and Disaster Management course will develop knowledge, technical skills, interpersonal and management skills, and experience. Read more

What you will study

The MSc Hazard and Disaster Management course will develop knowledge, technical skills, interpersonal and management skills, and experience. You will study a range of hazards using examples from the UK and other countries. This will provide you with the experience to assess risks and vulnerabilities from desk-based research, laboratory and field situations, consider hazard management and disaster risk reduction strategies, develop emergency plans, and critically review the concept of resilience along with techniques for its development.

You will consider the dynamic and multi-faceted nature of disasters and examine a range of aspects pertinent to the operational, political and socio-cultural issues involved in disaster relief, including aspects of international law. The course will ensure a sound working knowledge and experience with one of the mostly widely used GIS platforms, extensively used by many planning authorities, GOs and NGOs, and you will develop valuable skills in the acquisition and processing of spatial datasets with a wide variety of disaster management applications, along with the ability to visualise and depict spatial information.

Opportunities for study on residential field courses will include the use of field simulations either in Finland or in the UK, and the opportunity to examine environmental hazards and evaluate management strategies on an overseas residential field course. Currently, the field course takes place in Italy or Greece, to examine volcanic, seismic, landslide and tsunami hazards.

Modules

  • Principles and Concepts in Disasters - 20 credits
  • Multi-faceted causes and consequences of disasters, nature of disasters, disaster relief and international law.

  • Management of Coastal and Hydrological Hazards - 20 credits
  • Flooding and integrated flood risk management, coastal hazards and sea level rise, storms, heat wave, coastal pollution incidents, climate change and resilience.

  • Management of Geophysical and Technological Hazards - 20 credits
  • Landslides, chemical hazards and safety, industrial and pollution hazards, volcanic hazards, volcanic ash and aviation, seismic hazards, pandemics, terrorist incidents.

  • Personal Preparedness for Disasters - 20 credits
  • Personal preparedness, leadership, survival training, victim and refugee experiences, developed from the Disaster Summer School immersive simulation week.

  • Disaster Risk Management - 20 credits
  • Field survey training, vulnerability and risk analysis, disaster risk management strategies, emergency planning, resilience, information and communication, community engagement, disaster education, personal development in disaster management.
  • Planning for Disasters and Civil Contingencies - 20 credits
  • Emergency and civil contingency planning, multi-agency response coordination and training, crisis leadership strategies and styles.

  • Remote Sensing for Environmental Management - 20 credits
  • A practical introduction to the use of Remote Sensing and G.I.S. techniques and applications in environmental resource management; appropriate practical and analytical skills in data collection and manipulation of key environmental data.

  • Masters Research Project - 40 credits
  • Each student will prepare for a detailed research project, prepare a paper as if for submission for publication in a refereed academic journal and present their research to their peers.
  • Work Based Learning Project (optional)
  • Work placement opportunities are recommended as part of the course.

Teaching

The Disaster Management course is designed in a modular format and will be offered on a full and part time basis. Delivery will be mixed-mode, with a combination of traditional lectures, practicals and distance learning with supporting tutorials. For full time students, study will take place over 14 months, and for part time students, study may typically take two to three years.

The MSc Hazard and Disaster Management begins with a two week Summer School in August, where you will meet other students, academic tutors and visiting experts. You will:

  • Develop reflective learning skills
  • Enhance communication and team working skills in an international and multicultural setting.
  • Clarify the concepts of a disaster with experts and academic tutors.
  • Undertake a field course simulation training exercise, which focuses on survival skills
  • Reflect on experiences of victims of disaster

You will undertake a field course simulation training exercise, which will focus on survival skills. You will reflect on the experiences of victims of disasters, develop decision making through active participation and it will orientate you to the type of experiences that you may encounter in a disaster field situation.

After the summer school, lectures and self-directed learning will take place in the Autumn and Spring terms. Teaching and training will also include fieldwork within the region as well as the option for overseas residential fieldwork.

Study will utilise a range of diverse learning approaches and activities to acknowledge the rich and diverse character and content of the body of knowledge that forms this Master’s degree course. It will include:

  • Attending the Summer School
  • Lectures
  • Seminars and tutorials
  • Practical and laboratory work
  • Completing work packages by distance learning through the Virtual Learning Environment
  • Actively participating in computer workshops and laboratory work
  • Undertaking a range of field based studies and data collection
  • Participating in group based activities and simulations
  • One-to-one interactions with academic staff
  • Fieldwork including community-based learning
  • Self-directed study
  • Optional field or work-placement
  • Externally-linked activities and placements

Each week, lectures and practicals will take place. This normally involves seven to 10 hours of class contact timetabled within two days of the week. In addition, through the week you will be engaged in distance learning tutorials and activities, background reading, and working on a wide range of assessments. Some weeks will also have additional field or simulation time. For a full-time course, a minimum of 37 hours of study time per week is expected.

The course will also require attendance at a Summer School (two weeks), on another overseas residential field course (about ten days), and will also provide options for other extended field- or work-placements. UK and EU students complete the Summer School at the start of their course in August and International Students complete it at the end of their course. International students therefore begin their course in September and not August. This is to allow enough time for you to get your visa.



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This MSc examines the physical processes governing the behaviour of volcanoes. Read more
This MSc examines the physical processes governing the behaviour of volcanoes. The programme is taught by leading scientists who are working at the cutting edge of research into volcanoes, and will provide you with a strong background for independent research to PhD level or for a career in industry, the public sector or an NGO.

The programme is designed to equip you with knowledge of the physical processes of volcanoes, including both sub-surface and surficial behaviour, insights into important historical eruptions, understanding of risk and risk mitigation, and instruction and experiential learning on data gathering, handling analysis and presentation to publishable standard.

You will develop a wide range of skills, such as quantitative and computational skills, including the use of statistical and data handling software; proficiency in critical analysis of scientific material from a variety of sources, including primary research documents and original data; and the ability to synthesise concise and informative material produced for a variety of audiences.

Programme structure

Core units
-Physics of Volcanoes and Hazardous Flows
-Scientific Communication
-Literature Review (Volcanology)
-Research Methods in Volcanology

Optional units
-Frontiers in Earth Science
-Geophysical Fluid Dynamics
-Natural Hazards in Central America
-Natural Hazards in Central America (without fieldwork)
-Seismology
-Volcanic Hazards: Observation, Modelling and GIS

Research project
The final part of the programme consists of a research project. For further information on research projects, please see the School of Earth Sciences website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/earthsciences/research/projects.html

Careers

The MSc in Volcanology prepares students for research-based careers. Most students then continue on one of three paths, using the skills they have acquired at Bristol. About 40 per cent of graduating students continue on to study for a PhD at a range of institutions in the UK, Europe, North America, Australia and Singapore. Most overseas students return to their home country to work for government agencies in hazard management.

Other graduates choose to work in the commercial sector for either geotechnical companies (who manage assets for large multinationals) or risk management and reinsurance companies, typically in London where we have a burgeoning presence within that community.

The volcanology programme is rigorous and quantitative, and prepares students for settings where both domain-specific knowledge and the ability to conduct independent research are highly valued.

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With the eastern Mediterranean as our natural marine laboratory, the International M.Sc. Program in Marine Geosciences provides students with a unique opportunity to develop practical scientific experience at sea alongside a rigorous academic curriculum. Read more

With the eastern Mediterranean as our natural marine laboratory, the International M.Sc. Program in Marine Geosciences provides students with a unique opportunity to develop practical scientific experience at sea alongside a rigorous academic curriculum.

Established in 2007 as part of the multidisciplinary Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, the Department of Marine Geosciences combines research and graduate studies of the marine environment in the following main disciplines: exploration geophysics, seafloor mapping, remote sensing, geodynamics, tectonics, marine and coastal sedimentology, geochemistry, chemical and physical oceanography.

The two-year MSc program will begin in October.

What you will study

Topics to be covered include: the structure of the seafloor; the Earth’s crust below it and the search for energy sources (oil, gas, hydrates); the dynamics of the water body above it; sea level variations and their relation to tectonic and climate changes; coastline developments in present and past times; and, finally, present and past influences on human evolution. Students will have the opportunity to interact with central research institutions in Israel including the Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research Institute, the Geological Survey of Israel, the Geophysical Institute of Israel and other industrial institutes.

Taught in English, the program can be completed in two years and begins every October. Coursework, field trips and an educational cruise are held during the first two semesters, the summer semester is dedicated to establishing a research proposal, while the second year is dedicated to conducting research. Students will be required to submit a research thesis at the end of the second year of the program. Upon completion of the program, students will be awarded a Master of Science in Marine Geosciences.

For a full and detailed list of the program curriculum, please visit here.

Full Scholarships for outstanding students from China and India!

Careers

Graduates of the program will be well-placed to pursue careers within government research agencies, onshore and offshore site investigation contractors or consultancy companies, and various branches of higher education and research.

Field Work

Students will gain practical experience in marine geophysical survey work through hands-on field activities. The program includes educational research cruises to the deep sea, coastal and underwater field excursions, as well as geological field trips to marine structures currently exposed onshore. The research and educational cruises are carried out in water bodies in and surrounding Israel – the Mediterranean, the Dead Sea, the Red Sea and the Sea of Galilee.

Courses

Core Courses

  • Geophysical Investigation of the Marine Environment
  • Signals Analysis - Fundamentals and Application
  • Geology of Marine Sediments
  • Physical Oceanography
  • Geochemical Oceanography
  • Hydrography
  • Educational Cruise
  • Scientific Writing and Research Presentation
  • Interdisciplinary School Seminar
  • DMG Colloguium

Elective Courses

  • Intoduction to Geology
  • Introduction to Geophysics
  • Seismic Processing and Imaging
  • Processes in Marine Geology
  • Numerical Methods in Physics of Continuum
  • Processesing and Analysis of Seismic Data: Workshops
  • Seismic Data Interpretation
  • Two-Phase Flow
  • Tectonics of the Oceans
  • Geology of the Eastern Meditteranean
  • Seafloor Morphology
  • Topics in Coastal Geomorphology
  • New Frontiers in Marine Research
  • Miscropaleontolgy
  • Paleoceanography
  • Natural Energy
  • Underwater Geoarchaeology in Caesarea
  • Paleolimnology of the Dead Sea Region: Field Trip
  • Marine Geology of Mt. Carmel, Exploring the Cretaceous Seafloor: Field Trip
  • Coastal Geomorphology: Field Trip

For more information on the course curriculum and course description please click here.

Faculty

Currently, the Department of Marine Geosciences faculty includes seven senior members and six adjunct faculty members. The department is currently under the leadership of Professor Uri S. Ten Brink whose fields include marine geophysics, tectonics, earthquakes, landslides and tsunami hazards.

For a full list of faculty staff and their specialisations please visit here.

Scholarships

This program is eligible for MASA scholarship.

A number of full-tuition scholarships for outstanding students from China and India are available.

Further information on scholarships and financial aid can be found here.



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STUDY PROCESSES BELOW THE EARTH'S SURFACE. In the Master in Earth Structure and Dynamics programme, you will explore the composition, structure, and evolution of the Earth’s crust, mantle, and core. Read more

STUDY PROCESSES BELOW THE EARTH'S SURFACE

In the Master in Earth Structure and Dynamics programme, you will explore the composition, structure, and evolution of the Earth’s crust, mantle, and core. During this two-year programme, you will learn to link geological, geophysical, geochemical, and geodetic observations made at the Earth’s surface to physical processes operating within the planet.

Specialise in any aspect of Solid Earth Science

The programme combines geology, geophysics, mathematics, physics, chemistry and field studies to address how the solid Earth works. It allows you to specialise in virtually any aspect of solid Earth science, ranging from theoretical geophysics to pure geology or geochemistry. Many students choose a combined geology-geophysics focus.

Core areas of teaching and research

The main subject areas you will study consist of seismology, tectonophysics, mantle dynamics, structural geology, metamorphism, magmatic processes, basin evolution, hydrocarbon and mineral deposits, and the properties of Earth materials. You will examine processes ranging from slow geodynamic processes – such as mantle convection, plate tectonics, sedimentary basins formation and evolution, and mountain building – to those that can have an impact during a human lifetime. These include active crustal deformation, seismicity, and volcanism as well as subsidence, uplift induced seismicity and geo-resources.

In the programme, you will address questions such as:

  • How do mountain belts and sedimentary basins form? 
  • How can we image the internal structure of the crust and mantle? 
  • How does plate tectonics really work and how can we model it? 
  • What controls volcanic eruptions and earthquakes? 
  • Can CO2 be safely stored in reservoir rocks in the Earth’s crust? 

You can choose one of three specialisation tracks based on your interests in the field:

  • Earth Materials
  • Deformation and metamorphic and igneous processes operating in the crust and upper mantle
  • Physics of the Deep Earth and Planets
  • An in-depth geophysical approach to understand the deep interior of the Earth and other planets
  • Basins, Orogens, and the Crust-Lithosphere System
  • Understand the processes at the scale of the crust and lithosphere such as the formation and evolution of sedimentary basins or mountain chains. This is a combined track for a hybrid Geology-Geophysics (Solid Earth specialist) profile.  

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE

  • The Earth Structure and Dynamics programme focuses on all aspects of the solid Earth as a key component of system Earth – and therefore of Earth system science. This encompasses the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the solid Earth over the full range of spatial and temporal scales as well as the role of solid Earth structure and processes in societally relevant issues such as energy, geo-resources, and geohazards. Examples include understanding the physics of tectonically – or human – induced earthquakes, volcanic hazards or petroleum, mineral, sustainable or unconventional resources. Knowledge of these aspects has direct relevance for professional profiles and future job opportunities.


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The School of Earth Sciences has strong international links and the presence of researchers from all over the world makes for an exciting and stimulating environment. Read more
The School of Earth Sciences has strong international links and the presence of researchers from all over the world makes for an exciting and stimulating environment. Research involves the full breadth of the earth sciences and has benefited from major investment in new laboratories and equipment in the past few years. Important initiatives include experimental and theoretical studies of physical, chemical and biological processes of the Earth.

Please note: If you are applying for this programme, you need to select Geology as the programme choice when completing your online application form.

Research groups

The research programme at Bristol is characterised by an expanding range of exciting subject areas. Research in the School of Earth Sciences encourages interdisciplinary collaboration between its five research groups, which in turn nurtures revolutionary research.

Geochemistry
The Geochemistry group uses fundamental chemical techniques to understand natural processes on a range of temporal and spatial scales. This can be from single atoms on mineral surfaces and the environmental geochemistry of the modern Earth to the large-scale chemical structure of planets and the birth of the solar system. The group has considerable expertise in isotopic measurements, spectroscopy and first-principles calculations.

Geophysics
Geophysics uses physical properties of the solid Earth to measure structure and processes on scales from the single crystal to the entire planet. Members of the Bristol Geophysics group use gravity, seismic and satellite data to image the Earth in a variety of different contexts. These include the Earth's core, mantle and tectonic processes, volcanoes, oil and gas reservoirs and mines.

Palaeobiology
The Palaeobiology group uses the fossil record to study the history of life. Research focuses on major diversifications, mass extinctions, dating the tree of life, phylogenomics and molecular palaeobiology, morphological innovation, biomechanics, and links between evolution and development; the organisms of interest range from foraminifera to dinosaurs.

Petrology
The Petrology group uses a combination of high-pressure and high-temperature experiments, petrology, geochemistry and mineral physics to attack a wide range of problems in the solid Earth - from the core to the surface.

Volcanology
The Volcanology group at Bristol aims to understand the physical processes underlying volcanic phenomena and develop methods of hazard and risk assessment that can be applied to volcanoes worldwide.

Recent case studies and collaborators include the Met Office, Montserrat Volcano Observatory, Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland and INGEOMINAS in Columbia.

Research centres

The School of Earth Sciences is involved in a number of collaborative research groups on an international level. Inter-faculty research centres such as the Biogeochemistry Research Centre and the Cabot Institute involve collaboration across several departments and faculties.

Centre for Environmental and Geophysical Flows
This interdisciplinary research centre brings together expertise from the Schools of Earth Sciences, Geographical Sciences, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. This creates diverse research activities and interests, from traffic flow to explosive volcanic flows, meteorology to oceanography.

Biogeochemistry Research Centre
The Biogeochemistry Research Centre involves staff from the Schools of Earth Sciences, Geographical Sciences and Chemistry. The research aims to develop our understanding of the biogeochemistry of modern-day and ancient environments and the way that it is affected by natural processes and the actions of mankind.

Bristol Isotope Group
The Bristol Isotope Group is a world-class research facility for isotope measurements directed at understanding natural processes, from the formation of the solar system, the origin of Earth - its deep structure and atmosphere, through to the evolution of that atmosphere and contemporary climate change.

Interface Analysis Centre
The Interface Analysis Centre specialises in the application of a wide range of analytical techniques and is used by the Schools of Chemistry, Earth Sciences and Physics.

The Cabot Institute
The Cabot Institute carries out fundamental and responsive research on risks and uncertainty in a changing environment. Interests include climate change, natural hazards, food and energy security, resilience and governance, and human impacts on the environment.

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The international master program in Geophysics at KIT is research-oriented, has a strong focus on exploration and earthquake seismology and brings together theory and field experiments. Read more

The international master program in Geophysics at KIT is research-oriented, has a strong focus on exploration and earthquake seismology and brings together theory and field experiments. This provides our students the opportunity to cover the full range of geophysics from data acquisition to modelling, inversion and interpretation. The program is taught entirely in English.

Objective & Content

Students studying in the international master program in Geophysics benefit from the strong expertise in exploration and earthquake seismology for which the Geophysical Institute of KIT is known worldwide for more than 50 years.

In the international research-oriented master program we bring together our knowledge in theory as well as in field experiments and give our students the possibility to understand the full picture from data acquisition to modelling, inversion and interpretation.

Students take part in compulsory and elective courses within their 1st year covering different topics of seismology and proximate subjects. During their 2nd year, students will be fully integrated in one of the research groups working on their theses in order to have an optimum preparation for their future work in science and industry. For more details on the program structure see program structure above.

Recently, the concept of in situ lecturing was successfully established at KIT. In situ lectures are taught at the place which is being studied giving students the possibility to fully understand the dimensions and observe the whole range of parameters involved in the subject. Within the last years, in situ lectures have led our students to the Aeolian Islands, deep into potash mines in Thuringia, to the Gotthard base tunnel while it was built, and to seismically active regions in Germany and the Czech Republic.

International summer schools are conducted in cooperation with Bandung Institute of Technology and Australia National University. Since KIT is part of the Eucor universities 

Students can also choose lectures offered by our European partners.

Program Structure

Compulsory courses in the 1st year include Theory of Seismic Waves, Seismology, Physics of Seismic Instruments, Seismic Imaging, Seismic Modelling as well as Inversion and Tomography. In order to specialize, students can choose electives from Geophysics or proximate subjects. Lectures on Array Processing, Full Waveform Inversion, Geological Hazards and Risk, Induced Seismicity, Hazard and Risk Assessment of Mediterranean Volcanoes and a Winter School at the Black Forest Observatory are regularly offered.

During the 2nd year of the program students will be integrated in one of the research groups working on their thesis. We consider it as important to fully immerse into a project and work on it deeply over a longer period so that our students have an optimum preparation for their work in science and industry.

Requirements

Qualification for university entrance (e.g. Abitur, high school diploma, national test for university entrance, ...)

The Bachelor degree has to be completed with a minimum of 180 ECTS points or within a regular period of study of at least three years. If the Bachelor degree has not yet been conferred by the closing date for applications, but will be completed before the registration, you can apply with a preliminary transcript of records.

Profound knowledge of Geophysics, Mathematics and Physics (usually a minimum 20 credits each during the Bachelor studies). Missing credits in Geophysics can individually caught up for during the 1st year. For immediate success students without background in Geophysics can take part in an interactive convergence course covering the most important topics from Seismology and Seismics.

On request the following proofs can also be accepted: Bachelor degree of a university program taught in English University entrance qualification received in an English program Bachelor thesis written in English.

How to apply

Apply here: https://www.sle.kit.edu/vorstudium/master-geophysik.php  ;

Applications for the winter term (beginning in October) can be submitted until 15 July (Non-EU-Applicants) and until 30 September (German and EU-Applicants).

Due to the modular structure of the program, a start in the summer term (April) is also possible, but not recommended for students from abroad or students who do not hold a Bachelor degree in Geophysics.



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