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Applications are being accepted to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18. The MPhil introduces students to contemporary theories and research methods on the intersection of sociology and demography. Read more

About the course

Applications are being accepted to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18.

The MPhil introduces students to contemporary theories and research methods on the intersection of sociology and demography. This 21-month programme takes a life-course and multilevel approach, aiming to integrate micro and macro issues in analysing social problems and the causes and consequences of population change.

The MPhil Sociology and Demography will prepare you for doctoral work in sociology and demography and research-intense jobs.

The curriculum emphasises:

• population-level analysis and demographic measures
• a life course approach
• sociological analysis as the key approach to explanation
• advanced quantitative methods.

This emphasis is reflected in the compulsory papers. Optional papers and the thesis will reflect either a more specialised topical study (eg gender, family and fertility, migration and integration of migrants, health and mortality, intergenerational relationships) or methodological work.

The MPhil programme has the following components:

• Sociological Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures and seminars, assessed by an unseen examination
• Demographic Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of examination and assignments
• Life Course Research paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of methods
• Statistical Methods paper taught in the first year through lectures and computer labs, assessed through a combination of a test and assignments
• Research Design paper taught in the first year through lectures, assessed via a combination of methods
• Two optional papers over both years of the MPhil, normally taught through eight weekly classes/seminars for each paper and assessed by unseen examination or appropriate coursework
• Replication project in the second year, comprising a combination of individual and group work and assessed via assignments
• MPhil thesis, a substantial piece of original research (of up to 30,000 words) to be submitted by the end of the second year

Please note that the optional papers available may vary from year to year. For information about the optional papers available in 2016-17 please see http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/course-list?search=course_list&task=search.

Graduate destinations

Graduates often continue with a PhD at Oxford or doctoral studies at highly-ranked US and continental programmes. Others find placement in research-intensive occupations in the public sector (eg national statistical offices, government departments and regional/local authorities), in international organisations, think tanks, and in private sector occupations in which quantitative skills are highly valued (consulting, market research, health research, social research, and insurance companies).

Entry requirements for entry in 2017-18

Academic ability -

Proven and potential academic excellence:

Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in a social science subject.

The department will only consider applicants who have an undergraduate degree in arts, humanities or science subjects if they can demonstrate a strong interest in sociology, as taught at Oxford.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA sought is 3.7 out of 4.0.

Other appropriate indicators will include:

- References/letters of recommendation

Your references will support intellectual ability, academic achievement, motivation, a demonstrable interest in sociology as it is taught at Oxford.

Academic references are preferred, though professional references are acceptable if you have spent a significant amount of time in work.

- Written work produced by the student

Two pieces of written work of no more than 2,000 words are required. The written work must be in English and preferably about a sociological subject. Extracts from longer pieces should be prefaced by a short note which puts them in context.

This will be assessed for comprehensive understanding of the subject area; understanding of problems in the area; ability to construct and defend an argument; powers of analysis; powers of expression.

The work need not be closely related but it should have some sociological content.

- Statement of purpose/personal statement

The personal statement must be in English and should be approximately 750 words in length.

This will be assessed for:

• your reasons for applying
• evidence of motivation for and understanding of the proposed area of study
• the ability to present a reasoned case in English
• commitment to the subject, beyond the requirements of the degree course
• preliminary knowledge of research techniques; capacity for sustained and intense work
• reasoning ability
• ability to absorb new ideas, often presented abstractly, at a rapid pace.

Your statement should focus on your academic record and interests rather than personal achievements, interests and aspirations.

English language requirement:

Applicants whose first language is not English are usually required to provide evidence of proficiency in English at the higher level required by the University - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford/application-guide?wssl=1#content-tab--3

Funding

There are over 1,000 full graduate scholarships available for courses starting in 2016-17. Full scholarships will cover your course and college fees and provide a grant for living costs. Information about the full range of funding available can be found in the Fees and funding section - http://www.ox.ac.uk/node/17098/

For over 70% of Oxford scholarships, nothing more than the standard course application is usually required. If you fulfil the eligibility criteria and apply by the relevant January deadline, you will be automatically considered. Use the Fees, funding and scholarship search to find out whether you are eligible for scholarships which require an additional application. If you are, the tool will include links to full details of how to apply - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/fees-funding-and-scholarship-search

Divisional funding opportunities:

Oxford hosts one of 21 Doctoral Training Centres accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). In 2016 approximately 65 ESRC studentships are available across the Social Sciences. See the Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre website for details - http://researchtraining.socsci.ox.ac.uk/home-dtc

Costs

Annual fees for entry in 2017-18 - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/tuition-and-college-fees/fee-status?wssl=1

Home/EU (including Islands) - Tuition fee: £8,715; College fee: £3,021; Total annual fees: £11,736
Overseas - Tuition fee: £16,770; College fee: 3,021; Total annual fees: £19,791

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The MSc in Sociology for 2017-18 is now open to new applications. Students are given high quality research training in sociology, which includes knowledge of relevant theoretical approaches, an understanding of their application to substantive problems and skills in the use of major research techniques. Read more

About the course

The MSc in Sociology for 2017-18 is now open to new applications.

Students are given high quality research training in sociology, which includes knowledge of relevant theoretical approaches, an understanding of their application to substantive problems and skills in the use of major research techniques. The course prepares students for doctoral work in sociology and research-intense jobs in the public and private sector.

The MSc Sociology is a one-year taught course which is assessed in five elements.

Sociological analysis:

A compulsory core paper on sociological analysis, for which you sit a three hour unseen examination at the end of Trinity Term. The paper examines the nature of different sociological explanations, their potentials and methodological implications and their relationship with concepts from other disciplines. The interrelationships between description and explanation, theory and empirical data.

The course, in Michaelmas Term, consists of eight lectures (one hour each) followed by two seminars (also one hour each) where the class is split in two groups.

Research methods:

A compulsory research methods course, for which you are examined through a mixture of a formal examination and take-home assignments. This course comprises three sections: statistics, qualitative methods and research design.

Statistics:

The statistics course consists of eight statistics lectures and eight STATA sessions in the IT Laboratory (Michaelmas Term). Qualitative Methods (Michaelmas Term) consists of eight lectures and Research Design (Hilary Term) consists of eight lectures and classes.

Option papers:

You will take two option papers in Hilary term, for which you sit either an unseen examination or complete appropriate coursework. You should note that the options available may vary from year to year. There are normally eight weekly classes for each paper. For information on the Option Papers available in the 2016-17 academic year, please see http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/course-list?search=course_list&task=search.

Dissertation:

You will produce a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words.

Graduate destinations

Graduates pursue a variety of careers. Many go on to doctoral research either in Oxford or at leading departments in the US and continental Europe. Others pursue careers, often with a substantial research responsibility, in international, national and local government departments, NGOs, think tanks, consultancy and a variety of jobs in the private sector.

Entry requirements for entry in 2017-18

Academic ability -

Proven and potential academic excellence:

Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in a social science subject.

The department will only consider applicants who have an undergraduate degree in arts, humanities or science subjects if they can demonstrate a strong interest in sociology, as taught at Oxford.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA sought is 3.7 out of 4.0.

Other appropriate indicators will include:

- References/letters of recommendation

Your references will support intellectual ability, academic achievement, motivation, a demonstrable interest in sociology as it is taught at Oxford.

Academic references are preferred, though professional references are acceptable if you have spent a significant amount of time in work.

- Written work produced by the student

Two pieces of written work of no more than 2,000 words are required. The written work must be in English and preferably about a sociological subject. Extracts from longer pieces should be prefaced by a short note which puts them in context.

This will be assessed for comprehensive understanding of the subject area; understanding of problems in the area; ability to construct and defend an argument; powers of analysis; powers of expression.

The work need not be closely related but it should have some sociological content.

- Statement of purpose/personal statement

The personal statement must be in English and should be approximately 750 words in length.

This will be assessed for:

• your reasons for applying
• evidence of motivation for and understanding of the proposed area of study
• the ability to present a reasoned case in English
• commitment to the subject, beyond the requirements of the degree course
• preliminary knowledge of research techniques; capacity for sustained and intense work
• reasoning ability
• ability to absorb new ideas, often presented abstractly, at a rapid pace.

Your statement should focus on your academic record and interests rather than personal achievements, interests and aspirations.

- English language requirement

Applicants whose first language is not English are usually required to provide evidence of proficiency in English at the higher level required by the University. - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford/application-guide?wssl=1#content-tab--3

Funding

There are over 1,000 full graduate scholarships available for courses starting in 2016-17. Full scholarships will cover your course and college fees and provide a grant for living costs. Information about the full range of funding available can be found in the Fees and funding section. - http://www.ox.ac.uk/node/17098/

For over 70% of Oxford scholarships, nothing more than the standard course application is usually required. If you fulfil the eligibility criteria and apply by the relevant January deadline, you will be automatically considered. Use the Fees, funding and scholarship search to find out whether you are eligible for scholarships which require an additional application. If you are, the tool will include links to full details of how to apply.- http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/fees-funding-and-scholarship-search

Divisional funding opportunities -

Oxford hosts one of 21 Doctoral Training Centres accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). In 2016 approximately 65 ESRC studentships are available across the Social Sciences. See the Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre website for details. - http://researchtraining.socsci.ox.ac.uk/home-dtc

Costs

Annual fees for entry in 2017-18 - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/tuition-and-college-fees/fee-status?wssl=1

Home/EU (including Islands) - Tuition Fee: £12,300; College Fee: £3,021; Total Annual Fees: £15,321
Overseas - Tuition Fee: £19,335; College Fee: £3,021; Total Annual Fees: £22,356

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The Postgraduate Diploma in International Law is a one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) research course and is awarded on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 30,000 words, inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices and bibliography. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in International Law is a one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) research course and is awarded on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 30,000 words, inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices and bibliography. Students are assigned a supervisor by the Faculty's Degree Committee. The main aims of the course are:

- To give students with relevant experience at first-degree and/or Master's level the opportunity to carry out focussed research on an approved research topic in the field of international law under close supervision;
- To give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- To enable students to engage in work which is innovative and at the leading edge of legal scholarship.

A dissertation submitted for the Diploma in International Law must afford evidence of serious study and the ability to discuss a difficult problem critically.

An applicant interested in writing a thesis in any other area of law should apply for the Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwlwdpilw

Course detail

The course is exclusively by independent research. The proposed research topic is considered by the Degree Committee during the application process. While individual arrangements vary, the student should normally receive one-to-one supervision at least once a month.

Format

One to one supervision: While individual arrangements vary, the student may normally expect to receive one-to-one supervision at least once at month.

Lectures: Students are encouraged to attend lectures, especially at LLM level, within the general field of their research.

Journal clubs: The Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law (CJICL) is an open access, peer-reviewed academic journal founded and run by the postgraduate community at the Law Faculty.

Assessment

A thesis, not exceeding 30,000 words in length, including footnotes, but excluding appendices and bibliography, shall be referred to two Examiners, appointed by the Degree Committee, who may, at their discretion, examine the student orally on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls.

Each Examiner shall submit a separate report to the Degree Committee on the student's thesis, and the Examiners shall submit a joint report on the student's performance in the oral examination, if held. The Degree Committee, after considering the reports of the Examiners, shall resolve whether or not the student is entitled to be awarded the Diploma.

Supervisors are required to submit termly reports to the Student Registry which students can access online via their self-service accounts on CamSIS.

Continuing

Diploma candidates may apply to continue to the MLitt or PhD by completing and submitting a Graduate and Scholarships Application Form (GRADSAF) by the relevant deadline.

Continuation to the MLitt or PhD is subject to (a) a satisfactory outcome in the examination for the Diploma in International Law, (b) a satisfactory recommendation on the clarity and feasibility of the applicant's proposed MLitt/doctoral research following its assessment by the Diploma examiners through an informal discussion with the applicant and (c) the availability of a supervisor.

In appropriate circumstances, a student may be allowed to count not more than three full-time terms or five part-time terms towards the requirements for the MLitt or PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For detailed information about all possible funding sources (Faculty funding, University funding, and College funding) please refer to the Faculty of Law's website and the Fees and Graduate Funding section of the Student Registry's website.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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There is a growing recognition, that in addition to a common body of knowledge all managers need in order to succeed, there are critical specialist areas for managers which provide a sound understanding of all aspects of their work and a springboard for further career progression. Read more
There is a growing recognition, that in addition to a common body of knowledge all managers need in order to succeed, there are critical specialist areas for managers which provide a sound understanding of all aspects of their work and a springboard for further career progression.

This charity degree course is the first of its kind in the UK and Europe and reflects the increasing interest in funding and the need for transparency and accountability. Students will hold responsible positions within funding organisations wishing to gain a professional academic qualification.

Visit the website: http://www.cass.city.ac.uk/courses/masters/charity-courses/grantmaking-philanthropy-and-social-investment

Course detail

This course aims to:

• Develop a clear understanding of the principles and practices of funding
• Explore the importance of all aspects of the management of funding
• Develop skills in problem solving, risk assessment and probity of applications
• Explore ethical frameworks within funding

Students should be highly motivated managers and will normally have a good first degree, a related professional qualification or at least three years wholly relevant experience.

Format

The Postgraduate Certificate is offered on a part time basis and is taught over a period of six months. The Certificate consists of five modules: Introduction to Learning Principles and Practices of Grantmaking, Management of Grantmaking and Shadowing/Fieldwork.

The Postgraduate Diploma is offered on a part time basis and is taught over a period of 12 months. The Diploma consists of four core modules, plus three specialist pathway modules. The core modules are shared by all five Centre for Charity Effectiveness postgraduate courses.

How to apply

Apply here: http://www.city.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying-to-city

Funding

For information on funding, please follow this link: http://www.city.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/funding-and-financial-support

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MLitt in Law is a full-time course and may be awarded after two years of supervised research on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 60,000 words inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices, bibliography, table of contents and any other preliminary matter. Read more
The MLitt in Law is a full-time course and may be awarded after two years of supervised research on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 60,000 words inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices, bibliography, table of contents and any other preliminary matter. An MLitt dissertation must take due account of previously published work on the subject and must represent a useful contribution to learning. Candidates for the MLitt are registered in the first instance for the Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Legal Studies which provides training in legal research.

It is a requirement of the Certificate that candidates attend the weekly classes (during term-time only) provided by the Faculty's Research Training and Development Programme that offers instruction on research techniques and advice on matters such as getting work published and obtaining academic jobs. Candidates are required to submit, normally towards the end of May of their first year, four items for a progress review: a personal progress log, a 15,000-word dissertation, a short explanation of the proposed topic of the MLitt and copies of termly supervision reports. The work is formally assessed (normally by two teaching members of the Faculty) and candidates must attend an oral examination.

After this examination, the assessors' reports, along with a recommendation from the supervisor(s), are considered by the Faculty's Degree Committee whose members then decide whether to register the candidate for the MLitt Degree. The MLitt registration date is normally backdated so as to include the year spent working on the Certificate.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwlwmllaw

Fromat

The course is exclusively by research although students are required to attend, in their first year of study, the weekly(term-time only) two-hour research training classes provided by the Faculty's Research Training and Development Programme.

While individual arrangements vary, MLitt students may normally expect to receive one-to-one supervision at least once a month.

Students are required to attend, in their first year of study, the weekly (term-time only) two-hour research training classes provided by the Faculty's Research Training Programme.

Students are encouraged to attend Lectures, especially at LLM level, within the general field of their research.

The Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law (CJICL) is an open access, peer-reviewed academic journal founded and run by the postgraduate community at the Faculty of Law.

Students have the opportunity to give a presentation on their current research at the termly Graduate Research Seminars.

Supervisors are required to submit termly reports to the Student Registry which students can access via their self-service accounts on CamSIS.

Assessment

A thesis, not exceeding 60,000 words inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices, bibliography, table of contents and any other preliminary matter, is referred to two Examiners, appointed by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Law. Each Examiner shall make an independent report to the Degree Committee on the dissertation. Students are required to attend an oral examination and, following the oral examination, the Examiners submit a joint report to the Degree Committee stating whether or not they recommend the award of the degree.

Continuing

MLitt candidates may apply to continue to the PhD by completing and submitting a Graduate and Scholarships Application Form (GRADSAF) by the relevant deadline.

In appropriate circumstances, the terms spent working on the MLitt may be counted towards the PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For detailed information about all possible funding sources (Faculty funding, University funding, and College funding) please refer to the Faculty of Law's website and the Fees and Graduate Funding section of the Graduate Admissions Office website.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The aims of the course are. - to gain an in depth knowledge of the challenges faced by education systems across the world, as well as possibilities for change;. Read more
The aims of the course are:

- to gain an in depth knowledge of the challenges faced by education systems across the world, as well as possibilities for change;
- focus in particular on the educational challenges and aspirations of the poorest countries of the world;
- engage with contemporary issues of globalisation and international development in the field of education in order to interrogate the latest theoretically-grounded and evidence-based research;
- critically investigate dominant paradigms of globalisation and international development, and engage with topical issues of relevance to educational policy and practice;
- develop research and career paths within the wider research culture of both the Faculty and the broader university.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmpegd

Course detail

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific educational domain;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Education, Globalisation and International Development' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Assessment

- Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.
- Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
- Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the MPhil in Education to PhD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies is a one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) research course and is awarded on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 30,000 words, inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices and bibliography. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies is a one-year full-time (or two-year part-time) research course and is awarded on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 30,000 words, inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices and bibliography. Students are assigned a supervisor by the Faculty's Degree Committee.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwlwdplgs

Course detail

The main aims of the course are:

- To give students with relevant experience at first-degree and/or Master's level the opportunity to carry out focussed research on an approved research topic in the field of Law under close supervision;
- To give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- To enable students to engage in work which is innovative and at the leading edge of legal scholarship

A dissertation submitted for the Diploma in Legal Studies must afford evidence of serious study and the ability to discuss a difficult problem critically.

An applicant interested in writing a thesis on international law should apply for the Postgraduate Diploma in International Law.

Format

The course is exclusively by independent research. The proposed research topic is considered by the Degree Committee during the application process. While individual arrangements vary, the student should normally receive one-to-one supervision at least once a month.

There are no compulsory seminars or classes, however, students are encouraged to attend some or all of the classes provided by the Faculty's Research Training and Development Programme.

Students are encouraged to attend Lectures, especially at LLM level, within the general field of their research.

The Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law (CJICL) is an open access, peer-reviewed academic journal founded and run by the postgraduate community at the Faculty of Law.

Students have the opportunity to give a presentation on their current research at the termly Graduate Research Seminars.

Supervisors are required to submit termly reports to the Student Registry which students can access online via their self-service accounts on CamSIS.

Assessment

A thesis, not exceeding 30,000 words in length, including footnotes, but excluding appendices and bibliography, shall be referred to two Examiners, appointed by the Degree Committee, who may, at their discretion, examine the student orally on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls. Each Examiner shall submit a separate report to the Degree Committee on the student's thesis, and the Examiners shall submit a joint report on the student's performance in the oral examination, if held. The Degree Committee, after considering the reports of the Examiners, shall resolve whether or not the student is entitled to be awarded the Diploma.

Continuing

Diploma candidates may apply to continue to the MLitt or PhD by completing and submitting a Graduate and Scholarships Application Form (GRADSAF) by the relevant deadline.

Continuation to the MLitt or PhD is subject to (a) a satisfactory outcome in the examination for the Diploma in Legal Studies, (b) a satisfactory recommendation on the clarity and feasibility of the applicant's proposed MLitt/doctoral research following its assessment by the Diploma examiners through an informal discussion with the applicant and (c) the availability of a supervisor.

In appropriate circumstances, a student may be allowed to count not more than three full-time terms or five part-time terms towards the requirements for the MLitt or PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For detailed information about all possible funding sources (Faculty funding, University funding, and College funding) please refer to the Faculty of Law's website.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This route, which is not only the Faculty of Education's doctoral training programme but also accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council, provides a broad-based training in educational research that aims to help students. Read more
This route, which is not only the Faculty of Education's doctoral training programme but also accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council, provides a broad-based training in educational research that aims to help students:

- To become familiar with an appropriate range of intellectual and methodological traditions within the field
- To become skilled and critical readers of educational research
- To develop knowledge in depth of some substantive area of education and educational research
- To develop their capacity to frame research questions and devise appropriate research designs
- To develop confidence in using a range of both qualitative and quantitative approaches to gathering, analysing and interpreting evidence
- To develop their skills in presenting research-based evidence and argument
- To gain practical experience of educational research through conducting a small-scale investigation.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmeeer

Course detail

During their period of study, one year full time or two years part time, students follow six modules on:

1. Research Aims, Strategies of Enquiry and Design
2. Research Methods and Analysis
3. Research, Reporting and Presentation
4. Perspectives on Research Methodology
5. Issues in Data Analysis and Interpretation
6. Thesis Preparation.

Throughout, a student is supported by a supervisor who has expertise in the substantive field of the student's research project.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific educational domain;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

Students attend 2-4 hour taught sessions (a mix of lectures and smaller group seminars) once a week. The course consists of two levels. Introductory Level sessions will offer a general introduction to different aspects of educational research. Intermediate Level sessions are divided into two types: (1) the compulsory main programme of study sessions will offer further elements focused on the foundations of educational research theory and practice; (2) the elective sessions will offer intermediate level topics built on the foundation sessions taught at Introductory Level. Students are required to take all Introductory and Intermediate main programme sessions and should select 11 of the elective elements of the programme. The elective sessions are intended to facilitate students' depth of understanding and application of approaches appropriate to their proposed lines of enquiry. The course has been designed to allow students intending to undertake a particular mode of enquiry to focus more attention on their preferred methods within a framework that still ensures a broad and balanced coverage.

Written feedback is provided on the thesis by two independent assessors. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions. Supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.

Students following the two year MEd programme are required to submit the following in Year 1:
Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the MEd in Educational Research to the PhD or EdD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Research for Public Policy and Practice MSc equips students to work with the increasing number of national and international organisations committed to evidence-informed policy and practice. Read more
The Research for Public Policy and Practice MSc equips students to work with the increasing number of national and international organisations committed to evidence-informed policy and practice. Students learn alongside early career and experienced researchers, policymakers and practitioners from a diverse set of policy sectors and disciplines.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/research-public-policy-practice-msc

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 19 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Special. Only the IELTS is accepted. Applicants must obtain an overall grade of 7.0 with a minimum of 6.5 in the reading subtest and 6.0 in the writing subtest.
Further information can be found on our English language requirements page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from the International Students website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The programme will enable you to plan and appraise a systematic review of research in any policy area, to develop a critical appreciation of the full diversity of review approaches and types of research use, and equip you with understanding and skills to help ensure perspectives from the public, practitioners, policymakers and researchers are all considered in research and policy development.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

- Core Modules
Research Engagement, Participation and Impact
Systematic Reviews for Policy and Practice

- Options
Students select two options from a wide range of UCL Institute of Education Master's modules.

- Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 20,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and Learning

This programme is delivered via online learning or mixed mode (face-to-face daytime workshops with online learning). It is assessed by coursework assignments and a 20,000-word dissertation.

Funding

Applicants may be eligible to apply for funding from the Economic and Social Research Council via the Bloomsbury Doctoral Training Centre. The MSc provides Master's-level postgraduate training which can constitute the first year of ESRC 1+3 postgraduate PhD studentships.
Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- IOE Centenary Masters Scholarships
Value:
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Centenary Research Scholarships
Value:
Eligibility: EU students
Criteria:

- IOE COLFUTURO Fee Partnership
Value: UCL provides a 50% contribution towards tuition fees. (1 year)
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

- IOE Commonwealth Distance Scholars
Value: Fees and some expenses
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE CONICyT Fee Partnership
Value: IoE provides a 20% contribution towards tuition fees. (1 year)
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Erasmus Bursary
Value: £350/month (1)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Fulbright
Value:
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE International Master's Student Bursaries
Value:
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Vietnam International Education Development Scholarships - PGT
Value:
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

- IOE Windle Trust Scholarship
Value:
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria:

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas, for example one is a project director in mobile technology for learning, while another is a social research manager advising national government. Another graduate works as a senior editor of systematic research reviews.

- Employability
Students completing the programme are equipped with enhanced critical thinking skills and, in particular, skills for research design and appraisal, spanning a full range of research purposes and problems.

Why study this degree at UCL?

You will learn from research-active tutors based at the IOE’s EPPI-Centre, which is recognised worldwide for its development of methods for diverse kinds of systematic review, for the production of policy-relevant research, and for research into perspectives and participation. The programme is unique in the way that students study systematic reviews of both qualitative and quantitative data, and a full range of review designs.

The programme can be taken entirely at a distance, or with some face-to-face learning, and so attracts students from across the globe, many of whom are already working for research-focused or policy-making organisations.

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The programme is suited to experienced and recent graduates alike. The programme will provide you with the skills and knowledge to pursue, or further, a career in the field of social science research and evidence-informed policy and practice.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Research for Public Policy and Practice at graduate level
- why you want to study Research for Public Policy and Practice at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to the chosen programme
- how your academic and professional background meets the demands of this challenging programme
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

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The International Master's in Economy, State and Society is a unique, innovative, dynamic yet firmly established postgraduate programme offered by a consortium of leading European universities. Read more
The International Master's in Economy, State and Society is a unique, innovative, dynamic yet firmly established postgraduate programme offered by a consortium of leading European universities. It leads to the award of a highly prestigious double degree.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/economy-state-society-nation-history-international-ma

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016
Scholarship applicants:
Close: 27 March 2016
Fees note: Fee quoted in Euros

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Good
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The programme combines rigorous research methods training, discipline based and area studies training and intensive language tuition. Students develop cultural and linguistic knowledge of Eastern and Western Europe, and acquire the skills to identify and critically analyse key factors shaping the economies, states and societies of the expanding European region.

Students take modules to a total value of 120 ECTS, with 60 ECTS taken in year one at UCL and 60 ECTS taken in year two at their chosen institution.

- Core Modules
Language Course
Interrogating Boundaries Workshop
Historical Methods and Approaches OR Theories of Social and Political Research
Understanding and Analysing Data
Comparative Analysis in Social-Political Research
Contemporary Cultural Studies
Literary and Cultural Theory
Qualitative Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods

- Options
A selection of thematic SSEES modules from the relevant track

- Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in their second year, which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 20,000–25,000 words.

Teaching and Learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and research supervision. Assessment is by written examination, coursework and dissertation; language courses involve an oral examination.

Funding

For funding opportunities please visit the IMESS website http://www.imess.eu/
IMESS Scholarships for Home/EU and Overseas applicants are available. Further information can be found on the IMESS website (http://www.imess.eu).
Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme (CSSS)
Value: Full fees, flights, stipend, and other allowances (1 year)
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria: Based on both academic merit and financial need

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

Graduates of this programme are qualified to progress to doctoral research in the European area; others may advance to careers in governmental or international organisations, and may specialise in finance, commerce, analysis or consultancy. Others still may seek a career in diplomacy, or in journalism, or in non-governmental organisations. Indeed, the scope of IMESS is broad and so too, correspondingly, are the post-IMESS possibilities.

Top career destinations for this degree:
- Lecturer, Vilnius University (2011)
- Management Trainee, Maersk (2011)
- Administration Assistant, New Zealand Embassy (2012)
- Researcher, The Work Foundation (2011)
- Development Officer, Vidre (2011)

- Employability
Graduates of the programme have taken leadership positions in distinguished private and public sector organisations (including in the IMF, EBRD, Risk Control, banks and financial institutions, diplomacy and media, civil service, self-employment) and many have also continued on into doctoral studies Read some of our student testimonials here. Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The International Master's in Economy, State and Society is fast becoming the programme of choice for students with a serious interest in the economies, states and societies of the wider European region.

Students benefit from an integrated study programme, with the first year spent at UCL SSEES and the second at one of the partner universities in the Czech Republic (Prague), Estonia (Tartu), Finland (Helsinki), Poland (Kraków) and Serbia (Belgrade).

Our nationally unequalled specialist library and central London location provide an ideal environment for research, while our close contacts with employers, policy-makers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.

Student / staff ratios › 70 staff › 200 taught students › 80 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
This programme is designed to attract and challenge the brightest European Union and international students as well as professionals wishing to retrain to acquire European expertise and meet the challenges of the changing global environment. Evidence of English language ability is essential but there are no other language pre-requisites.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Economy, State and Society at graduate level
- why you want to study Economy, State and Society at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to this programme
- how your personal, academic and professional background meets the demands of a challenging and truly international academic environment
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

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The Dutch Golden Age MA is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the history and culture of the Netherlands in the early modern period, focusing on the Dutch Republic during its 17th-century efflorescence. Read more
The Dutch Golden Age MA is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the history and culture of the Netherlands in the early modern period, focusing on the Dutch Republic during its 17th-century efflorescence. Jointly offered by UCL, King's College London, and the Courtauld Institute, the programme draws on the full range of resources and expertise in London for study of this subject.

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Advanced
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

This interdisciplinary programme combines three fields: history, art history, and Dutch language and literature. It aims to provide a knowledge and understanding of the political, economic, cultural and religious history of the Netherlands in the period c.1550–1700.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three or four core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and the research dissertation (90 credits).

- Core Modules
Research Skills Seminar
Literature of the Dutch Golden Age
or one module on the history of Dutch art

- Recent optional modules included:
Dutch Genre Painting
From Renaissance to Republic: The Netherlands c.1555-1609
Political Thought in Renaissance Europe
Signs, Mind and Society: Early Modern Theories of Language
The Body Between Art and Science
Golden Age Kingship: Theory and Practice
Transformation of Jewish Culture in Early Modern Europe

- Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project based on 16th and/or 17th-century (primary) resources, which culminates in a dissertation up to 15,000 words.

Teaching and Learning

The programme takes the form of lectures, small-group seminars and individual tutorials. Through the research skills seminar students will visit various libraries and collections, in particular the Institute for Historical Research, British Library, and Warburg Institute. Assessment is through written coursework essays and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site Dutch Golden Age MA http://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/postgraduatestudy/taughtmasters/ma_dutch_golden_age

Funding

For the most recent information on funding available for 2015/16 entry please see the UCL HIstory website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/postgraduatestudy/taughtmasters/ma_funding .

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- Carol Chattaway Scholarship
Value: £2,500 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

- Furlong Bursary for MA Study in the Ancient Near East
Value: £7,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

- Jean Orr Scholarship
Value: £7,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

First destinations of recent graduates of the programme include: East Side Community Heritage; Volunteer, Warburg Institute; University of London: Research Degree in Art History; and University of Amsterdam: PhD Golden in the Age in Dutch Art.

- Employability
This programme not only provides an outstanding foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career but is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museum and heritage and the education sector. Debates, small group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. Likewise the analytical and research skills gained by students on this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with history alumni.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

The department is strongly committed to the intellectual development of all our students; if you come to UCL, you will receive individual supervision from leading historians.

Students benefit from London's extraordinary resources, including major collections of Dutch and Flemish art. The British Library, within walking distance of UCL, houses the largest collection of Dutch books anywhere outside the Low Countries.

Student / staff ratios › 39 staff including 8 postdocs › 101 taught students › 46 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The programme is suitable for students with a first degree in a relevant arts, humanities or social science discipline. Prior knowledge of the Dutch language is not required; depending on their linguistic skills, students will be placed in one of three language/literature courses and trained in the reading of Dutch texts.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Dutch Golden Age at graduate level
- why you want to study Dutch Golden Age at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to this programme
- how your academic background meets the demands of a challenging academic environment
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

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The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. Read more
The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. To become an accredited practitioner candidates are also required to hold the Advanced Diploma in Child and Adolescent Counselling. The increased emphasis on the integration of education, social services and health in the delivery of services to children under the Children's Act 2004, make this route particularly pertinent and valuable, not only to teachers but to a wide range of practitioners within the area.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmpepc

Course detail

The four main elements of the route are:

1. The Therapeutic Relationship and Therapeutic Processes
This element explores an integrative approach to the therapeutic relationship. It will include a study of the working alliance, the transferential relationship and the person to person relationship.

2. Professional Issues in Therapy with Children
In these sessions, the key professional, ethical and legal issues surrounding the practice of therapeutic counselling and research on counselling are examined. Since the context of work with children and adolescents is rapidly changing, with increased emphasis on working with other agencies, systems and groups as well as with individuals, it is important to understand different contexts and the different modes of working within them.

3. Understanding Child and Adolescent Development
This element explores the key theoretical frameworks for individual and group development in childhood and adolescence and their implications for therapeutic practices.

4. Developing Children's Social and Emotional Well Being

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- Demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of an integrative, relational, developmental and ecosystemic approach to psychological therapy with children and young people
- Shown abilities and skills to work therapeutically with children and young people
- Demonstrated a highly developed ethical attitude both in therapeutic practice and research
- Shown a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific topic;
- Demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- Shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- Demonstrated self-direction, originality and ethical awareness in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Each term, written work is submitted and formative feedback is provided. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions (three times a term). At the end of each term, supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

- Thesis: Up to 20,000 words
- Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
- Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the MPhil in Education to PhD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Often a stepping-stone toward PhD studies, this course allows students considerable freedom in designing an independent course of study under the direction of a supervisor. Read more
Often a stepping-stone toward PhD studies, this course allows students considerable freedom in designing an independent course of study under the direction of a supervisor. Applicants will normally have already assembled an appropriate data set and questions for their dissertation at the time of application. The MPhil provides training in archaeological research methods and associated transferable skills, and the opportunity to complete a research thesis under academic guidance. This thesis and its topic are normally considered as a vehicle for working out detailed plans for pursuing a PhD, but may also be taken as a stand-alone one-year MPhil degree.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmparr

Course detail

The MPhil in Archaeological Research consists of three components, structured around independent study:

1. A Research Paper (6000 words)
2. A Research Skills module
3. The Dissertation (25,000 words).

This course is for students who have a substantial and appropriate background in Archaeology (at the first degree level and in fieldwork) accompanied by considerable maturity in the development of their research topic. Training in specific research skills (archaeological computing, quantitative methods, GIS and/or laboratory-based techniques) are arranged as appropriate to the student's needs.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 70% of the student’s final mark.

A Research Paper of up to 6000 words will account for 25% of the final mark for the degree, and will be developed under guidance from the student’s supervisor. The Research Paper is an important milestone which helps students progress towards the dissertation.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and International students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHSS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust. The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources. For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Read more
The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Area option courses examine the archaeology of a particular region of the world (such as South Asia or Europe) in detail. Students are encouraged to choose a third module from the range of MPhil options on offer in the Division of Archaeology to complement their specific interests (e.g., heritage, science, material culture, etc). All module choices must have the approval of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Archaeology Coordinator.

Students may choose to specialise in any of the following options:

- Archaeological Heritage and Museums
- Archaeological Science
- Archaeology of the Americas
- Egyptian Archaeology
- European Prehistory
- Medieval Archaeology
- Mesopotamian Archaeology
- Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology
- South Asian Archaeology

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpmar

Course detail

Students electing the Archaeological Heritage option will take three taught modules:
1. The Socio-politics of the Past
2. Museums: History, Theory, and Practice
3. Management of the Archaeological Heritage. This course concentrates on issues of differentiation of interpretation.

The topics are all of academic importance and the teaching focuses on a theoretical understanding of the issues involved, with practical examples used as case studies. The aim is to educate you within this expanding field and to activate further research.

Students choosing the Archaeological Science option will take:
1. Archaeological Science
2. Practical Application of Scientific Methods modules
3. One other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (chosen in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil Coordinator).

This course covers a broad range of scientific archaeological approaches with geo- and bioarchaeological foci, from theoretical, methodological and practical points of view. A series of recurrent case studies is used to introduce the questions, techniques and ideas applicable in each archaeological situation. In addition, this MPhil equips students with analytical skills in archaeological science.

Format

All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). Students choosing Archaeology of the Americas, Archaeology of Egypt, European Archaeology, Medieval Archaeology, Mesopotamian Archaeology, Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology, or South Asian Archaeology take:

1. the Core Archaeology course
2. the appropriate area option course
3. any other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil coordinator).

The assessed components of the three selected modules each represent 15% of the final mark. The assessed components of Research Skills module represents 5%, while the dissertation counts for 50% of the final mark.

Assessment

- The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee. The dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are usually required to produce between 3 and 6 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are required to sit written examinations for some modules.

- Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust. The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources. For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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