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This project will aim. To Sample and isolate mycorrhizal fungi from symbiotic terrestrial orchidaceae. To morphologically characterise and identify the mycorrhizal fungi. Read more

This project will aim:

  1. To Sample and isolate mycorrhizal fungi from symbiotic terrestrial orchidaceae
  2. To morphologically characterise and identify the mycorrhizal fungi
  3. To test the propensity of selected strains as plant promoting symbiosis
  4. To establish diseases suppressant capacity of selected mycorrhizal fungi.

The outcomes of this research will aid conservation biology of an endangered species and support sustainable agriculture through the utilization of natural occurring organisms to enhance plant growth promotion and diseases control of crop species.

Further information

These projects are funded under the President’s Research Fellowship Programme of the Institute, with the college fees and research materials and consumables covered. A small student stipend will also be provided. The successful candidates will work in the enviroCORE, which is the Institute’s environmental research centre, in a team of research supervisors and postgraduate students.

Applicants should have a primary honours degree (Level 8) in an appropriate discipline (Biosciences, Microbiology, Genetics, Biology, Bioinformatics, Zoology, Environmental Science etc.). They must also hold a minimum of a Second Class Honours Grade 1 (2.1) undergraduate degree. The successful candidates are expected start in the postgraduate positions no later than September 2018.

To apply for a President’s Research Fellowship Scholarship, please email with the title(s) of the project being applied for, a CV and a statement (c.500 words) as to why this project is of interest to you. If applying for more than one research project, please list them in your order of preference.

Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2018



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Plant endophytic bacteria such as. Pseudomonas fluorescens. offer an untapped resource of new antibiotics and other bioactive molecules. Read more

Plant endophytic bacteria such as Pseudomonas fluorescens offer an untapped resource of new antibiotics and other bioactive molecules. We have identified a number of such bacterial strains that have activity against important plant diseases and parasites such as the nematode Meloidogynejavanica (root-knot disease of many plant species) and the pathogenic fungus Pyrenophora teres (Barley leaf spot disease). We have sequenced the genomes of three such strains (Moreira et al 2016) and identified a number of chromosomal regions with novel potential secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways. The first task of the project is to analyse these in detail using bioinformatics to compare with other pathways and to identify targets for gene inactivation. To demonstrate the potential role these pathways may have in killing M. javanica and P. teres we will use a targeted gene inactivation technique (perfected in our labs) to generate knock-out mutations in the key gene(s) involved in the synthesis of the bioactive products. In parallel, we will undertake an analysis of the metabolites produced by both the wild type strains and these mutants using HPLC, LCMS and GCMS with a view to identification of the pathway encoded bioactive compounds. Wild Type, mutant strains and extracts will be tested for activity against M. javanica and P. teres using bioassays developed in our labs. As time permits plant protection experiments in a plant growth room and greenhouse will also be undertaken. This project will be designed as a PhD programme with an international collaborative dimension.

Further information

These projects are funded under the President’s Research Fellowship Programme of the Institute, with the college fees and research materials and consumables covered. A small student stipend will also be provided. The successful candidates will work in the enviroCORE, which is the Institute’s environmental research centre, in a team of research supervisors and postgraduate students.

Applicants should have a primary honours degree (Level 8) in an appropriate discipline (Biosciences, Microbiology, Genetics, Biology, Bioinformatics, Zoology, Environmental Science etc.). They must also hold a minimum of a Second Class Honours Grade 1 (2.1) undergraduate degree. The successful candidates are expected start in the postgraduate positions no later than September 2018.

To apply for a President’s Research Fellowship Scholarship, please email with the title(s) of the project being applied for, a CV and a statement (c.500 words) as to why this project is of interest to you. If applying for more than one research project, please list them in your order of preference.

Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2018



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Fungal biology research will focus on yeasts, filamentous fungi and lichens. Projects will investigate the physiology, biochemistry, molecular genetics and genomics of these organisms, for example in the use of fungi as cell factories for the production of proteins and pharmaceuticals. Read more
Fungal biology research will focus on yeasts, filamentous fungi and lichens. Projects will investigate the physiology, biochemistry, molecular genetics and genomics of these organisms, for example in the use of fungi as cell factories for the production of proteins and pharmaceuticals. Other areas include stress response mechanisms and cell individuality in yeasts and filamentous fungi, the genetics of sexual reproduction in pathogenic fungi and those used in the biotechnology and food sectors, and the epigenetic control of gene transcription.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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The understanding of plant diversity and resources has never been more important. As we face the unprecedented challenges of climate change and environmental degradation, effective environmental surveillance and conservation depend upon detailed knowledge of plants and their habitats. Read more

The understanding of plant diversity and resources has never been more important. As we face the unprecedented challenges of climate change and environmental degradation, effective environmental surveillance and conservation depend upon detailed knowledge of plants and their habitats.

This programme is run jointly by the University and the world-renowned Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE). The RBGE is home to one of the world’s best living collections of plants (15,000 species across four sites, amounting to five per cent of known world species), a herbarium of three million preserved specimens and one of the UK’s most comprehensive botanical libraries.

RBGE offers collections-based biodiversity research opportunities across a wide spectrum of organisms and geographical regions. This diversity, coupled with the RBGE’s world-leading research in different continents, provides an unrivalled masters programme in plant biodiversity.

Programme structure

This programme is full time and consists of two semesters of lectures, practicals, workshops and investigations, followed by a four-month research project. The programme includes a two-week field course in a tropical country (recently Belize).

The programme is delivered mainly at RBGE but also at the University’s King’s Buildings campus.

There are no option elements to the programme – all courses are compulsory.

Courses

  • Conservation and Sustainability
  • Taxonomy and Plant Collections
  • Biodiversity of Angiosperms
  • Evolution of Cryptogams and Fungi
  • Evolution of Angiosperms
  • Plant Geography
  • Phylogenetics and Population Genetics
  • Biodiversity of Cryptogams and Fungi

Research

Your research project will be chosen in consultation with your supervisor, and will link directly with active research programmes at RBGE or other research institutions.

The field trip, together with training and a short practical exam, qualifies you for the RBGE Certificate in Practical Field Botany.

Career opportunities

The programme is good preparation for roles in taxonomy, while many graduates have also continued to PhD studies. Past students have entered a wide variety of jobs at research institutions, conservation agencies and elsewhere.



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Microbiology research covers organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, including archaea, bacteria, yeasts, lichens and filamentous fungi. Read more
Microbiology research covers organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, including archaea, bacteria, yeasts, lichens and filamentous fungi. Projects involve the use of physiological, genetic and genomic approaches to elucidate mechanisms of DNA recombination and repair (archaea and bacteria), of motility (bacteria), or of genome dynamics, sexual reproduction, biotechnological applications, or responses to environment and stress (fungi).

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Biology will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
The University of Nottingham is delighted to offer 10 x £1,000 tuition fee scholarships for students starting full-time study on one of the Masters by Research (MRes) programmes in the School of Biology at the University in September 2012. Applicants must be classified as ‘overseas’ students for fees purposes and be applying to study full time. All eligible students who have offers of admission before end of May 2012 will automatically be considered for the Scholarships. The scholarship winners will be notified in June 2012.

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The molecular approach to studying biological systems has underpinned huge advances in knowledge and promises much for the future in the understanding and application of biological principles. Read more
The molecular approach to studying biological systems has underpinned huge advances in knowledge and promises much for the future in the understanding and application of biological principles. At Nottingham we are using molecular approaches to study a wide range of model as well as innovative biological systems. Currently projects are available in research groupings that are investigating eukaryotic gene expression and vertebrate embryogenesis, including aspects of the development of the nervous system, germ cells and stem cell maturation, and the behaviour of cellular systems with respect to the many interactions of macromolecules within cells and their membranes. In addition there are projects to study in microbes the systems responsible for maintaining genome integrity and securing accurate chromosome transmission in bacteria, archaea and yeast, as well as the basis of bacterial motility. There are also projects concerned with the biology of fungi in relation to their stress responses and to their interactions with their environment in general, as well as with the use of fungi as cell factories for the production of proteins and pharmaceuticals. Finally there are projects in research groups studying ion channels, receptor-mediated carcinogenesis and ecotoxicology that use natural and synthetic toxins to dissect the properties of signalling molecules in nervous and muscle tissues and employ cutting-edge techniques to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of toxins and the mechanisms of disease.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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Molecular genetics is the study of genes at the molecular level. It focuses on the processes that underlie the expression of the genetic information from the DNA into the functional proteins that execute the genetic programme. Read more
Molecular genetics is the study of genes at the molecular level. It focuses on the processes that underlie the expression of the genetic information from the DNA into the functional proteins that execute the genetic programme. Within the School of Life Sciences research in molecular genetics is concentrated in the Human Genetics, Fungal Biology, and Developmental Genetics and Gene Control groups. In the Human Genetics group research in this area includes studies of the molecular basis of myotonic dystrophy and the identification of genes involved in cardiac development; the molecular genetics of muscle disease; mouse models of muscle disorders and molecular genetic approaches to anthropology and human population genetics. In the Fungal Biology group there are studies on the molecular events that determine stress responses during polarised growth, protein folding and secretion in yeasts and filamentous fungi; the molecular and cellular effects of stress on yeast cells and the genetic mechanisms that control sex in fungi. The Developmental Genetics and Gene Control group focuses on the mechanisms of eukaryotic gene expression and the genetics of vertebrate embryonic development. Developmental studies are focussed largely upon the mechanisms that control stem cell fate. Projects on the control of gene expression address the machinery used by cells to achieve appropriate levels of functional transcripts. These studies include control of transcription and the mechanisms of RNA maturation.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Read more

Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision.

Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science, biophysics and computational biologoy. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1235/biochemistry

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate research students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School houses a dynamic research community with five major research themes:

  • industrial biotechnology
  • infection and drug resistance
  • cancer and age-related diseases
  • cellular architecture and dynamics
  • reproduction, evolution and genomics

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Associated centres

- Kent Fungal Group

The Kent Fungal Group (KFG) brings together a number of research groups in the School of Biosciences that primarily use yeasts or other fungi as ‘model systems’ for their research. One strength of the KFG is the range of model fungi being exploited for both fundamental and medical/translational research. These include Bakers’ yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and yeasts associated with human disease, specifically Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.

In addition to studying key cellular processes in the fungal cell such as protein synthesis, amyloids and cell division, members of the KFG are also using yeast to explore the molecular basis of human diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases as well as ageing. The KFG not only provides support for both fundamental and medical/translational fungal research, but also provides an excellent training environment for young fungal researchers.

- Industrial Biotechnology Centre

The School houses one of the University’s flagship research centres – the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC). Here, staff from Biosciences, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Computing and Engineering combine their expertise into a pioneering interdisciplinary biosciences programme at Kent, in order to unlock the secrets of some of the essential life processes. These approaches are leading to a more integrated understanding of biology in health and disease. In the Centre, ideas and technology embodied in different disciplines are being employed in some of the remaining challenges in bioscience. With such an approach, new discoveries and creative ideas are generated through the formation of new collaborative teams. In this environment, the IBC is broadening and enriching the training of students and staff in science and technology.

- The Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of Reproduction (CISoR)

The centre comprises several like-minded academics dedicated to the study of reproduction in all its forms. Drawing on a range of academic disciplines, CISoR's core philosophy is that the study of this fascinating field will advance further through a multidisciplinary approach. Impactful, excellent research forms the basis of CISoR’s activities including scientific advance, new products and processes, contribution to public policy, and public engagement.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/



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Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Read more

Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision.

Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science, biophysics and computational biology. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1238/genetics

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate research students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

Our research degrees are based around lab-based and computational research projects. MScs are based around one-year research projects (Full Time). In all our research degrees you undertake a single, focused, research project from day one, and attend only certain components of our transferable skills modules. Our research degree students are supervised by supervisory teams which comprise their main supervisor(s) as well as supervisory chairs that give independent advice on progression.

You can select topics for the MSc from any of the research areas covered in the Research Areas section.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School houses a dynamic research community with five major research themes:

  • industrial biotechnology
  • infection and drug resistance
  • cancer and age-related diseases
  • cellular architecture and dynamics
  • reproduction, evolution and genomics

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Associated centres

- Kent Fungal Group

The Kent Fungal Group (KFG) brings together a number of research groups in the School of Biosciences that primarily use yeasts or other fungi as ‘model systems’ for their research. One strength of the KFG is the range of model fungi being exploited for both fundamental and medical/translational research. These include Bakers’ yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and yeasts associated with human disease, specifically Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.

In addition to studying key cellular processes in the fungal cell such as protein synthesis, amyloids and cell division, members of the KFG are also using yeast to explore the molecular basis of human diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases as well as ageing. The KFG not only provides support for both fundamental and medical/translational fungal research, but also provides an excellent training environment for young fungal researchers.

- Industrial Biotechnology Centre

The School houses one of the University’s flagship research centres – the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC). Here, staff from Biosciences, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Computing and Engineering combine their expertise into a pioneering interdisciplinary biosciences programme at Kent, in order to unlock the secrets of some of the essential life processes. These approaches are leading to a more integrated understanding of biology in health and disease. In the Centre, ideas and technology embodied in different disciplines are being employed in some of the remaining challenges in bioscience. With such an approach, new discoveries and creative ideas are generated through the formation of new collaborative teams. In this environment, the Centre is broadening and enriching the training of students and staff in science and technology.

- The Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of Reproduction (CISoR)

The centre comprises several like-minded academics dedicated to the study of reproduction in all its forms. Drawing on a range of academic disciplines, CISoR's core philosophy is that the study of this fascinating field will advance further through a multidisciplinary approach. Impactful, excellent research forms the basis of CISoR’s activities including scientific advance, new products and processes, contribution to public policy, and public engagement.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/



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Goal of the pro­gramme. Life on Earth depends on solar energy captured by plants - they are the base of most food webs and underpin the functioning of all major ecosystems. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Life on Earth depends on solar energy captured by plants - they are the base of most food webs and underpin the functioning of all major ecosystemsPlants release the oxygen we breath. They convert solar energy into chemical energy, providing us with food, fibres, renewable energy sources, and raw materials for many industries. Plants do not carry out these processes in isolation. They interact with other organisms and the physical and chemical environment, communicate and actively adjust to their circumstances. How do they do these things and how can we profit from understanding them? When you have graduated from the Master’s Program in Plant Biology you will have the answers to these big questions, and more, such as:

  • How one plant cell develops into a complicated organism and how plant cells, tissues and organs communicate with each other
  • How plants avoid, tolerate or defend themselves from external stress factors such as diseases, drought and excessive solar radiation
  • How plants sense their environment and communicate with each other and with other organisms
  • How plants, interacting with microbes, fungi and animals, maintain ecosystems and thus life
  • How the genotypic, functional and morphological differences between plants allow them to thrive in vastly different habitats

You will also be able to:

  • Understand how research in plant biology and biotechnology can contribute to plant breeding and production
  • Plan, coordinate and execute high-quality basic and applied scientific research
  • Have a good command of the scientific method and critically evaluate research across scientific disciplines
  • Use the basic skills needed to expand your knowledge into other related fields and communicate with experts in those fields
  • Act in working life as an expert and innovator in your field, supported by your language, communication and other transferable skills
  • Be eligible for scientific post-graduate (doctoral) studies

After earning your degree, you can continue towards a PhD or move directly into a career. If you have a Bachelor’s degree in a field of biology from another Finnish university or from a foreign university anywhere in the world, you are welcome to apply for the Master’s programme in Plant Biology. Based on your previous studies we will evaluate the possible need for supplementary studies, which will be included in your degree.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

The Master’s Programme in Plant Biology is a joint programme of the Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences and the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, which ensures an exceptionally comprehensive curriculum. You will be able to study the diversity of wild and cultivated plants from the Arctic to the Tropics, as well as plant functions from the molecular to the ecosystem level.

The teaching is diverse, consisting of modern laboratory and computer courses, field courses, seminars and excursions. The curriculum is intertwined with research. You will be introduced to the research groups from the beginning of your studies, so you will become familiar with research methods as your studies progress. Much of the study material is in various learning platforms (such as Moodle), which allow distance learning. You will have a personal tutor who will help you tailor an individual study plan according to your requirements.

Within the programme you can choose among several optional study modules and focus on, for example:

  • Plant biotechnology and breeding
  • Molecular biology and genetics
  • Regulation of growth, reproduction and differentiation of tissues
  • Biological basis of crop yield
  • Plant ecology and evolutionary biology
  • Evolutionary history and systematics of plants and fungi
  • Species identification

All modules are worth at least 15 credits. They are interlinked to ensure a coherent and balanced degree that allows you to obtain a broad perspective. Alternatively, you can focus on your primary research interest while acquiring the skills needed to follow your career goals on completion of your degree.

A translational perspective is emphasised in courses in which it is relevant. That will allow you to apply the acquired basic knowledge in problem-based research, bridging the gap between basic and applied research.



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The Bordeaux Biology Agrosciences (B2AS) program offers an integrated multidisciplinary approach that is adapted to the realities of research (background research) as well as to the socio-economic sector (professional courses). The program objectives are to train and equip researchers and professionals to face the issues posed by agriculture in the 21st century. Read more

The Bordeaux Biology Agrosciences (B2AS) program offers an integrated multidisciplinary approach that is adapted to the realities of research (background research) as well as to the socio-economic sector (professional courses). The program objectives are to train and equip researchers and professionals to face the issues posed by agriculture in the 21st century. This is achived by integrating plant biotechnology and agrofood technology within course content in order to deal with the challenges of innovation in agriculture.

With such an integrated approach, the Master B2AS represents a meeting point between academia and professionals. During the program, students may specialize either in the field of plant biology, biotechnology, plant breeding, genetics, plant and human health benefits, food production and innovation. The wide partner network provides students with a range of complementary expertise. This means that specific competencies are developed within the chosen field of biotechnology and plant breeding for agriculture improvements.

Program structure

Semester 1:

Scientific English (3 ECTS)

  • Students will reinforce and develop the reading, writing, listening and speaking skills relevant to a biological science research context.
  • Students will acquire knowledge of the linguistic and discursive features of both written and spoken scientific English.
  • Structure and rhetoric of the research article, writing up an abstract. Oral scientific presentation – students prepare a mini-symposium on the topic related to their future work placement (and thus complete relevant bibliographical and reading research in preparation).
  • Students are evaluated on their communication skills in English and also on their ability to manage complex scientific concepts in English.

Plant development and reproduction (3 ECTS)

  • Genetic regulation of root and stem apical meristem functioning, epigenetic regulations of plant development and reproduction, parental imprinting, plant hormones, fruit and seed development, sex determination in plants, cellular mechanisms involved in plant organ growth and development.

Metabolism and cellular compartmentation (3 ECTS)

  • Metabolism and cell compartmentation: morphodynamic organization of the plant secretory pathway, lipid and protein machineries; membrane transporters in plants and the related methods of study; lipid signaling in plant cells; formation and dynamics of membrane domains; regulation of metabolism and gene expression by sugars in plants. Nature and importance of futile cycles in plants.

Biotechonology (3 ECTS)

  • In vitro culture and applications, plant transformation and applications to crop plants, GMO legislation and traceability, metabolic engineering, GMO and production of antibodies and of molecules of high health value, GMO in the food industry, fungi biotechnology.

Plant pathogen interactions (3 ECTS)

  • Plant-Mollicutes interactions, plant-virus interactions: analysis of plant and virus factors necessary for virus cycle, viroids; RNA interference, plant defence mechanisms against pathogens (fungi, bacteria and virus), breeding of plants resistant to pathogens, biodiversity of plant pathogens, epidemiology of plant pathogen interactions and impact on crop production.

Plant breeding (3 ECTS)

  • Principles of selection and genetic gain, response to selection, germplasm resources, collecting, analysing, classifying, international rules on germplasm resources. Population improvement and cultivar development (breeding for lines, hybrids, clones, populations), high throughput phenotyping, breeding strategies and methods including molecular breeding (MAS, genomic selection) and biotechnologies, multiple traits selection, genotype by environment interaction, protecting varieties and intellectual property, plant breeding international network and organization.

Quantitative and population genetics and evolution (3 ECTS)

  • Population genetics and genetic diversity, haplotype structure, domestication and genetic consequences, linkage disequilibrium, genetic variance, estimating variance components, heritability, genetic correlations, association genetics, genomic selection, induced diversity TILLinG, natural diversity ecoTILLinG, linking genetics, genomics and bioinformatics : from fine- mapping to gene cloning; genotyping by sequencing.

Semester 2:

Laboratory Practice (6 months/30 ECTS) 

  • In a public laboratory and/or a private company laboratory.

Strengths of this Master program

During their studies, students will:

  • Acquire scientific knowledge in various fields of plant biology, green biotechnology, food supplements, food production, etc.
  • Receive a modern research-based training.
  • Develop an understanding of the challenges of modern agricultural practices in a context of environmental constraints and increasing demand.
  • Develop an understanding of the benefits and limits of modern biotechnology.
  • Acquire the skills to develop action planning processes for bioscience.
  • Acquire skills and practice within an English-speaking environment as well as other languages practised within the consortium.
  • Develop the necessary skills to collaborate with international teams and networks.
  • Acquire competencies for knowledge transfer to students and collaborators.
  • Develop competencies to create, finance and manage a new start-up.
  • Acquire an understanding of today’s industrial and economic environment within the Biotech sector.

After this Master program?

The objectives of the B2AS program are to prepare students for further study via PhD programs and/or careers in the food and agronomy industry throughout the world. This is achieved by providing high-level training in plant sciences but also by preparing students with relevant knowledge and skills in management and business. 

Graduates may apply for positions in the following industrial sectors in a R&D laboratory as well as in production activities:

  • Plant research laboratories
  • Plant breeding companies
  • Agro-chemical companies
  • Green and white biotechnology companies
  • Food, diet and nutrition companies
  • Plant medicinal production companies
  • Food supplement or nutraceutical companies
  • Pharmaceutical companies
  • Business trade companies


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The ReNu2Farm project will explore the demand for nutrients and organic matter, at farm and regional levels, with the aim to make a map of regions in North West Europe with their specific nutrient and organic matter needs and propose alternatives to conventional fertilisers derived from recycling. Read more

The ReNu2Farm project will explore the demand for nutrients and organic matter, at farm and regional levels, with the aim to make a map of regions in North West Europe with their specific nutrient and organic matter needs and propose alternatives to conventional fertilisers derived from recycling.

The project is a large European collaborative effort and involves multiple research partners from academia and industry from Belgium (2), France (1), Germany (2), Ireland (3), Luxembourg (1) and the Netherlands (1). The project is funded by the Interreg NWE (North-West Europe) programme, part of the ERDF (European Regional Development Fund).

Specific Project Information

The microbiota (bacteria and fungi) will be analysed using total DNA extraction, library construction, next generation DNA sequencing, bioinformatic and statistical analysis.

This position will provide the opportunity to the successful candidate to complete a Level 9 Master Degree by research, specialising in the environmental field, and most specifically on the ecological impact assessment of recycling derived fertilisers.

• A literature review will be completed by both students as soon as they start to bring them to the state of the art in this area.

• The students will work closely with two Irish partners (Teagasc, University of Limerick) to investigate the impact of fertilisers derived from recycling approaches on the microbiota (nematodes, fungi and bacteria) of Irish grass land soil.

• The successful candidates will have the opportunity to interact in a multidisciplinary European wide research project with important environmental application for sustainable agriculture, with relevant stakeholders in Ireland and in project partner countries.

• The project will involve traveling to trial sites, taking samples of soil and plant material, extracting nematodes, identifying them morphologically, extracting DNA and RNA, purification and quantification of DNA/RNA, sending nucleic acid samples for sequencing analysis, curating and analysing sequencing data and preparing data for publication, both in highly specialised scientific journals, but also in popular science media and project technical reports as required.

• The projects will involve travelling to meetings and conferences as required. 

The successful candidates are expected to take up the postgraduate positions no later than September 2018.

Note: Postgraduate fees will be covered and a student stipend will be paid monthly for the duration of the project to each successful applicant.

Please apply to: Dr Thomaé Kakouli-Duarte () on or before 4th June 2018



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This course combines theoretical knowledge and practical training in the immunology of infectious diseases through comprehensive teaching and research methods. Read more

This course combines theoretical knowledge and practical training in the immunology of infectious diseases through comprehensive teaching and research methods. Students will gain specialised skills in applying scientific concepts, evaluating scientific data and carrying out modern immunological techniques. Students will benefit from the unique mix of immunology, vaccinology, molecular biology, virology, bacteriology, parasitology, mycology and clinical medicine at the School.

Infectious diseases represent an increasingly important cause of human morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Vaccine development is thus of great importance in terms of global health. In parallel with this growth, there has been a dramatic increase in studies to identify the innate, humoral or cellular immunological mechanisms which confer immunity to pathogenic viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. As a result, increasing numbers of scientists, clinicians and veterinarians wish to develop their knowledge and skills in these areas.

The flexible nature of the course allows students to focus on attaining a broader understanding of infectious disease through attending taught units. Students can also undertake an extended research project within groups led by experienced team leaders. Such projects can involve basic investigations of immune mechanisms or applied field based studies.

Graduates from this course go into research positions in academia and industry, and further training such as PhD study.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/files/iid_progspec.pdf)

- Intercalating this course (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/courses/ways-study/intercalating-study-masters-degree)

Visit the website https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/immunology-infectious-diseases

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- demonstrate specialist knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of host immunity to infection against the diverse range of pathogens which confront human populations

- apply this specialist knowledge to a range of practical skills and techniques, in particular modern molecular and cellular techniques for assessing immune responses to pathogens

- critically assess, select and apply appropriate research methods to investigate basic immunological mechanisms and applied issues in the immunology of infection

- critically evaluate primary scientific data and the published scientific literature

- integrate and present key immunological concepts at an advanced level, both verbally and in written form

Structure

Term 1:

There is a one-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and an introduction to major groups of pathogens, followed by two compulsory modules:

- Immunology of Infectious Diseases

- Analysis & Design of Research Studies

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:

Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which may be taken only after consultation with the Course Directors.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:

Advanced Immunology 1 (compulsory)

- Slot 2:

Advanced Immunology 2 (compulsory)

- Slot 3:

Advanced Training in Molecular Biology*

Clinical Immunology*

Extended Project*

Basic Parasitology

Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries

- Slot 4:

Extended Project*

Immunology of Parasitic Infection: Principles*

Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications*

Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine

Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases

Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights

Genetic Epidemiology

- Slot 5:

AIDS*

Antimicrobial Chemotherapy*

Extended Project*

Molecular Cell Biology & Infection*

Mycology*

Further details for the course modules - https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/immunology-infectious-diseases#structure

Residential Field Trip

Towards the end of Term 1, students get the opportunity to hear about the latest, most exciting aspects of immunological research at the British Society of Immunology Congress. The cost is included in the £500 field trip fee.

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project on an immunological subject, for submission by early September. Some of these projects may take place with collaborating scientists overseas or in other colleges or institutes in the UK. Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved.

The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msiid.html#sixth



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This course provides comprehensive knowledge and practical training in the spread of microorganisms (predominantly bacterial and viral pathogens), disease causation and diagnosis and treatment of pathogens significant to public health. Read more

This course provides comprehensive knowledge and practical training in the spread of microorganisms (predominantly bacterial and viral pathogens), disease causation and diagnosis and treatment of pathogens significant to public health. The increasing incidence of microbial infections worldwide is being compounded by the rapid evolution of drug-resistant variants and opportunistic infections by other organisms. The course content reflects the increasing importance of genomics and molecular techniques in both diagnostics and the study of pathogenesis.

In response to a high level of student interest in viral infections, the School has decided to offer the opportunity for students who focus on viruses in their module and project choices to be awarded a Master's degree in Medical Microbiology (Virology). This choice will depend on the module selection of the individual student in Terms 2 and 3 and choice of project.

Graduates from this course move into global health careers related to medical microbiology in research or medical establishments and the pharmaceutical industry.

The Bo Drasar Prize is awarded annually for outstanding performance by a Medical Microbiology student. This prize is named after Professor Bohumil Drasar, the founder of the MSc Medical Microbiology course.

The Tsiquaye Prize is awarded annually for the best virology-based project report.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/files/mm_progspec.pdf)

- Intercalating this course (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/courses/ways-study/intercalating-study-masters-degree)

Visit the website https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/medical-microbiology

Objectives

By the end of the course students should be able to:

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of the nature of viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi and basic criteria used in the classification/taxonomy of these micro-organisms

- explain the modes of transmission and the growth cycles of pathogenic micro-organisms

- demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis and the outcomes of infections

- distinguish between and critically assess the classical and modern approaches to the development of therapeutic agents and vaccines for the prevention of human microbial diseases

- demonstrate knowledge of the laboratory diagnosis of microbial diseases and practical skills

- carry out a range of advanced skills and laboratory techniques, including the purification of isolated microbial pathogens, study of microbial growth cycles and analyses of their proteins and nucleic acids for downstream applications

- demonstrate research skills

Structure

Term 1:

There is a one-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and course-specific sessions, followed by two compulsory modules:

- Bacteriology & Virology

- Analysis & Design of Research Studies

Recommended module: Molecular Biology

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:

Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules that can be taken only after consultation with the Course Director.

- Slot 1:

Clinical Virology

Molecular Biology & Recombinant DNA Techniques

- Slot 2:

Clinical Bacteriology 1

Molecular Virology

- Slot 3:

Advanced Training in Molecular Biology

Basic Parasitology

- Slot 4:

Clincal Bacteriology 2

Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications

- Slot 5:

Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Molecular Cell Biology & Infection

Mycology

Pathogen Genomics

Further details for the course modules - https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/courses/masters-degrees/module-specifications

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a laboratory-based original research project on an aspect of a relevant organism, for submission by early September. Projects may take place within the School or with collaborating scientists in other colleges or institutes in the UK or overseas.

The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose

Course Accreditation

The Royal College of Pathologists accepts the course as part of the professional experience of both medical and non-medical candidates applying for membership. The course places particular emphasis on practical aspects of the subjects most relevant to current clinical laboratory practice and research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msmm.html#sixth



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Course description. Lead academic. Dr Martin Nicklin. This flexible course focuses on the molecular and genetic factors of human diseases. Read more

Course description

Lead academic: Dr Martin Nicklin

This flexible course focuses on the molecular and genetic factors of human diseases. Understanding those factors is crucial to the development of therapies.

Core modules cover the fundamentals. You choose specialist modules from the pathway that interests you most.

We also give you practical lab training to prepare you for your research project. The project is five months of invaluable laboratory experience: planning, carrying out, recording and reporting your own research.

Recent graduates work in academic research science, pharmaceuticals and the biotech industry.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

  • From Genome to Gene Function
  • Human Gene Bioinformatics
  • Research Literature Review
  • Human Disease Genetics
  • Modulating Immunity
  • Laboratory Practice and Statistics

Six optional pathways

Genetic Mechanisms pathway

  • Modelling Protein Interactions
  • Gene Networks: Models and Functions

Microbes and Infection pathway

  • Virulence Mechanisms of Viruses, Fungi and Protozoa
  • Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity
  • Characterisation of Bacterial Virulence Determinants

Experimental Medicine pathway

  • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease
  • Model Systems in Research
  • Novel Therapies

Cancer pathway

  • Molecular Basis of Tumourigenesis and Metastasis
  • Molecular Techniques in Cancer Research
  • Molecular Approaches to Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

Cardiovascular pathway

  • Vascular Cell Biology
  • Vascular Disease: Models and Clinical Practice

Clinical Applications pathway

Apply directly to this pathway. Available only to medical graduates. Students are recruited to a specialist clinical team and pursue the taught programme (1-5) related to the attachment. They are then attached to a clinical team for 20 weeks, either for a clinical research project or for clinical observations. See website for more detail and current attachments.

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars, tutorials, laboratory demonstrations, computer practicals and student presentations.

Assessment is continuous. Most modules are assessed by written assignments and coursework, although there are some written exams.

Two modules are assessed by verbal presentations.

Your research project is assessed by a thesis, possibly with a viva.



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