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Our Genes, Environment & Development in Psychology & Psychiatry MSc course provides interdisciplinary training in a range of behavioural genetics topics and research methods relevant to psychology and psychiatry. Read more

Our Genes, Environment & Development in Psychology & Psychiatry MSc course provides interdisciplinary training in a range of behavioural genetics topics and research methods relevant to psychology and psychiatry. You will study three required modules and undertake a research project on one of the broad range of subject areas that are considered fundamental to an understanding of behavioural genetics.

Key benefits

  • Offers specialised interdisciplinary graduate training in several subject areas and research methods.
  • Taught by the Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, a department recognised as a world-leader in the field of interdisciplinary studies in psychology, psychiatry and behaviour.
  • Opportunity to attend the weekly SGDP Centre research seminars led by renowned researchers, such as Professor Francesca Happé, Professor Robert Plomin, Professor Terrie Moffitt and Professor Sir Michael Rutter.
  • Extensive collaborations within King’s as well as with other universities.
  • Study with students from from diverse and rich backgrounds.
  • Access to large sets of data for populations who have been studied and followed up over many years.
  • Located in a beautiful modern building designed to foster interaction.
  • Our state-of-the-art molecular genetics laboratory provides a complete suite of resources for research.

Description

The MSc Genes, Environment & Development in Psychology and Psychiatry (GED PP) programme takes a highly interdisciplinary approach to the study of how genetics and the environment ('nature and nurture') combine during human development to produce behaviour, diseases and psychiatric disorders. Students are taught by world leading experts and receive training across multiple research fields: molecular & behavioural genetics, twin modelling, statistical genetics, epigenetics, bioinformatics, social and cognitive psychology and developmental psychiatry. Topics are taught from an introductory to advance level through both theoretical and hands-on practical sessions (wet and computer labs), followed by a supervised research project in an area of the student's interest. Students come from a range of academic backgrounds (e.g. genetics, psychology, maths, computing, medicine) and on completion of the course will be exceptionally well equipped to pursue a PhD or work for a pharmaceutical or healthcare organisation. More than half of the students secure PhD studentships while completing the MSc

In addition to disorder characterisation and presentation of the genetic, social and otherenvironmental risk factors, our course also covers the molecular mechanisms and the specialised analysis methods relevant to interdisciplinary research in this field. By focusing on current research in this area, our course will enhance your understanding of research methods and enable you to critically appraise the relevant scientific literature.

Course format and assessment

You will be taught through a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials.

Year 1

You will be assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations.

Examination (15%) | Coursework (70%) | Practical (15%)

Extra information

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

Career prospects

Our graduates go on to further full-time study in an academic research environment or in a taught clinical programme, gain employment in an academic, clinical or pharmaceutical organisation. Some students may enter scientific publishing.



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The course is a unique combination of. in advanced therapeutic medicines and will provide academic and laboratory research training in three key areas (streams). Read more
The course is a unique combination of

'hot' and rapidly developing topics

in advanced therapeutic medicines and will provide academic and laboratory research training in three key areas (streams):

•Gene and Nucleic Acid Based Therapies
•Regenerative Medicine
•New Horizons in Pharmacology

The main purpose of this programme is to facilitate state-of-the-art education in next generation therapies for scientist and clinicians, who will be equipped to significantly contribute to these rapidly expanding fields.

A major focus is training in

translational research

illustrating all steps required to progress novel therapies from bench-to-bedside and towards drug licensing.

It is the provision of teaching in all three areas of advanced therapeutic development which makes our programme unique.

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The Institute of Genetic Medicine brings together a strong team with an interest in clinical and developmental genetics. Our research focuses on the causes of genetic disease at the molecular and cellular level and its treatment. Read more
The Institute of Genetic Medicine brings together a strong team with an interest in clinical and developmental genetics. Our research focuses on the causes of genetic disease at the molecular and cellular level and its treatment. Research areas include: genetic medicine, developmental genetics, neuromuscular and neurological genetics, mitochondrial genetics and cardiovascular genetics.

As a research postgraduate in the Institute of Genetic Medicine you will be a member of our thriving research community. The Institute is located in Newcastle’s Life Science Centre. You will work alongside a number of research, clinical and educational organisations, including the Northern Genetics Service.

We offer supervision for MPhil in the following research areas:

Cancer genetics and genome instability

Our research includes:
-A major clinical trial for chemoprevention of colon cancer
-Genetic analyses of neuroblastoma susceptibility
-Research into Wilms Tumour (a childhood kidney cancer)
-Studies on cell cycle regulation and genome instability

Cardiovascular genetics and development

We use techniques of high-throughput genetic analyses to identify mechanisms where genetic variability between individuals contributes to the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. We also use mouse, zebrafish and stem cell models to understand the ways in which particular gene families' genetic and environmental factors are involved in the normal and abnormal development of the heart and blood vessels.

Complex disease and quantitative genetics

We work on large-scale studies into the genetic basis of common diseases with complex genetic causes, for example autoimmune disease, complex cardiovascular traits and renal disorders. We are also developing novel statistical methods and tools for analysing this genetic data.

Developmental genetics

We study genes known (or suspected to be) involved in malformations found in newborn babies. These include genes involved in normal and abnormal development of the face, brain, heart, muscle and kidney system. Our research includes the use of knockout mice and zebrafish as laboratory models.

Gene expression and regulation in normal development and disease

We research how gene expression is controlled during development and misregulated in diseases, including the roles of transcription factors, RNA binding proteins and the signalling pathways that control these. We conduct studies of early human brain development, including gene expression analysis, primary cell culture models, and 3D visualisation and modelling.

Genetics of neurological disorders

Our research includes:
-The identification of genes that in isolation can cause neurological disorders
-Molecular mechanisms and treatment of neurometabolic disease
-Complex genetics of common neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease
-The genetics of epilepsy

Kidney genetics and development

Kidney research focuses on:
-Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS)
-Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR)
-Cystic renal disease
-Nephrolithiasis to study renal genetics

The discovery that aHUS is a disease of complement dysregulation has led to a specific interest in complement genetics.

Mitochondrial disease

Our research includes:
-Investigation of the role of mitochondria in human disease
-Nuclear-mitochondrial interactions in disease
-The inheritance of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy
-Mitochondrial function in stem cells

Neuromuscular genetics

The Neuromuscular Research Group has a series of basic research programmes looking at the function of novel muscle proteins and their roles in pathogenesis. Recently developed translational research programmes are seeking therapeutic targets for various muscle diseases.

Stem cell biology

We research human embryonic stem (ES) cells, germline stem cells and somatic stem cells. ES cell research is aimed at understanding stem cell pluripotency, self-renewal, survival and epigenetic control of differentiation and development. This includes the functional analysis of genes involved in germline stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Somatic stem cell projects include programmes on umbilical cord blood stem cells, haematopoietic progenitors, and limbal stem cells.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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Discover the origins of organisms, their genes and how they interact with the environment. Train in the specialist area of evolution and biodiversity. Read more

Discover the origins of organisms, their genes and how they interact with the environment. Train in the specialist area of evolution and biodiversity.

You’ll learn about the beginnings and appearance of organisms and their genes, as well as their relationship within the environment. You’ll carry out theoretical and experimental studies of evolutionary biology within the laboratory, studying genes, genomes and phylogeny. The course also includes field work and applications to real problems, biodiversity and conservation science.

Led by some of the world’s top academics, teaching methods are varied, and include hands-on laboratory work, lectures, seminars, tutorials and field work. You will be able to select from a diverse range of topics and projects to build your course.

Your studies will help you develop the skills you need to move into a wide range of careers in the sciences or to take on further research. Our graduates have an excellent employment record with companies and academic institutions across the globe. Graduates have moved into roles with employers including Sanger Institute at Cambridge, The Pirbright Institute and Atlas Genetics.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-2018/taught-postgraduate-master-s-courses/msc-evolutionary-and-population-biology/

If you are interested in applying for one of our master's courses and you would like to find out more about your job prospects, then there is a webinar for you on Friday 24 November at 1pm GMT.

Join us from around the world without leaving your house.

During the webinar you will be able to find about:

• the current job market

• what our graduates go to on to do after their master's

• how the careers service and the Faculty's careers adviser can help you with finding a job. You will also have the opportunity to put your questions to staff during a live question and answer session.

Find out more and register for the webinar.      

Why study Biology and Biochemistry with us?

- 90% of our research judged to be internationally recognised, excellent or world-leading

- Our current research funding portfolio stands at £14 million, supporting internationally excellent research in the biosciences

What will I learn?

The aim of each of our MSc programmes in Biology and Biochemistry is to provide professional-level training that will develop highly skilled bioscientists with strong theoretical, research and transferable skills, all of which are necessary to work at the forefront of modern biosciences.

For further information please visit our department pages (http://www.bath.ac.uk/bio-sci/postgraduate/)

Career opportunities

Since graduating, our students have gone on to employment or further research at institutions in the US, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa.

Recent employers include:

Morvus-Technology Ltd

Janssen-Cilag

Royal United Hospital, Bath

Ministry of Defence

State Intellectual Property Office, Beijing

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford University

AbCam

Salisbury Foundation Trust Hospital

BBSRC

Lonza

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/bio-sci/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is a one year full time programme, which provides an ideal opportunity and environment in which to gain practical training in Research Methods and to join a thriving research team within Swansea University College of Medicine. The Medicine and Life Sciences course has been developed with an emphasis on providing students with a research-oriented approach to their learning. Students are able to tailor their studies towards a career in one of the College’s internationally recognised research themes:

– Biomarkers and Genes,

– Devices,

– Microbes and Immunity,

– Patient & Population Health and Informatics.

Key Features of MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is committed to supporting the development of evidence within the areas of Health, Medicine and Life Science through the training of researchers whose findings will directly inform their own understanding and that of others. The ethos of this programme is to produce graduates with the research skill and knowledge to become effective researchers, who will contribute to the body of knowledge within their chosen area of interest that will have an impact upon the health and well-being of all.

- The advantage of a MRes over other formats is that it provides a structured yet in-depth approach, taking the taught component of FHEQ Level 7 teaching as a framework for conducting research on the candidates own practice.

- Innovative and integrated curriculum that reflects the various aspects of the research process.

- Multidisciplinary teaching team with vast experience and expertise in conducting high quality research.

- Research informed teaching.

- Teaching is supported by online learning and support.

-Flexibility for you to gain specialist knowledge.

- A one year full-time taught masters programme designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required for a successful research career.

- This course is also available for two years part-time study.

- The opportunity to conduct an individual research project with an interdisciplinary team within a supportive environment.

- Students will be assigned a research-active supervisory team

The aim of the MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is to provide students with a broad research training to prepare them for a research career in Medical and Life Science research with emphasis on: Biomarkers & Genes, Devices, Microbes & Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. The course has been developed to enable graduates to pursue a variety of research careers in Medical and Life Sciences. The programme comprises both taught and research elements.

By the end of the Medicine and Life Sciences programme students will have:

Developed necessary skills to critically interpret and evaluate research evidence; Gained experience the in analysis and interpretation of research data; Advanced knowledge at the forefront of Medical and Life Science research, with the ability to integrate the theoretical and practical elements of research training; Developed the ability to conceptualise, design and implement a research project for the generation of new evidence that informs Health, Medicine and Life Science; Developed practical research skills by working with an interdisciplinary research team; The ability to confidently communicate research ideas and conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences; Acquired transferable skills which enhance your employability and future research career.

Modules

Modules on the Medicine and Life Sciences course may include:

PMRM01 Critical Appraisal and Evaluation

PMRM02 Data Analysis for Health and Medical Sciences

PMRM03 Research Leadership and Project Management OR any topic specific FHEQ Level 7 module from the College of Medicine ’s portfolio

Mode of delivery:

The 60 credits of the taught element will be delivered face-to-face, combining formal lecturing, seminars, and group work in addition to tutor-led practical classes. The remaining 120 credits for the research element will be available as distance learning either off or on-site. Irrespective of the location for conducting the research project, students will supported through monthly online (Skype)/or face-to-face supervisory meetings.

Course Structure

Students must complete 3 modules of 20 credits each and produce a 120 credits thesis on a research project aligned to one the College’s research theme. Each taught module of the programme requires a short period of attendance that is augmented by preparatory and reflective material supplied via the course website before and after attendance.

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is designed in two phases:

Phase 1 – Training and Application (October – January; 60 credits)

Taught modules in Research Methods and their application to Medicine and Life Science. Personalised education and training relevant to student’s research interests. Identification of research questions and how they might be addressed.Focused on students existing knowledge and research skills.

Phase 2 – Research Project (February – September; 120 credits)

The project is selected by the student in combination with an academic supervisory team. Focussed on one of the College’s four main research themes: Biomarkers and Genes, Devices, Microbes and Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. At the end of Part 2 students submit a 40,000 word thesis worth 120 credits leading to the award of Master of Research in Medicine and Life Science.

Attendance Pattern

Students are required to attend the University for 1 week (5 consecutive days) for each module in Phase One. Attendance during Phase Two is negotiated with the supervisor.

You are also encouraged to attend the Postgraduate Taught Induction Event during the induction week and any programme associated seminars, together with Postgraduate research events.



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Research profile. Our Division of Psychiatry is internationally recognised as a world-class clinical research and teaching centre. Read more

Research profile

Our Division of Psychiatry is internationally recognised as a world-class clinical research and teaching centre.

We focus on the mechanisms underlying the development of major psychiatric disorders, including autism, bipolar disorder, depression, dementia and schizophrenia.

Expertise and studies

We have a particular expertise in longitudinal, clinical and biological studies of large cohorts of people at high risk of psychotic disorders drawn from across Scotland. Our studies include:

  • the Edinburgh High Risk Study, which examines 200 young people at high genetic risk of schizophrenia over a period of ten years
  • the Edinburgh Study of Co-Morbidity, which examines teenagers at high cognitive risk for schizophrenia
  • the Bipolar Family Study, which examines over 200 young people at familial risk of bipolar disorder and controls

In psychiatric genetics, we take part in international genome wide association studies and focus on analyses of candidate genes including DISC-1, NDE-1 and DLG-2.

We also have a major focus on the functional genetics of psychiatric illness and have investigated the effects of variation in genes, such as DISC-1, on brain structure and function, as well as their programming during development in stem cell models.

We have demonstrated, for the first time, that structural and functional MRI changes precede the onset of psychosis and could be used as a diagnostic aid.

We have also demonstrated that imaging can be used to separate autism from learning disability in people of matched IQ.

We have made substantial progress in the discovery of genes, including DISC-1, associated with psychosis and have played a leading role in understanding how genetic variation alters brain structure and function and risk for mental illness.

Research methods

The principal methods used are state-of-the-art structural and functional imaging techniques and genetic studies. We are also involved in a number of clinical trials of novel therapeutic interventions.

Major conditions of interest

Our major interests (that straddle the disciplines of Neurology and Psychiatry) include:

  • Autism and learning disability (Andrew Stanfield)
  • Dementia prevention (Craig Ritchie)
  • Bipolar disorder and depression (Andrew McIntosh)
  • Schizophrenia (Stephen Lawrie, Mandy Johnstone)
  • Cognition and Behaviour (collaborations with the Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology
  • Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology

We are also closely involved in two philanthropically funded Specialist Centres of Excellence:

Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences

The Division of Psychiatry is a part of the Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences (CCBS) in the Edinburgh Medical School. CCBS integrates laboratory and clinical research to study the causes, consequences and treatment of major brain disorders.

Training and support

Postgraduate students are mentored and supported by at least two supervisors and receive long-term guidance from their thesis committee.

We offer a transferable skills programme and project-specific courses, including opportunities to become involved in science communication and public engagement. In addition, the Division provides clinical case demonstrations and specialist seminars.

Facilities

We offer well-characterised cohorts of patients and expertise in a wide variety of techniques to study biological aspects of psychiatric disorders.



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Goal of the pro­gramme. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

How do genes regulate the development and functioning of cells, tissues and organisms? How do molecules, cells and tissues function and communicate with each other, and how are their functions studied? These are the key issues for understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms, whose disruption can contribute to the onset and progression of various diseases. Researchers in the fields of genetics, genomics, cellular and developmental biology, biochemistry, structural biology, and biosciences of health are searching for the answers to these questions.

Upon completing the Master’s Programme in Genetics and Molecular Biosciences:

  • You will have in-depth knowledge of genetics and molecular biosciences and of the experimental methods used in them.
  • You will understand the characteristics and functions of genes and biomolecules at the cellular, tissue and organism levels.
  • You will be able to analyse scientific knowledge critically and communicate it to different audiences.
  • You will have the ability to produce new scientific information about the properties of genes, biomolecules and cells by means of experimental studies.
  • You will be able to take advantage of existing research data and biological databases.
  • You will have mastered good scientific practice and know how to act accordingly.
  • You will have the capacity for independent project management and problem solving, as well as for maintaining and developing your own expertise.
  • You will have the ability to work in multi-disciplinary and multicultural communities.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

The Master's programme is based on basic scientific research. In the programme you will acquire knowledge and skills in modern genetics and molecular biosciences, which you will deepen in your chosen field of specialisation. The programme is tightly integrated with the experimental research carried out at the University of Helsinki in genetics, genomics, biochemistry, structural biology, and cellular and developmental biology. By combining course units, you will be able to acquire a broad-based understanding of biological phenomena and of the molecules that have an effect on health, including their interactions and functions at the levels of cells, tissues and organisms. 

Courses include a variety of working methods: seminars, lectures, laboratory work, oral and written presentations, project work in small groups, independent studies and study circles formed by the students. The instruction will utilise digital learning environments.

These diverse teaching methods require active involvement from you. They will develop your ability to search, structure and present new information, as well as to draw conclusions. You will learn about the principles and methods of research during laboratory exercises, and about practical work in research groups and when writing your Master's thesis. In addition to academic excellence, you will acquire general working life skills such as fact-finding, problem solving, communication, project management and teamwork. You will acquire competence both for post-graduate studies in a Doctoral Programme and for expert positions immediately after gaining your Master's degree.



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Molecular genetics is the study of genes at the molecular level. It focuses on the processes that underlie the expression of the genetic information from the DNA into the functional proteins that execute the genetic programme. Read more
Molecular genetics is the study of genes at the molecular level. It focuses on the processes that underlie the expression of the genetic information from the DNA into the functional proteins that execute the genetic programme. Within the School of Life Sciences research in molecular genetics is concentrated in the Human Genetics, Fungal Biology, and Developmental Genetics and Gene Control groups. In the Human Genetics group research in this area includes studies of the molecular basis of myotonic dystrophy and the identification of genes involved in cardiac development; the molecular genetics of muscle disease; mouse models of muscle disorders and molecular genetic approaches to anthropology and human population genetics. In the Fungal Biology group there are studies on the molecular events that determine stress responses during polarised growth, protein folding and secretion in yeasts and filamentous fungi; the molecular and cellular effects of stress on yeast cells and the genetic mechanisms that control sex in fungi. The Developmental Genetics and Gene Control group focuses on the mechanisms of eukaryotic gene expression and the genetics of vertebrate embryonic development. Developmental studies are focussed largely upon the mechanisms that control stem cell fate. Projects on the control of gene expression address the machinery used by cells to achieve appropriate levels of functional transcripts. These studies include control of transcription and the mechanisms of RNA maturation.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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Discover the origins of organisms, their genes and how they interact with the environment. Train in the specialist area of evolution and biodiversity. Read more

Discover the origins of organisms, their genes and how they interact with the environment. Train in the specialist area of evolution and biodiversity.

This course is ideal for you if you want to go into a research career or study for a PhD in the field of Evolutionary Biology. You’ll learn about the beginnings and development of species, their genes and genomes. You’ll study practical evolutionary problems with model organisms, such as the fruit fly, as well as theoretical explorations of evolution using modelling and bioinformatics.

The MRes provides a unique mix of taught components, extended laboratory projects, literature reviews and preparation of a grant proposal based on a research dissertation. You’ll gain an insight into a range of research activities and techniques, gaining the transferable skills training needed for all early stage researchers. You’ll also address the scientific, ethical and commercial context within which the research takes place.

All of the MRes courses can be studied as the first year of our Integrated PhD course.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-2018/taught-postgraduate-master-s-courses/mres-evolutionary-biology/

If you are interested in applying for one of our master's courses and you would like to find out more about your job prospects, then there is a webinar for you on Friday 24 November at 1pm GMT.

Join us from around the world without leaving your house.

During the webinar you will be able to find about:

• the current job market

• what our graduates go to on to do after their master's

• how the careers service and the Faculty's careers adviser can help you with finding a job. You will also have the opportunity to put your questions to staff during a live question and answer session.

Find out more and register for the webinar.      

Why study Biology and Biochemistry with us?

- 90% of our research judged to be internationally recognised, excellent or world-leading

- Our current research funding portfolio stands at £14 million, supporting internationally excellent research in the biosciences

Career opportunities

Our graduates have gone on to further research in Lausanne, Berlin, Brussels, Frankfurt, and academic posts in Malaysia, Sweden, Germany, Canada, the US and in the UK. Recent employers of Bath graduates include:

British Aerospace

Network Rail

Powergen

Barclays Capital

BNP Paribas

Pfizer

AstraZenaca

MBDA UK Ltd

ATASS

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/bio-sci/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



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The two-year MSc Bioinformatics concerns a new scientific discipline with roots in computer science, statistics and molecular biology. Read more

MSc Bioinformatics

The two-year MSc Bioinformatics concerns a new scientific discipline with roots in computer science, statistics and molecular biology. Bioinformaticians apply information technology to store, retrieve and manipulate these data and employ statistical methods capable of analysing large amounts of biological data to predict gene functions and to demonstrate relationships between genes and proteins.

Programme summary

DNA contains information about life, but how is this information used? Biological data, such as DNA and RNA sequence information produced by next-generation sequencing techniques, is accumulating at an unprecedented rate. Life scientists increasingly use bioinformatics resources to address their specific research questions. Bioinformaticians bridge the gap between complex biological research questions and this complex data. Bioinformaticians use and develop computational tools to predict gene function(s) and to demonstrate and model relationships between genes, proteins and metabolites in biological systems. Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary field that applies computational and statistical techniques to the classification, interpretation and integration of large-scale biological data sets. If different data types are joined then complex interactions in biological systems can be studied. The use of systems biology methods to study complex biological interactions offers a wealth of possibilities to understand various levels of aggregation and enables control of biological systems on different scales. Systems biology approaches are therefore quickly gaining importance in many disciplines of life sciences, such as in applied biotechnology where these methods are now used to develop strategies for improving production in fermentation. Other examples include bioconversion and enzymatic synthesis, and in the study of human metabolism and its alterations where systems biology methods are applied to understand a variety of complex human diseases, including metabolic syndromes and cancer. The Wageningen Master programme focuses on the practical application of bioinformatics and systems biology approaches in many areas of the Life Sciences. To ensure that students acquire a high level of understanding of modelling and computing principles, the students are trained in the fundamentals of database management, computer programming, structural and functional genomics, proteomics and systems biology methods. This training includes advanced elective courses in molecular biology and biostatistics.

Thesis tracks

Bioinformatics
The bioinformatics track focuses on the practical application of bioinformatics knowledge and skills in molecular life sciences. It aims at creating and using bioinformatics resources to address specific research questions. The knowledge and skills gained can be applied in many life science disciplines such as molecular & cell biology, biotechnology, (human) genetics, health & medicine and environmental & biobased technology.

Systems Biology
The systems biology track focuses on the study of the complex interactions in biological systems and on the emerging properties derived from these. Systems biology approaches to complex biological problems offer a wealth of possibilities to understand various levels of aggregation. It enables control of biological systems on completely different scales, ranging from the molecular cellular level to marine, plant, or animal ecosystems to a desired state. The knowledge and skills gained can be applied in many life science disciplines including molecular & cell biology, applied biotechnology, genetics, medicine and vaccine development, environmental and biobased technology.

Your future career

Bioinformatics and Systems Biology are new fast growing biology based interdisciplinary fields of research poorly served by the traditional curricula of Life Sciences. As demand has outpaced the supply of bioinformaticians, the first job after graduation is often a PhD project at a research institute or university. It is expected that five years after graduation, about one third will stay employed as a scientist at a university or research centre, while the others choose for careers at research-oriented pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies.

Alumnus Tom van den Bergh.
"It is sometimes difficult for doctors to diagnose genetic diseases caused by missense mutations. A missense mutation does not necessarily mean that you have the gene-associated disease and will become ill since not all missense mutations lead to appreciable protein changes." Tom created a database for Fabry’s disease for his final thesis. He wrote a computer programme that reads publications and stores all information about Fabry mutations in its database. Genetic researchers can, in turn, quickly access this database to determine if the mutation they found in a patient has already been addressed in literature and what the effects were.

Related programmes:
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Molecular Life Sciences
MSc Plant Biotechnology

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Actuaries evaluate and manage financial risk. They make financial sense of the future for their clients by applying advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to solve complex financial problems. Read more
Actuaries evaluate and manage financial risk. They make financial sense of the future for their clients by applying advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to solve complex financial problems.

Qualifying as an actuary is a passport to a wide variety of careers in insurance companies, investments, pensions, health care and banking – not just in the UK, but throughout the world. Kent is one of a very few universities in the UK to teach the subject.

Our Postgraduate Diploma (PDip) in Actuarial Science, MSc in Applied Actuarial Science and International Master’s are all fully accredited by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries; they also provide a fast-track route to qualifying as an actuary, because students who achieve a high enough overall mark in these programmes can obtain exemptions from the professional examinations included within their studies.

This PDip in Actuarial Science programme gives you the opportunity to gain exemptions from eight of the Core Technical subjects (CT1 to CT8) of the professional examinations and provides you with a firm foundation for the later subjects. If you perform well enough on this course to obtain the full set of exemptions available, you could reduce your time to qualify as an actuary by three years or more.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1/actuarial-science

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

MA319 - Probability and Statistics for Actuarial Science (15 credits)
MA501 - Statistics for Insurance (15 credits)
MA529 - Probability and Statistics for Actuarial Science 2 (15 credits)
MA639 - Time Series Modelling and Simulation (15 credits)
MA816 - Contingencies 1 (15 credits)
MA817 - Contingencies 2 (15 credits)
MA819 - Business Economics (15 credits)
MA820 - Financial Mathematics (15 credits)
MA825 - Survival Models (15 credits)
MA826 - Finance & Financial Reporting (15 credits)
MA835 - Portfolio Theory and Asset Pricing Models (15 credits)
MA836 - Stochastic Processes (15 credits)
MA837 - Mathematics of Financial Derivatives (15 credits)
MA840 - Financial Modelling (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is usually by a mixture of coursework and examination; exact weightings vary from module to module.

- Accreditation
Students who are considered to have performed sufficiently well in the programme (both in examinations and coursework), as determined by an examiner appointed by the UK Actuarial Profession, will be exempt from all the CT subjects studied within the programme. If a student fails to achieve a suitable overall standard, they might still be awarded individual module exemptions as recommended by the Profession’s examiner. Please note that individual exemptions are granted based on the final written examinations only.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- give you the depth of technical appreciation and skills appropriate to a Master’s level programme in actuarial science

- provide successful students with eligibility for subject exemptions from the Core Technical series of examinations of the actuarial profession. This means obtaining a thorough knowledge and understanding of various core actuarial techniques and gaining current knowledge and understanding of the practice of some of the major areas in which actuaries are involved

- ensure you are competent in the use of information technology, and are familiar with computers, together with the relevant software

- introduce you to an appreciation of recent actuarial developments, and of the links between subject theories and their practical application in industry

- prepare you for employment within the actuarial profession and other financial fields

- provide suitable preparation for students who wish to proceed to the MSc in Applied Actuarial Science.

Research areas

- Genetics and insurance risks

Advances in human genetics, and medical sciences in general, have led to many gene discoveries; a number of single-gene disorders have been successfully identified and studied in detail. Researchers are now increasingly focusing on common multifactorial genetic disorders such as cancer, heart attack and stroke, caused by interaction of genes and environmental factors. It is important for the insurance industry to understand the full implications of these latest developments. First, can an insurer justify charging different premium rates to different risk groups? Second, if insurers are not allowed to discriminate between individuals based on their genes, by regulation or by law, is there a risk of adverse selection?

- Economic capital and financial risk management

Financial services firms are in the business of accepting risks on behalf of their customers. Customers do not always have the time or expertise to handle financial risks on their own, so they pass these on to financial services firms. However, even the most reputable firms can sometimes get it wrong, so it is fundamentally important for all stakeholders that financial services firms hold an appropriate amount of capital calculated on a robust scientific basis, to back the risks they are running. Economic capital can provide answers by specifying a unifying approach to calculating risk-based capital for any firm in the financial services sector.

From a public policy perspective, regulators and governments face the dilemma of whether to regulate against genetic underwriting or to allow market economies to take their own course. On one hand, there is a moral obligation not to discriminate against individuals for their genetic make-up. On the other hand, risk of adverse selection against insurance firms cannot be ruled out altogether. Maintaining an appropriate balance between the two is key.

Careers

- The UK Actuarial Profession

The UK Actuarial Profession is small, but influential and well rewarded. There are more than 6,500 actuaries currently employed in the UK, the majority of whom work in insurance companies and consultancy practices.

Survey results published by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries suggest that the average basic salary for a student actuary is £36,842 with pay and bonuses increasingly sharply as you become more experienced. The average basic salary of a Chief Actuary is £209,292.

As an actuary, your work is extremely varied and can include: advising companies on the amount of funds to set aside for employee pension payments; designing new insurance policies and setting premium rates; pricing financial derivatives and working in fund management and quantitative investment research; advising life insurance companies on he distribution of surplus funds; and estimating the effects of possible major disasters, such as earthquakes or hurricanes, and setting premium rates for insurance against such disasters. For more information about the actuarial profession, see http://www.actuaries.org.uk

- Employability support

Helping our students to develop strong employability skills is a key objective within the School and the University. We provide a wide range of services and support to equip you with transferable vocational skills that enable you to secure appropriate professional positions within industry. Within the School we run specialist seminars and provide advice on creating a strong CV, making job applications and successfully attending interviews and assessment centres.

Our graduates have gone on to successful careers in the actuarial, finance, insurance and risk sectors.

Professional recognition

Offers exemptions from subjects CT1 to CT8 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries professional examinations, with the option to take further subjects for exemption purposes.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This Masters in Bioinformatics is a new, exciting and innovative programme that has grown out of our well-regarded MRes in Bioinformatics. Read more
This Masters in Bioinformatics is a new, exciting and innovative programme that has grown out of our well-regarded MRes in Bioinformatics. Bioinformatics is a discipline at the interface between biology and computing and is used in organismal biology, molecular biology and biomedicine. This programme focuses on using computers to glean new insights from DNA, RNA and protein sequence data and related data at the molecular level through data storage, mining, analysis and display - all of which form a core part of modern biology.

Why this programme

◾Our programme emphasises understanding core principles in practical bioinformatics and functional genomics, and then implementing that understanding in a series of practical-based elective courses in Semester 2 and in a summer research project.
◾You will benefit from being taught by scientists at the cutting edge of their field and you will get intensive, hands-on experience in an active research lab during the summer research project.
◾Bioinformatics and the 'Omics' technologies have evolved to play a fundamental role in almost all areas of biology and biomedicine.
◾Advanced biocomputing skills are now deemed essential for many PhD studentships/projects in molecular bioscience and biomedicine, and are of increasing importance for many other such projects.
◾The Semester 2 elective courses are built around real research scenarios, enabling you not only to gain practical experience of working with large molecular datasets, but also to see why each scenario uses the particular approaches it does and how to go about organizing and implementing appropriate analysis pipelines.
◾You will be based in the College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences, an ideal environment in which to train in bioinformatics; our College has carried out internationally-recognised research in functional genomics and systems biology.
◾The new programme reflects the development and activities of 'Glasgow Polyomics'. Glasgow Polyomics is a world-class facility set up in 2012 to provide research services using microarray, proteomics, metabolomics and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Its scientists have pioneered the 'polyomics' approach, in which new insights come from the integration of data across different omics levels.
◾In addition, we have several world-renowned research centres at the University, such as the Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Parasitology and the Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, whose scientists do ground-breaking research employing bioinformatic approaches in the study of disease.
◾You will learn computer programming in courses run by staff in the internationally reputed School of Computing Science, in conjunction with their MSc in Information Technology.

Programme structure

Bioinformatics helps biologists gain new insights about genomes (genomics) and genes, about RNA expression products of genes (transcriptomics) and about proteins (proteomics); rapid advances have also been made in the study of cellular metabolites (metabolomics) and in a newer area: systems biology.

‘Polyomics’ involves the integration of data from these ‘functional genomics’ areas - genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics - to derive new insights about how biological systems function.

The programme structure is designed to equip students with understanding and hands-on experience of both computing and biological research practices relating to bioinformatics and functional genomics, to show students how the computing approaches and biological questions they are being used to answer are connected, and to give students an insight into new approaches for integration of data and analysis across the 'omics' domains.

On this programme, you will develop a range of computing and programming skills, as well as skills in data handling, analysis (including statistics) and interpretation, and you will be brought up to date with recent advances in biological science that have been informed by bioinformatics approaches.

The programme has the following overall structure
◾Core material - 60 credits, Semester 1, made up of 10, 15 and 20 credit courses.
◾Elective material - 60 credits, Semester 2, students select 4 courses (two 10 credit courses and two 20 credit courses) from those available.
◾Project - 60 credits, 14 weeks embedded in a research group over the summer.

Core and optional courses

◾Programming (Java)
◾Database Theory and Application
◾Foundations of Bioinformatics
◾Omics and Systems Approaches in Biology
◾These 4 courses are obligatory for those taking the MSc degree and the PgDip; they are also obligatory for those with no prior programming experience taking the PgCert.
◾60-credit summer research project lasting 14 weeks - this is also obligatory for those taking the MSc programme; normally this will be with one of the research laboratories in Glasgow associated with the programme, but there is also the opportunity to study in suitable laboratories in other parts of the world.

Optional courses include:
◾RNA-seq and next generation transcriptomics
◾Metagenomics
◾Pathogen Polyomics
◾Using Chemical Structure Databases in Drug Discovery for Protein Targets
◾Identification of disease-causing genetic variants
◾A range of more general biology and computing biology courses are also available in semester 2.

Career prospects

Most of our graduates embark on a research career path here in the UK or abroad using the skills they've acquired on our programme - these skills are now of primary relevance in many areas of modern biology and biomedicine. Many are successful in getting a PhD studentship. Others are employed as a core bioinformatician (now a career path within academia in its own right) or as a research assistant in a research group in basic biological or medical science. A postgraduate degree in bioinformatics is also valued by many employers in the life sciences sector - e.g. computing biology jobs in biotechnology/biosciences/neuroinformatics/pharma industry. Some of our graduates have entered science-related careers in scientific publishing or education; others have gone into computing-related jobs in non-bioscience industry or the public sector.

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Research profile. Normal growth of an animal, from the fertilised egg through to end of life maturity, requires concerted action of all the genes found in the animal genome. Read more

Research profile

Normal growth of an animal, from the fertilised egg through to end of life maturity, requires concerted action of all the genes found in the animal genome. Not all genes are active at any one stage or in any one cell type. Gene expression is dynamic yet programmed. Sometimes this programming goes awry and disease ensues. Research in the Division of Developmental Biology aims to characterise, understand and ultimately exploit the ever changing profile of gene expression found in mammals. This will allow the development of a better understanding of biology which in turn will enable new biotech, agricultural and biomedical advances to become reality.

We believe that a supported, active and innovative post-graduate student community is essential if we are to deliver our goals. This community represents the scientists, entrepreneurs, communicators and regulators of the future.

Research in the Division of Developmental Biology aims to enhance fundamental knowledge of the control of cellular growth and differentiation aiming to underpin the development of better disease intervention strategies.

We will advance our understanding of function in these essential biological processes through mechanistic studies at the cell, tissue and whole animal level with particular focus on:

  • animal biotechnology and stem cells
  • tissue and organ development
  • tissue damage and repair
  • regulatory networks in development

Within the Division of Developmental Biology we have 19 Group Leaders plus 2 Career Track Fellows who supervise about 30 students at any one time.

Training and support

Studentships are of 3 or 4 years duration and students will be expected to complete a novel piece of research which will advance our understanding of the field. To help them in this goal, students will be assigned a principal and assistant supervisor, both of whom will be active scientists at the Institute. Student progress is monitored in accordance with School Postgraduate (PG) regulations by a PhD thesis committee (which includes an independent external assessor and chair). There is also dedicated secretarial support to assist these committees and the students with regard to University and Institute matters.

All student matters are overseen by the Schools PG studies committee. The Roslin Institute also has a local PG committee and will provide advice and support to students when requested. An active staff:student liaison committee and a social committee, which is headed by our postgraduate liaison officer, provide additional support.

Students are expected to attend a number of generic training courses offered by the Transkills Programme of the University and to participate in regular seminars and laboratory progress meetings. All students will also be expected to present their data at national and international meetings throughout their period of study.

Facilities

In 2011 The Roslin Institute moved to a new state-of-the-art building on the University of Edinburgh's veterinary campus at Easter Bush. Our facilities include: rodent, bird and livestock animal units and associated lab areas; comprehensive bioinformatic and genomic capability; a range of bioimaging facilities; extensive molecular biology and cell biology labs; café and auditorium where we regularly host workshops and invited speakers.



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Summary

Stratified Medicine, also known as Personalised Medicine, is at the cutting edge of a new era for medicine. Our ability to understand how genes, lifestyle and environment can influence disease promises to revolutionise healthcare practices. Stratified Medicine relies on using biomarkers (e.g. genes or protein) to stratify (or split) patients into specific groups for diagnosing or treating diseases. The ideals of Stratified Medicine will be realised with the development of technologies and systems to predict disease, select the best treatment, and reduce side effects for individual patients. This approach to streamline healthcare provides more accurate clinical decision making tools to identify ‘the right treatment, for the right person, at the right time.’

About

The course is designed as a Masters programme but it is credit-bearing and flexible, so students may also exit with a PgCert or PgDip at key points.

Career options

This course provides an academically challenging science education for those who wish to follow a career within the area of Stratified Medicine. Graduates may also choose to proceed to higher postgraduate degree programmes (MPhil/PhD). Students will aslo undertake this online programme for their continued professional development within their individual areas of employment and this may be for career enhancement.



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