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Students will learn how to acquire knowledge from a range of sources including history, horticulture, architecture, garden archaeology and other subjects, to develop an appreciation of the study of garden history as a cultural discipline. Read more
Students will learn how to acquire knowledge from a range of sources including history, horticulture, architecture, garden archaeology and other subjects, to develop an appreciation of the study of garden history as a cultural discipline.

Students will be able to appreciate the differences in garden-making over time and in different countries, from the 16th century to the present day in Britain, Europe and America. Emphasis will be on design and management, ownership, and the culture from which these examples have evolved.

This degree will provide an academically rigorous environment in which students will learn a range of academic research and writing skills. Teaching will be undertaken at the Institute of Historical Research (http://www.history.ac.uk/), with a strong emphasis on tutor/student interaction in class. There will be practical sessions at museums and libraries, as well as visits to gardens in London. There will also be an optional field trip to Italy in the spring.

Structure

The course will be run on a full-time basis over one year. Teaching will take place on Thursdays from 10:00 to 17:00 and will be divided between two terms. The third term will be dedicated to dissertation preparation and writing. Please get in touch if you would like to see the full timetable.

Students must complete core module 1, core module 2 (selecting three options from the six provided), and core module 3 - a 15,000 word dissertation in order to be awarded the full MA.

However, there are a range of options available for flexible study:

Those wishing to pursue this course on a part-time basis can complete Modules 1 and 2 (the taught elements of the course) in their first year and Module 3, the dissertation, in their second year
Module 1 can be undertaken as a standalone unit leading to a PGCert, the credit for which can be banked should the student wish to complete the MA at a later date (within a prescribed time frame) Please enquire for further details.
Module 1: Researching Garden History (60 credits)

The first term will showcase the huge variety of resources available to study garden and landscape history from archaeology, architecture, cartography, horticulture, manuscripts, paintings and other works of art, from the sixteenth century to the present day.

Sessions include:

Early maps of gardens (British library)
Garden Archaeology (Hampton Court)
Gardens and Architecture referencing Drawings Collection at the RIBA and V&A
The Italian Renaissance and English Gardens
The eighteenth century garden + visit to Chiswick House
Gardening and Photographic images
Assessment

A 5,000 word report on the history of a garden chosen by the student and an accompanying presentation.

Module 2: Culture and Politics of Gardens (60 credits)

This module consists of six optional units of which students must choose three.

These sessions aim to:

Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of gardens and landscapes in different countries
Develop students’ critical analysis and judgement
Demonstrate the importance of context and the relationship of garden and landscape history to other disciplines such as literature, social history, film and visual media and the history of ideas
The module will look at Historiography, theory, the connection between culture and politics in landscape making and the expansion of the skills of term one across regional boundaries.

For instance, the influence in Britain of the Italian Renaissance’s new ideas on garden making, including architecture, sculpture and hydraulic engineering; iconography in gardens and landscapes; formality in garden-making as an indicator of the power of the owner, from the sixteenth century onwards, as in France; different aspects of the ‘natural’ garden from the eighteenth century onwards; conflict between the ‘natural’ and the formal in the nineteenth century between William Robinson and Reginald Blomfield in Britain; gender and garden making; and shifting boundaries between architect, landscape architect and plantsman relating to the status of those designing gardens and landscapes in the 21st century.

Students will choose one unit from each group:

Students will choose one unit from each group:

Group A
French gardens of the seventeenth century
The evolution of the English garden in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries

Group B
The eighteenth-century garden
The American garden

Group C
The Suburban Garden in England between the wars
Twentieth- and twenty-first-century gardens

Please note: Optional units are subject to change. Please consider this a guide only.

Assessment

Two 5,000 word assessed essays on two of the three options taken, and an assessed student presentation on the outline of the intended dissertation.

Module 3: Dissertation (60 credits), 15,000 words

Mode of study

12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

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Garden Design is a rich and diverse interdisciplinary and collaborative discipline spanning the traditions of arts and sciences. Read more

Overview

Garden Design is a rich and diverse interdisciplinary and collaborative discipline spanning the traditions of arts and sciences. The MA Garden Design aims to provide an integration of the creativity of art and design with the core knowledge of ecology, landscape and garden theory, history, technology, restoration and the understanding of the theoretical and applied levels of knowledge and practice in Garden Design.

MA Garden Design is a progression and a complement to the undergraduate Landscape and Garden Design (LGD) course in the School of Design at Writtle University College. The Masters is intended to take the next steps in developing theory and practice of garden design by providing more advanced perspectives and applications to the undergraduate course. Garden Design focuses on the meaning of gardens, theory and history of gardens, conservation and restoration of gardens, and rural and urban social, economic and ecological contexts. The MA Garden Design is part of the School of Design and part of the overall postgraduate design programme that includes Landscape Architecture.

Professional Accreditation

This course has been accredited by the Landscape Institute and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA) and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (Europe).

You can find out more about these here;
http://www.landscapeinstitute.org/
http://iflaeurope.eu/about/

Core modules in Year One

Semester One: Theories of Landscape and Garden Design, Landscape Ecology, Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project, contextual to Garden Design), Research Methods in Landscape and Garden Design, Research Colloquium, Conservation and Restoration of Historic Gardens (option).

Semester Two: Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design, Designing within a Historic Context, Advanced Design Studio II, Options (e.g. Restoration and Management of Historic Gardens, Professional Practice, Special topics (specific project/research interest area) and Dissertation or Design Research Project.

Delivery and Assessment

The most successful teaching method across the UK for Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Garden Design, Art and Environmental Planning and Design has been this combination of design studio and classroom.

Work Experience

Internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory and private sector landscape and garden design consultancies within the UK and internationally.

All degrees at Writtle University College are awarded by the University of Essex.

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The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. Read more

Overview

The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. It involves the analysis of environmental, cultural, historical and legal factors as well as the exploration of human needs and expression. Landscape architecture approaches elements of change and their physical and phenomenal relationships through the implementation of landscape and garden designs, landscape plans, and landscape management strategies. The profession addresses a broad range of landscapes in urban, suburban, rural and ‘wilderness’ settings. The scale of such projects varies from expressive detailed design at a site scale to master planning at community and campus scales to landscape analysis and planning at regional scales.

The interdisciplinary nature of Landscape Architecture is a rich and diverse subject drawing on the traditions of both arts and sciences. The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course and the undergraduate Landscape and Garden Design Course are accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI).

Accreditation

The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course is accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI) and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (Europe).

Core modules in Year One

Semester One: Theories of Landscape, Landscape Ecology, Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project), Research Methods in Landscape Architecture and Design, Research Colloquium.

Semester Two: Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design, Professional Practice, Advanced Design Studio II, Options (e.g. Landscape and Environmental Assessment, Landscape Resource Management, Special topics (specific project/research interest area) and Dissertation or Design Research Project.

Work Experience

Landscape Architecture Programme internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory, private sector landscape, environmental and urban design consultancies and private practice as Landscape Architects within the UK and internationally.

All Writtle University College degrees are awarded by the University of Essex.

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The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. Read more

Overview

The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. It involves the analysis of environmental, cultural, historical and legal factors as well as the exploration of human needs and expression.

Landscape architecture approaches elements of change and their physical and phenomenal relationships through the implementation of landscape and garden designs, landscape plans, and landscape management strategies. The profession addresses a broad range of landscapes in urban, suburban, rural and ‘wilderness’ settings. The scale of such projects varies from expressive detailed design at a site scale to master planning at community and campus scales to landscape analysis and planning at regional scales.

The interdisciplinary nature of Landscape Architecture is a rich and diverse subject drawing on the traditions of both arts and sciences.

If you would like to find out more about our postgraduate courses please see here: http://www.writtle.ac.uk/Postgraduate-Courses

Accredited

The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course is accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI) and the International Federation for Landscape Architects (Europe).

Core Modules in Year One

Semester One:
* Theories of Landscape
* Landscape Ecology
* Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project)
* (Option) Research Methods in Landscape Architecture and Design
* Research Colloquium

Semester Two:
* Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design
* Professional Practice
* Advanced Design Studio II and Options (e.g. Landscape and Environmental Assessment, Landscape Resource Management, Special topics (specific project/research interest area)

Work Experience

Landscape Architecture Programme internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory, private sector landscape, environmental and urban design consultancies and private practice as Landscape Architects within the UK and internationally.

All Writtle College degrees are awarded by the University of Essex.

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The understanding of plant diversity and resources has never been more important. As we face the unprecedented challenges of climate change and environmental degradation, effective environmental surveillance and conservation depend upon detailed knowledge of plants and their habitats. Read more

Programme description

The understanding of plant diversity and resources has never been more important. As we face the unprecedented challenges of climate change and environmental degradation, effective environmental surveillance and conservation depend upon detailed knowledge of plants and their habitats.

This programme is run jointly by the University and the world-renowned Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE).

This programme is run jointly by the University and the world-renowned Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE). The RBGE is home to one of the world’s best living collections of plants (15,000 species across four sites, amounting to five per cent of known world species), a herbarium of three million preserved specimens and one of the UK’s most comprehensive botanical libraries.

RBGE offers collections-based biodiversity research opportunities across a wide spectrum of organisms and geographical regions. This diversity, coupled with the RBGE’s world-leading research in different continents, provides an unrivalled masters programme in plant biodiversity.

Programme structure

This programme is full time and consists of two semesters of lectures, practicals, workshops and investigations, followed by a four-month research project. The programme includes a two-week field course in a tropical country (recently Belize).

The programme is delivered mainly at RBGE but also at the University’s King’s Buildings campus.

There are no option elements to the programme – all courses are compulsory.

Courses
Conservation and Sustainability
Taxonomy and Plant Collections
Biodiversity of Angiosperms
Evolution of Cryptogams and Fungi
Evolution of Angiosperms
Plant Geography
Phylogenetics and Population Genetics
Biodiversity of Cryptogams and Fungi

Research:
Your research project will be chosen in consultation with your supervisor, and will link directly with active research programmes at RBGE or other research institutions.

The field trip, together with training and a short practical exam, qualifies you for the RBGE Certificate in Practical Field Botany.

Career opportunities

The programme is good preparation for roles in taxonomy, while many graduates have also continued to PhD studies. Past students have entered a wide variety of jobs at research institutions, conservation agencies and elsewhere.

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This programme is professionally accredited by the Landscape Institute and provides you with professionally focused landscape architectural skills. Read more

Programme description

This programme is professionally accredited by the Landscape Institute and provides you with professionally focused landscape architectural skills.

We offer the only professional, degree-level programmes in landscape architecture in Scotland and they are some of the best delivered worldwide.

This programme focuses on landscape architectural design and is taught by a range of project types and contexts, concerned with building a sustainable future for the landscape we inhabit.

Landscape architecture is a discipline that focuses on intervention in the landscape through the activities of design, planning and management. Landscape is defined as outdoor spaces, environments and relationships between people and places. Landscape Architecture is concerned with landscapes of all types, both urban and rural and at all scales from the garden to the region. It is distinguished by its position at the interface of art and design and the physical, natural and social sciences.

The programme benefits from the studio-based learning typical of an art college environment. Contextual subjects are delivered from within Landscape Architecture and from the wider University community. Uniquely, plants and horticulture are taught at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE). The programme therefore benefits from the intimate small scale nature of ECA and the wider worldwide reputation of the University and RBGE.

Edinburgh itself is a unique and exciting centre for study, with many of the issues at the heart of the profession on hand. Within a short distance, the relatively undeveloped areas of the Scottish Highlands and the Borders illustrate different problems, opportunities and solutions. However, the programme is international in outlook with a graduating course currently sited in Poland.

The programme has a long and excellent relationship with employers worldwide and contributes to professional practice by its links with public bodies and other agencies.

Programme structure

The programme focuses on four landscape portfolio courses which contain a variety of design options you can choose from based on factors such as previous experience or personal interest. These are set on real sites with real issues, with differing scales and complexity, and with stakeholders actively informing the process.

The courses become increasingly complex and self-directed as the programme progresses and they are supported via aligned contextual and technological courses. The programme culminates in a major design project you select and develop with support from staff.

Career opportunities

Our graduates are hugely in demand. Currently, almost all of our graduates gain rewarding employment very soon after graduation. Some go on to study research-led degrees (PhD). Many become leaders in their field worldwide.

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This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Read more
This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Students benefit from the Institute of Archaeology's emphasis on the role of heritage in today's society, from the art and archaeology collections of UCL, and from the unrivalled resources of London's museums.

Degree information

Students are introduced to theoretical issues involved in cultural heritage and develop a critical understanding of the social and political context in which the processes for managing cultural heritage operate. The flexible programme structure allows students to design a theoretically based or practically based degree depending on each individual's needs and interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following core modules:
-Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development

Optional modules - students then choose to follow futher option choices to the value of 60 credits. At least 30 credits must be taken from the list below. The remaining 30 credits may also come from this list or can be chosen from the outstanding range of Master's option choices offered by the UCL Institute of Archaeology.
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Traditions
-Cultural Memory
-Funerary Archaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations, site visits and guest lectures, and includes a 20-day placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. Assessment is through essays, projects reports, a heritage agency report following the placement, and the dissertation.

Placement
Students have the option to do a 20-day voluntary placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. In recent years, these placements have included organisations such as English Heritage, The National Trust, Historic Royal Palaces, ICOMOS (Paris), World Monuments Fund (Paris), UNESCO World Heritage Centre (Paris) and the Museum of London. The placement is not formally assessed.

Careers

Recent graduates of this programme have gone on to work in policy areas and project areas for national and international organisations, such as English Heritage, the National Trust, ICOMOS and UNESCO. They have also worked in development control, consultancies (such as Atkins Global), and in museums, site interpretation and education. Many students have also gone on to further research in academic institutions around the world, such as Stanford, Athens and Leiden, or here at UCL.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Adult Learning officer, Museum of London
-Garden of Reason Assistant, Ham House and Garden
-Museum Curator, Haysrim Museum
-Researcher, Museo Nacional de Colombia (Colombian National Museum)
-Art and Finance, Sotheby's Institute of Arts, London

Employability
Graduates have a critical understanding of both the theoretical and operational aspects of heritage and its use of the past to enrich the present for the public. The interdisciplinary nature of cultural heritage studies leads to creativity and initiative. Graduates are highly motivated and articulate. They have an acute awareness of the moral and ethical issues that are inherent in cultural heritage which contributes to skilful negotiation of contested matters. These abilities are valued by employers and heritage agencies and contribute to innovative exhibitions, educational activities, public programming and policy and strategy development. The breadth of the degree widens the spectrum of employment opportunities.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

We are international in outlook and membership, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the globe.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. The institute's outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

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The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS). Read more
The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS).

All ResM students are supervised by college staff based in Cornwall on the Stoke Climsland or Newquay campuses and co-supervised by Plymouth University staff. The ResM culminates in the examination of a thesis based on a period of extended research, preceded by two taught modules that equip the student for research.

The ResM programme at Duchy is tailored to individual needs and commonly involves working with an industry partner. There are full-time and part-time routes.

Full and partial fees bursaries may be available, please contact Dr Peter McGregor for more information and eligibility criteria.

Indicative project titles for Agriculture & Food:
• Agricultural change and its social, economic and environmental implications
• Farm family wellbeing
• Succession and retirement in farming
• Impact of organic farming on the rural economy
• Sustainable farming and food
• The food and farming economy of Devon and Cornwall

Proposed project titles:
• Generating virus free tulips: A collaborative project with the Botanic Garden Cambridge. You will be based in the nationally renowned micro-propagation laboratory at Duchy College Rosewarne (moving to Eden Project by Sept 2016) and undertake a series of experiments to generate virus free tissue and help preserve a rare and valuable tulip accession of the Botanic Garden Cambridge. Techniques will include tissue culture and molecular viral detection.

Student case study: “Study is flexible and fits in alongside my employment plus the tutors are experts in their field. When I finish I hope to use my knowledge and research to enhance the training offered to farmers in the South West” (Polly Gilbert, ResM Agriculture & Food).

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Research within this area centres on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge and is supported by members of the Centre for Biocultural Diversity (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/research/research-centres/cbcd/index.html). Read more
Research within this area centres on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge and is supported by members of the Centre for Biocultural Diversity (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/research/research-centres/cbcd/index.html).

We research local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. The Centre has an Ethnobiology Lab and Ethnobotanical Garden, and extensive collaborative links, including with the Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew), and Eden Project.

MSc by Research
This course is a one-year full time or two-year part-time programmes. You research and write a thesis under the supervision of one or two academic staff.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/204/ethnobiology

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. In general, you work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The School has a lively postgraduate community drawn together not only by shared resources such as postgraduate rooms, computer facilities (with a dedicated IT officer) and laboratories, but also by student-led events, societies, staff/postgraduate seminars, weekly research student seminars and a number of special lectures.

The School houses well-equipped research laboratories for genetics, ecology, visual anthropology, virtual paleoanthropology, Animal Postcranial Evolution, biological anthropology, anthropological computing, botany, osteology and ethnobiology. The state-of-the-art visual anthropology laboratory is stocked with digital editing programmes and other facilities for digital video and photographic work, and has a photographic darkroom for analogue developing and printing. The biological anthropology laboratory is equipped for osteoarchaeological and forensic work. It curates the Powell-Cotton collection of human remains, together with Anglo-Saxon skeletons from Bishopstone, East Sussex. The ethnobiology laboratory provides equipment and specimens for teaching ethnobiological research skills, and serves as a transit station for receiving, examining and redirecting field material. It also houses the Powell-Cotton collection of plant-based material culture from Southeast Asia, and a small reference and teaching collection of herbarium and spirit specimens (1,000 items) arising from recent research projects.

Kent has outstanding anthropology IT facilities. Over the last decade, the School has been associated with many innovatory projects, particularly in the field of cognitive anthropology. It provides an electronic information service to other anthropology departments, for example by hosting both the Anthropological Index Online and Experience-Rich Anthropology project. We encourage all students to use the Centre’s facilities (no previous experience or training is necessary).

Anthropology at Kent has close links with the nearby Powell-Cotton Museum, which has one of the largest ethnographic collections in the British Isles and is particularly strong in sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian material. It also houses an extensive comparative collection of primate and other mammalian material. Human skeletal material is housed at the Kent Osteological Research and Analysis Centre within the School.

Anthropology, together with the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) form the School of Anthropology and Conservation.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems, ethnoecology, and other systems of environmental knowledge, as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. The Centre has an Ethnobiology Lab and Ethnobotanical Garden, and extensive collaborative links, including with the Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew), and Eden Project.

Careers

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Centre, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This relationship ensures that successful completion of our courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research.

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. Studying anthropology, you develop an understanding of the complexity of all actions, beliefs and discourse by acquiring strong methodological and analytical skills. Anthropologists are increasingly being hired by companies and organisations that recognise the value of employing people who understand the complexities of societies and organisations.

Many of our alumni teach in academic positions in universities across the world, whilst others work for a wide range of organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course will enable you to gain a strong background in the theory of analytical and forensic techniques and how to apply them to complex problems such as those encountered at crime scenes. Read more
This course will enable you to gain a strong background in the theory of analytical and forensic techniques and how to apply them to complex problems such as those encountered at crime scenes. It emphasises the key skills required in this specialised area of science, including good measurement and scientific practice, sample collection and chain of custody, evaluation and interpretation of data, and constructing expert witness reports.

Kingston University has its own scene-of-crime house located on site, which is used to recreate crime scenes and enables you to put your investigative skills into practice. The property's garden is used by the forensic team's archaeologist for field investigations.

Lecturers on the course have wide experience in the forensics sector and many have worked either as forensic scientists or as expert witnesses. They are also actively engaged in forensic research, and are supported by visiting speakers from leading forensic consultancies.

What will you study?

You will explore recent trends in forensic science and learn about the latest analytical devices used, such as atomic and molecular spectroscopic and separation techniques and DNA profiling.

You will look at the role of the forensic scientist and learn how to, for example, investigate and analyse drugs of abuse, fibres and firearms and conduct fire investigation. There is also the opportunity to present expert evidence at a mock courtroom trial in a magistrates' court, examined by Kingston's own trainee lawyers and/or their law lecturers.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to carry out your research project in industry (depending on your results and project availability) or in Kingston University's extensive forensic and analytical laboratories.

Assessment

Exams, laboratory reports, assignments, case studies, oral presentations, poster presentations, practical research project.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Accreditation for this course

This course is accredited by the The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences for the component standards in Interpretation, Evaluation and Presentation of Evidence; Laboratory Analysis; and Crime Scene Investigation.

When you graduate you are eligible to apply to be an Associate Member (AFSSoc post-nominals) of The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Having completed appropriate continuing professional development in a forensic science workplace, you can also become a Professional Member (MFSSoc) or Accredited Forensic Practitioner.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Modules
-The Role of the Professional Forensic Scientist
-Separation Science
-Molecular and Atomic Spectroscopy
-Forensic Chemistry and Trace Analysis
-Project

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How are banks innovating to meet customer demands? Is globalisation increasing risk in the banking and finance sector?. This course builds on your existing knowledge of finance, banking or business to prepare you for a challenging and rewarding career in any banking specialism. Read more
How are banks innovating to meet customer demands? Is globalisation increasing risk in the banking and finance sector?

This course builds on your existing knowledge of finance, banking or business to prepare you for a challenging and rewarding career in any banking specialism. You follow an advanced and up-to-date programme of study using industry-standard trading software.

We provide you with a broad vision and understanding of the changing nature of modern banking firms. You develop a detailed understanding of areas including:
-Portfolio management
-Modern banking methods
-Bank strategy and risk
-Regulation and the internationalisation process

This course is taught at Essex Business School. We're proud to be an internationally diverse and research intensive school, ranked in the top 25 in the UK for research excellence (REF, 2014). By embedding the latest academic and industry thinking into our teaching, you experience an education that’s at the forefront of the issues impacting today’s banking and finance sectors.

We help you understand the financial drivers of an increasingly complex banking world to give you the best foundation for your career.

Our MSc Banking and Finance is also available to study part-time and you may be eligible for scholarships and discounts provided by the University of Essex. Essex Business School also offers a limited number of scholarships for the CFA level one exam and IMC level one and two exams to exceptional Masters students.

Essex Business School is an IMC Advantage Partner and a Recognised Partner of the CFA. Postgraduate loans for Masters courses are now available from the Student Loans Company, worth up to £10,000, for students from the UK and EU.

Our expert staff

Our finance group is one of the largest in the UK.

Our expert team are at the forefront of financial debate and have presented their research at the Bank of England, the European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve. They combine academic and industry experience to explore issues such as:
-Business ethics
-Corporate social responsibility
-Organisation studies
-Leadership and strategy
-Finance and banking
-Risk management
-International management

Essex Finance Centre is based at the School and uses social science theories to address the important issues faced by today’s organisations in the commercial, public and third sectors.

Specialist facilities

Our zero carbon building reflects our ethical approach to business.

Located on our Colchester Campus on the Knowledge Gateway and Parkside Office Village, our Essex Business School building features a unique winter garden, which gives the building its own micro-climate. The Eden-style dome provides an innovative working environment, which includes:
-Bloomberg Financial Market Labs in our virtual trading floor
-Modern lecture theatres
-Study pods and innovation booths – perfect for group working
-Networking opportunities with visiting businesses
-Bonds café
-Study skills support, such as workshops and learning resources

Your future

Our course will provide you with the foundations for a rewarding career in banking and finance, equipping you with the skills to lead at a global level. In 2015, 78% of our postgraduate taught students were in work or further study (DLHE).

Many of our graduates enjoy roles in a host of occupations, including financial analysis, management, public administration and accountancy. Many even now run their own successful businesses.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you enhance your CV by taking part in employability opportunities, such as work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Banking and Finance - MSc
-Modern Banking
-Dissertation
-Research Methods in Finance: Empirical Methods in Finance
-Bank Strategy and Risk
-Portfolio Management
-Postgraduate Mathematics Preparation
-Exchange Rates and International Finance (optional)
-Trading Global Financial Markets (optional)

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This course offers you the opportunity to specialise in either Composition or Musicology & Ethnomusicology and is taught in the heart of London with access to major arts centres. Read more
This course offers you the opportunity to specialise in either Composition or Musicology & Ethnomusicology and is taught in the heart of London with access to major arts centres. It covers a wide range of subjects: the Composition pathway enables you to work closely with your lecturers to study a variety of musical genres and styles and if you choose Musicology, you will benefit from seminars with leaders in the field covering the evolution of different musical forms and their role in and expression of the cultures in which they developed.

Key benefits

- Intensively taught programme covering a wide range of specialised topics.

- Provides a foundation for further research focusing on current approaches and advanced techniques.

- Musicology and Ethnomusicology students choose from historical, sociocultural and theoretical modules taught by distinguished staff (including two fellows of the British Academy).

- Composition students benefit from one-to-one lessons and participation in composition seminars and have the opportunity to hear their works performed by resident ensemble Lontano.

- Option to take modules in other Arts and Humanities departments at King's, or at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).

- Located in the heart of London's music scene, with two major opera companies (Royal Opera Covent Garden and English National Opera) and two major arts centres (South Bank Centre—location of the Royal Festival Hall—and Barbican) within short walking distance.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/music-mmus.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

You may specialise in Composition or Musicology and Ethnomusicology (please note, we do not offer Performance). Composers work closely with their teachers throughout, while musicologists benefit from seminars with leaders in the field. We encourage you to choose modules that reflect your particular interests, and up to a third of your choices may be from other Arts & Humanities departments, meaning you can build a broad and truly individual stay pathway.

Our specialist modules will teach you current approaches to academic writing on music as well as advanced techniques for research and composition. At the end of your programme, you will submit a piece of special study – either a dissertation or a substantial work of 8-15 minutes in duration (the composition must be notated in a conventional manner) – for which we will give you one-to-one supervision.

- Course purpose -

Our aim is to nurture leaders in musicology, ethnomusicology and composition. If you intend go on to research or composition at doctoral level, or if you want to build on your existing skills, this programme will be ideal for you.

- Course format and assessment -

Modules worth 120 credits, plus a special study (dissertation or portfolio) worth 60 credits.

Career Prospects:

Further research in the department; further research (at doctoral level) in UK or overseas (particularly USA); teaching; media, arts, other related bodies.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation. Read more
The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation.

Our course is taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals and is based on the Department's well established tradition of interdisciplinary education and training.

It will not only help prepare you for an exciting career in the industry, but it will also help prepare you to continue your studies onto a Doctor of Philosophy research programme.

Many distinction-level graduates from this programme stay on for a PhD, often funded in part by the University of Bath.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/conservation/index.html

Key programme features

- Provides technical training within an academic framework
- Taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals
- Based on interdisciplinary co-operation between architects and engineers
- International leader in its field
- Proven track record of employability
- Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
- Fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Buildings Conservation (IHBC)
- Suited to engineers, architects, surveyors, planners, geographers, archaeologists, historians and managers, but we also accept (and encourage) students who have either taken a non-vocational degree (usually history or history of art, but also geographers, archaeologists, etc.) or have a degree in a different field that they want to change from.

The programme draws profoundly on its unique location, the World Heritage City of Bath, an ideal study material and environment.

Structure and Content

See programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ar/ar-proglist-pg.html#B) for more detail on individual units.

Teaching for taught units takes place on Wednesdays and Fridays, with one day given to each set of two units. The sequence in which units are taught is reversed each year so that part-time students attend on the same day over the period of their study.

- Full-time study: 12 months, with students attending two days a week (Wednesday and Friday)
- Part-time study: 24 months, with students attending one day a week (Wednesday or Friday)
- Extended part-time study: 48 months, with students attending one day/one semester per year.

Where students do not wish to write the dissertation, or are ineligible to progress, a PG Diploma is awarded after successful completion of the taught course only.

Dissertation:
During the final three months of the degree you will produce a dissertation. This is your opportunity to explore a particular topic that has been covered during the programme in far greater depth.

Transfer:
A student may request a transfer from part-time to extended part-time study. If approved, the transfer will take into account units completed already and will be applied on a pro rata basis. For example, if a part-time student completes four units in year one and then transfers to the extended part-time programme, they will be given two more years to complete.

Conservation techniques

- Structural conservation techniques: principles, faults and their causes, diagnoses and remedies, and surveying and analytical techniques
- Materials conservation techniques: technology and conservation of building elements from structure to finishes
- Information and awareness about related fields (including furniture and fabric conservation), and the experts who can be called upon
- The legal framework of conservation.

Philosophy

- A range of philosophies towards the repair and re-use of old buildings
- History of conservation, from John Wood and James Wyatt, the Victorian age, William Morris and the development of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings through to present day policies and the listing of twentieth century buildings
Stimulating debate and the opportunity to develop an individual viewpoint
- A body of knowledge on the history of British architecture from town planning to interiors
- An awareness of adjacent related fields including garden conservation and archaeology.

Teaching of the Theory of Classical Architecture

- Visual training based around the teaching of classical architecture within the context of Bath as a classical city
- Aims to achieve a high level of architectural correctness and competence in detailing architectural elements.

Case studies

- You will attend six case studies (a combination of large and small buildings at sites both local to Bath and further afield)
- The case studies cover the philosophy upon which the conservation work is based, the architectural and engineering principles involved and a study of the techniques and technologies employed.

Career Options

Bath students have an excellent track record for getting jobs.


The MSc provides a short cut to becoming a Chartered Surveyor. Graduates get exemption from the RICS internal examinations and are eligible for entry to the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence (APC). This usually involves two years of structured training with an employer followed by the APC. Visit the RICS website for more information.

Graduate destinations:

- Inspector for the Victorian Society
- English Heritage (historic research department, inspectors, managers)
- Architects’ practices working on conservation and building new country houses in the classical style
- National Trust Manager of Uppark House
- Conservation officer, UNESCO, Paris
- Conservation architects with well-known practices working on every type of historic building from Salisbury cathedral to medieval timber-framed barns
- Development Officer with Turquoise Mountain repairing a mosque in Kabul
- Member of the Information Team, the Science Museum, South Kensington.

About the department

The Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering brings together the related disciplines of Architecture and Civil Engineering. It has an interdisciplinary approach to research, encompassing the fields of Architectural History and Theory, Architectural and Structural Conservation, Lightweight Structures, Hydraulics and Earthquake Engineering and Dynamics.

Our Department was ranked equal first in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 for its research submission in the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit of assessment.


Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/

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How do organisations make financial decisions? How can accountants ensure their actions benefit a business’ bottom line, without negatively impacting society?. Read more
How do organisations make financial decisions? How can accountants ensure their actions benefit a business’ bottom line, without negatively impacting society?

Our professionally accredited MSc Accounting and Financial Management is designed for those who have not studied accounting before, but have a degree in business, economics or another related subject. We provide a comprehensive grounding in corporate analysis and reporting, as well as building your confidence in financial decision-making. You then tailor your studies to suit your preferred career direction in industry, commerce or professional services by choosing from optional modules.

You cover topics including:
-Theories of financial reporting
-Management accounting and control
-Theoretical and critical approaches to accounting and financial management
-Analysis of financial statements

You study at Essex Business School, in one of the top 25 accounting and finance departments in the UK for research excellence (REF, 2014). We expose you to cutting-edge course content, informed by the latest academic thinking so you can excel in your professional career.

This course is also available to study part time and you may be eligible for University of Essex scholarships and discounts. Essex Business School also offers a limited number of scholarships for the CFA level one exam and IMC level one and two exams to exceptional Masters students.

Essex Business School is an IMC Advantage Partner and a Recognised Partner of the CFA.

Postgraduate loans for Masters courses are now available from the Student Loans Company, worth up to £10,000, for students from the UK and EU.

Our expert staff

Our world renowned staff are at the forefront of debate and research in accounting issues and embed this thinking into your course.

You’ll find our academics, such as Professor Prem Sikka, writing on issues affecting commercial businesses, public sector bodies and not-for-profit organisations in global titles like The Huffington Post.

We use a broad range of social science theories and concepts to explore:
-Business ethics
-Corporate social responsibility
-Organisation studies
-Leadership and strategy
-Finance and banking
-Risk management
-International management

Specialist facilities

Our Essex Business School building uses an environmentally friendly design and features its own micro-climate:
-The UK’s first zero carbon business school building
-An innovative virtual trading floor with Bloomberg Financial Market Labs
-High-tech lecture theatres
-A winter garden with study pods and innovation booths for group working
-A vibrant café located near to our sun terrace
-Study skills workshops

Your future

We foster your creativity and ethical awareness so you’re ready to meet the challenges of the international business world. In 2015, 78% of our postgraduate taught students were in work or further study (DLHE).

Our MSc Accounting and Financial Management provides you with the skills needed for roles in financial analysis, management, public administration and accountancy. Our course will be particularly useful if you want to pursue a career in industry, commerce or with professional services firms, with many of our graduates also beginning their own entrepreneurial ventures.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MSc Accounting and Financial Management
-Dissertation
-Research Methods in Accounting
-Corporate Reporting and Analysis
-Financial Decision Making
-Issues in Financial Reporting (optional)
-Audit Theory (optional)
-Corporate Marketing Strategy (optional)

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