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This programme falls within the theme ‘Sustainable Power Generation and Supply’ of the Research Councils’ Energy Programme, the first of its kind in the UK. Read more
This programme falls within the theme ‘Sustainable Power Generation and Supply’ of the Research Councils’ Energy Programme, the first of its kind in the UK.

Masters graduates will have a systematic knowledge and understanding of hydrogen, fuel cells and their applications, including developments and problems at the forefront of the discipline. They will be able to evaluate current research critically, and be original in the application of their knowledge, proposing new hypotheses as appropriate.

Typical Masters graduates will be able to deal with complex issues, making sound judgements in the absence of complete information, and will be able to communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences. They will be self-motivating and able to act autonomously, and will have the qualities and transferable skills necessary to exercise initiative and personal responsibility, to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations, and to have the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development.

Their high level of numeracy and skills in problem solving, team working, communication and information technology will equip them for successful careers outside as well as within the process and allied industries.

The MRes in Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and their Applications:

Demonstrates the exciting future promise of hydrogen, fuel cells and their applications in a zero-emission world
Shows that industry supports the developments and that jobs are plentiful
Stresses the international nature of the course, with travel overseas
Emphasises the high quality nature of the teaching in top grade RAE Schools
Supports entrepreneurial spirit, with three spin-out companies in hydrogen and fuel cells founded during the past 12 months at the University of Birmingham
Programme content

The programme will focus on taught modules (60 credits) in science, engineering and team building, as well as business and management, and a dissertation.

Further core modules deal with topics such as:

Materials for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies
The Energy System
Marketing and TQM
Effective Project Management
Business Methods, Economics and Strategy
Optional modules

A wide range of optional modules enables you to gain specific knowledge relating to hydrogen energy and fuel cell technology. You may also choose to study business, management and public engagement modules, or develop mathematical modelling skills.

The programme can be studied full-time over one year, or part-time over two or three years. Modules are also available individually to fulfil continuing professional development needs.

Dissertation

The research thesis will focus on any of the following areas: Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems, Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Engineering for Domestic Applications, Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) Stack Engineering for Automotive, Hybrid Vehicular Systems, Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) & Electrocatalyst development, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) Stack Engineering for Portable Applications, Alkaline Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells, Discovery of New Nano-Materials for Hydrogen Production & Storage, Discovery of non-PGM alloys Materials, Hydrogen Production from Biomolecules by Novel Methods, Development of Novel Pd Alloy Thin-films for Use in High temperature Hydrogen Membrane Reactors.

Successful Masters students will have the opportunity to study for the PhD with Integrated Study in Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and their Applications.

About the School of Chemical Engineering

Birmingham has one of the largest concentrations of Chemical Engineering expertise in the UK, with an excellent reputation in learning, teaching and research.
Investment totalling over £3.5 million in our buildings has resulted in some of the best teaching, computing and laboratory facilities anywhere in the UK.
We have achieved an excellent performance in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) – the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. 87% of the research in the School was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent. It was ranked joint fourth overall in the UK for its research prowess and first nationally for research impact.
The enthusiasm that the academic staff have for their research comes through in their teaching and ensures that they and you are at the cutting edge of chemical engineering.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Fuel Technology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Fuel Technology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Key Features of MSc in Fuel Technology

Providing a sustainable, affordable and secure energy future through the discovery and implementation of new technology is a key challenge for the 21st Century. With more people requiring energy, effective solutions need to come from a wide range of sources. For the near term, various fuels will be the key to energy globally; presently oil and gas with an increasing reliance on hydrogen and biofuels.

The Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) is a leading centre of excellence for the development of advanced technologies in energy resources.

The Centre benefits from world-leading expertise in the area of a wide range of energy technologies and fuel technology.

The Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) research areas, broadly speaking, fit into one of three categories:

- Hydrocarbon: Oil and gas production and processing; downstream issues relating to efficient fuel refining; additives and fuel composition/performance chemistry.
- Hydrogen: technologies for the efficient generation of hydrogen from wasted energy generation; photocatalysis for hydrogen generation; hydrogen as an energy vector.
- CO2: technologies for the efficient removal of carbon dioxide from fuel feedstocks; use of carbon dioxide as a fuel source.
- Biofuel: methods for developing the process streams enabling integration of biofuel production with the chemistry industry supply chain.

The MSc by Research Fuel Technology has a wide range of subject choices including:

Catalyst design
Process characterisation
Refining
Process optimisation
Pilot scale studies

MSc by Reasearch in Fuel Technology typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Find out more about the facilities at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University on our website.

Links with Industry

One of the major strengths of the College of Engineering at Swansea University is the close and extensive involvement with local, national and international engineering companies.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK
Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK
Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK

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Our Energy programmes allow you to specialise in areas such as bio-energy, novel geo-energy, sustainable power, fuel cell and hydrogen technologies, power electronics, drives and machines, and the sustainable development and use of key resources. Read more
Our Energy programmes allow you to specialise in areas such as bio-energy, novel geo-energy, sustainable power, fuel cell and hydrogen technologies, power electronics, drives and machines, and the sustainable development and use of key resources.

We can supervise MPhil projects in topics that relate to our main areas of research, which are:

Bio-energy

Our research spans the whole supply chain:
-Growing novel feedstocks (various biomass crops, algae etc)
-Processing feedstocks in novel ways
-Converting feedstocks into fuels and chemical feedstocks
-Developing new engines to use the products

Cockle Park Farm has an innovative anaerobic digestion facility. Work at the farm will develop, integrate and exploit technologies associated with the generation and efficient utilisation of renewable energy from land-based resources, including biomass, biofuel and agricultural residues.

We also develop novel technologies for gasification and pyrolysis. This large multidisciplinary project brings together expertise in agronomy, land use and social science with process technologists and engineers and is complemented by molecular studies on the biology of non-edible oilseeds as sources for production of biodiesel.

Novel geo-energy

New ways of obtaining clean energy from the geosphere is a vital area of research, particularly given current concerns over the limited remaining resources of fossil fuels.

Newcastle University has been awarded a Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education for its world-renowned Hydrogeochemical Engineering Research and Outreach (HERO) programme. Building on this record of excellence, the Sir Joseph Swan Centre for Energy Research seeks to place the North East at the forefront of research in ground-source heat pump systems, and other larger-scale sources of essentially carbon-free geothermal energy, and developing more responsible modes of fossil fuel use.

Our fossil fuel research encompasses both the use of a novel microbial process, recently patented by Newcastle University, to convert heavy oil (and, by extension, coal) to methane, and the coupling of carbon capture and storage (CCS) to underground coal gasification (UCG) using directionally drilled boreholes. This hybrid technology (UCG-CCS) is exceptionally well suited to early development in the North East, which still has 75% of its total coal resources in place.

Sustainable power

We undertake fundamental and applied research into various aspects of power generation and energy systems, including:
-The application of alternative fuels such as hydrogen and biofuels to engines and dual fuel engines
-Domestic combined heat and power (CHP) and combined cooling, heating and power (trigeneration) systems using waste vegetable oil and/or raw inedible oils
-Biowaste methanisation
-Biomass and biowaste combustion, gasification
-Biomass co-combustion with coal in thermal power plants
-CO2 capture and storage for thermal power systems
-Trigeneration with novel energy storage systems (including the storage of electrical energy, heat and cooling energy)
-Engine and power plant emissions monitoring and reduction technology
-Novel engine configurations such as free-piston engines and the reciprocating Joule cycle engine

Fuel cell and hydrogen technologies

We are recognised as world leaders in hydrogen storage research. Our work covers the entire range of fuel cell technologies, from high-temperature hydrogen cells to low-temperature microbial fuel cells, and addresses some of the complex challenges which are slowing the uptake and impact of fuel cell technology.

Key areas of research include:
-Biomineralisation
-Liquid organic hydrides
-Adsorption onto solid phase, nano-porous metallo-carbon complexes

Sustainable development and use of key resources

Our research in this area has resulted in the development and commercialisation of novel gasifier technology for hydrogen production and subsequent energy generation.

We have developed ways to produce alternative fuels, in particular a novel biodiesel pilot plant that has attracted an Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) AspenTech Innovative Business Practice Award.

Major funding has been awarded for the development of fuel cells for commercial application and this has led to both patent activity and highly-cited research. Newcastle is a key member of the SUPERGEN Fuel Cell Consortium. Significant developments have been made in fuel cell modelling, membrane technology, anode development and catalyst and fuel cell performance improvements.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student you will be based in the Sir Joseph Swan Centre for Energy Research. Depending on your chosen area of study, you may also work with one or more of our partner schools, providing you with a unique and personally designed training and supervision programme.

You have access to:
-A modern open-plan office environment
-A full range of chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and marine engineering laboratories
-Dedicated desk and PC facilities for each student within the research centre or partner schools

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Climate change is a major challenge for the 21st century, requiring an alternative supply of cleaner energy from renewable sources. Read more
Climate change is a major challenge for the 21st century, requiring an alternative supply of cleaner energy from renewable sources. This course is designed with an engineering focus that deals with applications, combined with the business element; applicable whether you work for a large organisation or a small to medium-size enterprise.

The MSc will meet, in part, the exemplifying academic benchmark requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Accredited MSc graduates who also have a BEng(Hons) accredited for CEng, will be able to show that they have satisfied the educational base for CEng registration.

Key features
-The programme provides hands-on skills in 3D CAD and solid modelling, FEA and CFD analysis, Polysun and WindPRO simulations using industry-standard software.
-You can undertake a wide range of challenging and interesting sponsored and non-sponsored projects in the specific areas of wind power, solar power, biofuels and fuel-cells-related technologies.
-Excellent career progression and internship with leading renewable companies: around 80% of students who have graduated from this programme have been recruited by the relevant industries as a consultant such as Atkins, Alstom Power, Inditex, Vattenfall, Shell, SGS UK Ltd and many others.
-Completion of this programme would be an ideal progression to PhD level of research studies if you are interested in following an academic or research career in novel areas of renewable energy.

What will you study?

The course provides an in-depth knowledge of renewable energy systems design and development, commercial and technical consultancy and project management within the sustainable engineering environment.

You will gain technical skills in and knowledge of solar power, wind power, biofuel and fuel cell technologies, as well as renewable energy business and management. In addition, you will gain practical skills in up-to-date computer-aided simulation technologies such as Polysun for solar energy applications, WindPRO for wind farm applications and ECLIPSE for biomass applications.

Option modules enable you to specialise in project engineering and management, as well as risk management or engineering design and development. Advanced topics, such as 3D solid modelling, computer-aided product development and simulation, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and simulation allow you to gain further practical and theoretical knowledge of analytical software tools used in product design.

Assessment

Coursework, exams, individual project.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

If you start this course in January, you will complete the same modules as students who started in September but in a different format – please contact us at for more information.

Core modules
-Biomass and Fuel Cell Renewable Technology
-Solar Power Engineering
-Wind Power Engineering
-Project Dissertation

Option modules (choose one)
-Engineering Projects and Risk Management
-Computational Fluid Dynamics for Engineering Applications
-Computer Integrated Product Development

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The world’s increasing demand for energy, together with global warming and fossil fuel depletion provides new opportunities for nuclear energy to play a role in the transition to sustainable energy system solutions. Read more
The world’s increasing demand for energy, together with global warming and fossil fuel depletion provides new opportunities for nuclear energy to play a role in the transition to sustainable energy system solutions. This creates a substantial need for engineers and scientists who can take part in developing the fourth generation of nuclear energy technology and take nuclear energy into a safer future. Besides energy, nuclear science and technology have applications in medicine, process industry, material physics and environmental monitoring.

Programme description

There is a heightened demand for highly trained nuclear engineers to research and develop the processes, instruments, and systems used in nuclear energy and radiation technology and to address questions such as how to model and predict reactor behaviour, the use of nuclear radiation as well as radiation protection, how to control and treat nuclear systems, and safety engineering.

As the face of nuclear technology changes, future challenges within the field include e.g developing the next generation of nuclear reactors and fuel, improving safety, optimizing processes to increase nuclear fuel efficiency and reduce nuclear waste, improve the processes for handling nuclear waste, create systems that minimize risks in the interaction between humans and technology and finding materials and technologies for future nuclear systems.

Besides applications related to energy, nuclear technology can be found in e.g the use of radioactive isotopes and radiation for medical diagnosis and treatment, in industrial measurement techniques, labelling of substances with radioactive isotopes in biosciences.

The nuclear Master’s programme at Chalmers is one of very few with a broad education, coupling different disciplines at Chalmers as well as industry. The compulsory courses in the program are designed to give the basic “must-have” knowledge in nuclear engineering, and a large number of elective advanced courses are available in many key subjects.

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Research students in Forensic Science have the opportunity to work alongside a multidisciplinary team in the School of Life Sciences, and can benefit from strong links with industry practitioners. Read more
Research students in Forensic Science have the opportunity to work alongside a multidisciplinary team in the School of Life Sciences, and can benefit from strong links with industry practitioners.

You have the opportunity to engage in the work of the Forensic Analysis Research Group, to develop innovative methods and techniques to assist in solving crime and casework-related issues. The team are currently engaged in high-profile studies including collaborative projects with the Centre for Applied Science and Technology at the UK Home Office.

You have access to a range of training programmes to support you in your independent investigations and an experienced supervisory team are on hand to offer advice and direction. Ongoing research projects in the School include Chemical Analysis of Legal Highs and GHB, DNA Analysis in Forensic and Archaeological Contexts, and Microcrystalline Testing for Drugs.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Main research areas:
-Drug analysis
-Ignitable liquid and fuel analysis
-Explosives analysis
-DNA fingerprinting
-Fingerprinting science
-Dye and pigment analysis
-Forensic anthropology
-Spectroscopic techniques (including Raman) and separation science
-Surface analysis
-Mechanical properties of biological materials.

Recent research projects include:
-Chemical analysis of fingerprints
-Analysis of legal highs and GHB
-Analysis of fuel markers and detection of fuel adulteration
-Development of sensors for forensic applications
-Microcrystalline testing for drugs
-Analysis of smoke for fire investigation
-Enhancement of DNA at crime scenes
-Development of colloids and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)
-DNA analysis in forensic and archaeological contexts
-Molecular typing of skin micro-organisms in forensic identification
-Forensic analysis of the mechanical properties of biological materials.

How You Study

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors to assess progress and guide research methodologies, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

These postgraduate research programmes allow you the opportunity to expand your knowledge and expertise in the specialist field of forensic science. They provide the chance to develop an in-depth foundation for further research or progression to careers in forensic science-related industries.

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Run in partnership with fellow members of the Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC), Birmingham, Leeds, London and Manchester, the course gives you access to more than 90 per cent of the UK’s academic expertise in nuclear waste immobilisation, decommissioning and clean-up. Read more

About the course

Run in partnership with fellow members of the Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC), Birmingham, Leeds, London and Manchester, the course gives you access to more than 90 per cent of the UK’s academic expertise in nuclear waste immobilisation, decommissioning and clean-up.

You’ll be based in the department’s world-leading NucleUS Immobilisation Science Laboratory, and will take eight modules on the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include reactor materials and nuclear waste management with each module including one week at one of our partner universities.

A welcoming department

A friendly, forward-thinking community, our students and staff are on hand to welcome you to the department and ensure you settle into student life.

Your project supervisor will support you throughout your course. Plus you’ll have access to our extensive network of alumni, offering industry insight and valuable career advice to support your own career pathway.

Your career

Prospective employers recognise the value of our courses, and know that our students can apply their knowledge to industry. Our graduates work for organisations including Airbus, Rolls-Royce, the National Nuclear Laboratory and Saint-Gobain. Roles include materials development engineer, reactor engineer and research manager. They also work in academia in the UK and abroad.

90 per cent of our graduates are employed or in further study 6 months after graduating, with an average starting salary of £27,000, the highest being £50,000.

Equipment and facilities

We have invested in extensive, world-class equipment and facilities to provide a stimulating learning environment. Our laboratories are equipped to a high standard, with specialist facilities for each area of research.

Materials processing

Tools and production facilities for materials processing, fabrication and testing, including wet chemical processing for ceramics and polymers, rapid solidification and water atomisation for nanoscale metallic materials, and extensive facilities for deposition of functional and structural coatings.

Radioactive nuclear waste and disposal

Our £3million advanced nuclear materials research facility provides a high-quality environment for research on radioactive waste and disposal. Our unique thermomechanical compression and arbitrary strain path equipment is used for simulation of hot deformation.

Characterisation

You’ll have access to newly refurbished array of microscopy and analysis equipment, x-ray facilities, and surface analysis techniques covering state-of-the-art XPS and SIMS. There are also laboratories for cell and tissue culture, and facilities for measuring electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties.

The Kroto Research Institute and the Nanoscience and Technology Centre enhance our capabilities in materials fabrication and characterisation, and we have a computer cluster for modelling from the atomistic through nano and mesoscopic to the macroscopic.

Stimulating learning environment

An interdisciplinary research-led department; our network of world leading academics at the cutting edge of their research inform our courses providing a stimulating, dynamic environment in which to study.

Teaching and assessment

Working alongside students and staff from across the globe, you’ll tackle real-world projects, and attend lectures, seminars and laboratory classes delivered by academic and industry experts.

You’ll be assessed by formal examinations, coursework assignments and a dissertation.

Sample modules

Processing, Storage and Disposal of Nuclear Waste; Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Reactor Physics and Criticality; Risk Management.

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Home to the world-leading research centre, NucleUS Immobilsation Science Laboratory, the Department is recognised as a centre of excellence for the study of waste immobilisation and the development of new materials for future reactors. Read more

About the course

Home to the world-leading research centre, NucleUS Immobilsation Science Laboratory, the Department is recognised as a centre of excellence for the study of waste immobilisation and the development of new materials for future reactors.

You’ll be taught by staff with international reputations in their field, giving you an excellent grounding in materials science which can be applied to nuclear science and engineering, and across the whole nuclear fuel cycle.

A welcoming department

A friendly, forward-thinking community, our students and staff are on hand to welcome you to the department and ensure you settle into student life.

Your project supervisor will support you throughout your course. Plus you’ll have access to our extensive network of alumni, offering industry insight and valuable career advice to support your own career pathway.

Your career

Prospective employers recognise the value of our courses, and know that our students can apply their knowledge to industry. Our graduates work for organisations including Airbus, Rolls-Royce, the National Nuclear Laboratory and Saint-Gobain. Roles include materials development engineer, reactor engineer and research manager. They also work in academia in the UK and abroad.

90 per cent of our graduates are employed or in further study 6 months after graduating, with an average starting salary of £27,000, the highest being £50,000.

Equipment and facilities

We have invested in extensive, world-class equipment and facilities to provide a stimulating learning environment. Our laboratories are equipped to a high standard, with specialist facilities for each area of research.

Materials processing

Tools and production facilities for materials processing, fabrication and testing, including wet chemical processing for ceramics and polymers, rapid solidification and water atomisation for nanoscale metallic materials, and extensive facilities for deposition of functional and structural coatings.

Radioactive nuclear waste and disposal

Our £3million advanced nuclear materials research facility provides a high-quality environment for research on radioactive waste and disposal. Our unique thermomechanical compression and arbitrary strain path equipment is used for simulation of hot deformation.

Characterisation

You’ll have access to newly refurbished array of microscopy and analysis equipment, x-ray facilities, and surface analysis techniques covering state-of-the-art XPS and SIMS. There are also laboratories for cell and tissue culture, and facilities for measuring electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties.

The Kroto Research Institute and the Nanoscience and Technology Centre enhance our capabilities in materials fabrication and characterisation, and we have a computer cluster for modelling from the atomistic through nano and mesoscopic to the macroscopic.

Stimulating learning environment

An interdisciplinary research-led department; our network of world leading academics at the cutting edge of their research inform our courses providing a stimulating, dynamic environment in which to study.

Teaching and assessment

Working alongside students and staff from across the globe, you’ll tackle real-world projects, and attend lectures, seminars and laboratory classes delivered by academic and industry experts.

You’ll be assessed by formal examinations, coursework assignments and a dissertation.

Core modules

Nuclear Reactor Engineering Studies; Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Nuclear Waste Immobilisation and Disposal; Materials for Nuclear Systems; Science of Materials; Materials Processing and Characterisation; Materials Selection, Properties and Applications; Technical Skills Development; Research project in the area of your choice.

Examples of optional modules

Glasses and Cements; Advanced Materials Manufacturing – Part 1.

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Biotechnology is defined as the industrial exploitation of living organisms or the exploitation of components derived from these organisms. Read more

MSc Biotechnology

Biotechnology is defined as the industrial exploitation of living organisms or the exploitation of components derived from these organisms.

Programme summary

During the master Biotechnology you learn more about the practical applications of biotechnology, including age-old techniques such as brewing and fermentation, which are still important today. In recent decades, gene modification has revolutionized the biotechnology industry, spawning countless new products and improving established processes. Modern biotechnology has become an applied area of science with a multidisciplinary approach embracing recombinant DNA technology, cellular biology, microbiology, biochemistry, as well as process design and engineering.

Specialisations

Cellular and Molecular Biotechnology
This specialisation focuses on the practical application of cellular and molecular knowledge with the aim of enhancing or improving production in micro-organisms or cell cultures. Possible majors: molecular biology, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, enzymology and cell biology. The knowledge and skills gained can be applied in food biotechnology, medicine and vaccine development, environmental and bio-based technology.

Process Technology
This specialisation focuses on engineering strategies for developing, enhancing or improving production in fermentation, bioconversion and enzymatic synthesis. Possible majors: bioprocess engineering, food or environmental engineering, applied biotechnology and system and control techniques. The knowledge and skills gained can be applied in food biotechnology, medicine and vaccine development, environmental and bio-based technology.

Marine Biotechnology
This specialisation focuses on the use of newly- discovered organisms from the sea in industrial processes. Applications include production of new medicines, fine chemicals, bio-based products and renewable energy.

Medical Biotechnology
This specialisation focuses on the use of modern biotechnology in the development and production of new vaccines and medicines. Advanced molecular and cellular techniques are used to study diagnostic and production methods for vaccines and medicines. Possible majors: molecular biology, microbiology, virology and cell biology.

Food Biotechnology
This specialisation focuses on the application from biotechnology to food processing. The approach includes microbial and biochemical aspects integrated with process engineering and chemistry. Possible majors: food microbiology, food chemistry and process engineering.

Environmental and Biobased Technology
This specialisation focuses on the design and development of biotechnological processes for solving environmental problems by removing waste products or by producing renewable energy. Possible majors: environmental technology, bioprocess engineering, microbiology and biobased chemical technology.

Your future career

Graduates in biotechnology have excellent career prospects. More than 60 percent begin their careers in research and development. Many of these Master graduates go on to earn their PhD degrees and often achieve management positions within a few years. Approximately 30 percent of our graduates start working for biotechnology companies immediately. Relatively few begin their careers outside the private sector or in a field not directly related to biotechnology. In the Netherlands, some graduates work for multinational companies such as Merck Schering Plough, DSM, Heineken, Unilever and Shell, while others find positions at smaller companies and various universities or research centres such as NKI and TNO.

Alumnus Sina Salim.
In America and Brazil, production of maize and sugar cane for bio ethanol takes up enormous swathes of arable land that could otherwise be used for food production. This leads to the well-known food versus fuel dilemma. An alternative method for producing biodiesel is the use of algae. Currently, too much energy is consumed during the growth and harvesting of algae, but huge efforts are being made to reduce these energy requirements. Sina Salim is trying to develop a cheap and energy efficient harvesting method to ultimately produce biodiesel from algae, a competitor of fossil fuel. Now he is operational scientist at Bioprocess Pilot Facility B.V.

Related programmes:
MSc Molecular Life Sciences
MSc Food Technology
MSc Bioinformatics
MSc Plant Biotechnology
MSc Environmental Sciences.

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The MPhil and PhD programmes in Chemical Engineering attract students from diverse disciplinary backgrounds such as statistics, maths, electrical engineering, chemistry and physics. Read more
The MPhil and PhD programmes in Chemical Engineering attract students from diverse disciplinary backgrounds such as statistics, maths, electrical engineering, chemistry and physics. You may work on multidisciplinary research projects in collaboration with colleagues across the University or from external organisations.

Research in the School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials is cross-disciplinary and our strategy is to ensure that our research groups grow and provide a balanced portfolio of activities for the future. This is achieved in part through MPhil and PhD supervision.

Advanced materials

Every article, instrument, machine or device we use depends for its success upon materials, design and effective production. We work on a wide range of materials topics including:
-New material development
-Optimising of materials processing
-Testing and evaluation at component scale and at high spatial resolution
-Modelling
-Failure analysis

Much of our work relates to materials and processes for renewable energy generation, energy efficiency, carbon capture and storage. We also use biological and bio-inspired processes to develop new functional materials.

The Group Head is Professor Steve Bull, Cookson Group Chair of Materials Engineering – high spatial resolution mechanics. His research focuses on development and testing of compliant and porous materials, and the use of sustainable materials. Professor Bull is the 2013 recipient of the Tribology Silver Medal presented by the Tribology Trust, the top national award in this area.

Electrochemical engineering science

Electrochemical Engineering Science (EES) arose out of the pioneering fuel cell research at Newcastle in the 1960s. We are continuing this research on new catalyst and membrane materials, optimising electrode structures and developing meaningful fuel cell test procedures.

We are investigating electrochemical methods for surface structuring, probing and testing at the micron and nanoscale. More recently, we have been using electrochemical analysis to understand cellular and microbial catalysis and processes.

Applications of our research are in:
-Energy production and storage
-Micro and nanoscale device fabrication
-Medical and health care applications
-Corrosion protection

The Group Head is Professor Sudipta Roy. Professor Roy's research focuses on materials processing, micro/nano structuring and corrosion.

Process intensification

Process intensification is the philosophy that processes can often be made smaller, more efficient and safer using new process technologies and techniques, resulting in order of magnitude reductions in the size of process equipment. This leads to substantial capital cost savings and often a reduction in running costs.

The Group Head is Professor Adam Harvey. Professor Harvey's research focuses on Oscillatory Baffled Reactors (OBRs), biofuel processing and heterogeneous catalysis.

Process modelling and optimisation

Our goal is to attain better insight into process behaviour to achieve improved process and product design and operational performance. The complexity of the challenge arises from the presence of physiochemical interactions, multiple unit operations and multi-scale effects.

Underpinning our activity is the need for improved process and product characterisation through the development and application of process analytical techniques, hybrid statistical and empirical modeling and high throughput technologies for chemical synthesis.

The Group Head is Professor Elaine Martin. Professor Martin's research focuses on Process Analytical Technologies, Statistical and Empirical Process Data Modelling, and Process Performance Monitoring.

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Materials Engineering includes the development, specification and engineering applications of new and existing materials. Your research will focus on understanding the physical and chemical descriptions that underlie materials performance, and develop property and performance models of materials. Read more
Materials Engineering includes the development, specification and engineering applications of new and existing materials. Your research will focus on understanding the physical and chemical descriptions that underlie materials performance, and develop property and performance models of materials.

As a postgraduate researcher in Materials Engineering you will be based in the School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials. Our research areas include kinetics and formation mechanisms of new materials, and predictive modelling based upon mechanistic understanding. Work covers the production, property measurement and performance assessment of:
-Ceramics
-Polymers
-Metals
-Composites

We focus on developing new materials for advanced engineering applications, including microelectronics, optics and power transmission.

Current research projects include:
-Developing novel surface engineering processes and materials (such as fullerene-like coating materials)
-Energy-based methods for performance modelling
-Nanomaterials and nanocharacterisation techniques
-Novel materials for intensified processes

A major research strength is the measurement and modelling of the mechanical response of materials at high-spatial resolution, particularly in microelectronic and optical devices. A combination of unique equipment and interdisciplinary expertise supports this.

Another research focus is the materials requirements for the sustainable development and use of key resources, in particular water and energy. We have significant research into the generation of energy from novel sources, low carbon and renewable technologies and the clean-up of effluent and wastewater.

Our major areas of research are:
-Fuel cells and energy systems
-Gasification
-Cold plasma gasification
-Bio-fuel cells
-Bio-diesel production
-Gas and water treatment
-Nano-structured polymer composites for pollution control
-Sustainable and environmental electrochemical systems
-Photochemical processes and electrochemical synthesis

The School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials runs a postgraduate training programme that is compulsory for all new students and involves selected taught modules. You also receive research training from the Science, Agriculture and Engineering Graduate School that covers professional/key skills, personal development and research techniques. You have the opportunity to supplement your income by undertaking laboratory demonstrating and tutorial classes.

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The Aircraft Design option of the MSc in Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) aims to provide a comprehensive overview of aircraft performance, structures and systems. Read more

Course Description

The Aircraft Design option of the MSc in Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) aims to provide a comprehensive overview of aircraft performance, structures and systems. A holistic teaching approach is taken to explore how the individual elements of an aircraft can be designed and integrated using up-to-date methods and techniques. You will learn to understand how to select specific systems such as fuel systems, and their effect on the aircraft as a whole.
This course is suitable for students with a background in aeronautical or mechanical engineering or those with relevant industrial experience.

Overview

Modern aircraft design focuses on the integration of new technologies and systems, with current and advanced configurations to lead us towards environmentally friendly and cost effective aviation in the civil arena and high performance and effective aviation in the military arena. This includes new structures, materials and manufacturing processes. New aircraft design is essential to address issues such as carbon footprint reduction, lower noise pollution and improved passenger comfort as well as contributing to national security.

Our work in this field covers all flying vehicles including civil and military aircraft, helicopters, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems (UAVS), ultra-high capacity airlines and space vehicles. Current research being undertaken includes:

Advanced Configurations – such as blended wing and morphing wing aircraft design. This includes both fixed wing and rotorcraft vehicles.

Advanced Systems Integration – such as Distributed Propulsion using hydrogen or alternative fuels for power and high temperature superconducting materials technology.

Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes – exploring the benefits achieved through the application of advanced composite materials.

Advanced Design Methodologies – developing techniques to ensure that optimum designs are achieved.

Airworthiness Compliance – ensuring new designs demonstrate the same safety requirements as traditional aircraft.

Operational Aspects – cost, performance, reliability and maintainability are important features of aircraft design as well as advanced techniques such as Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM). Vulnerability and susceptibility also have a major impact.

Biomimetics – taking lessons from nature for example insects and birds, and their application in aviation such as launch, recovery and flight.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Structure

The Aircraft Design option consists of a taught component, a group design project and an individual research project.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following outcomes from this degree course:

•To build upon knowledge to enable students to enter a wide range of aerospace and related activities concerned with the design of flying vehicles such as aircraft, missiles, airships and spacecraft
•To ensure that the student is of immediate use to their employer and has sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression
•To provide teaching that integrates the range of disciplines required by modern aircraft design
•To provide the opportunity for students to be immersed in a 'Virtual Industrial Environment' giving them hands-on experience of interacting with and working on an aircraft design project

Modules

The taught programme for the Aircraft Design masters is generally delivered from October to March. As well as completing the 12 compulsory taught modules, students have an extensive choice of optional modules to match their specific interests.

Core:
- Airframe System Design
- Design and Analysis of Composite Structures
- Initial Aircraft Design (including Structural Layout)
- Loading Actions
- Aircraft Stability and Control
- Aircraft Performance
- Design for Manufacture and Operation
- Fatigue Fracture Mechanics and Damage Tolerance
- Aeroelasticity
- Reliability, Safety Assessment and Certification
- Flight Experimental Methods (Jetstream Flight Labs)
- Detail Stressing

Optional:
- Computing Aided Design (CATIA)
- Aircraft Aerodynamics
- Structural Dynamics
- Structural Stability
- Aircraft Accident Investigation
- Aircraft Power Plant Installation
- Avionic System Design
- Aerospace System Development and Life Cycle Model
- Integrated Vehicle Health Management
- Sustaining Design (Structural Durability)
- Finite Element Analysis (including NASTRAN/PATRAN Workshops)
- Crashworthiness

Individual Project

The individual research project aims to provide the training necessary for you to apply knowledge from the taught element to research, and takes place from March to September. The project may be theoretical and/or experimental and drawn from a range of topics related to the course and suggested by teaching staff, your employer or focused on your own area of interest.

Recent Individual Research Projects include:
- Ultra Long Range Science UAV Structure / Systems Development
- Conceptual Design of a Hypersonic Space Launcher and Global Transportation System
- Effect of Aerodynamics on the Conceptual Design of Blended Wing Body Aircraft
- Review, Evaluation and Development of a Microlight Aircraft
- Feasibility of the Application of Low Cost Scaled Aircraft Demonstrators.

Group Project

The extensive group design project is a distinctive and unique feature of this course. This teamwork project takes place from October to March, and recreates a virtual industrial environment bringing together students with various experience levels and different nationalities into one integrated design team.

Each team member is given responsibility for the detailed design of a significant part of the aircraft, for example, forward fuselage, fuel system, or navigation system. The project will progress from the conceptual phase through to the preliminary and detail design phases. You will be required to run project meetings, produce engineering drawings and detailed analyses of your design. Problem solving and project coordination must be undertaken on a team and individual basis. At the end of the project, groups are required to report and present findings to a panel of 200 senior engineers from industry.

This element of the course is both realistic and engaging, and places the student group in a professional role as aerospace design engineers. Students testify that working as an integrated team on real problems is invaluable and prepares them well for careers in a highly competitive industry.

Assessment

The taught modules (10%) are assessed by an examination and/or assignment. The Group Project (50%) is assessed by a written technical report and oral presentations. The Individual Research Project (40%) forms the remainder of the course.

Career opportunities

The MSc in Aircraft Design is valued and respected by employers worldwide. The applied nature of this course ensures that our graduates are ready to be of immediate use to their future employer and has provided sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression.

This course prepares graduates for careers as project design engineers, systems design, structural design or avionic engineers in aerospace or related industries, with the aim of progressing to technical management/chief engineer. Graduates from the MSc in Aircraft Design can therefore look forward to a varied choice of challenging career opportunities in the above disciplines.

Many of our graduates occupy very senior positions in their organisations, making valuable contributions to the international aerospace industry. Typical student destinations include BAE Systems, Airbus, Dassault and Rolls-Royce.

For further information

on this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/AVD-Option-Aircraft-Design

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The extensive consumption of fossil fuels worldwide has been contributing increasingly to global warming, air pollution and imminent energy crisis. Read more
The extensive consumption of fossil fuels worldwide has been contributing increasingly to global warming, air pollution and imminent energy crisis. One of the global challenges of the 21st century is to tackle these risks surrounding excessive CO2 emissions by replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy sources such as solar, wind and biomass. However, a report by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) shows that the world's current use of renewable energy is only 13% of its overall energy consumption. In response to this, European Commission directives aim for a 20% reduction in fossil fuel usage throughout Europe by 2020, and a 15% increase in the use of renewable energy in the UK within the same time period. For Scotland, the Scottish Executive has a target of generating 17% to 18% of electricity from renewables by 2010, a figure rising to 80% by 2020. Renewables located in Scotland count towards both the Scottish target and to the overall target for the UK. Consequently, according to the UK Low Carbon Transition Plan (LCTP) by 2020: 34% of carbon emissions will be cut, over 1.2 million people will be employed in ‘green’ jobs; the efficiency of 7 million homes will be improved, with over 1.5 million of them generating renewable energy. With any luck, more than 50% of the world‘s energy supply could be met with renewables by 2050 .

It follows through that huge business incentives, markets and a wide variety of employment opportunities throughout the world can be expected with the development of renewable energy resources as a substitute for fossil fuel technology. The purpose of the MSc programme is to help meet this demand by cultivating qualified and skilled professionals with specialist knowledge into the relevant technology within the renewable energy sector.

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This interuniversity 'master after master' program (60 ECTS) is jointly organized by the Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network (BNEN), a consortium of six Belgian universities. Read more

Organizing institutions

This interuniversity 'master after master' program (60 ECTS) is jointly organized by the Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network (BNEN), a consortium of six Belgian universities: Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Universiteit Gent, Université de Liège , Université Catholique de Louvain et Université Libre de Bruxelles and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN). Students can enroll for this master program at each of the six partner universities. The program is built up of 31 ECTS of common compulsory courses, 9 ECTS of elective courses and a compulsory Master Thesis of 20 ECTS.

The primary objective of the programme is to educate young engineers in nuclear engineering and ts applications and to develop and maintain high-level nuclear competences in Belgium and abroad. BNEN catalyses networking between academia, research
centres, industry and other nuclear stakeholders. Courses are organised in English and in a modular way: teaching in blocks of one to three weeks for each course, allowing for optimal time management for professional students and facilitating registration for individual modules.
All courses take place at SCK•CEN, in Mol, Belgium. The lectures take place in a dedicated, brand-new classroom in the conference centre of SCK•CEN (Club-House), located in a wooded area and nearby the SCK•CEN restaurant and library services. SCK•CEN offers a variety of accommodation options: houses, villas, studios and dormitories. For more information visit: http://www.sckcen.be

About the programme

The one-year progamme was created in close collaboration with representatives of the utility companies and power plants and teaches students in all aspects of nuclear technology and its applications, creating nuclear engineering
experts in the broad sense. Exercises and hands-on sessions in the specialised laboratories of SCK•CEN complement the theoretical classes and strengthen the development of nuclear skills and attitudes in a research environment. Various technical visits
are organised to research and industrial nuclear facilities.
The programme can be divided into three core blocks:
ƒ- A set of introductory courses allowing refreshing or first contact with the basic notions of nuclear physics, material sciences and the
principles of energy production through use of nuclear phenomena.
ƒ- A core block of nuclear engineering applied to power generation and reactor use; theory of reactors and neutronics, thermal hydraulic problems encountered in reactor exploitation, the nuclear fuel cycle and the specific material corrosion problems.
-ƒ An applications block where safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants and the legal and practical aspects of radiation protection and nuclear measurements are discussed.

Scholarships

BNEN grants are available for full-time students.

Curriculum

http://www.vub.ac.be/en/study/nuclear-engineering/programme

Nuclear energy: introduction 3 ECTS credits
Introduction to nuclear physics 3 ECTS
Nuclear materials I 3 ECTS
Nuclear fuel cycle and applied radiochemistry 3 ECTS
Nuclear materials II 3 ECTS
Nuclear reactor theory 8 ECTS
Nuclear thermal hydraulics 6 ECTS
Radiation protection and nuclear measurements 6 ECTS
Operation and control 3 ECTS
Reliability and safety 3 ECTS
Advanced courses 4 ECTS
Master thesis 15 ECTS
Total 60 ECTS

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Effective use of renewable energy and improvements in the efficiency of power generation facilities will enable better energy management in the future and help reduce environmental impact. Read more

Why take this course?

Effective use of renewable energy and improvements in the efficiency of power generation facilities will enable better energy management in the future and help reduce environmental impact. This course responds to an urgent need for specialists in energy and power systems management, as well as a growing skills shortage of people with core knowledge in this field.

The course provides relevant, up-to-date skills that will equip both graduates and working professionals in the advanced concepts of sustainable electrical power and energy generation. It offers skills for operation, control, design, regulation and management of power systems and networks of the future. You will also receive training in and understanding of energy production, delivery, consumption and efficiency.

What will I experience?

On this course you will:

Benefit from experts in the industry who will deliver part of the course as visiting lecturers, bringing professional expertise and industry-relevant material
Be encouraged to reach a level of competence and professionalism where you can effectively integrate your technical and non-technical knowledge to solve a range of problems of a complex nature
Learn in a challenging and stimulating study environment
Develop a range of key skills by means of opportunities provided in the study units
Being an MSc course, you are encouraged and expected to be able to reach a level of competence and professionalism where you can effectively integrate your technical and non-technical knowledge to solve a range of problems of a complex nature.

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course will help to maximise your career potential in this field and equips you to work as an engineer, at an advanced level, in the fields of energy and power systems management.

Module Details

You will study several key topics and complete a four-month individual project in which you apply your knowledge to a significant, in-depth piece of analysis or design. Projects are tailored to your individual interests and may take place in our own laboratories or, by agreement, in industry. Experts from Industry (STS Nuclear) deliver part of the course as visiting lecturers, bringing professional expertise and industry-relevant material to the programme.

Here are the units you will study:

Power Systems Technology: This unit provides an in-depth overview of contemporary electrical power systems. It covers the elements of electrical power systems including generation, transmission and distribution in the mixed energy source paradigm.

Electrical Machines and drives: Provides an in-depth overview of the operational principles and physical design of DC and AC electrical machines as well as broad understanding of concepts of power electronics and power electronic converters, so that you can describe their application and selection criteria. You will develop an understanding of the issues present in converter design, including the impact of physical layout and heat dissipation.

Energy Systems: Focuses on the techniques and principles of operation of thermodynamics and combustion systems, as well as the provision and management of energy. It also focuses on power generation and combined systems, BioMass processers application of heat and fluid transfer.

Renewable and Alternative Energy: Provides an in-depth coverage of the principles of renewable and alternative energy systems: Winds, Solar, BioMass, Geothermal, Fuel Cells, Hydrogen Technologies and Nuclear Energy.

Nuclear Technology: A study of nuclear engineering including the theory of atomic and nuclear physics, methods and benefits of generating electricity from nuclear power plants, and the effects of ionising radiation. The nuclear fuel cycle and the associated environmental impacts are also considered. The development of international guidance on nuclear and radiological safety and a comparison of national regulatory structures are analysed. The importance of safety cultures, safety behaviours and safety cases is a key element throughout this module.

Energy Management: The unit is specifically designed to provide the students with the basic of economical analysis and evaluation of energy projects and asset management as well as risk and hazard assessment, comprising legislation, hazard identification and quantification, quantified risk analyses, methods of elimination/mitigation, economic appraisal of integrated renewable, and petroleum projects; with numerous pertinent case studies.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials (personal and academic), laboratory sessions and project work. The course has a strong practical emphasis and you will spend a significant amount of time in our Energy, Power systems and Electronic laboratories.

A range of assessment methods encourages a deeper understanding of engineering and allows you to develop your skills. Here’s how we assess your work:

Written examinations
Coursework
Laboratory-based project work
A major individual project/dissertation

Student Destinations

This course is designed to respond to a growing skills shortage of people with core knowledge in energy and power systems management. It is an excellent preparation for a successful career in this ever expanding and dynamic field.

On successful completion of the course, you will have gained the skills and knowledge that will make you attractive to a wide variety of employers with interests ranging from overall system design to the more detailed development of subsystems. You will acquire the ability to critically evaluate methodologies, analytical procedures and research methods in energy and power systems management and in the use of state-of-the-art computational tools, the design of sustainable electrical power systems and networks and regulatory frameworks. For practicing engineers with professional business experience, the course is an opportunity to update your knowledge of current design practice and also to familiarise themselves with developments in codes and methods of analysis.

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