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Masters Degrees (Garden Design)

We have 25 Masters Degrees (Garden Design)

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Garden Design is a rich and diverse interdisciplinary and collaborative discipline spanning the traditions of arts and sciences. Read more

Overview

Garden Design is a rich and diverse interdisciplinary and collaborative discipline spanning the traditions of arts and sciences. The MA Garden Design aims to provide an integration of the creativity of art and design with the core knowledge of ecology, landscape and garden theory, history, technology, restoration and the understanding of the theoretical and applied levels of knowledge and practice in Garden Design.

MA Garden Design is a progression and a complement to the undergraduate Landscape and Garden Design (LGD) course in the School of Design at Writtle University College. The Masters is intended to take the next steps in developing theory and practice of garden design by providing more advanced perspectives and applications to the undergraduate course. Garden Design focuses on the meaning of gardens, theory and history of gardens, conservation and restoration of gardens, and rural and urban social, economic and ecological contexts. The MA Garden Design is part of the School of Design and part of the overall postgraduate design programme that includes Landscape Architecture.

Professional Accreditation

This course has been accredited by the Landscape Institute and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA) and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (Europe).

You can find out more about these here;
http://www.landscapeinstitute.org/
http://iflaeurope.eu/about/

Core modules in Year One

Semester One: Theories of Landscape and Garden Design, Landscape Ecology, Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project, contextual to Garden Design), Research Methods in Landscape and Garden Design, Research Colloquium, Conservation and Restoration of Historic Gardens (option).

Semester Two: Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design, Designing within a Historic Context, Advanced Design Studio II, Options (e.g. Restoration and Management of Historic Gardens, Professional Practice, Special topics (specific project/research interest area) and Dissertation or Design Research Project.

Delivery and Assessment

The most successful teaching method across the UK for Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Garden Design, Art and Environmental Planning and Design has been this combination of design studio and classroom.

Work Experience

Internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory and private sector landscape and garden design consultancies within the UK and internationally.

All degrees at Writtle University College are awarded by the University of Essex.

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Students will learn how to acquire knowledge from a range of sources including history, horticulture, architecture, garden archaeology and other subjects, to develop an appreciation of the study of garden history as a cultural discipline. Read more
Students will learn how to acquire knowledge from a range of sources including history, horticulture, architecture, garden archaeology and other subjects, to develop an appreciation of the study of garden history as a cultural discipline.

Students will be able to appreciate the differences in garden-making over time and in different countries, from the 16th century to the present day in Britain, Europe and America. Emphasis will be on design and management, ownership, and the culture from which these examples have evolved.

This degree will provide an academically rigorous environment in which students will learn a range of academic research and writing skills. Teaching will be undertaken at the Institute of Historical Research (http://www.history.ac.uk/), with a strong emphasis on tutor/student interaction in class. There will be practical sessions at museums and libraries, as well as visits to gardens in London. There will also be an optional field trip to Italy in the spring.

Structure

The course will be run on a full-time basis over one year. Teaching will take place on Thursdays from 10:00 to 17:00 and will be divided between two terms. The third term will be dedicated to dissertation preparation and writing. Please get in touch if you would like to see the full timetable.

Students must complete core module 1, core module 2 (selecting three options from the six provided), and core module 3 - a 15,000 word dissertation in order to be awarded the full MA.

However, there are a range of options available for flexible study:

Those wishing to pursue this course on a part-time basis can complete Modules 1 and 2 (the taught elements of the course) in their first year and Module 3, the dissertation, in their second year
Module 1 can be undertaken as a standalone unit leading to a PGCert, the credit for which can be banked should the student wish to complete the MA at a later date (within a prescribed time frame) Please enquire for further details.
Module 1: Researching Garden History (60 credits)

The first term will showcase the huge variety of resources available to study garden and landscape history from archaeology, architecture, cartography, horticulture, manuscripts, paintings and other works of art, from the sixteenth century to the present day.

Sessions include:

Early maps of gardens (British library)
Garden Archaeology (Hampton Court)
Gardens and Architecture referencing Drawings Collection at the RIBA and V&A
The Italian Renaissance and English Gardens
The eighteenth century garden + visit to Chiswick House
Gardening and Photographic images
Assessment

A 5,000 word report on the history of a garden chosen by the student and an accompanying presentation.

Module 2: Culture and Politics of Gardens (60 credits)

This module consists of six optional units of which students must choose three.

These sessions aim to:

Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of gardens and landscapes in different countries
Develop students’ critical analysis and judgement
Demonstrate the importance of context and the relationship of garden and landscape history to other disciplines such as literature, social history, film and visual media and the history of ideas
The module will look at Historiography, theory, the connection between culture and politics in landscape making and the expansion of the skills of term one across regional boundaries.

For instance, the influence in Britain of the Italian Renaissance’s new ideas on garden making, including architecture, sculpture and hydraulic engineering; iconography in gardens and landscapes; formality in garden-making as an indicator of the power of the owner, from the sixteenth century onwards, as in France; different aspects of the ‘natural’ garden from the eighteenth century onwards; conflict between the ‘natural’ and the formal in the nineteenth century between William Robinson and Reginald Blomfield in Britain; gender and garden making; and shifting boundaries between architect, landscape architect and plantsman relating to the status of those designing gardens and landscapes in the 21st century.

Students will choose one unit from each group:

Students will choose one unit from each group:

Group A
French gardens of the seventeenth century
The evolution of the English garden in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries

Group B
The eighteenth-century garden
The American garden

Group C
The Suburban Garden in England between the wars
Twentieth- and twenty-first-century gardens

Please note: Optional units are subject to change. Please consider this a guide only.

Assessment

Two 5,000 word assessed essays on two of the three options taken, and an assessed student presentation on the outline of the intended dissertation.

Module 3: Dissertation (60 credits), 15,000 words

Mode of study

12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

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Programme description. Design Informatics combines Data Science with Design Thinking in a context of critical enquiry and speculation. Read more

Programme description

Design Informatics combines Data Science with Design Thinking in a context of critical enquiry and speculation. We build a value-aware, reflective practice at the interface between data and society by combining theory and research with an open-ended process of making and hacking.

Human activity is being constantly shaped by the flow of data and the intelligences that process it, moving towards an algorithmically mediated society. Design Informatics asks how we can create products and services within this world, that learn and evolve, that are contextualised and humane. Beyond that, it asks questions about what things we should create, speculating about the different futures we might be building and the values behind them.

The central premise is that data is a medium for design: by shaping data, we shape the world around us. Data Science provides the groundwork for this, with Design Thinking underpinning reflective research through design. You will use this in working with the internet of things and physical computing, machine learning, speech and language technology, usable privacy and security, data ethics, blockchain technologies. You will connect technology with society, health, architecture, fashion, bio-design, craft, finance, tourism, and a host of other real world contexts, through case studies, individual, and collaborative projects. You will understand user experience in the wider socio-cultural context, through an agile programme of hacking, making and materialising new products and services.

Programme structure

Please be aware that the structure of the programme may change.

Throughout the programme, you will be working both individually and in teams of designers and computer scientists. Everyone will have to write code during the course, and everyone will have to make physical objects. Several courses, including the dissertation, will involve presenting the artefact, product, service, or interactive experience that you have created to the general public in a show.

In the first year, you will study:

  • Design Informatics: Histories and Futures
  • Data Science for Design (compulsory for MA/MFA, strongly recommended for MSc/ Advanced MSc)
  • Case Studies in Design Informatics 1
  • Design with Data
  • Design Informatics Project
  • 20 credits of elective courses

In Design with Data and Design Informatics Project, you are likely to work with an external partner, such as the Royal Bank of Scotland, Amazon, Edinburgh City Council, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh or the National Museum of Scotland.

MSc and MA students then undertake a dissertation in the summer before graduation.

MFA and Advanced MSc students take a summer placement with a relevant digital organisation then return for a second year of study, comprising:

  • Case Studies in Design Informatics 2
  • 60 credits of elective courses
  • A dissertation

Elective courses are drawn from the Masters Programmes of the School of Informatics, Edinburgh College of Art, and Philosophy, Psychology, and Language Sciences. Courses are typically 10 or 20 credits.

Career opportunities

This programme will put you at the cutting edge of the intersection between data science, design, and information technology, opening a host of opportunities in working with companies, charities, and the public sector. We encourage entrepreneurship. For those who wish to stay in academia, the course provides a solid foundation for a PhD in related areas.



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The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. Read more

Overview

The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. It involves the analysis of environmental, cultural, historical and legal factors as well as the exploration of human needs and expression. Landscape architecture approaches elements of change and their physical and phenomenal relationships through the implementation of landscape and garden designs, landscape plans, and landscape management strategies. The profession addresses a broad range of landscapes in urban, suburban, rural and ‘wilderness’ settings. The scale of such projects varies from expressive detailed design at a site scale to master planning at community and campus scales to landscape analysis and planning at regional scales.

The interdisciplinary nature of Landscape Architecture is a rich and diverse subject drawing on the traditions of both arts and sciences. The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course and the undergraduate Landscape and Garden Design Course are accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI).

Accreditation

The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course is accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI) and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (Europe).

Core modules in Year One

Semester One: Theories of Landscape, Landscape Ecology, Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project), Research Methods in Landscape Architecture and Design, Research Colloquium.

Semester Two: Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design, Professional Practice, Advanced Design Studio II, Options (e.g. Landscape and Environmental Assessment, Landscape Resource Management, Special topics (specific project/research interest area) and Dissertation or Design Research Project.

Work Experience

Landscape Architecture Programme internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory, private sector landscape, environmental and urban design consultancies and private practice as Landscape Architects within the UK and internationally.

All Writtle University College degrees are awarded by the University of Essex.

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The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. Read more

Overview

The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. It involves the analysis of environmental, cultural, historical and legal factors as well as the exploration of human needs and expression.

Landscape architecture approaches elements of change and their physical and phenomenal relationships through the implementation of landscape and garden designs, landscape plans, and landscape management strategies. The profession addresses a broad range of landscapes in urban, suburban, rural and ‘wilderness’ settings. The scale of such projects varies from expressive detailed design at a site scale to master planning at community and campus scales to landscape analysis and planning at regional scales.

The interdisciplinary nature of Landscape Architecture is a rich and diverse subject drawing on the traditions of both arts and sciences.

If you would like to find out more about our postgraduate courses please see here: http://www.writtle.ac.uk/Postgraduate-Courses

Accredited

The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course is accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI) and the International Federation for Landscape Architects (Europe).

Core Modules in Year One

Semester One:
* Theories of Landscape
* Landscape Ecology
* Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project)
* (Option) Research Methods in Landscape Architecture and Design
* Research Colloquium

Semester Two:
* Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design
* Professional Practice
* Advanced Design Studio II and Options (e.g. Landscape and Environmental Assessment, Landscape Resource Management, Special topics (specific project/research interest area)

Work Experience

Landscape Architecture Programme internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory, private sector landscape, environmental and urban design consultancies and private practice as Landscape Architects within the UK and internationally.

All Writtle College degrees are awarded by the University of Essex.

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The Landscape Architecture Studies MA will educate you in the knowledge and values of landscape architecture and its interface with planning and architecture. Read more
The Landscape Architecture Studies MA will educate you in the knowledge and values of landscape architecture and its interface with planning and architecture. You will develop a practical understanding of the theories, methods and techniques that are applied to landscape architecture, with much of what you learn applicable worldwide.

Through studying this course you will learn how to demonstrate systematic knowledge and understanding of landscape architecture and its interface with planning and architecture. This includes the design and planning of both urban and rural landscapes with the potential to study landscape projects in a range of country contexts.

We will work with you to expand on your ability to think critically about the design of place and space. You will develop advanced skills so that you can deal with complex aspects of landscape design and planning in a creative and innovative way.

You will develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of the way landscape has been conceptualised and theorised at different times and in different places, informed by relevant research findings and relevant practice. You will consider this historical context with changes in the environment and the impact this will have on landscape architecture in the future.

The studio based design projects offer an opportunity for you to refine your design skills. The practical skills you will develop include being able to creatively respond to complex architectural briefs and generating design proposals. You will be able to evaluate the materials, process and techniques that apply to landscape architectural projects and integrate these into your proposals.

On graduation you will be equipped for advanced practice in landscape-related disciplines. The Landscape Architecture Studies MA is ideal if you want to further your education, develop your career, or prepare for further specialised study. Through the course you will develop advanced transferrable skills in literacy, design and communication.

The course can also open up some career paths outside of landscape architecture, such as landscape conservation and garden design history.

Delivery

The course is taught and based on the Newcastle campus. The course runs across two taught semesters with the summer months taken up with a final thesis design project.

You will participate in a significant amount of work with your tutor and the other students. The style of teaching depends on the modules selected and includes:
-Design studio teaching
-Lectures
-Guided reading
-Seminars
-Project work
-Site visits

You will be assessed by multiple choice exams and coursework, including essays, individual and group studio projects, response diaries and your final major thesis.

Facilities

The course is based in a dedicated taught postgraduate Design Studio building. The School's Workshop is nearby. Dedicated School desktop computers and large and small format printers are also available. Most spaces in the School are Wi-Fi enabled.

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MA by Dissertation in Art & Design is designed to help students review, develop and progress their practice as an artist or designer. Read more

Why study an MA by Dissertation in Art & Design?

MA by Dissertation in Art & Design is designed to help students review, develop and progress their practice as an artist or designer. The course has been created to enhance the breadth and depth of students’ artistic abilities and capacities for self-direction and professionalism. It will allow students to develop an individual practice and engender the required excellence to successfully become a creative professional.

If you would like to find out more about our postgraduate courses in Art & Design please see here: http://www.writtle.ac.uk/design/postgraduate.cfm

Who is the course for?

The MA by Dissertation in Art and Design is for those with art and/or design degrees or related Honours qualifications. These include, for example: fine art, graphic design, illustration, interactive media, networked media, architecture, interior, landscape and garden design, and art history. Students may choose to progress straight from their undergraduate studies or return to their studies after a period of work. As a non-taught postgraduate degree, the MA by Dissertation offers students the opportunity to identify and refine an area of research within an open studio culture of debate and practice led by established practicing artists, curators, theorists and art historians. A portfolio of work and CV are required, together with a letter addressing research interests and reasons for applying.

Course aims

Giving students an intellectually-stimulating and creative environment in which they can further develop their potential as an artist or designer.
Providing teaching and peer-group learning that is both challenging and responsive to student needs.

Providing a place for debate that aids students in becoming increasingly articulate and professional in questioning and improving their works and goals.

Providing practical support and the necessary technical resources for creating works in a range of different media.

Developing a range of transferable skills and the knowledge of how to apply them in the art and design industries.

Delivery and assessment

While the MA by Dissertation is a non-taught postgraduate degree, students benefit from, and contribute to, the dynamism of the studio-based Art and Design courses at Writtle School of Design. Students attend a weekly seminar in which they present their research findings and practice to tutors and fellow students.
Assessment is in three parts: a dissertation, portfolio of practice-based research and an exhibition or final major project that embodies the results of the research carried out.

Dissertation:

The dissertation comprises a written thesis (of up to 10,000 words) which sets out the relationship between the student’s work and the wider field of knowledge/the subject area, addressing the theoretical, historical and critical context of their work.

The Portfolio of Research:

The portfolio of research is a comprehensive body of developmental work that demonstrates an exploratory and reflective approach to an appropriate breadth of media, tools and techniques. The format of this portfolio is agreed with supervisors but may include a blog, journal, sketchbook and/or a collection of sketches and models.

The Final Exhibition:

The public presentation of art and design work is an important aspect of creative professional life and students will be supported in planning, promoting and implementing a public presentation of their work to a professional standard at the end of the course.

Throughout the programme students will engage with the following activities:

Semester one:
• Introduction to Research Methods
• Discussion of texts
• Exhibition visits
• Exploration and reflection on tools, techniques, materials
• Seminars

Semester two:
• Development of work towards final exhibition or major project
• Discussion of texts
• Exhibition visits
• Seminars

Spring-Summer:
• Dissertation – supported by seminars and tutorials

Career prospects

Career possibilities for art and design graduates have increased over recent years, reflecting the burgeoning opportunities within the cultural sector in the UK and internationally. Graduates work as professional artists, filmmakers, graphic designers, game designers, curators, and gallery professionals in public and private galleries. They also write for magazines, newspapers and journals on a whole variety of cultural topics. Other career opportunities for MA graduates include residency programmes, community-led outreach work and teaching art or design. Students who are on our MA programme may already be professional artists or designers who wish to reinvigorate and refocus their practice.

To find out more about our careers guidance, please see here: http://www.writtle.ac.uk/Careers

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This programme is professionally accredited by the Landscape Institute and provides you with professionally focused landscape architectural skills. Read more

This programme is professionally accredited by the Landscape Institute and provides you with professionally focused landscape architectural skills.

We offer the only professional, degree-level programmes in landscape architecture in Scotland and they are some of the best delivered worldwide.

This programme focuses on landscape architectural design and is taught by a range of project types and contexts, concerned with building a sustainable future for the landscape we inhabit.

Landscape architecture is a discipline that focuses on intervention in the landscape through the activities of design, planning and management. Landscape is defined as outdoor spaces, environments and relationships between people and places. Landscape Architecture is concerned with landscapes of all types, both urban and rural and at all scales from the garden to the region. It is distinguished by its position at the interface of art and design and the physical, natural and social sciences.

The programme benefits from the studio-based learning typical of an art college environment. Contextual subjects are delivered from within Landscape Architecture and from the wider University community. Uniquely, plants and horticulture are taught at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE). The programme therefore benefits from the intimate small scale nature of ECA and the wider worldwide reputation of the University and RBGE.

Edinburgh itself is a unique and exciting centre for study, with many of the issues at the heart of the profession on hand. Within a short distance, the relatively undeveloped areas of the Scottish Highlands and the Borders illustrate different problems, opportunities and solutions. However, the programme is international in outlook with graduating courses currently sited in Poland, Estonia and France.

The programme has a long and excellent relationship with employers worldwide and contributes to professional practice by its links with public bodies and other agencies.

Programme structure

The programme focuses on four landscape portfolio courses, which contain a variety of design options you can choose from based on factors such as previous experience or personal interest. These are set on real sites with real issues, with differing scales and complexity, and with stakeholders actively informing the process.

The courses become increasingly complex and self-directed as the programme progresses and they are supported via aligned contextual and technological courses. The programme culminates in a major design project you select and develop with support from staff.

Career opportunities

Our graduates are hugely in demand. Currently, almost all of our graduates gain rewarding employment very soon after graduation. Some go on to study research-led degrees (PhD). Many become leaders in their field worldwide.



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This MA Landscape Architecture course incorporates a conversion course in year one, providing a foundation programme that enables applicants who don’t have a degree in Landscape Architecture an opportunity to enter year two of the programme, where you will join students who have previously completed a degree in Landscape Architecture. Read more

Summary

This MA Landscape Architecture course incorporates a conversion course in year one, providing a foundation programme that enables applicants who don’t have a degree in Landscape Architecture an opportunity to enter year two of the programme, where you will join students who have previously completed a degree in Landscape Architecture.

The conversion year is a studio based learning environment that delivers a combination of key skills that support the communication of projects, investigating the idea that our laboratory is a designed ecology and that you will learn about the landscape across its range of scales.

The second part of the year looks at the idea that landscape is a sequence of interrelated designed environments connected by land, ecology, water, climate and infrastructure, sitting in a cultural context that extends from Parish to global political and economic systems.

Students can choose to study towards a Postgraduate Diploma, or a Master's qualification.

Modules

The PG Diploma modules are: professional practice; critical urbanism; critical design; designed ecologies; research methods: dissertation/thesis design project; design thesis project 1; design thesis project 2; design thesis project 3: technology.

Master’s award modules: The above modules along with a dissertation.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework in all modules except for professional practice, which is partly assessed by a written exam; the majority of coursework is related to design projects, although some modules require the submission of written papers, drawn theoretical analysis and construction and planting design workbooks or studies.

Career prospects

On successful completion of the PgDiploma you can apply to become a licentiate member of the Landscape Institute (LI), the chartered body for landscape architecture in the UK. Full chartered status is gained following completion of the LI’s Professional Practice Examination after a further two years in practice. Students have found employment both during and on completion of the course, in a wide range of design practices in the UK and overseas.

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How can we prevent another financial crisis? Is it by better understanding risk in financial securities? Can improving the way we measure and manage risk create stability in the financial world?. Read more
How can we prevent another financial crisis? Is it by better understanding risk in financial securities? Can improving the way we measure and manage risk create stability in the financial world?

The after effects of the 2008 financial meltdown are still being felt across the globe. We need knowledgeable financial professionals who can evaluate risk, act rationally and understand the economic impact of their actions in order to find solutions. If you can rise to the challenge of making ethical, sound financial decisions in pressurised environments, MSc Financial Engineering and Risk Management is for you.

You follow advanced, contemporary study in financial engineering and risk management and develop a deeper understanding of the risks within modern financial securities. You also become skilled in the design of robust management systems to measure risk. Upon graduation, you should possess the skills and knowledge for a successful career in commercial, investment and central banks, hedge funds, regulatory authorities and rating agencies.

You master areas including:
-Asset pricing
-Derivative securities
-Financial modelling
-Mathematical research techniques using Matlab

MSc Financial Engineering and Risk Management is taught at Essex Business School, home to one of the largest, and most respected, finance groups in the UK. Our teaching is grounded in contemporary issues and professional practice, supported by industry-standard facilities, such as our Bloomberg virtual trading floor.

We’re ranked in the top 25 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014) and are home to an international community of scholars, practitioners and academics; our current Masters students join us from more than 40 countries.

This course is also available to study part-time and you may be able to apply for scholarships and discounts offered by the University of Essex. Essex Business School also offers a limited number of scholarships for the CFA level one exam and IMC level one and two exams to exceptional Masters students.

Essex Business School is an IMC Advantage Partner and a Recognised Partner of the CFA.

Postgraduate loans for Masters courses are now available from the Student Loans Company, worth up to £10,000, for students from the UK and EU.

Our expert staff

We’re home to Essex Finance Centre, which produces research at the cutting-edge of financial debate.

Work by our expert staff has been discussed in the Bank of England, the European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve, so you join a business school that seeks to make a real difference to solving financial challenges around the world.

We combine academic experience with industry expertise and are renowned for research into:
-Business ethics and corporate social responsibility
-Organisation studies
-Leadership and strategy
-Finance and banking
-Risk management
-International management

Specialist facilities

You’re based at our Colchester Campus, in our landmark zero carbon building.

Our Colchester home is an example of our dedication to sustainable and ethical business practices. Its design is both environmentally friendly and architecturally stunning, with a winter garden and sun terrace contributing to the building’s own micro-climate and providing a tranquil environment for group working and socialising. Our Bonds café is located on site, making a great space for reviewing course notes before lectures.

Our virtual trading floor, complete with Bloomberg Financial Market Labs, enables you to practice dealing stocks and securities using industry-standard equipment. You can also benefit from our study skills workshops, designed to help you excel in your academic work.

Our building is also located on the University’s Knowledge Gateway, providing potential opportunities to network with inspiring SMEs who locate their businesses on our Colchester Campus.

Your future

An Essex Business School education is founded on creativity, innovation and ethical awareness to prepare you for the challenges of the global marketplace. In 2015, 78% of our postgraduate taught students were in work or further study (DLHE).

Our course provides you with the opportunity to develop a career in financial analysis, management, public administration and accountancy, as well as fostering your entrepreneurial spirit.

We provide plenty of support along the way to help you secure your dream job. Our dedicated employability team work closely with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-MSc Finance and Investment: Dissertation
-Finance Research Techniques Using Matlab
-Research Methods in Finance: Empirical Methods in Finance
-Postgraduate Mathematics Preparation
-Risk Management
-Financial Modelling
-Asset Pricing
-Derivative Securities
-Trading Global Financial Markets (optional)

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This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Read more
This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Students benefit from the Institute of Archaeology's emphasis on the role of heritage in today's society, from the art and archaeology collections of UCL, and from the unrivalled resources of London's museums.

Degree information

Students are introduced to theoretical issues involved in cultural heritage and develop a critical understanding of the social and political context in which the processes for managing cultural heritage operate. The flexible programme structure allows students to design a theoretically based or practically based degree depending on each individual's needs and interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following core modules:
-Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development

Optional modules - students then choose to follow futher option choices to the value of 60 credits. At least 30 credits must be taken from the list below. The remaining 30 credits may also come from this list or can be chosen from the outstanding range of Master's option choices offered by the UCL Institute of Archaeology.
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Traditions
-Cultural Memory
-Funerary Archaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations, site visits and guest lectures, and includes a 20-day placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. Assessment is through essays, projects reports, a heritage agency report following the placement, and the dissertation.

Placement
Students have the option to do a 20-day voluntary placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. In recent years, these placements have included organisations such as English Heritage, The National Trust, Historic Royal Palaces, ICOMOS (Paris), World Monuments Fund (Paris), UNESCO World Heritage Centre (Paris) and the Museum of London. The placement is not formally assessed.

Careers

Recent graduates of this programme have gone on to work in policy areas and project areas for national and international organisations, such as English Heritage, the National Trust, ICOMOS and UNESCO. They have also worked in development control, consultancies (such as Atkins Global), and in museums, site interpretation and education. Many students have also gone on to further research in academic institutions around the world, such as Stanford, Athens and Leiden, or here at UCL.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Adult Learning officer, Museum of London
-Garden of Reason Assistant, Ham House and Garden
-Museum Curator, Haysrim Museum
-Researcher, Museo Nacional de Colombia (Colombian National Museum)
-Art and Finance, Sotheby's Institute of Arts, London

Employability
Graduates have a critical understanding of both the theoretical and operational aspects of heritage and its use of the past to enrich the present for the public. The interdisciplinary nature of cultural heritage studies leads to creativity and initiative. Graduates are highly motivated and articulate. They have an acute awareness of the moral and ethical issues that are inherent in cultural heritage which contributes to skilful negotiation of contested matters. These abilities are valued by employers and heritage agencies and contribute to innovative exhibitions, educational activities, public programming and policy and strategy development. The breadth of the degree widens the spectrum of employment opportunities.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

We are international in outlook and membership, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the globe.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. The institute's outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

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Our MBA Museum Management equips you with the skills to become a successful manager or entrepreneur within the museum and gallery sector. Read more
Our MBA Museum Management equips you with the skills to become a successful manager or entrepreneur within the museum and gallery sector. If you are self-funding your studies, our MBA scholarship could offer you a £5,000 fee discount.

You gain a solid grounding in the essentials of business management, from operations and human resources to business strategy. You also learn the specifics of managing galleries and exhibitions, curation and art history, so you graduate with the necessary knowledge and skills to make a meaningful contribution as a leader within the arts sector.

This is a unique degree among Anglo-American universities, drawing on strengths from two of Essex’s world renowned Schools. Essex Business School is ranked in the UK’s top 20 (Association of Business Schools) and our Art History programme, home to the highly innovative Centre for Curatorial Studies, ranks 6th for research excellence.

With our MBA Museum Management, you benefit from a fully-rounded business education, centred on the themes of innovation, entrepreneurship, sustainability and international business, yet with the added benefit of acquiring expertise in the arts sector.

This course can also be studied part-time.

Our expert staff

Essex Business School is home to internationally respected academics and practitioners, who conduct world-class research in the areas of: business ethics and corporate social responsibility; organisation studies; leadership and strategy; finance and banking; risk management and international management. You are taught by staff from a wide range of nationalities, preparing you for an international career.

Our MBA Director, Nigel Pye, has academic and private sector experience, having held several senior positions at organisations such as Ernst and Young, KPMG, Warwick Business School and Cranfield University.

In Art History, our academic staff are experts in the history, theory and practice of curating art from the Renaissance to the present, as well as more unconventional forms of visual culture, such as protest placards and medical imagery. Here are a few examples of recent or current projects by staff members:
-Dr Gavin Grindon, Lecturer in Art History and co-director of our Centre for Curatorial Studies, recently curated The Museum of Cruel Designs and Guerilla Island at Banksy's Dismaland show. He also co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, one of the best attended shows in the museum’s history. He has also widely published on activist art in leading journals such as Art History
-Dr Adrian Locke, a Visiting Fellow in Art History and Senior Curator at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, has curated a diverse range of exhibitions, including Mexico: A Revolution in Art, 1910–1940 (2013) and Radical Geometry: Modern Art of South American from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection (2014). He also co-curated the exhibition Ai Weiwei, which opens at the Royal Academy in September 2015
-Dr Matt Lodder, Lecturer in Art History with an emphasis on modern and contemporary visual culture, is co-curating the exhibition Tattoo: Ancient Myths, Modern Meanings, which opens next year in the U.S
-Dr Michael Tymkiw, co-director of the Centre for Curatorial Studies, has a book under contract entitled Nazi Exhibition Design and Modernism. He has also just launched an interdisciplinary research project that focuses on using digital technologies to expand disability access in museums—a project that involves collaborations with several museums in Colchester and London, including firstsite and the Victoria and Albert Museum

Specialist facilities

You benefit from state-of-the-art facilities, including the new Essex Business School building - the first zero-carbon business school building in the UK.

You can enjoy a stunning working environment, including:
-A beautiful winter garden, which gives the building its own micro-climate
-A virtual trading floor with Bloomberg Financial Market Labs to practice trading stocks and securities
-Light and spacious teaching areas
-Study pods and innovation booths for group working
-A café with an adjacent sun terrace

Our art history facilities, where several modules are taught, also enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an ongoing programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate students, including those who pursue the MBA in Museum Management
Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our curatorial students
-Our Centre for Curatorial Studies is home to staff who specialise in the history and theory of exhibition design and who curate high-profile exhibitions

Your future

Our MBA Museum Management allows you to position yourself competitively for managerial positions in museum and gallery sectors, auction houses, art insurance and art law, or to begin your own entrepreneurial venture in the cultural industries. We equip you with subject-specific knowledge and encourage you to draw on your creativity, innovation and ethical awareness when solving business challenges.

You have access to Essex Business School’s employability team, as well as the University’s Employability and Careers Centre. Together, they can provide support when seeking additional work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Business Research Methods and Skills
-International Business Environment
-Business Strategy
-People and Organisations
-Managerial Economics
-Venture Academy: Creating and Growing a New Venture
-International Marketing Strategy
-Sustainable Operations
-Accounting and Finance for Managers
-Managing Galleries and Exhibition Projects
-Critique and Curating
-Exhibition (Joint Project)
-Dissertation: MBA Museum Management

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Our MRes Accounting is designed for those wishing to follow a career in research and/or academia. It is the ideal first step if you hope to progress to doctoral studies, such as PhD. Read more
Our MRes Accounting is designed for those wishing to follow a career in research and/or academia. It is the ideal first step if you hope to progress to doctoral studies, such as PhD.

We equip you with the skills and knowledge to appreciate the depth and breadth of accounting theories and techniques and apply these within a social science context. The content of our course is a direct response to requirements for, and suggested improvements in, research training laid down by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

You deepen your thinking about accounting and develop a broader understanding of the changing roles and perception of accounting within an ever-changing social context.

You develop knowledge and understanding of:
-Research skills, including both quantitative and qualitative approaches
-Theoretical stances underpinning different approaches to research
-How to design a research proposal, including construction of research questions and/or hypotheses
-Launching and managing a research project, including data collection, analysis and interpretation

You study at Essex Business School, ranked in the top 25 in the UK for research excellence and research intensity (REF, 2014). In addition, 75% of our research was deemed world leading or internationally excellent (REF, 2014).

Our MRes Accounting is also available to study part-time.

Postgraduate loans for Masters courses are now available from the Student Loans Company, worth up to £10,000, for students from the UK and EU.

Our expert staff

Our expert staff are a combination of leading academics and practitioners at the forefront of accounting research. For example, Professor of Accounting Prem Sikka is a world-renowned critic of tax avoidance and has been quoted in The Guardian, The Huffington Post and The Independent. He is the only living academic to have been recognised for his achievements in the accounting field by both the UK and US academies.

We’re home to three internationally respected accounting research centres:
-Essex Accounting Centre
-Centre for Global Accountability
-BAFA Accounting and Finance in Emerging Economies

You benefit from the very latest thinking in:
-Corporate governance
-Corporate social responsibility
-Accounting in the public and third sector
-Accounting in emerging economies
-Corporate reporting and regulations

We address the important issues faced by commercial businesses, public sector bodies and not-for-profit organisations using social science theories and concepts.

Specialist facilities

We’re proud of our stunning Essex Business School building, which uses a sustainable design. As well as being the first zero carbon business school in the UK, the building provides a superb working environment for our community of students and staff.

You benefit from facilities such as:
-A virtual trading floor with Bloomberg Financial Market terminals
-A fully staffed student services helpdesk
-A lush winter garden, which contributes to the building’s own micro-climate
-Group working and networking areas
-Bonds café
-Study skills workshops for postgraduate students

Your future

Our MRes puts you in a particularly strong position to progress to doctoral studies in the field of accounting, for example by studying for a PhD.

The School’s employability team and the University’s Employability and Careers Centre are here to support you in your career decisions and provide information on further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MRes Accounting
-Dissertation
-Management Accounting (optional)
-Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Empirical Explorations of the Contemporary Workplace
-Research Evaluation Projects
-Research Methods in Accounting
-Philosophy of Management and Accounting
-Cases in Corporate Governance (optional)

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IN BRIEF. Study entirely online using our Virtual Learning Environment. Apply the skills and theory you learn to your own work place. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Study entirely online using our Virtual Learning Environment
  • Apply the skills and theory you learn to your own work place
  • Gain a global perspective in the field of occupational therapy
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

You can study this highly regarded qualification online from anywhere in the world, which is ideal if you have a busy work schedule and home life.

The course is a flexible route by which to achieve expert status within your profession. Upon graduation, you'll have gained a global perspective on the field of occupational therapy.

COURSE DETAILS

This course is delivered entirely online providing you with the opportunity to learn from, share and engage in critical debate with peers and colleagues all over the world.

We appreciate that undertaking a course entirely online may seem a daunting process and to help you meet this challenge we will provide you with tutorial and technical support. Our aim is to create an online community of like-minded individuals who support and encourage each other to make a difference in the world of occupational therapy.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The full course runs part-time over three years giving you the chance to exit with the following awards:

  • Postgraduate Certificate: two modules over one year
  • Postgraduate Diploma: four modules over two years
  • Master's: four modules plus a dissertation over three years
  • Selected stand-alone module (30 master's level credits)

TEACHING

Each modules runs over a twelve week semester and there are two semesters per academic year.

Your study will take place online and you will not be required to attend the University at any point. However you will have full access to our online library resources and other student support service.

Your online learning will take place in our virtual learning environment, Blackboard. You'll attend online lectures in real-time and engage in tutor and peer-led work plus you'll have  access to wkis, blogs and discussion forums.

You'll also have the chance to take academic tutorials via email, telephone or skype and you will also be allocated a personal tutor for pastoral support.

The Occupational Therapy team at the University also work closely with the Institute for Dementia at their new Dementia Hub. The brand new Hub, opened in May 2017, features a dementia friendly garden, a visitors’ centre designed to look as much as possible like a home, and will be a base for the University’s dementia associates. The centre also contains a special kitchen built to demonstrate the latest dementia friendly designs, with a glass fronted fridge and cupboards as well as other design features such as colour cues to help people with dementia understand the environment.

People with dementia and their carers can visit the Hub to take part in activities such as gardening and dance and to get guidance from others who have experienced the condition, while researchers from across the University will also be able to work there. As a student you'll benefit from gaining insight into the research but also practically from the facilities and activities offered by the Hub.

ASSESSMENT

This course offers a range of assessments with some flexibility of choice available as appropriate. Assessments will enable you to meet your learning needs, your current interests and the needs of your workplace as relevant.

CAREER PROSPECTS

This course will develop your professional skill set and boost your confidence. You'll graduate with the ability to effectively articulate your views and contribute to the global development of the profession.

There is a strong international flavour to the course. During your time with us you'll have the chance to learn from, share and engage in critical debate and discussion with peers and colleagues from all over the world.

FURTHER STUDY

As a qualified occupational therapist, the University is committed in supporting your continuing professional development and offers a range of short courses and study days throughout the year to keep you at the forefront of new developments within the profession.

You may also wish to pursue further academic study through a research degree on completion of this course.



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