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Behavioural economics applies psychological insights into human behaviour to explain how real people make economic decisions. Read more
Behavioural economics applies psychological insights into human behaviour to explain how real people make economic decisions.

Who is it for?

The course is suitable for recent graduates in economics, psychology and related social science or quantitative disciplines who are looking to develop a career in the fast-paced world of behavioural economics, either in the public or private sector.

As the course is offered in full-time and part-time modes, it is also suited to professionals who want to enhance their theoretical knowledge and practical skills and would benefit from an academic environment.

Objectives

Behavioural economics applies psychological insights into human behaviour to investigate how people make economic decisions under various conditions of constraint (e.g. time and knowledge) and influence (e.g. social pressure). This is an important field in modern economics, and the social sciences more generally.

Commercial organisations have long known the limitations of individual decision making and they routinely use this knowledge in their commercial practices (e.g. anchoring effect of minimum payment on credit cards). The practical implications of behavioural economics are varied and significant, and acknowledged to provide a powerful and cost-effective approach to improving human welfare.

The Behavioural Economics MSc will develop your skills and knowledge to prepare you for a wide variety of roles in the private or public sector that require a solid understanding of human behaviour.

Teaching and learning

The modules are taught by lecturers from the economics and psychology department with research interests in behavioural economics.

In each module you will receive typically 30 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources (e.g., videos and advanced readings provided on the learning platform Moodle) for your self-directed study. You will be required to take responsibility for your own learning and to take advantage of the learning opportunities offered (e.g., invited speakers programme and online resources). The learning and teaching strategies for each module will expose you to a range of methods, comprising: lectures, guest lectures, seminars, group work, workshops, small group discussions, tutorials, reflective reports and research project supervision.

Assessment

In order to assess your full range of learning, you will complete reflective reports, essays, examinations, interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a research dissertation. Most individual modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations. In addition, you will be directed to independent study and receive detailed feedback on your coursework as an aid to your further learning. These different forms of assessment have the aim of assessing your knowledge, skills and appreciation in different areas of behavioural economics (e.g., theoretical knowledge and applied aspects of behavioural techniques).

Modules

Full-time students take four modules in each of the first two terms, followed by a written research dissertation in the third term.

Most of the modules are structured as a combination of two-hour lectures (to present information) and one-hour seminars or clinics (to understand and assimilate lecture material) or lab sessions. Teaching and learning is enhanced by technology-supported resources, and teaching staff are available for one-to-one interaction and feedback.

It is expected that full-time students will spend about three hours in lectures/seminars plus self-directed, independent study hours for each module per week. You should also expect to attend seminars given by invited speakers and seminars on dissertation writing (about one to two hours per week).

Your workload might vary from week to week.

Term 1
-Principles of Economics
-Cognitive and Economic Science of Rational Choice
-Psychological Processes: Individual and Social
-Behavioural Research Methods: Design and Analysis

Term 2
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory
-Fundamentals of Cognitive Science
-Applied Econometric and Psychological Research Methods
-Professional Aspects of Behavioural Economics

Term 3
-Research Dissertation
Students with a strong background in Economics may substitute 'Principles of Economics' with a microeconomics module from one of the MSc programmes offered by the Department of Economics. You may also substitute an appropriate elective from one of the MSc modules offered by the Department of Economics for 'Professional Aspects of Behavioural Economics' - this will allow a pathway through the programme that is focused on theoretical and research economic themes.

Career prospects

Whilst there is not yet a specific occupation of 'behavioural economist', the knowledge and skills acquired are highly valuable in a range of sectors:
-Economic consultants undertaking marketing activities
-Health economics consultants developing sales/markets for products (from branded medicines to health insurance schemes)
-Public policy specialist who advises on the choice architecture of decision making (e.g., transport decisions)
-Political campaigns and public relations more generally
-General marketing, sales and consumer psychology (preferences, sensitivity to incentives, and default behaviour)
-Brand awareness consultancies
-Financial trading and risk assessment
-Internet auction companies
-Design consultancies (e.g. websites)
-In large international institutions, e.g. World Bank, EBRD, Central Banks etc.

City’s Behavioural Economics postgraduate course would be especially valuable for professionals who already work in occupations which involve the need to understand the scientific dynamics of human decision making and behaviour (e.g., financial traders who require the right psychological attitude as much as appropriate strategy knowledge).

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Introduce your future students to the wonderful world of language. Have a love for languages and a yearning to teach them? The University of Canberra’s TESOL and FLT programs are highly regarded internationally and have placed graduates in senior positions throughout Australia and across the world. Read more

Introduce your future students to the wonderful world of language

Have a love for languages and a yearning to teach them? The University of Canberra’s TESOL and FLT programs are highly regarded internationally and have placed graduates in senior positions throughout Australia and across the world. This course will broaden your understanding of language teaching in a variety of educational, social and cultural contexts, enhance your knowledge in areas such as curriculum design, assessment, discourse analysis and language acquisition and prepare you for a role as a teacher-researcher, foreign language teacher or TESOL instructor or director.

Study a Master of Arts in TESOL and Foreign Language Teaching at UC and you will:

  • broaden and deepen your understanding of language teaching in a variety of educational, social and cultural contexts
  • enhance your knowledge in areas such as curriculum design and evaluation, testing and assessment, discourse analysis, language acquisition, research methods and approaches to teaching grammar
  • gain practical knowledge and skills whilst reviewing the way that beliefs, principles and theories affect teaching
  • be able to make informed pedagogical decisions
  • understand the relationship between language teaching and learning.

Typical study pattern

Year 1

Semester 1

Semester 2

Year 2

Semester 1

  • Four Restricted Choice Units- 12 cp

Career opportunities

A range of career opportunities exist for Master of Arts in TESOL and Foreign Language Teaching graduates, including as a:

  • Foreign language teacher
  • Academic adviser
  • TESOL language instructor
  • TESOL program director
  • TESOL textbook writer or editor


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Learn how different brain functions contribute to cognition, mediate social interaction, and determine mental health, well-being and psychiatric illness. Read more
Learn how different brain functions contribute to cognition, mediate social interaction, and determine mental health, well-being and psychiatric illness.

Who is it for?

This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. Students will also be well-equipped should they wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

Objectives

This Masters degree bridges three research and clinical disciplines:
-Cognitive neuroscience (the study of human brain functions such as memory, perception and language).
-Clinical neuroscience (the understanding of neurological, psychological or psychiatric illness via their neural and cognitive antecedents).
-Social neuroscience (the investigation of brain processes that help us communicate, feel, learn and interact with others).

The major aim of this programme is to provide you with a thorough grounding in the neuroscience that underpins human cognitive brain function, clinical, social and affective interaction, and neuropathology.

Teaching will comprise of seminars, lectures, computing and statistics classes, and supervision of an individual research project. Your learning experience during the programme will be enhanced by an invited speaker’s programme of external experts who work in clinical, social or cognitive neuroscience.

Academic facilities

You will have access to all the facilities and laboratories in the Psychology Department. Our members have experience with a wide range of neuroscientific techniques, including neuropsychological testing, psychophysics and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI).

We have particular strengths in the use of Electroencephalography (EEG), Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial Electric Stimulation (a weak current applied to the scalp), in addition to measures of human behaviour (e.g. response times, response errors, and eye movements) and physiological measures (e.g. galvanic skin response and heart rate).

We test neurologically normal individuals, special populations (e.g. people with synesthesia) and people with expertise or acquired skills (e.g. dancers, musicians, athletes), as well as people with brain damage (e.g. neglect or split-brain patients), psychiatric diagnoses (e.g. schizophrenia), sensory deficits (e.g. visual and hearing impairments) and developmental disorders (e.g. dyslexia or autism).

Placements

We help facilitate Clinical placements and are able and offer Research placements within our department.

Clinical placements: Center for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN) in collaboration with City and Hackney Mind (CHM).

Teaching and learning

Teaching will be comprised of lectures, seminars, group work and discussions, workshops and tutorials, reports, computing and statistics classes and the individual research dissertation.

You will undertake independent study, supported by the teaching and learning team, and will receive detailed feedback on your coursework. You will be provided with assessment and grade-related criteria which will outline your intended learning outcomes, along with the skills, knowledge and attitudes you are expected to demonstrate in order for you to complete an assessment successfully. You will also be assigned a personal tutor as your primary contact, who will advise you on academic matters and monitor your progress through the programme.

You will find a supportive vibrant research environment in the Department. The course is taught by academics, who are internationally recognised experts in their field with different backgrounds in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience.

Assessment

Your learning will be assessed through essays, examinations, oral presentations, research methods projects and interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a dissertation.

Modules

The programme consists of eight taught modules worth 15 credits each with around 30-34 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources and an empirical research project (worth 60 credits).

You will learn about the latest advances in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience and develop an appreciation of the reciprocal nature of research and practice in these domains. For example how insights from functional neuroimaging inform our understanding of neurological disorders and how clinical observations inform neurocognitive modelling.

Course structure
-Principles of Neuroscience: Brain anatomy, techniques and paradigms
-Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
-Mental Health, Well-being and Neuroscience
-Fundamental Processes in Cognitive Neuroscience & Neuropsychology I
-Fundamental Processes in Cognitive Neuroscience & Neuropsychology II
-Social Cognition and the Social Brain
-Statistical models and Research Methods and Programming
-Research Dissertation
-Invited speakers programme

Career prospects

This course will provide you with knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. You will also be well-equipped should you wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

The knowledge and skills you will acquire in this programme are highly valuable, whether you choose to pursue further research or an applied occupation. They will enhance your employability prospects in a wide range of sectors including the pharmaceutical industry, neuromarketing, the computing industry, science and the media, science and the arts, business or education.

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The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.). Read more
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.).

As such, it is designed for practitioners and would-be practitioners across this spectrum who wish to engage with applied human rights.

Overview

Our MA in Applied Human Rights is distinctive in five main ways:
-Tt is uniquely applied, exploring how human rights can advance social justice in law, policy and social activism
-It is interdisciplinary and holistic (integrating knowledge of human rights, development, conflict, and more)
-Students will acquire relevant knowledge but also skills that are vital for a career in human rights e.g. project management skills
-The lecturers are both academics and experienced practitioners, and the international human rights defenders hosted by the Centre will attend and lead classes
-An international field trip to South Africa takes place in the first term (student numbers permitting), enabling students to work alongside local NGOs and human rights defenders on concrete projects

Course content

The MA structure has two components: compulsory modules, and optional modules. In total, students need to complete five modules (two compulsory, in the first term; one compulsory, running over two terms; two options in the second term). A dissertation will fulfill the requirements for an MA. This structure has been chosen so as to maximize the choice available to students, but to guide the selection process in a constructive way eg: indicating where modules are practice-based and where they are not.

Continuous assessment of applied skills is a feature of the programme.

Compulsory modules
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Social sciences and human rights practice (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits, term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits, terms 3-4)

Optional modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Those offered by CAHR will share the characteristics of the MA (practice based and interdisciplinary) and will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also select from optional modules listed below taught by other departments.
Optional modules taught at CAHR:
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

*Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Careers

Our MA provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian and development organisations, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

Recent graduates have secured work with:
-Government departments, e.g. working on health equality and trafficking in the UK, Finnish Centre for Human Rights (NHRI)
-Human rights organisations, e.g. Freedom House, the Terrence Higgins Trust, the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organisation, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute (Washington, DC), Freedom from Torture (Yorkshire & Humberside), International Services and Brave New Films (USA)
-Development and humanitarian organisations, e.g. Norwegian People's Aid and Merlin
-Inter-governmental agencies, e.g. the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation in The Hague, UNDP in Bangladesh, UNRIC in Brussels and Quaker UN Office in Geneva
-Research posts, e.g. PhD positions and Research Assistant on Corporate Social Responsibility at the American University, Beirut
-Think-tanks, e.g. Involve, London
-Businesses, e.g. Ethical Trade Coordinator at New Look Retailers

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Positively contribute to your local community. Our Master of Pharmacy provides you will the foundation for a successful career in the pharmaceutal industry. Read more

Positively contribute to your local community

Our Master of Pharmacy provides you will the foundation for a successful career in the pharmaceutal industry. Fast-track your studies and embark on a journey to apply evidence-based medicine and critical thinking to problem solve real-life medical scenarios. This rewarding postgraduate degree will give you the opportunity to have a positive impact on your patients lives. The course is also now accredited by the Australia Pharmacy Council (APC).

Complete a Master of Pharmacy at UC and you will:

  • integrate theory and practice through lectures, laboratories and clinical placements
  • gain the necessary knowledge, exposure, attitudes and clinical decision making skills required to practice as a pharmacist
  • undertake a series of problem based clinical studies to further develop your skills and adaptability
  • develop an understanding of healthcare consumers' needs within a framework of the healthcare team and the institutions that supply healthcare
  • have the opportunity to gain direct experience of the regulatory side of pharmacy practice.

Work-integrated learning

Work-integrated learning (WIL) is learning first-hand through real work or work-like experiences. WIL is a key element to enhancing employability in the workplace and is integral to many of our courses. This reinforces our commitment to preparing professional and highly employable graduates with the right mix of skills and knowledge.

Professional Accreditation

This program has been granted accreditation by the Australian Pharmacy Council and is approved by the Pharmacy Board of Australia as a qualification leading to registration as a pharmacist in Australia.

Typical study pattern

Year 1

Semester 1

Semester 2

Year 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Career opportunities

A range of career opportunities exist for Master of Pharmacy graduates, including as a:

  • practicing pharmacist
  • regulator within the government and broader pharmaceutical industry. 


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The University of Canberra MBA offers individuals aspiring to senior management and executive roles the opportunity to develop skills and competencies relevant to the effective management of enterprises. Read more

The University of Canberra MBA offers individuals aspiring to senior management and executive roles the opportunity to develop skills and competencies relevant to the effective management of enterprises. The course covers all aspects of management, including managing people, accounting and finance, economics, information and decision making. 

The MBA emphasises development of skills required to succeed in increasingly complex business environments such as international trade or public administration working across legal, industry or cultural boundaries.

Learning objectives

Graduates of this course will have a broad and coherent theoretical and technical knowledge in a range of core areas of business management, such as marketing, accounting, economics, research methods, strategic management, innovation and IT, and the impact of law and institutions on business managers

Skills

Graduates will have well developed cognitive, technical and communication skills. They will be able to analyse complex problems in a range of disciplines and select appropriate methods and technologies when developing solutions and recommendations. They will be able to work with limited information, evaluate gaps in information and have the research skills required to find required information. They will have strong communication skills and will be able to transmit their knowledge, skills and ideas using a variety of communication styles, as would be expected by audiences from technical or non-technical backgrounds.

Typical study pattern

Ningbo University, Ningbo

Year 1

Term 4

Year 2

Term 2

Term 4

Year 3

Term 2



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The University of Canberra MBA offers individuals aspiring to senior management and executive roles the opportunity to develop skills and competencies relevant to the effective management of enterprises. Read more

The University of Canberra MBA offers individuals aspiring to senior management and executive roles the opportunity to develop skills and competencies relevant to the effective management of enterprises. The course covers all aspects of management, including managing people, accounting and finance, economics, information and decision making. 

The MBA emphasises development of skills required to succeed in increasingly complex business environments such as international trade or public administration working across legal, industry or cultural boundaries.

Delivered at the East China University of Science & Technology (ECUST) campus, Shanghai.

Learning objectives

Graduates of this course will have a broad and coherent theoretical and technical knowledge in a range of core areas of business management, such as marketing, accounting, economics, research methods, strategic management, innovation and IT, and the impact of law and institutions on business managers

Skills

Graduates will have well developed cognitive, technical and communication skills. They will be able to analyse complex problems in a range of disciplines and select appropriate methods and technologies when developing solutions and recommendations. They will be able to work with limited information, evaluate gaps in information and have the research skills required to find required information. They will have strong communication skills and will be able to transmit their knowledge, skills and ideas using a variety of communication styles, as would be expected by audiences from technical or non-technical backgrounds.

Typical study pattern

East China University of Science & Technology Shanghai

Year 1

Term 2

Term 4

Year 2

Term 2



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The University of Canberra MBA offers individuals aspiring to senior management and executive roles the opportunity to develop skills and competencies relevant to the effective management of enterprises. Read more

The University of Canberra MBA offers individuals aspiring to senior management and executive roles the opportunity to develop skills and competencies relevant to the effective management of enterprises. The course covers all aspects of management, including managing people, accounting and finance, economics, information and decision making. 

The MBA emphasises development of skills required to succeed in increasingly complex business environments such as international trade or public administration working across legal, industry or cultural boundaries.

Learning objectives

Graduates of this course will have a broad and coherent theoretical and technical knowledge in a range of core areas of business management, such as marketing, accounting, economics, research methods, strategic management, innovation and IT, and the impact of law and institutions on business managers.

Skills

Graduates will have well developed cognitive, technical and communication skills. They will be able to analyse complex problems in a range of disciplines and select appropriate methods and technologies when developing solutions and recommendations. They will be able to work with limited information, evaluate gaps in information and have the research skills required to find required information. They will have strong communication skills and will be able to transmit their knowledge, skills and ideas using a variety of communication styles, as would be expected by audiences from technical or non-technical backgrounds.

Typical study pattern

Royal Institute of Management, Bhutan

Year 1

Term 1

Term 2

Year 2

Term 1




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Enhance your leadership career in the public service. This course is co-designed by leading academics and senior administrators who are currently involved in the study and practice of 21st century governance. Read more

Enhance your leadership career in the public service

This course is co-designed by leading academics and senior administrators who are currently involved in the study and practice of 21st century governance. That means you’ll be gathering a fairly impressive list of core professional skills in the areas of public management, policy analysis and leadership.

You’ll be able to boost your ethical research skills by undertaking a dissertation project and enhance your career opportunities at both the national and sub-national levels of the public services sector. Now that’s good policy.

Study a Master of Public Administration at UC and you will:

  • gain a broad view of public management, service delivery and policy analysis across the spectrum of public sector activities
  • understand how the international political environment affects organisational objectives
  • understand the different modes of governance available to deliver different public goods and services
  • be able to accurately use, interpret and draw inference from information gathered as evidence to support routine and strategic decision-making
  • gain a critical understanding of the central concepts relating to public administration, public management and public policy.

Typical study pattern

Year 1

Semester 1

Semester 2

Year 2

Semester 1

Career opportunities

A range of career opportunities exist for Master of Public Administration graduates in a range of sectors, including in:

  • Federal government as a general operations manager, labour relations manager or financial manager
  • Local and state government as a chief administration officer, human services director or public works director
  • Non-profit sector as a program director, grant administrator or fundraising manager.


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The MSc in Child Development is designed to prepare psychology graduates for the next stage of their career in research or applied areas of psychology. Read more

Overview

The MSc in Child Development is designed to prepare psychology graduates for the next stage of their career in research or applied areas of psychology.

Keele has a vibrant, well-established and ever-expanding community of researchers in child development. Students will benefit from their expertise across a wide range of areas including child social development (e.g. bullying and peer relationships), child cognitive development (e.g. theory of mind, attention in autism and ADHD) and education (e.g. girls and science and enhancing collaborative learning in the classroom). MSc students are made to feel part of this research culture both through the formal modules and through involvement in research seminars and meetings.

- Career Destinations:
Many of our MSc graduates go on to take up positions in the workplace, register for professional psychology training (e.g. educational psychology) or a PhD in psychology.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/childdevelopment/

Course Aims

The programme provides taught content and research training in a range of areas in Child Development, building on areas of staff research expertise. Strengths include: children’s peer relationships, e.g. bullying in schools; children’s trust in health professionals; written emotional expression in adolescents; eye movements in children with autism and ADHD; how an understanding of the nature of knowledge and beliefs develops in children and young adults; social influences on learning, such as how teachers use feedback in the classroom; and how to promote collaborative learning; factors that influence children’s subject choices, e.g. girls and science; children’s musical development and engagement; and parenting, e.g. interactions at family mealtimes.

We have well-established links with local schools and have created research partnerships where students come to the university to experience learning in a university setting as well as allowing our students to gain valuable experience working and collecting data in a school setting. We also run the project White Water Writers which gives groups of young people the chance to write and publish their own full length novel in a week. We work with local primary, secondary, SEN and other youth groups such as looked after children and MSc students are given the opportunity to take the lead in running this project.

Course Content

The programme addresses written and communication skills, independent learning skills, data analysis, critical reflection and critical evaluation. Our students benefit from a wide range of support including accessible academic staff with a wide range of expertise, laboratory and other research space, study space, and access to IT and research tools.

List of Module Titles:
- Advanced Study in Child Development (30 credits)
- Contemporary Research in Psychology (15 credits)
- Advanced Research Skills & Design (15 credits)
- Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits)
- Advanced Quantitative Statistics (15 credits)
- Research Apprenticeship in Psychology (15 credits)
- Dissertation (75 credits)

Teaching & Assessment

The course is of one year duration for full time and two years for part-time.

The course is assessed through written coursework, unseen examination, verbal presentation of research, and independent research written up as a dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme. Limited support is available for research-related expenses.

Scholarships

There are substantial scholarships available, please see this link: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/internationalfunding/postgraduate/
or
http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. Read more
The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. The programme also develops critical, analytical and transferable skills that prepare you for professional, academic and research careers in the exciting and rapidly advancing area of archaeological science or in non-cognate fields.

The programme places the study of the human past at the centre of archaeological science enquiry. This is achieved through a combination of science and self-selected thematic or period-based modules allowing you to situate your scientific training within the archaeological context(s) of your choice. The programme provides a detailed understanding of the foundations of analytical techniques, delivers practical experience in their application and data processing, and the ability to design and communicate research that employs scientific analyses to address archaeological questions. Upon graduation you will have experience of collecting, analysing and reporting on data to publication standard and ideally equipped to launch your career as a practising archaeological scientist.

Distinctive features

The MSc Archaeological Science at Cardiff University gives you access to:

• A flexible and responsive programme that combines training in scientific enquiry, expertise and vocational skills with thematic and period-focused archaeology.

• Materials, equipment, library resources and funding to undertake meaningful research in partnership with a wide range of key heritage organisations across an international stage.

• A programme with core strengths in key fields of archaeological science, tailored to launch your career in the discipline or to progress to doctoral research.

• A department where the science, theory and practice of archaeology and conservation converge to create a unique environment for exploring the human past.

• Staff with extensive professional experience in researching, promoting, publishing, and integrating archaeological science across academic and commercial archaeology and the wider heritage sector.

• An energetic team responsible for insights into iconic sites (e.g. Stonehenge, Çatalhöyük), tackling key issues in human history (e.g. hunting, farming, food, and feasts) through the development and application of innovative science (e.g. isotopes, residue analysis, DNA, proteomics)

• A unique training in science communication at every level - from preparing conference presentations and journal articles, to project reports, press releases and public engagement, our training ensures you can transmit the excitement of scientific enquiry to diverse audiences.

• Support for your future career ambitions. From further study to science advisors to specialists – our graduates work across the entire spectrum of archaeological science as well as moving into other successful careers.

Structure

There are two stages to this course: stage 1 and stage 2.

Stage 1 is made up of:

• 40 credits of Core Skills and Discipline-Specific Research Training modules for Archaeology and Conservation Master's students
• A minimum of 40 credits of Archaeological Science modules
• An additional 40 credits of Archaeological Science or Archaeology modules offered to MA and MSc students across the Archaeology and Conservation department

Stage 2 comprises:

• 60 credit Archaeological Science Dissertation (16-20,000 words, topic or theme chosen in consultation with academic staff)

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Archaeological Science Dissertation

Teaching

Teaching is delivered via lectures, laboratory sessions, interactive workshops and tutorials, in addition to visits to relevant local resources such as the National Museum Wales and local heritage organisations.

Lectures take a range of forms but generally provide a broad structure for each subject, an introduction to key concepts and relevant up-to-date information. The Archaeological Science Master's provides students with bespoke training in scientific techniques during laboratory sessions. This includes developing practical skills in the identification, recording and analysis of archaeological materials during hands on laboratory sessions. These range from macroscopic e.g. bone identification, to microscopic e.g. material identification or status with light based or scanning electron microscopy, to sample selection, preparation and analysis e.g. isotopic or aDNA and include health and safety and laboratory management skills. Students will be able to develop specialist practical skills in at least one area of study. In workshops and seminars, you will have the opportunity to discuss themes or topics, to receive and consolidate feedback on your individual learning and to develop skills in oral presentation.

This programme is based within the School of History, Archaeology and Religion and taught by academic staff from across Cardiff University and by external speakers. All taught modules within the Programme are compulsory and you are expected to attend all lectures, laboratory sessions and other timetabled sessions. Students will receive supervision to help them complete the dissertation, but are also expected to engage in considerable independent study.

Assessment

The 120 credits of taught Modules within Stage 1 of the Programme are assessed through in-course assessments, including:

Extended essays
Oral presentations
Poster presentations
Statistical assignments
Critical appraisals
Practical skills tests
Data reports
Research designs

You must successfully complete the taught component of the programme before progressing to Stage 2 where assessment is:

Dissertation (16-20,000 words)

Career prospects

After successfully completing this MSc, you should have a broad spectrum of knowledge and a variety of skills, making you highly attractive both to potential employers and research establishments. You will be able to pursue a wide range of professional careers, within commercial and academic archaeology and the wider heritage sector. Career paths will generally be specialist and will depend on the choice of modules. Graduates will be well placed to pursue careers as a specialist in isotope analysis, zooarchaeological analysis or human osteoarchaeology. They will also be in a position to apply for general laboratory based work and archaeological fieldwork. Working within science communication and management are other options. Potential employers include archaeological units, museums, universities, heritage institutions, Historic England and Cadw. Freelance or self-employment career routes are also common for animal and human bone analysts with postgraduate qualifications.

The archaeology department has strong links and collaborations across the heritage sector and beyond. British organisations that staff currently work with include Cadw, Historic England, English Heritage, Historic Scotland, National Museum Wales, the British Museum, the Welsh archaeological trusts and a range of other archaeology units (e.g. Wessex Archaeology, Oxford Archaeology, Cambridge Archaeology Unit, Archaeology Wales). In addition, staff are involved with archaeological research across the world. You will be encouraged to become involved in these collaborations via research projects and placements to maximise networking opportunities and increasing your employability.

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If you enjoy working with people, have a passion for food, and are fascinated by the relationships between food, nutrients, health, and disease, then the Master of Science in Nutrition & Dietetics is for you. Read more

If you enjoy working with people, have a passion for food, and are fascinated by the relationships between food, nutrients, health, and disease, then the Master of Science in Nutrition & Dietetics is for you. Study at Massey and turn your passion into your profession.

Dietetics is the application of nutritional science to individuals and groups in health and various states of disease. As a Registered Dietitian (RD), you will be uniquely qualified to translate the latest nutritional science into practical dietary advice. Dietitians promote good health, advise about prevention of nutrition-related problems, and are able to treat disease and ill health. Working as part of a community or healthcare team, you will have the opportunity to specialise in areas such as diabetes or paediatrics, or you can employ your skills in the food or sports industries, education, research, or journalism.

MSc (Nutrition and Dietetics) graduates will meet the registration competency requirements of the New Zealand Dietitians Board. They will develop the attributes, qualities, and skills considered essential for gaining employment and making an important contribution in the community they will serve.

The programme provides students with sound knowledge of nutrition and dietetics science, theories underpinning current practices, and excellent understanding of professional and ethical practice. Students will improve their analytical thinking, gain effective communication and information management skills, and develop self-directed and independent learning abilities.

Careers

Graduates are eligible to apply to be registered with the New Zealand Dietitians Board to practise as a dietitian in New Zealand (NZRD), and will become eligible to apply for registration in both Australia and the United Kingdom.

DietitiansNZ is a professional association that represents dietitians practising in diverse areas of dietetics.

Career opportunities include:

  • Clinical Dietetics (e.g. hospitals, clinics, private practice)
  • Community Dietetics (e.g. Marae, public health, rest homes, schools)
  • Consultancy and Private Practice
  • Food Companies and Food Industry
  • Foodservice Management
  • Industry (e.g. corporate health and wellness, private consulting)
  • Health Promotion / Public Health Agencies (e.g NZ Ministry of Health, NZ Heart Foundation)
  • Media (e.g. writing publications, television, marketing)
  • Medical Nutritional Companies (e.g. nutrition and dietetics advisor, nutritional representative)
  • Research and Education
  • Sports and Exercise Nutrition (e.g. elite and recreational sports teams, fitness industry)


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Your path to contribute to effective solutions in health care. Read more

Your path to contribute to effective solutions in health care

Are you intrigued by topics like health insurance, costs, benefits and reforms and health disparities? Does contributing to economic solutions in this atypical sector sound like the challenge for you? The Health Economics programme provides you with the concepts and quantitative skills necessary to face the 21st Century health sector challenges.

This programme teaches you to apply economic knowledge and econometric analysis to pressing issues in health care. You will address problems caused by rising costs, population aging and rapid advances in medical technology. All this, in a sector with atypical agents (after all, doctors do not maximise profits) where even the value of the main good itself, health, is subject of debate. 

Get educated by the best in Rotterdam

Health Economics? Rotterdam is where you should be. As global frontrunners in research and training our researchers frequently publish in top journals in the field and are regularly consulted by international bodies from all over the world. It’s these researchers of the Health Economics Group of Erasmus School of Economics and the Health Economics and Health Systems and Insurance groups of the Institute for Health Policy and Management who will shape your education.

Careers

The Master specialisation in Health Economics at Erasmus School of Economics has an outstanding reputation in the health business community. It has everything to prepare you for a bright future as a health economist at for example:

  • consulting firms (e.g. KPMG, IMS Health, SiRM)
  • the pharmaceutical industry (e.g. Pfizer, Glaxo Smith Kline)
  • health insurance companies (e.g. Achmea, Delta Lloyd)
  • academia (e.g. EUR, University of Birmingham)
  • international organisations (e.g. WHO, World Bank)
  • regional health authorities and government institutions (e.g. RIVM, Ministry of Health)
  • hospitals (e.g. Erasmus MC)

"Addressing topical healthcare issues is inspirational in and of itself"

Far from an average sector, complex and far-reaching economic issues and as topical as science gets: Health Economics is truly unique. Do you want to combine quantitative skills with economics in this sector? Meet your fellow students!

Download the brochure here.



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This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the four main ‘pillars’ of IP Law, namely, Copyright, Patents, Trade marks and Industrial Designs. The four main components of IP Law will be examined from three distinct perspectives: domestic (UK), EU and International (global treaties/conventions) and will encompass analysis of legislation, case law (common law and civil law) and specific legal concepts. Where possible, comparative analysis will be carried out as between for example, specific EU IP Law developments and those of third country States e.g. India, Pakistan and China. In addition, certain third countries with well-developed, mature IP systems (e.g. the U.S., Canada and Australia) will be examined for a comparative assessment. The distinct themes of how the Internet has brought about new thinking in the IP world and, possible overlapping forms of IP protection (e.g. copyright and patent protection of computer software) will be examined.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students from both a common law and civil law background will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary intellectual property lawyers. The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, patent and trade mark attorneys, local Intellectual Property Offices (e.g. the UK Intellectual Property Office, Chinese Patent and Trade Mark Office and the Office of the Controller General of Patents, Designs and Trade Marks in India),international organisations such as the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the United Nations and specialist bodies within the EU e.g. the Office for the Harmonisation of the Internal Market (OHIM) and the European Patent Office (EPO). Directorate-General Internal Market and Services of the European Commission deals with IP matters and is also a potential employer. Other potential employers include international courts and tribunals, think tanks and research centres (e.g. the specialist Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law (Munich), non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice; Business, Innovation and Skills and; Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Intellectual Property Law
Data Protection Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Intellectual Property Law
Optional Modules (choose 4)

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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Veterinary epidemiology is a key component in a number of the global grand challenges relating to disease control, food security and climate change. Read more

Veterinary epidemiology is a key component in a number of the global grand challenges relating to disease control, food security and climate change. Consequently, there is a need to improve our ability to understand, predict and respond to patterns and dynamics of disease and to control outbreaks.

The R(D)SVS and SRUC partnership creates the greatest concentration of research power in veterinary and agricultural sciences in the UK. The MSc draws on this wealth of experience and research activity to provide scientific knowledge of the fundamental biological processes (e.g. behaviour, physiology, immunology, ecology) and environmental and farming management practices (e.g. husbandry, nutrition, livestock trade) driving disease transmission, persistence, prevalence and spread in livestock production systems. This enables in-depth understanding of complex environmental patterns of disease, which facilitates prediction of disease risk and control. This multidisciplinary systems approach will provide you with the skills to make significant contributions to tackling food security, climate change and disease control in your role as an animal health professional.

By the end of the programme you will not only have a detailed understanding of the biology driving disease persistence and prevalence, but also how the biology scales up from individuals to populations. You will understand how this interacts with agricultural management practices to determine the efficacy of disease control strategies and livestock production (i.e. interdisciplinary systems thinking and communication). Furthermore, the systems approach offers a way to frame disease challenges and problem solve disease risk at a range of scales (e.g. from veterinarians tackling specific outbreaks to the consequences of climate change on disease risk). To this end the programme provides training in methodological skills for the design, implementation, analysis, interpretation and communication of epidemiological studies, disease surveillance and disease control in animal populations and wider host communities.

Courses are delivered by active researchers presenting their own research, which is placed into context with global grand challenges. As such, you will be exposed to and taught skills appropriate for developing a research career.

Online learning

The programme will use the University’s award winning online learning environments, which includes video podcasts, web-based discussion forums and expert tuition.

Programme structure

The programme is delivered part-time by online learning over period of 3-6 years.

You may undertake the programme by intermittent study (flexible progression route), accruing credits within a time limit of:

  • 1 years for the Certificate (maximum period 2 years)
  • 2 years for the Diploma (maximum period 4 years)
  • 3 years for the MSc (maximum period of 6 years including a maximum period of 12 months from the start of your written reflective element to it being completed)

The programme is modular in structure, offering a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied; other than the three core courses required for the certificate, students may choose to study individual courses, to complete a sufficient number of credits to be awarded the:

  • Certificate (60 credits)
  • Diploma (120 credits)
  • MSc (180 credits)

Postgraduate Professional Development

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course(s), without the time or financial commitment of a full Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses over two years through our PPD scheme. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. Alternatively, after one year of taking courses you can choose to transfer your credits and continue on to studying towards a higher award on a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme. Although PPD courses have various start dates throughout a year you may only start a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme in the month of September. Any time spent studying PPD will be deducted from the amount of time you will have left to complete a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme.

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire knowledge about disease systems in livestock production environments and the interactions between the biological and livestock management processes driving disease dynamics.
  • Acquire specific skills to link individual farm environments and management practices to disease risk and production efficiency at farm and national scales.
  • Be able to interpret, be critical of and communicate scientific results and information in research.

Career opportunities

The courses and programme as a whole will provide:

  • general postgraduate training (e.g. for people in education, government, policy-making, agricultural and veterinary organisations) to enable promotion, further employment opportunities or personal fulfilment
  • general postgraduate training for people considering a career in research (e.g. a precursor to a PhD)
  • topic-specific postgraduate training (e.g. for veterinarians for continuing professional development) to enable promotion, further employment opportunities or personal fulfilment


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