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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Gender and Culture is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Gender and Culture is the University of Regensburg. Founded in 1962, Regensburg is a renowned international centre of teaching and research. Although it has over 21,000 thousand students, the university offers a broad range of disciplines of study, as well as having excellent infrastructure and a favourable staff-student ratio. Regensburg is also active in research, with six special research areas supported by the German Research Society and a strong presence in German- and EU-funded research initiatives. The university has a significant international presence, offering exchange links with more than 200 European institutions and 45 overseas universities. Students will have access to the complete range of services and facilities offered at the university, along with inclusion in the many academic and social activities that take place. Located right in the heart of the old town of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the university is situated in the centre of a culturally and socially rich area with over 2000 years of history.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

This programme focuses on the issues surrounding gender based violence and human rights and principles of human rights. This discipline and subject area has a wide international reach in terms of how society and central government tackle the different levels of crimes against women and men in different countries and regions of the world looking at the very basic rights of people, expectations and challenges in some societies to top level and bringing in a range of other disciplines to analyse issues.  There are a wide range of career options within this subject area which range from international development and diplomacy to security, peace-building, charitable work to improve conditions in communities, women's and men's rights, international justice, policy and law making and so on.

In this programme the focus will be on ways we think about, understand and respond to violence. How do we know what counts as violence or a violent act?Why does legislation against violence so often transpire as inadequate, perhaps especially in the case of gendered and sexual violence? As the links between sex, gender and violence appear intimate and often lethal, a central but not exclusive focus of the programme will be on theories and practices of sex/gender. You are taught by experts in the School of Sociology.  

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods
  • Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2

  • Sex, Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches

Optional

  • Dimensions of Globalisation
  • The Comparative Study of European Societies
  • Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by renowned international experts from The Centre for Gender Studies and School of Sociology
  • University of Aberdeen provides an excellent range of interdisciplinary events which you can attend

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

  • International
  • Scotland and EU
  • Other UK

Find out more from the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs 



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The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of development and/or conflict, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs.

As the pioneering programme of its kind internationally, this MSc programme develops detailed empirical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding the complex linkages between violent conflict and development, both historically and today. It enables students to explore these linkages both within specific country and regional contexts and in the context of global interdependencies and the ways these affect peace, war, and non-war violence.

The programme introduces students to competing analytical approaches. It is multi-disciplinary though shaped by a particular interest in political economy. It encourages deep case study knowledge. And it offers students the ability to tailor their choice of optional courses and dissertation research to their own interests.

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations.

The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in the patterns of violence internationally, in how violence affects development, and in how the uneven processes of development themselves may both generate violence and generate mechanisms for containing violence.

Highlights include:

- Zoe's Blog! (http://vcd-soas.blogspot.co.uk/) A convenor's-eye view of the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme

- Exploration of the long history of theories of human violence

- Relationships between violence and long-run historical change

- The concept of a continuum of violence

- The relevance of historical and more recent evidence that the process of structural change involved in ‘development’ is inherently conflictual and often violent

- To what extent democratisation is a mechanism for securing perpetual peace

- The challenges of understanding gender based violence

- Whether abundant natural resources, or high levels of inequality, or clear markers of religious or ethnic difference are clear sources of violent conflict

- How highly localised violent conflicts are connected to processes of global economic development

- The challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and ‘war to peace transitions’

- The role of NGOs in causes of, dynamics of, and responses to conflict

- Explaining the prevalence of high levels of non-war violence

- Explanations of the political economy of – and alternative perspectives on – terrorism

- Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see Postgraduate modules for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development. They then select one of three ‘development’ modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; or Anthropology of Development. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and their knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students put together a group case study presentation.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules). By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 97kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/file101806.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Engage critically with debates around the relationships between gender, violence and conflict. You’ll consider perspectives from anthropology, international relations, sociology and law. Read more
Engage critically with debates around the relationships between gender, violence and conflict. You’ll consider perspectives from anthropology, international relations, sociology and law. You have the opportunity to explore critical and feminist approaches to social research and its ethics.

The course focuses on:
-Gendered experiences of violence
-Conflict and peace
-Militarisation
-Masculinities and femininities
-Representations and embodiment
-Institutionalisation of violence

How will I study?

In the autumn and spring terms, you’ll take core modules and options. In the summer, you undertake supervised work on your dissertation.

Assessment is through term papers, coursework assignments, practical exercises and presentations as well as the final 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

[[Careers[[
This MA is for you if you’re working in – or planning to work in – the fields of:
-International development and diplomacy (including on gender, gender-based violence, conflict and security, and peace-building)
-The charity sector/NGOs
-Various activist movements, women’s rights, and peace and justice nationally or internationally

The MA is also excellent preparation for a PhD in Anthropology, Gender Studies, International Relations or International Development.

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Gender Health & Development - Masters Module/Short Course. This module is designed to provide participants with a critical approach to gender and to be able to develop competency in gender sensitive planning and practice in health and social development. Read more

Gender Health & Development - Masters Module/Short Course

This module is designed to provide participants with a critical approach to gender and to be able to develop competency in gender sensitive planning and practice in health and social development.

Indicative content will include:

-gender as a social concept

-theoretical perspectives which explain gender differences

-gender, class, ethnicity and age

-gender based violence

-gender effects on health

-gender effects on development

-gender relations

-men and women's health

-gender planning frameworks

-gender sensitive health interventions

Credit Rating: 15 SCOTCAT/5ECTS

Participants of the professional development courses will receive a certificate of attendance from the Institute.

However, participants wishing to gain an award may register for a post graduate certificate. The modules are then taken for credit on a part-time basis each year. A PG Cert requires 60 credits and a post graduate diploma requires 120 credits. If you do a dissertation in addition to the short courses, you will gain 180 credits.

If you register for an award, you can have up to 4 years for a PG Cert, 5 years for a PG Dip and 7 years for a MSc to complete in part-time mode.



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The M.Phil. in Gender and Women's Studies provides a critical understanding of the current scholarship on the position and representation of gender in society. Read more
The M.Phil. in Gender and Women's Studies provides a critical understanding of the current scholarship on the position and representation of gender in society. Drawing on insights and perspectives from a number of academic fields within the Humanities and Social Sciences, the course is both interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, training students to research across a range of disciplines. Its students acquire a deep understanding of the cultural contexts in which theories of gender are produced, performed and negotiated and an ability to use primary source material as well as critical theories and scholarship. The course also hones the sort of analytical, written, and verbal communication skills that are highly valued and effective in a many different careers.

All students take the core modules Gender Theories, Gender Research Seminar and Approaches to Gender Research, which provide a grounding in key approaches and skills. Students choose further modules from a wide range of electives, varying from year to year. These include both special topics and further skills and methodologies training options, allowing students to build specific skills and to follow their individual interests. Recently offered modules include: Gender and Symbolic Violence; Gender, Art and Identity; Gender and War in the 20th Century; Saints and Sanctity in Ireland, Britain and Europe; Gender, Identity and Authority in 18th century France; Gender and Nation in Irish Writing; Approaches to Historical Research; Libraries and Archives; Curating Art in Theory and Practice. The capstone of the course is a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words on a research topic in the area of Gender and Women's Studies selected by the student, carried out under the supervision of a member of the teaching staff of the course.

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This programme provides dynamic and interdisciplinary analysis into fields of conflict studies and theories and concepts on violence, terrorism studies and international security. Read more

This programme provides dynamic and interdisciplinary analysis into fields of conflict studies and theories and concepts on violence, terrorism studies and international security. The MA in VTS helps students develop a critical and analytical approach to problems in history and the contemporary world in these three core areas. It challenges accepted wisdom and opens up the debate about the role of violence in relation to political power in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Successfully completing the MA can enhance students' opportunities for career advancement by developing their knowledge and skills, including the independent research skills required for the dissertation.

Course Details

Six taught modules, plus a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Students will take:

3 core modules/classes in the autumn term:

  • Violence, Terrorism and Security
  • Approaches to Research Design
  • Contemporary Security

2 core modules/classes in the spring term

  • Conflict Intervention
  • Global Terrorism 

Plus one elective module/class from the following:

  • Ethnic Conflict
  • International Political Economy
  • Philosophy of Conflict and War

Over the summer term students complete a 15,000 word MA dissertation

Some recent MA VTS dissertation topics have included:

  • Bioterrorism and arms control
  • Child soldiers and international law
  • Counter-insurgency and targeted assassinations
  • Covert Intelligence and Collusion
  • Cultures of Youth Violence
  • Cyber-terrorism
  • Gender and Counter-terrorism

Assessment and Feedback

Assessment and Feedback are continuous throughout the course of study. 

Students are provided a range of assessment approaches, both formal and informal as well as formative and summative, in order to enhance the student learning experience and improve student attainment. Each module typically consists of two or three main pieces of assessment and can include essays, policy reports, simulations, presentations, among other forms of assessment.

Feedback is provided throughout the VTS programme for continuous student reflection and growth. Teachers provide thorough and systematic feedback on assessed work. Feedback is also available from your personal tutor as well as via various support mechanisms and training courses in the university, such as via the Student Guidance Centre.

Career Prospects

The MA in VTS provides you with the essential transferable skills and in-depth knowledge of theories and issues in the areas of violence, security and terrorism for career development at any stage, from students straight from an undergraduate degree with limited to no prior professional experience to those seeking continued professional development. The programme enables you to broaden your horizons providing you with a competitive edge in a global graduate market in a wide variety of areas such as the security sector, including intelligence agencies, government agencies and public office, the military, NGOs, academia, businesses and corporations, and the media among many other possibilities.

We are proud that many of our graduates have gone to serve in the most senior ranks of a number of National Police Services, and Law Enforcement Agencies, Border and Immigration Control, National Armed Forces including the US Army, US Air Force, US Secret Service, British Army and Irish Defence Forces. Our graduates also work as senior government policy advisers in a variety of different countries, including the State Department in the USA, in international NGOs in diverse parts of the globe including major conflict zones, other graduates have gone into international security consultancy, and many have worked in the media, and others have gone on to successful careers working for international business in a variety of capacities. The MA also provides the research skills and knowledge to carry out a PhD to pursue, as a number of our graduates have done, an academic career. 

Why Queen's

  • Queen’s University, located in Belfast, Northern Ireland offers a unique opportunity for our students to access and engage with a community context previously challenged by violence, terrorism and security as part of the programme of study. Our students have the opportunity to live and study in a post-conflict environment as well as meet people involved in Northern Irish conflict and the peace process, from researchers and policy makers to ex-combatants
  • World-class research: Students have the opportunity to study under world-class academics in the areas of Violence, Terrorism and Security such as Professor Beverley Milton-Edwards, Professor Richard English, Dr Debbie Lisle, Dr Michael Bourne, Dr Heather Johnson, Dr Julie Norman, Dr Andrew Thomson, among many others. 


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This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on gender issues in development. Read more

This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on gender issues in development.

You’ll learn about the experiences and viewpoints of people and nations of the Global South regarding development issues, as well as the inter-relationships between global, national and local actors in contested strategies for development.

You’ll also review strategies, programmes and policies in development, including organisations and donors promoting development, and assess the progress made by different development actors towards key international development goals.

You’ll explore controversies at the centre of contemporary development challenges and analyse both the theories and realities of development, to understand the different approaches, practices and discourses involved.

Research insight

MA Global Development has a close working relationship with the Global Development and Justice research group that aims to examine central debates within the field of global development from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The Global Development and Justice research group is also actively involved, amongst others, in the Centre for Global Development, a university-wide network that promotes cross-disciplinary approaches to the field, as well as the Leeds Centre for African Studies.

Course content

Core modules examine key issues surrounding global development, such as markets, inequality, democratisation, gender, health, education, human rights, conflict, violence and crime. You’ll also learn about various aspects of development practice, like the theoretical and analytical principles of Project Cycle Management. Additionally, you’ll hone your research and writing skills and then showcase them in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on a topic of your choice.

These modules will equip you to analyse, understand and discuss the major changes, problems and opportunities facing societies and people in the Global South. You’ll study some of the broader social, political, and economic causes of the problems, and the achievements and setbacks that people have experienced in their efforts to tackle them at the global, national and local levels and improve their societies and lives. You’ll learn to analyse, understand, and discuss development in the Global South in the 2010s in all its dynamism, complexity and significance.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you, including natural resources struggles, global health, gender and globalisation, education, international political economy or issues related to Africa and China.

If you are a part-time student, you can choose how to spread your studies across two years. However, we recommend that you at least take your compulsory modules in your first year, and you have to take the compulsory dissertation module in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Global Inequalities and Development 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Education in Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • Research Methodology for Development 15 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Gender MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Gender MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Modules are conducted through a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. Tutors also provide you with individual advice on written work and you should begin to develop expertise in improving your work through face to face discussion with your tutors, formative assessment and through detailed feedback. You’ll be expected to carry out a good deal of independent, detailed and considered study.

All part-time students attend exactly the same classes as full-time students which usually take place between 9am and 5pm; there are no evening classes.

Assessment

Each module is assessed separately, through assessments that range from long essays to projects and assignments, offering you the opportunity to work in your particular field of interest within each topic area. You will also carry out a dissertation into a research area of your choice.

Career opportunities

This programme is aimed at students who would like to pursue either a professional career or further research in international development and related fields, and generally have a desire to put their education into practice in the Global South.

You’ll gain a wide range of professional skills on top of your subject knowledge. You’ll have an understanding of project design and management in a development context, as well as being able to analyse quantitative and qualitative data. You’ll be able to construct clear arguments, critically assess different options for action, analyse policy documents, write research reports and give presentations. You’ll also be trained to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations.

Our programme equips you for various career paths. Compatible careers include working in international development agencies, international organisations, governments, politics, NGOs, research organisations, policy making, companies, media, and academia.

Graduates have gone on to work in, for instance, non-governmental organisations in the UK or overseas, research and consultancy firms, international organisations (such as the UN), the Civil Service, the media, or have continued with further study (e.g. PhD research).

We encourage you to seek practical work experience in the international development field, and advise you on how to go about it.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This MA scheme is ideal for those who wish to study Gender and Women’s Studies in combination with empirical and theoretical developments in Sociology at an advanced level, and particularly suitable for those interested in social research and/or feminist sociological theory. Read more

This MA scheme is ideal for those who wish to study Gender and Women’s Studies in combination with empirical and theoretical developments in Sociology at an advanced level, and particularly suitable for those interested in social research and/or feminist sociological theory.

Students take core courses in each of the disciplines and can choose from a range of optional courses in addition to these. This combination is administered from the Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies, one of the largest centres in the UK for feminist research, gender studies and women’s studies and part of one of the most highly regarded Sociology departments in the UK.

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

◾Debates in Gender Research

◾Gender, Sex and Bodies

◾Dissertation

Optional

◾Women's Studies Research Project

◾Feminist Media and Cultural Studies

◾Feminist Technoscience Studies

◾Gender and Violence

◾Capitalism and Crisis

◾Environment and Culture

◾The Social Life of Science and Technology: Theories and Debates

◾Social and Cultural Theory

◾Cybercultures

◾Research Projects in Practice: From Design to Dissemination

◾Contemporary Debates in Sociology

◾Critical Methods in Media and Cultural Studies

◾Methods in Science and Technology Studies

◾Mobilities, Society & Change

◾Critical Debates in Media and Cultural Studies



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The MA degree can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two years. Read more
The MA degree can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two years. In addition to the four compulsory modules (Difference, Diversity & Change; Interdisciplinary Methods in Women's Studies; Gender, Violence & Justice; Women, Citizenship & Conflict) and the 60 credit dissertation, students taking the MA Women Violence and Conflict will select a programme of research training modules to make up the remaining 40 credits, or opt to take Work, Politics & Culture and a further 20 credits of research training methods from the available selction. This programme should be agreed with the supervisor and submitted to Chair of Board of Studies. You will be allocated a supervisor for your dissertation which must be submitted towards the end of your final year.

Natalie, an MA Women, Violence and Conflict student writes:
'Welcome! I'd encourage students to take advantage of all the resources available to them - don't be shy! Everyone is the department is wonderful and more than willing to help. I'd encourage you to get to know your classmates - the beauty of this department is how amazingly interesting and diverse the students and professors are. I've learned more from my classmates than I ever anticipated. I'd say, frankly, READ. Read as much as you can on as many topics as you can - it's not often that you'll have the opportunity to engage these topics in depth in such a supportive environment with some of the greatest resources right in the department! Don't be afraid to not know, or to ask questions. Everyone is here to support you both academically and otherwise. Challenge yourself and appreciate the opportunity to feel uncomfortable sometimes! I'm sad my time here is almost over!!'

Programme aims

-To provide a solid grounding in interdisciplinary women's studies, emphasizing gendered aspects in relation to violence and conflict in inter/national contexts
-To expose students to an interdisciplinary range of conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches to and debates violence against women and in contexts of violent conflict
-To familiarize students with the epistemological and philosophical underpinnings of research methodologies, the politics and ethics of research, the principles of research design and to enable them to evaluate and apply a range of methodologies to research questions related to issues of violence against women
-To foster the development of a critical, self-reflexive and independent approach to research and scholarship, as well as the acquisition of transferable skills

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Applicants apply for the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme but can decide to follow the Palestine Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab). Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Applicants apply for the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme but can decide to follow the Palestine Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab).

We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development and/or conflict, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, development issues in Palestine.

Students taking the Palestine Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Palestine. Development and conflict issues in Palestine are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in the Middle East. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the Centre for Palestine Studies, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Palestine.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-violence-conflict-and-development-palestine-pathway/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 97kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/file101806.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

- Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This degree incorporates a number of topics including concepts used in gender analysis of development, social justice, gender and power, poverty and inequality, and gendered approaches to social and human development such as capabilities, social exclusion and human rights, and violence, religion and identities. Read more
This degree incorporates a number of topics including concepts used in gender analysis of development, social justice, gender and power, poverty and inequality, and gendered approaches to social and human development such as capabilities, social exclusion and human rights, and violence, religion and identities.

We offer a broad training integrating theory and development policy experience which is both sectoral (eg education; land and property; credit and finance; rural livelihoods; sustainable development, environment and conservation; HIV/AIDS) and cross-cutting (eg migration, and male gender identities and masculinities in development).

Our graduates are employed in the World Bank, the UK DFID, and other bilateral aid agencies, and in large international NGOs like Oxfam as well as in developing country government departments and as academics.

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This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. Read more

This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. It also offers international human rights practitioners the opportunity to update their knowledge and further develop intellectual and critical skills.

Key features of the course include opportunities to

  • develop a multidisciplinary understanding of human rights and social justice as they exist today in theory, policy and practice
  • develop an understanding of how human rights organisations work in theory and practice
  • engage with the research work of staff in the Human Rights and Social Justice Research Cluster and the Department of Law and Criminology
  • complete in-depth case studies on key topics in human rights
  • learn from experienced practitioners and policy-makers from local and international human rights organisations

The MA Applied Human Rights combines a robust academic and intellectual learning environment covering law, politics, criminology and and social science with first-hand opportunity of experiencing how human rights organisations work in theory and practice. This course addresses the implications of global changes for human rights practitioners.

During the course you investigate contemporary local and global human rights topics, including • gender violence • children as soldiers • radicalisation and counter-terrorism • deaths in custody • refugees and asylum seekers • global security • torture • poverty.

You also gain the experience and skills needed to carry out in-depth case studies on key contemporary challenges to the human rights regime/

A unique opportunity available on this course is being able to take part in the work of the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice on a range of practical human rights projects, public events, case reviews, seminars and workshops.

Throughout your studies you develop a range of intellectual, conceptual and practical skills by analysing complex material and communicating the findings in clear, concise and accessible language. These transferable skills help you develop knowledge of human rights in an applied context. This gives you a sound basis for a career in many areas of human rights policy and practice.

You also learn through guest speakers (previous guest speakers include Shami Chakrabarti and Trevor Phillips) how human rights principles are applied in practical situations, to inform responses to a particular social problem. In addition, we have experts working on various human rights projects (such those for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, British Council, United Nations, Amnesty and Clarion Global) providing real world case studies to provide a strong applied flavour to the course.

You can complete a dissertation which can be based on a topic of your choice, enabling you to specialise in an area of interest, or can choose to plan and take part in a project on human rights.

Course structure

Modules

  • human rights in the 21st century
  • principles of human rights and social justice
  • researching human rights
  • project management for human rights
  • dissertation

Assessment

  • essays
  • reports
  • case studies
  • presentations
  • dissertation

Employability

On the course you gain transferable skills and develop knowledge of human rights and social justice theories and practice to prepare you to work with

  • human rights non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
  • local and central government services
  • research and development organisations 


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This programme is one of five interdisciplinary pathways that are delivered as part of the South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP). Read more
This programme is one of five interdisciplinary pathways that are delivered as part of the South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP).

The programme recognises social scientific research on security, conflict and human rights from different disciplines, and how different approaches treat these issues. The programme moves beyond traditional approaches to security studies to complement these with wider perspectives, such as human (in)security, including domestic insecurity and violence, to develop better strategies for resolving conflicts and securing social justice.

We equip researchers with the interdisciplinary skills to impact the research, policy and practice as needed to avoid and mitigate security risks.

Programme structure

Core units
-Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Design
-Conceptual Issues in Security, Conflict and Human Rights
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences

The research training units Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences and Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences run a number of times across the faculty. Students may request to take whichever unit best fits their timetable, but requests are subject to space constraints.

Optional units can be taken at the Universities of Bristol, Bath or Exeter. Options vary from year to year but may include the following units available at Bristol:
-Theoretical Approaches in Security Studies
-International Security
-Feminisms and International Relations
-Theories of International Relations
-International Political Economy
-Theories of Development
-Governance, Institutions and the Global Political Economy
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-US Security Policy
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US Relations in Global Politics
-East Asia and Global Development
-Japan and East Asia: Socio-Economic Development
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-China in Transition: Development Strategies and Reform
-Gender Violence: International and Global Perspectives
-Gender Masculinity/ies and International Relations

Dissertation
Over the summer you will complete a research-based dissertation of up to 15,000 words, individually supervised by a member of staff from the school.

Careers

The MRes in Security Conflict and Human Rights offers useful preparation for a number of careers. Foremost, the MRes is the academic basis and preparation for students choosing the 1+3 programme (the first year is the MRes and the +3 the PhD).

The programme emphasises ESRC-accredited research methods training, the ability to plan, research and write a sophisticated dissertation, and the ability to think in broad theoretical and interdisciplinary terms about challenging issues. These provide an ideal introduction to academic research and to working for NGOs.

It would be of interest to anyone pursuing a career path in international security, development and conflict issues, international development departments of government, policy researchers, consultants, policy civil servants or the military.

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