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Masters Degrees (Freshwater Ecology)

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Programme overview. The programme involves a ten week intensive training, focusing on fundamental ecological concepts and theory in the aquatic realm set against the contemporary scenario of global ecological change. Read more
Programme overview

The programme involves a ten week intensive training, focusing on fundamental ecological concepts and theory in the aquatic realm set against the contemporary scenario of global ecological change. Essential theoretical, field and laboratory research skills will be developed and honed via comprehensive modules and seminars: state-of-the-art techniques for whole organism and environmental process research; converting science to policy or management and consultancy via stakeholder engagement; and scientific reporting. Two separate week-long residential field-courses will allow students to put theory into practice: one with our River Communities Group in Dorset on the R Frome, learning about and actually testing some of the ecological tools developed for bio-assessment; and one practicing skills such as hydroacoustics, netting & electric fishing, and observational census methods for cetaceans, fishes, and birds. Students will spend time shadowing the internationally renowned researchers within the Aquatic Ecology Group of SBCS before developing a research proposal and conducting a six-month project. These may be jointly supervised by colleagues at related institutes and agencies such as the Institute of Zoology, the Natural History Museum, NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, and the Environment Agency, or indeed in industry. We will equip science graduates with the essential skills to proceed to further research via PhD or careers in the applied sector.

• Delivered by leading international researchers in the Aquatic Ecology Group, with input from the School of Geography, and in conjunction with multiple external institutes and agencies.
• Designed to ensure contemporary training in practical research skills to promote graduate employability
• Modules developed spanning the aquatic spectrum, accommodating pure theory and applied practical skills in the field
• Access to state-of-the-art analytical facilities from investment by the Science Research Infrastructure Fund.
• Considerable opportunity for projects in the UK and overseas, both in house, and with collaborating institutions across London

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This Masters programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology is mainly intended to provide training for students who hope to enter a PhD programme in the areas of ecology and environmental biology, and who wish training in transferable skills and in ecological and environmental disciplines. Read more
This Masters programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology is mainly intended to provide training for students who hope to enter a PhD programme in the areas of ecology and environmental biology, and who wish training in transferable skills and in ecological and environmental disciplines.

Why this programme

-This Ecology and Evnvironmental Biology degree programme draws on the research expertise of a large number of University staff and allows you the chance to obtain experience in a wide range of modern research techniques.
-There is considerable expertise in this area of biology available at Glasgow, especially in ornithology, fish biology, aquatic ecosystems, and theoretical, physiological, molecular and evolutionary ecology.
-Excellent research and teaching facilities are available at the Scottish Centre for Ecology and the Natural Environment (SCENE) and Cochno Farm and Research Centre
-You will be encouraged to tailor the MSc Ecology and Environmental Biology programme to your own specific requirements and interests, within the limitations of the courses and projects offered.

Programme structure

The programme consists of a taught component, and two research projects in individual laboratories and/or field based.

The taught component consists of core research skills and specialist option in analytical and sampling techniques.

The main part of the degree, however, is devoted to experience of research techniques. You will carry out two 20-week research projects with individual placements chosen to reflect your interests and the skills you wish to acquire. After each project, you will write a scientific report.

Core and optional courses

Core Courses
-Key Research Skills
-Research Project (x 2)

Optional Courses
-Programming in R (prerequisite for all modelling and epidemiology)
-Infectious Disease Ecology & the Dynamics of Emerging Disease
-Single-species Models
-Conservation Genetics & Phylodynamics
-Freshwater Sampling Techniques
-Invertebrate Identification
-Molecular Analyses for DNA Barcoding and Biodiversity Measurement
-Phyloinformatics
-Vertebrate Identification

Career prospects

The programme will provide an excellent training for those who want to undertake a PhD programme and enter ecological management or conservation businesses. It should also serve as an excellent introduction to research in the UK for overseas students intending to proceed to a PhD in this country.

Some of the Institutions/Organisations our M.Res students went on to:
-Bremen Institute for Tropical Marine Ecology (ZMT)
-Clyde River Foundation
-Dakshin Foundation, India
-Victoria University, Wellington (New Zealand)
-University of Glasgow
-Warwick University

Some of the more exotic locations for MRes projects in recent years have included southern Brazil, Trinidad, Tobago, Kuwait, Egypt, Svalbard (Norway), Canada, the Azores (Portugal), Oman, Cayman Islands, and The Philippines.

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This course is unusual. Unlike our other Masters course (in Invertebrate Ecology & Conservation) there is only one compulsory module (the Research Project). Read more
This course is unusual. Unlike our other Masters course (in Invertebrate Ecology & Conservation) there is only one compulsory module (the Research Project). Provided there are no timetable clashes you can put together a course that suits you from the list of modules that are available from the list below. The course may be particularly attractive to people in employment who want to tailor the course to their specific job-related needs and can use the extra time a part-time course gives to negotiate around timetable clashes. The ‘negotiated learning’ module, available as an option on the ‘Invertebrate’ course, is also available on this course allowing you to tailor the material even more closely to your personal interests. Naturally this kind of choice means that you have to be very careful: if you have a particular career direction in mind you might have to be quite careful in your choice of modules – we work closely with you to make sure that you do make that right choice.

Course content

The content of the course depends on the qualification you want.

The MSc in Ecology & Conservation consists of a Research Project (worth 60 credits) and 7- 8 modules (adding up to 120 credits), the only compulsory module is the research project which means that you can choose any module from the following list provided the module is running and there are no timetable clashes (part-time students will find it easier to access a wider choice than full-time students):

Greening the Grey: biodiversity, buildings and sealed surfaces (15 credits)
Ecological Survey and Identification Skills (15 credits)
GIS for Ecology and Conservation (15 credits)
Managing Freshwater Habitats (15 credits)
Managing Terrestrial Habitats (15 credits)
Negotiated Learning Module (15 credits)
Professional Practice for Ecologists (15 credits)
Invertebrate Conservation Management (15 credits)
Invertebrate Taxonomy with (residential) Field Course (30 credits)
Research Placement for Ecologists (15 credits)
Residential Field Course (15 credits)
Work Experience for Ecologists (15 credits)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Ecology and Conservation is awarded for the completion of 120 credits (7-8 modules) but does not include the Research Project.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Ecology and Conservation is awarded for the completion of 60 credits (3-4 modules) from the list above (excluding the Research Project).

To give a feel for the importance of the research project: the Research Project is ‘worth’ one third of the total credits for the MSc.

To gain the MSc you need 180 credits
To gain the Postgraduate Diploma you need 120 credits
To gain the Postgraduate Certificate you need 60 credits

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The course is designed for recent graduates in biological or environmental sciences who are keen on invertebrates and who hope to move into conservation-related careers, and for people currently working in conservation, consultancy, and land management who want to upgrade their professional qualifications. Read more
The course is designed for recent graduates in biological or environmental sciences who are keen on invertebrates and who hope to move into conservation-related careers, and for people currently working in conservation, consultancy, and land management who want to upgrade their professional qualifications. No other specialist MSc course exists on invertebrate ecology and conservation. This course covers freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates, but excludes marine invertebrates

The MSc in Invertebrate Ecology and Conservation consists of a Research Project and 8 modules: Invertebrate Conservation Management; Invertebrate Taxonomy and Specialist Identification; Managing Aquatic Habitats; Managing Terrestrial Habitats;
Habitat Mapping and Geographical Information Systems (GIS); Managing the Consequences of Climate Changeand a Residential Field Course

and either a Work Placement, a Research Placement, Greening the Grey: biodiversity, buildings and sealed surfaces, or Negotiated Learning module.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Invertebrate Ecology and Conservation is awarded for the completion of eight modules (as above) but does not include the Research Project.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Invertebrate Ecology and Conservation is awarded for the completion of four modules from the list above (excluding the Research Project) but must include either Invertebrate Conservation Management or Invertebrate Taxonomy and Specialist Identification.

To give a feel for the importance of the research project: all modules except the Research Project are ‘worth’ 15 ‘credits’, the Research project is rated at 60 credits.

To gain the MSc you need 180 credits
To gain the Postgraduate Diploma you need 120 credits
To gain the Postgraduate Certificate you need 60 credits

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The MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER) is closely aligned to our MSc Freshwater and Marine Ecology (FAME) programme. However, the rationale for offering AER is to provide a more comprehensive practical training by application in the laboratory or field, rather than by formal tuition in the lecture theatre. Read more
The MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER) is closely aligned to our MSc Freshwater and Marine Ecology (FAME) programme. However, the rationale for offering AER is to provide a more comprehensive practical training by application in the laboratory or field, rather than by formal tuition in the lecture theatre. In essence then, AER melds both UK and European models of MSc. The key element is the extended project which provides all the skills required to undertake further academic or applied research and students will be encouraged to publish their work.

Programme Structure

Students are required to take three taught modules and an associated one week field training course shared with FACS students and then acquire the remainder of the necessary credits by completing an extended project aligned to cutting edge research groups within the Centre for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment.
(http://www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/research/researchcentresandservices/)

Required Modules – Aquatic systems: structure and function; Aquatic systems: hydrological, hydrochemical and geomorphological processes; Statistics for the biosciences

Field training course – an introduction to key field skills held as a residential course at the Freshwater Biological Association’s River Lab on the River Frome, Dorset.

Individual research project – comprising a literature review, a written thesis, a seminar presentation, and an oral examination

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This programme is delivered in close collaboration with our advisory board of representatives from the water industry, and provides fundamental and applied training in the science and management of freshwater environments. Read more

Overview

This programme is delivered in close collaboration with our advisory board of representatives from the water industry, and provides fundamental and applied training in the science and management of freshwater environments. Combining hydrology, geomorphology, biogeochemistry and ecology, the degree is designed to produce outstanding scientists capable of developing interdisciplinary environmental solutions to priority water resource and catchment issues. It involves fieldwork at our research sites including the near-natural Tagliamento River, Italy, and heavily impacted rivers within London and the south-east of England.

This programme:

- facilitates networking within the water and environmental sectors
- lets you develop core understanding of freshwater environmental systems and the key policy and legal frameworks that underpin their management
- provides hands-on training in flood estimation and inundation modelling using industry-standard software
- allows you to broaden your skills and knowledge in the monitoring and management of pollutants, nutrient levels and greenhouse gas emissions in aquatic systems
- provides training in river assessment methods
- develops your skills and knowledge in the theory and practice of river restoration
- learn transferable skills in field and lab methods, project management, statistical analysis, Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and the use of remotely sensed data, report writing, problem solving and presenting
- follow in the footsteps of our graduates who have secured positions in the water and environmental sectors including Jacobs, Halcrow Group, JBA Consulting, River Trusts, Thames Water, Environment Agency, Parish Geomorphic and ESIS Inc.

Why study at QMUL Geography?

- Professional and friendly environment: We are recognised as an international centre for excellence in teaching and research. Our work is at the forefront of human geography, shaping debates and providing significant new insight and understanding. We are also known for our friendly, collegial and welcoming ethos and are home to many of contemporary human geography's best known scholars.
- Research excellence: Almost 80 per cent of our research outputs (books and articles) are rated as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*) placing us 5th in the UK for this measure. Our research scores increased across all areas in the latest UK score of research excellence (REF 2014) and we're ranked joint 11th for geography in the UK overall. We're also proud to feature in the top 100 departments in the world to study geography (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016)
- Employability: 94% of respondents from our postgraduates were in work or further study six month after graduation; 91% at graduate level (DLHE 2015).
- You will develop knowledge and understanding relevant to employment in organisations such as Environment Agency, Defra, Natural England, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, British Geological Survey and environmental consultancies.

Funding:

A bursary of up to £4,000 is available from the Worshipful Company of Water Conservators for this programme. Contact Dr Gemma Harvey at to find out more.

Fieldwork

Students visit our researchers' site at the near-natural Tagliamento River in Italy as well as heavily-impacted rivers in London and the south east of England.

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Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines. genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few. Read more
Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines: genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few.

In 2014 the school relocated to a new £54 million, state-of-the-art Life Sciences building. Our new laboratory facilities are among the best in the world, with critical '-omics' technologies and associated computing capacity (bioinformatics) a core component. The new building is designed to foster our already strong collaborative and convivial environment, and includes a world-leading centre for evolutionary biology research in collaboration with key researchers from earth sciences, biochemistry, social medicine, chemistry and computer sciences. The school has strong links with local industry, including BBC Bristol, Bristol Zoo and the Botanic Gardens. We have a lively, international postgraduate community of about 150 research students. Our stimulating environment and excellent graduate school training and support provide excellent opportunities to develop future careers.

Research groups

The underlying theme of our research is the search for an understanding of the function, evolution, development and regulation of complex systems, pursued using the latest technologies, from '-omics' to nanoscience, and mathematical modelling tools. Our research is organised around four main themes that reflect our strengths and interests: evolutionary biology; animal behaviour and sensory biology; plant and agricultural sciences; and ecology and environmental change.

Evolutionary Biology
The theme of evolutionary biology runs through all our research in the School of Biological Sciences. Research in this theme seeks to understand organismal evolution and biodiversity using a range of approaches and study systems. We have particular strengths in evolutionary genomics, phylogenetics and phylogenomics, population genetics, and evolutionary theory and computer modelling.

Animal Behaviour and Sensory Biology
Research is aimed at understanding the adaptive significance of behaviour, from underlying neural mechanisms ('how', or proximate, questions) to evolutionary explanations of function ('why', or ultimate, questions). The approach is strongly interdisciplinary, using diverse physiological and biomechanical techniques, behavioural experiments, computer modelling and molecular biology to link from the genetic foundations through to the evolution of behaviour and sensory systems.

Plant and Agricultural Sciences
The global issue of food security unifies research in this theme, which ranges from molecular-based analysis of plant development, signal transduction and disease, to ecological studies of agricultural and livestock production systems. We have particular strengths in functional genomics, bioinformatics, plant developmental biology, plant pathology and parasite biology, livestock parasitology and agricultural systems biology. Our research is helped by the LESARS endowment, which funds research of agricultural relevance.

Ecology and Environmental Change
Research seeks to understand ecological relations between organisms (plant, animal or microbe) at individual, population and community levels, as well as between organisms and their environments. Assessing the effect of climate change on these ecological processes is also fundamental to our research. Key research areas within this theme include community ecology, restoration ecology, conservation, evolutionary responses to climate change and freshwater ecology. Our research has many applied angles, such as ecosystem management, wildlife conservation, environmental and biological control, agricultural practice and informing policy.

Careers

Many postgraduate students choose a higher degree because they enjoy their subject and subsequently go on to work in a related area. An Office of Science and Technology survey found that around three-quarters of BBSRC- and NERC-funded postgraduates went on to a job related to their study subject.

Postgraduate study is often a requirement for becoming a researcher, scientist, academic journal editor and for work in some public bodies or private companies. Around 60 per cent of biological sciences doctoral graduates continue in research. Academic research tends to be contract-based with few permanent posts, but the school has a strong track record in supporting the careers of young researchers by helping them to find postdoctoral positions or develop fellowship applications.

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This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus. Read more
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus.
Students have access to new and unique research facilities including the Tropical Sustainable Futures Complex (TSFC) on the Cairns campus and the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) at the site of the Canopy Crane at Cape Tribulation.
The two new field-based facilities provide direct and ready access to field locations and are designed for students to engage in practical field activities and long-term monitoring projects. Both facilities present exciting teaching opportunities that will provide students with much greater real-world experience and engagement with field biology.
These are flexible courses allowing students to specialise in the animals and ecology of rainforests, savannas, tropical freshwater systems, tropical wildlife, or tropical insects.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply specialised theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Science (GCertSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate of Science are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Certificate.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*Dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*More tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*Teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus. Read more
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus.
Students have access to new and unique research facilities including the Tropical Sustainable Futures Complex (TSFC) on the Cairns campus and the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) at the site of the Canopy Crane at Cape Tribulation.
The two new field-based facilities provide direct and ready access to field locations and are designed for students to engage in practical field activities and long-term monitoring projects. Both facilities present exciting teaching opportunities that will provide students with much greater real-world experience and engagement with field biology.
These are flexible courses allowing students to specialise in the animals and ecology of rainforests, savannas, tropical freshwater systems, tropical wildlife, or tropical insects.

Course learning outcomes

The graduates of James Cook University are prepared and equipped to create a brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide.
JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF SCIENCE (GDipSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Diploma of Science are eligible for entry to the Master of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Diploma.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*Dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*More tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*Teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus. Read more
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus.
Students have access to new and unique research facilities including the Tropical Sustainable Futures Complex (TSFC) on the Cairns campus and the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) at the site of the Canopy Crane at Cape Tribulation.
The two new field-based facilities provide direct and ready access to field locations and are designed for students to engage in practical field activities and long-term monitoring projects. Both facilities present exciting teaching opportunities that will provide students with much greater real-world experience and engagement with field biology.
These are flexible courses allowing students to specialise in the animals and ecology of rainforests, savannas, tropical freshwater systems, tropical wildlife, or tropical insects.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate an advanced level of scientific knowledge from with their chosen major
*Critically analyse scientific theory, models, concepts and techniques from within their chosen major
*Critically read and evaluate quantitative and qualitative research findings from within their chosen major
*Apply analytic tools and methodologies to define and describe scientific problems from within their chosen major
*Communicate effectively and persuasively, both orally and in writing.

Award title

MASTER OF SCIENCE (MSc)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*Dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*More tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*Teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Biosciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Biosciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

This MRes in Biosciences programme will provide you with research training in one or more of our Research Pathways and you will benefit from training in our Specialist Research Facilities. Research staff will share their expertise and assist you in developing the skills necessary to do independent research, leading to a dissertation written as a scientific paper.

All research students in Biosciences undertake taught modules followed by a major research project under the guidance of academic staff in one or more of our Research Pathways, and benefitting from training in our specialist research facilities.

The MRes Biosciences is a one-year programme. All research students undertake taught modules followed by a major research project under the guidance of academic staff in one or more of our Research Pathways , and benefiting from training in our Specialist Research Facilities.

Biosciences at Swansea has a good relationship with a wide range of external partners, including SMEs, Government Agencies, Local Government, UK and overseas research institutes and universities.

Research Pathways

1) Behavioural and Movement Ecology
Studying adaptations, and the selective pressures in the social and ecological environment that bring them about. We specialise in the movement ecology of individuals and collectives and can provide specialist research training to understand the role of the environment in structuring the properties of animal movement and behaviour.

2) Evolutionary and Molecular Biology
Understanding the diversity of life from a molecular perspective. We use the latest genetic and genomics techniques to address key questions in ecology, behaviour and conservation from an evolutionary perspective in a range of non-model organisms, from fungi to plants and animals.

3) Marine Biology, Fisheries and Aquaculture
From developing new techniques in fish husbandry and rearing of commercially important aquaculture species, to research in food and fuel security, low carbon technologies, biogeochemical cycles and climate change. Specialist research training can be provided on a diverse range of temperate to tropical aquatic organisms, from microplankton to invertebrates to fish, inhabiting marine to freshwater environments.

4) Mathematical and Statistical Ecology
Research that complements the full range of our academic expertise, from theoretical investigations of ecosystem complexity, stoichiometric ecology, pattern formation and animal movement, to practical agricultural applications and the operation of micro-algal biotechnology.

5) Population and Community Ecology
Combining experimental and theoretical approaches to develop our understanding of how species interactions with their environment (including other species) generate the spatial-temporal biodiversity patterns we observe in nature. Study systems include plankton ecosystems, coastal ecosystem functioning, disease control, conservation, and the impact of spatial-temporal environmental variation on community dynamics.

6) Whole Organism Biology
Our staff comprises world-leading experts on a range of organisms studied around the world, and welcome students who want to develop projects around such species.

7) Wildlife Diseases and Pest Control
Research focused on developing natural agents and solutions for the control of wildlife diseases and invertebrate pests that impact on food security and human and animal health. Research training provided in disease detection methods, disease management, and the socioeconomic benefits of pest control.

Facilities

As a student on the MRes Biosciences programme, you will benefit from a range of facilities such as:

Our excellent facilities include a unique built Animal Movement Visualisation Suite (£1.35m), incorporating an electronic wall linked to a computer-tesla cluster for high-speed processing and visualisation of complex accelerometry and magnetometry data derived from animals. Coupled with this facility is the Electronics Lab with capacity for research, development and realisation of animal tags with new capacities (sensors, energy-harvesting systems, miniaturization, 3-D printing of housings etc.); a custom-designed 18m on coastal research vessel; a recent investment of £4.2m on a new suite of state-of-the art Science laboratories; and the £2m unique Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Research (CSAR) with a 750 m2 controlled environment building, with programmable recirculating aquatic systems, unique within the UK’s higher-education sector. These are tailored for research on a diverse range of organisms, ranging from temperate to tropical and marine to freshwater. Coupled with this are nutrient and biochemical analytical capabilities.

Theoretical/mathematical research uses advanced university computing facilities that includes high-end graphics workstations, high-speed network links and the Blue Ice supercomputer located at the Mike Barnsley Centre for Climatic Change Research.

Several dedicated Bioscience labs housed within our grade 2 listed Wallace Building recently benefitted from a £4.2 million renovation programme, providing world-class research facilities that includes a specialist molecular ecology lab and a dedicated arthropod facility.

Research

We are 7th in the UK and top in Wales for research excellence (REF 2014)

93.8% of our research outputs were regarded as world-leading or internationally excellent and Swansea Biosciences had the highest percentage of publications judged ‘world-leading’ in the sector. This is a great achievement for the Department, for the College of Science and indeed for Swansea University.

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The programme includes the following profiles. This profile introduces students into the study of animal and plant development, microbiology, cell signaling pathways, cytoskeleton dynamics, cancer biology, virology and immunology. Read more
The programme includes the following profiles:

Genetics, Cell and Developmental Biology

This profile introduces students into the study of animal and plant development, microbiology, cell signaling pathways, cytoskeleton dynamics, cancer biology, virology and immunology. Courses of this profile span multiple levels of biological organization, from whole organisms down to the molecular level. Students choosing this profile not only receive up-to-date knowledge on these topics but also acquire the laboratory skills required to engage in cutting-edge research.

Environment, Biodiversity and Ecosystems

This profile allows students to gain experience in the research methods used to study the evolution and ecology of organisms found in terrestrial, freshwater and coastal ecosystems. A staff of experts teaches up-to-date knowledge on individual organisms, populations, species communities and ecosystems, backed up by their active research experience in taxonomy and phylogeny, vertebrate and invertebrate ecology, evolutionary ecology, biogeography, plant ecology, plant-animal interactions, and nature management. In addition, students are introduced into ecological research by means of practical field training and excursions in Belgium and abroad.

Herpetology

This unique profile addresses biology students with a passion for amphibians and reptiles. An international team of visiting scientists organizes lectures on diversity, ecology, physiology, behavior, evolution and conservation biology and prepares students for a professional career in herpetology. Ecological and herpetological field courses in European and tropical countries form an important part of this programme. As a student, you will be in a stimulating environment, with fellow students and top-experts sharing your passion. For more information, have a look at http://www.herpetology.be.

Human Ecology

This profile focuses on the interaction between humans and their natural environment. The increasing impact of the human population on ecosystems worldwide stresses the urgent need for researchers with a multidisciplinary background, that engage in developmental plans for a durable use and management of natural resources. The profile Human Ecology addresses an international audience of students and offers a course programme that, besides scientific topics, also addresses technological, socio-economical and political aspects. For more information, have a look at http://www.humanecology.be.

EMMC Tropical Biodiversity and Ecosystems

The world faces a crisis risking extinction of species through global warming. Due to impact of e.g., changes in land use and destruction of habitats, tropical rain forests, mangrove forests and coral reefs are disappearing and with them ecosystem functions, goods and services on which human populations are dependent. In order to conserve nature, to manage or even to restore tropical biodiversity and ecosystems, we must understand patterns of tropical biodiversity, study how organisms interact with their environment and how they respond to perturbations and change. Next to research, this is dealt with in this unique masters programme. http://www.tropimundo.eu

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Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. Read more
Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. This Masters programme provides specific training in data collection, modelling and statistical analyses as well as generic research skills. It is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining field data with computational and genetic approaches to solve applied problems in epidemiology and conservation.

Why this programme

-This programme encompasses key skills in monitoring and assessing biodiversity critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change.
-It covers quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data critical for animal health and conservation.
-You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbria (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or environmental consulting firms whenever possible.
-The uniqueness of the programme is the opportunity to gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects, which will enhance future career opportunities, including entrance into competitive PhD programmes. For example, there are identification based programmes offered elsewhere, but most others do not combine practical field skills with molecular techniques, advanced informatics for assessing biodiversity based on molecular markers, as well as advanced statistics and modelling. Other courses in epidemiology are rarely ecologically focused; the specialty in IBAHCM is understanding disease ecology, in the context of both animal conservation and implications for human public health.
-You will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity, and you will have opportunites to actively participate in internationally recognised research. Some examples of recent publications lead by students in the programme: Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. and Frank, L. (2016), Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. J Appl Ecol. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632. Rysava, K., McGill, R. A. R., Matthiopoulos, J., and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 30:1461-1468. doi: 10.1002/rcm.7572. Ferguson, E.A., Hampson, K., Cleaveland, S., Consunji, R., Deray, R., Friar, J., Haydon, D. T., Jimenez, J., Pancipane, M. and Townsend, S.E., 2015. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease; consequences for the elimination of canine rabies. Scientific Reports, 5, p. 18232. doi: 10.1038/srep18232.
-A unique strength of the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in:
-Monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
-Quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation
-Ethics and legislative policy – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.

Core courses
-Key research skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, advanced linear models, experimental design and power analysis)
-Measuring biodiversity and abundance
-Programming in R
-Independent research project

Optional courses
-Molecular analyses for biodiversity and conservation
-Biodiversity informatics
-Molecular epidemiology and phylodynamics
-Infectious disease ecology and the dynamics of emerging disease
-Single-species population models
-Multi-species models
-Spatial and network processes in ecology & epidemiology
-Introduction to Bayesian statistics
-Freshwater sampling techniques
-Invertebrate identification
-Vertebrate identification
-Human Dimensions of Conservation
-Principles of Conservation Ecology
-Protected Area Management
-Animal welfare science
-Legislation related to animal welfare
-Enrichment of animals in captive environments
-Care of captive animals
-Biology of suffering
-Assessment of physiological state

Career prospects

You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, environmental consultancies, government agencies, ecotourism and conservation biology, and veterinary or public health epidemiology.

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The MSc in Conservation Biology provides you with a knowledge base and the practical experience to address issues relating to biodiversity conservation and biodiversity management. Read more
The MSc in Conservation Biology provides you with a knowledge base and the practical experience to address issues relating to biodiversity conservation and biodiversity management.

Modern conservation science transcends the traditional boundaries of biology, ecology and environmental management. Today’s managers of biodiversity need to be versed in a broad range of specialist fields, from population ecology and human community development, through to international wildlife trade and the economics of conservation, as well as the latest techniques in endangered species recovery.

Our MSc in Conservation Biology is an interdisciplinary pathway that integrates all of these aspects of conservation biology. It is designed for wildlife managers with practical experience in international conservation work looking to acquire formal scientific training, as well as students with academic qualifications looking to develop a career in conservation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/273/conservation-biology

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Teaching which integrates natural and social sciences

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Research-led pathway taught by academics rated as world-leading and internationally excellent (REF 2014) who are members of DICE

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with international conservation organisations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global. Read more

Why take this course?

The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global.

This is what our course sets out to do and thanks to our close proximity to many types of temperate marine habitats and internationally protected conservation areas, we offer the perfect location for investigation.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Research at our internationally-renowned Institute of Marine Sciences or carry out microbiological work at the University’s Field Centre for Environmental Technology at Petersfield Sewage Works
Rear coldwater species for restocking programmes or trial fish food at Sparsholt College’s National Aquatics Training Centre
Study abroad through Erasmus or various other conservation and research schemes

What opportunities might it lead to?

You’ll be taught by leading international researchers and the course has been designed with strong input from outside agencies including environmental consultancies, a range of government bodies and industry. This ensures your training links directly to UK and international employment opportunities.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Consultancy work
Government-based research
Conservation
Teaching
Further study

Module Details

You will cover a variety of topics in advanced laboratory and field skills, and choose from units that cover marine ecology, aquaculture, ecotoxicology and pollution, and scientific journalism. A large amount of your time will also be spent on the research project that will enable you to apply the skills and knowledge you have gained.

Core units are:

• Research Toolkit: This covers a range of key professional skills for research methods (communication skills, ethics and report writing), advanced field skills (boat sampling, taxonomy, and marine and freshwater sampling methods), advanced laboratory skills (genomics, monitoring and pollution monitoring methods) and remote sensing technology (such as GIS).

• Research Project: Your final project allows you to select from a range of marine and freshwater projects provided by staff within the School, government research laboratories, NGOs and private research companies. During the project you will write literature reviews and develop skills in data analysis and presentation.

Then choose any three optional units from:

• Ecotoxicology and Pollution: This provides an introduction to environmental toxicology using model and non-model organisms.

• Aquaculture: This unit focuses on the principles of aquaculture production, global production and diversity of aquaculture species. It is taught by academic staff and staff from the National Aquatics Training Centre at Sparsholt College. Areas covered include larval culture, diseases and pathology, feeding and growth, reproductive manipulation, and business and management.

• Marine Policy, Planning and Conservation: Planning and Conservation: This unit explores contemporary debates on coastal and marine management with a specific focus on marine policy, planning and conservation.

• Science and the Media: Science communication is increasingly becoming an important part of science. This unit firstly addresses the skills required by scientists to effectively communicate with the media and general public and secondly, provides an understanding of the skills needed for a career in science journalism.

• Subtidal Marine Ecology: Selected topics of current interest in marine ecology, incorporating both theory and applied aspects, culminating in a week-long practical field course in the Mediterranean Sea. The unit carries an additional cost for the field trip, and requires a minimum level of training and experience in SCUBA diving to participate.

Programme Assessment

Hands-on laboratory-based work teamed with field trips means that practical learning underpins the theory learned in lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. You’ll also find that some aspects of your course may be taught online using our virtual learning environment.

You will be assessed using a range of methods from exams to coursework and presentations, with great opportunities to present your final-year projects to industry and researchers from other departments and organisations.

Student Destinations

Once you have completed this course, you will be particularly well placed to enter a wide range of interesting and rewarding careers in the UK and abroad. We will ensure you have all the relevant knowledge and skills that employers require, giving you the opportunity to either pursue a scientific career, enter the teaching profession, or further study should you want to continue your research.

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