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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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This course centres on building the foundational skills required for textual analysis, cultural study, and critical theory, and is designed for those interested in a range of issues, with the dissertation allowing them to focus on a single topic. Read more

Summary

This course centres on building the foundational skills required for textual analysis, cultural study, and critical theory, and is designed for those interested in a range of issues, with the dissertation allowing them to focus on a single topic.

Modules

Research skills; text, culture, theory; dissertation; plus 4 optional modules from: approaches to the long 18th century; cinema, sexuality, spectatorship; 18th-century fiction; feminism and postmodernism; Jewish literature and culture; literature and law; nationalisms and sexualities; postcolonial studies; records of early play; the 20th-century body; towards modernity and after; unknown Jane Austen; Victorian readers and the politics of print; women and writing the French revolution; other relevant optional modules.

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This course allows students to specialise in the history and culture of the long 18th century, through interdisciplinary study encompassing literature, history, philosophy, and visual and material culture; students are introduced to concepts and issues central to current research and study the collection of early women's writing at Chawton House Library. Read more

Summary

This course allows students to specialise in the history and culture of the long 18th century, through interdisciplinary study encompassing literature, history, philosophy, and visual and material culture; students are introduced to concepts and issues central to current research and study the collection of early women's writing at Chawton House Library.

Modules

Approaches to the long 18th century; research skills (in English or history); dissertation; plus 4 optional modules from: 18th-century fiction; English social and cultural life in the long eighteenth century; philosophy and the art of tragedy; slavery and abolition in the Atlantic world; towards modernity and after; unknown Jane Austen; women and writing the French revolution; other relevant optional modules.

Visit our website for further information...



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Drawing on Birkbeck's position as a world-leading centre in the field of nineteenth-century studies, this MA offers you the chance to take a genuinely interdisciplinary approach to studying the literature, culture and history of Victorian Britain. Read more
Drawing on Birkbeck's position as a world-leading centre in the field of nineteenth-century studies, this MA offers you the chance to take a genuinely interdisciplinary approach to studying the literature, culture and history of Victorian Britain. You will encounter a compelling range of Victorian texts, contexts, themes and ideas on a degree course that does justice to the energy and variety of the Victorian period.

Two core modules, Progress and Anxiety, 1789-1859 and Modernising Victorians, introduce some of the most significant debates, ideas and events of the long nineteenth century, and offer you the chance to develop new critical approaches to Victorian studies. Weekly seminars take you from the French Revolution to the Boer War and investigate topics such as the discovery of geological time, movements for social and political reform, the aims and limits of realist fiction, the Great Exhibition, Darwinism, aestheticism, the religious imagination and the Gothic revival.

These compulsory courses are supplemented by a wide range of option modules, which allow you to pursue your own interests in the field of Victorian Studies and beyond. Recently offered option modules are listed below.

Students in their final year of study have the chance to take an internship module. Successful interns spend a term working with one of London's Victorian cultural institutions, gaining first-hand experience of working in the cultural sector and using their host institution's archives to develop a unique research project. Previous interns have worked with the Dickens House Museum, the Salvation Army Heritage Centre and Archive, and the Guildhall Art Gallery, and have developed their projects into funded doctoral research topics.

A schedule of visiting speakers and other events, organised by Birkbeck's Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, ensures that you have the opportunity to engage with leading Victorian studies specialists from around the world, and are welcomed into one of the country's liveliest research communities.

Staff teaching on this MA include:

Professor Hilary Fraser
Professor Laurel Brake
Professor David Feldman
Dr Nicola Bown
Dr Carolyn Burdett (Course Director)
Dr Luisa Calè
Dr Julia Laite
Dr David McAllister
Dr Emily Senior
Dr Heather Tilley
Dr Ana Parejo Vadillo.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Explore this fascinating period through a multidisciplinary approach, bringing together literature, visual art, history and cultural studies.
Our graduates have an impressive record in competing for Arts and Humanities Research Council awards for research degrees.
Our lively Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies organises a dynamic range of year-round events that showcase the research of Birkbeck's academics, researchers and students, including our annual Dickens Day and our Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies. The Centre also established, and for many years hosted, the London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar.
Read 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, our free, open-access online journal that celebrated its tenth anniversary in November 2015 with a special issue on 'The Nineteenth-Century Digital Archive'.
Read more about our Dickens's Our Mutual Friend project, which culminated in November 2015 as part of the tenth-anniversary celebrations of 19.
Birkbeck is at the geographical centre of London's research library complex, a short distance from the British Library, the University of London Library, the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.
The University of London Library has an outstanding collection of literary periodicals of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics.

In your first semester you might explore the popular culture of coffee house and tavern, the political world on the street and in parliament, the vocations of women poets and polemicists, polite society and its interest in the management of emotions and arts, and the metropolitan life of London.

In the second semester, you can examine Romantic poetics and manifestos, the theoretical and political growth of philosophical and cultural enlightenment, Orientalism, travel, and the French Revolution and its aftershocks.

This pathway aims to prepare students to formulate a research topic, identify research materials, and present an argument in written and oral form that is formed by alternative interpretations. Students who complete the pathway will be aware of the interdisciplinary debates concerning the literature and history of this period, and will have engaged with a variety of materials: theoretical, visual, historical, and literary. You will also be able to deploy a range of appropriate skills in research, bibliography, and IT.

You will be taught in small seminar groups, and will be introduced to a number of key research resources in London through a module in research skills.

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This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. Read more
This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. The programme is administered from Queen Mary, so you register as a Queen Mary student � once you complete the programme, your degree will be a joint University of London-UCL MA. The MA Programme as a whole offers advanced training in intellectual history, the history of political thought and the history of philosophy, spanning the period from the ancient world to the Twenty-First Century. You will also be provided with an essential grounding in the various methods and approaches associated with the study of the history of thought developed over the past quarter-century in Europe and the United States.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module: Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History, a selection of modules chosen from the list below, and an individually supervised dissertation. Below is a typical sample of module options that may be offered in a given year:

Democracy: Ancient and Modern Richard Bourke (Queen Mary)
Propaganda and Ideology in Rome Valentina Arena (UCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
Languages of politics: Italy 1250-1500 Serena Ferente (KCL)
Political Thought in Renaissance Europe Iain McDaniel (UCL)
Early-modern theories of the state Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary)
The Public Sphere in Britain, 1476 - 1800 Jason Peacey (UCL)
Signs, Mind, and Society: Early Modern Theories of Language Avi Lifschitz (UCL)
Enlightenment and Revolution: Political Ideas in the British Isles 1688-1800 Ian McBride (KCL)
Selfhood, Sensibility and the Politics of Difference in the European Enlightenment Adam Sutcliffe (KCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
From Hume to Darwin God, Man and Nature in European Thought Niall O'Flaherty (KCL)
Visions of Capitalism Jeremy Jennings (Queen Mary) [please note: not running 2011-12]
In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1790-1890 Gareth Stedman Jones (Queen Mary)
Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to Liberalism Maurizio Isabella (Queen Mary)
Crisis and Future in Nineteenth-Century European Thought Axel K�rner (UCL)
Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, 19th�20th Centuries Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary)

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This course looks at the economic, political, social and cultural changes that were seen throughout the world between c.1500 and c.1800. Read more

About the course

This course looks at the economic, political, social and cultural changes that were seen throughout the world between c.1500 and c.1800. Events such as the British civil wars, the settling of the ‘New World’, the early stages of industrialisation, and the French Revolution transformed the way people thought and lived. This MA allows you to explore this momentous period with a group of internationally renowned scholars.

Our department

We are one of the largest, most active and successful centres for teaching and historical research both in the UK and internationally. Our academic reputation means that we are ranked third in the UK for research excellence (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Our team of over 35 academic staff and 100 postgraduate students work together to create a thriving and supportive research culture. This vibrant community includes a regular research seminar series, covering a huge range of topics, and a range of research centres and networks exploring interdisciplinary themes. Our students also run an active Postgraduate Forum organising a wide variety of social and research events, and collaborating with staff and students both in Sheffield and further afield.

Our teaching

Our world-leading research informs what we teach. We offer a flexible degree structure with a wide range of modules covering a variety of periods, locations, themes and approaches.

An MA degree in history will further develop the range of transferable skills at your disposal. You will have the freedom to tailor your research and focus on the skills that are most important to you. We offer modules that are specifically designed to provide you with skills in public history – Presenting the Past, History Writer’s Workshop and Work Placement all give you real, hands-on experience.

Your future

These kinds of skills are why our graduates are successful in both further study and a wide range of careers – from taking PhDs, lecturing and working in the museum and tourist industry to business management, marketing, law and working in the media.

In addition to the personal and professional development you will experience through your modules, we offer dedicated careers support to enable you to successfully plan your future.

Studentships

University and AHRC Studentships are available. Please contact us or see our website for further details. You’ll need to submit your application by the appropriate funding deadline.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Assessment is by bibliographical and source-based exercises, written papers, oral presentation, and a 15,000 word dissertation.

Part-time study

All our masters can be taken part-time. Seminars are held during working hours (9am–6pm) – there are no lectures. The number of contact hours will vary over the two years, but you’ll usually have at least one two-hour seminar each week. You’ll take one core module each year and the rest of your course will be made up from optional modules giving you plenty of choice and flexibility over what you study.

Core modules

Research Presentation; Early Modernities; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

Microhistory and the History of Everyday Life; Burying the White Gods: Indigenous People in the Early Modern Colonial World; The Early Modern Body: Identity, Politics and Embodiment, c1640-1800; Eighteenth-century Print Culture; Language and Society in Early Modern England; Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early Modern Europe.

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The MRes is an advanced historical research programme, and students specialize in ancient, medieval, early modern or modern history under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field of research. Read more
The MRes is an advanced historical research programme, and students specialize in ancient, medieval, early modern or modern history under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field of research. Students receive training in historiographical and technical skills necessary for doctoral study and develop their knowledge of the period they choose to focus on.

Key benefits

- One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2015).

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK.

- Ideal preparation for doctoral study, with advanced training in research skills combined with an extended dissertation.

- Specialise in Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern or Modern History.

- The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/history-mres.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MRes History programme provides students with the opportunity to engage in advanced historical research and appropriate research training tailored to students’ particular research interests. At its heart is the 30,000 word dissertation, delivered through a series of intensive one-to-one supervisions with tutors expert in the students’ fields of research. Through its taught training modules, the programme offers students the chance to engage at an advanced level with disciplinary and methodological debates, as well as conduct training work preliminary to writing the dissertation. These modules, combined with the dissertation, provide students with the ability to conduct large-scale independent research projects.

- Pathways -

Students on the MRes History follow one of four pathways, best suited to their research interests:

Ancient History – this pathway draws on the great strength of ancient history research in the University of London, which has the largest number of ancient historians in post anywhere in the world. The compulsory Sources & Methods in Ancient History is an intercollegiate module, involving most of the ancient historians in London, who take seminar sessions on their own specialist areas. Students are also required to study Greek and/or Latin for Research, Epigraphy or Papyrology.

Medieval History – this pathway builds on the popular MA in Medieval History at King’s, which has an outstanding track record for training medievalists for doctoral research. Students take the compulsory module Materials and Methods, which introduces methodological problems that medieval historians confront when handling source materials and when engaging with historical methods or schools of thought, as well as compulsory training in Palaeography and Latin for Graduates.

Early Modern History – this pathway enables each student to put together a tailor-made programme best suited to his or her research interests, providing an excellent basis for the research dissertation. Students choose between two core modules that focus on historiography (Approaches to Early Modern History) or practical skills (Advanced Skills for Historians). Optional modules cover topics including the history of religion, power, ritual, bodies, science, cities, knowledge, images and objects.

Modern History – students focus either on British and European history since the French Revolution, or on the history of global interaction since the 16th century. All students choose between two core modules that focus on historiography (Transnational History) or practical skills (Historical Methods). In addition, students are permitted to choose from a very wide range of taught optional modules.

- Course purpose -

Both to provide training in the historiographical and technical skills necessary for further study, and also to deepen your knowledge of the period studied. Suitable both for potential academics and for personal interest for those with a clear research focus.

- Course format and assessment -

We will provide you with two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you undertake at least 17 hours of independent study. If you are a part-time student, this will only apply during your first year. For your dissertation, we will provide 12 hours of one-to-one supervision and we will expect you to undertake 1,118 hours of independent study.

Career Prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This Master's degree in history explores early modern European societies in the period from the Renaissance to the Reformation and on to the Enlightenment and the outbreak of the French Revolution. Read more
This Master's degree in history explores early modern European societies in the period from the Renaissance to the Reformation and on to the Enlightenment and the outbreak of the French Revolution. One of its most exciting and distinguishing features is that it considers developments in Britain, continental Europe (notably France and Italy) and the wider world (particularly the Americas) in comparative perspective, which brings into question the idea of the distinctive nature of national histories.

Some of the key themes you will study are the impact of religious conflict, economic and social developments, government and social order, the growth of urban settlements, population and demographic change, the mutual interactions between Europe and the Americas, and the growth of state power. You will be able to choose option modules in early modern history from across the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology and you will receive training in historical methodologies and research techniques to help you research and write a dissertation on the subject that most interests you.

You will read widely in both secondary works and translated primary sources, but there is no language requirement.

Key teaching staff on this programme

Course director: Dr Brodie Waddell

Professor Julian Swann
Dr Filippo de Vivo
Professor Vanessa Harding
Dr Laura Stewart.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
This Master's programme offers a unique opportunity to study early modern European societies comparatively.
You will be able to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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This course is an opportunity to develop your understanding of particular aspects of French language, literature and culture while enhancing your research and critical skills. Read more

About the course

This course is an opportunity to develop your understanding of particular aspects of French language, literature and culture while enhancing your research and critical skills. It’s designed for students who see an MA as an end in itself, as well as those who want to prepare for a PhD.

You also have the option to take a shorter course and qualify with a postgraduate diploma or certificate. Please contact us for further information.

International careers

Your knowledge and skills will be useful in all kinds of careers. Our graduates work all over the world in academic research, teaching, government and cultural organisations.

An inspiring environment

We organise seminars, contribute to national and international conferences, and exchange expertise with other universities in the Worldwide Universities Network.

We specialise in film, visual cultures and performance, literary text, sociology, cultural history and politics, and gender studies. We teach and research subjects including poetry, contemporary art, classical music, cartoons, feminism, the French Revolution and postcolonial France.

Facilities and resources

We’re leaders in humanities knowledge transfer and the development of digital resources. We’ve been awarded funding to create a database of French film stars, electronic editions of old French romances and the Chronicles of Froissart, and an online archive relating to André Gide.

Our new building has dedicated study areas for postgraduate students and a café where you can relax and catch up with friends. The nearby Humanities Research Institute hosts seminars, workshops and conferences. The Information Commons and Western Bank Library are also close, giving you easy access to research collections.

Core modules

French Cultural Studies I; French Cultural Studies II.

Examples of optional modules

Advanced Translation from French; Case Study in Social Sciences; Constructions of the City; Critical Theory; Directed Reading; Gender Studies; Research Skills.

Students can also choose from a selection of modules run by other departments.

Studentships

If you’re offered a place, you can apply for faculty awards or the White Rose College of Arts and Humanities (WRCoAH) scholarships. The department’s Marjorie Shaw bursaries are also available to MA students.

Teaching and assessment

We teach in English and French, as appropriate. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, translations and analytical exercises) and projects or a dissertation.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Our Chemistry Master's programme provides you with an exceptional toolbox for your future. The programme is closely associated with the research Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Read more

Interdisciplinary approach

Our Chemistry Master's programme provides you with an exceptional toolbox for your future. The programme is closely associated with the research Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Its mission is to fundamentally understand, design and control the functioning of molecules and materials. The institute is a centre of excellence that trains the next generation of leaders in science and entrepreneurship. Research in the IMM ranges from condensed matter science to chemical biology, and builds on novel theoretical, synthetic and spectroscopic methods. Our goal is to explore new roads proceeding from synthesis and growth to design and architecture of molecular constructs and materials with specific, desired properties. The cooperation of chemists and physicists, and increasingly biologists, in one research institute is unique worldwide. It is the secret of IMM's success and its many scientific breakthroughs.

Specialisations within the Master's in Chemistry

The Master's programme in Chemistry offers you three specialisations:
- Chemistry for Life
- Molecular Chemistry
- Physical Chemistry

Top scientists

The funding we have received for our research reflects the achievements we have made. Prof. dr. Wilhelm Huck received an ERC Grant for his research on chemical reactions in extremely small drops of water. The ultimate goal is to build a synthetic cell for this. We need to understand how complex networks function in confined spaces and how the physical environment of the cell impacts on enzymatic reactions. Prof. dr. Roeland Nolte received an ERC to do research on the development of supramolecular catalysts and materials using nature as a guide. Prof. dr. Jan van Hest received funding from the Gravitation programme for his work on self-repairing materials, materials that continually adapt to their environment. This includes the idea of how the body repairs its cells and ensures that the right substances reach the right places at the right time. They want to gain fundamental understanding of the complexity of that dynamic.

The Nijmegen approach

The first thing you will notice as you enter our Faculty of Science is the open atmosphere. This is reflected by the light and transparent building and the open minded spirit of the people that you will meet, working, exploring and studying there. It is no wonder students from all over the world have been attracted to Nijmegen. You study in small groups, in direct and open contact with members of the staff. In addition, Nijmegen has excellent student facilities, such as high-tech laboratories, libraries and study ‘landscapes'.

Studying by the ‘Nijmegen approach' is a way of living. We will equip you with tools which are valuable for the rest of your life. You will be challenged to become aware of your intrinsic motivation. In other words, what is your passion in life? With this question in mind we will guide you to translate your passion into a personal Master's programme.

Quality label

For the third time in a row, this programme was rated number one in the category Chemistry in the Netherlands by the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

Most of our graduates take up a PhD position, either in Nijmegen or elsewhere in the world. Our research institutes have many vacancies for PhD projects every year. Our graduates also find work as researchers and managers in industry, in business and in research institutes.

Our approach to this field

"The Republic has no need of chemists and savants", were the words with which Antoine Lavoisier, one of the founders of modern chemistry, ended up on the guillotine during the French revolution. Fortunately these days the importance of chemistry for the benefit of a sustainable society is well-recognised. As such, chemistry has been designated a key area by the Dutch "innovatieplatform". So there will be many chemistry-related innovation initiatives in both industry and academia. This will be substantiated by a steering committee formed by the Association of Dutch Chemical Industries (VNCI) and the Chemical Science division of the Netherlands' Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO/CW). These developments demand a continuous influx of well-trained chemists.

An integrated Chemistry programme was set up at the University of Nijmegen in 1962. The current Master's degree programme in Chemistry derives from the integrated programme that was established in 1999.

Radboud University Nijmegen aims to provide a Master's degree programme in Chemistry at an internationally recognised level. The programme is based on the research themes that exist within the Research Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM) and to a somewhat lesser extent, the Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (RIMLS). In recent years, the IMM has focused on chemistry research in the areas of organic chemistry (synthetic, bio-organic, supramolecular and materials), nuclear magnetic resonance (solid state NMR and biophysical chemistry), and solid state chemistry. Furthermore, increasing research interaction with biology and physics groups has emerged to offer ample opportunities for new research and education. Based on this research, modern, high quality education can be provided within the Master's degree programme.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/chemistry

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As competing models for the study of art history proliferate, the MA at Leeds interrogates the formation and development of art history as an academic discipline. Read more

As competing models for the study of art history proliferate, the MA at Leeds interrogates the formation and development of art history as an academic discipline.

You’ll encounter first-hand the texts and debates that reveal art history’s complex legacies, enabling you to understand how art history has found itself increasingly figured within a wider field of cultural formations, and to trace how contemporary problems (intellectual, political and institutional) bear on the ways art history is currently practised.

We provide a rigorous framework for you to engage with the most diverse range of artistic practices as they intersect with issues of subjectivity, history, global politics, materiality and memory. We combine a series of optional modules (on topics from medieval art to contemporary capitalism to ‘non-Western’ practices), core modules on methodology and advanced research skills, and self-directed research leading to a dissertation on a topic of your own choice.

Specialist facilities

In 2016 the School moves to a new location on campus, offering a fully redesigned and refurbished learning environment in a beautiful listed building complete with professionally laid out studios and versatile exhibition spaces.

The University also incorporates museums and galleries such as the Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery and the History of Science, Technology and Medicine Museum, as well as other performance and exhibition spaces.

The world class Brotherton Library holds a wide variety of archive and early printed material in its Special Collections which are available for use in your independent research. Our other library resources are also excellent, and the University Library offers a comprehensive training programme to help you make the most of them.

Course content

Across both semesters, you’ll take core modules. These will enable you to develop practical skills for advanced-level research, and to engage critically with key debates in art history from the foundations of the discipline up to contemporary approaches.

Alongside this, you’ll work in depth on specialist topics, with choices from an array of optional modules covering a considerable chronological and geographic range with diverse critical and methodological approaches.

The development of your research skills and specialist knowledge will ultimately be focused in the writing of your dissertation – an independent and self-devised research project, which you will undertake with the guidance of your supervisor.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MA History of Art Core Course 30 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 1 5 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 2 5 credits
  • Art History Dissertation 50 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Reading Sexual Difference 30 credits
  • Beyond the Trench: Collaborative Projects on the History, Remembrance and Critical Heritage of the First World War 30 credits
  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • The Margins of Medieval Art 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Feminism and Culture: Theoretical Perspectives 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • Aesthetics and Politics 30 credits
  • From Chagall to Kitaj and Beyond 30 credits
  • Critical and Curatorial Challenges in Contemporary Art: The Documenta Exhibitions at Kassel 1992-2012 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • The Origins of Postcolonial England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Technology, Media and Critical Culture 30 credits
  • Unmaking Things: Materials and Ideas in the European Renaissance 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits
  • Assessing the French Revolution 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Art MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Art MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching methods including lectures, online learning, seminars and tutorials. However, independent study is crucial to the programme – it allows you to prepare for classes and assessments, build on your skills and form your own ideas and research questions.

Assessment

Most of our taught modules are assessed through essays, which you’ll submit at the end of the semester in which you take each module. However, you’ll also experience in-course assessments on your core modules, as well as being assessed on presentations and reports.

Career opportunities

This programme will develop your visual, critical and cultural awareness and expand your subject knowledge in history of art. In addition, it will equip you with sophisticated research, analytical, critical and communication skills that will put you in a good position to succeed in a variety of careers.

Our graduates have pursued careers as curators and education staff in museums and galleries and worked for national heritage organisations, as well as in journalism, publishing, arts marketing, public relations, university administration and teaching. Others have transferred the skills they gained into fields like the insurance industry, independent style editing and freelance writing on fashion, arts and culture.

Many of our graduates have also continued with their research at PhD level and secured external funding to support them – including AHRC scholarships. A large proportion of our former research students are now developing academic careers in the UK, Europe, Asia, USA and Canada.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Modern History at Glasgow brings together social and political historians, active in research on topics from the French Revolution to the War on Terror in Afghanistan. Read more
Modern History at Glasgow brings together social and political historians, active in research on topics from the French Revolution to the War on Terror in Afghanistan. The Masters in Modern History provides you with thorough research training and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

◾Members of the Centre for Gender History, the Centre for War Studies and the Centre for Scottish Cultural Studies are all leaders in their fields.
◾You will enjoy access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
◾Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, giving you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
◾You will also have unparalleled access to Scotland's world-leading collections including the National Library of Scotland, the National Collections and the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
◾Internships are available with the Hunterian Museum. There are also opportunities to work closely with other key institutions such as Glasgow Museums and Glasgow Women's Library.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Modern History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
◾Research resources and skills for historians.

Optional courses

Course options may include
◾Secret intelligence in the 20th century
◾American material culture
◾Introduction to social theory for researchers
◾American counterculture
◾History of medicine, 1850-2000
◾The American way of war
◾Topics in historical computing
◾Issues, ideologies and institutions of modern Scotland
◾Gender, politics and power
◾Christianity and sexual revolution.

The courses taught each year vary depending upon staff availability.

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as
◾The art of war
◾Democracy and governance: classical political thought
◾Political philosophy
◾2D digitisation
◾Archives and records theory
◾Employers, elites and the state: capitalism in Britain.

Courses in Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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This one-year programme will allow artists who have already achieved high production values in their studio work to combine this with contemporary critical theory. Read more

This one-year programme will allow artists who have already achieved high production values in their studio work to combine this with contemporary critical theory.

You’ll develop your artistic practice in well-equipped studios and work towards an exhibition of your own. At the same time, you’ll explore contemporary art, theory and criticism to inform and contextualise your work – and you’ll specialise in one area of criticism or theory when you choose from a wide range of optional modules.

In a region full of cultural resources, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Henry Moore Institute, you’ll learn from expert researchers and practitioners as well as a host of visiting artists and speakers.

You could explore aesthetics, feminist studies, deconstruction and museum practice – and you could even undertake a work placement in a museum, gallery or other cultural institution.

Specialist facilities

In 2016 the School moves to a new location on campus, offering a modern and well-equipped learning environment in a beautiful listed building. You’ll be able to develop your artistic practice in professionally laid out studio spaces and versatile exhibition spaces.

We have a printmaking workshop on campus with facilities for etching, relief and screen printing, as well as a wet darkroom. Our computer suite has dedicated workstations for offline video editing and other applications. A 3D workshop and fabrication area are also housed within the School, with a dedicated space for casting.

The University incorporates museums and galleries such as the Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery and the History of Science, Technology and Medicine Museum, as well as other performance and exhibition spaces.

Course content

The course gives you the chance to take full responsibility for your own programme of work. At its core is your studio practice, where you’ll develop your portfolio of work and build towards your own exhibition at the end of Semester 2.

You’ll work with a range of materials and have the freedom to develop your creativity through the media that suit you best. The study of different cultural and critical theories will be integrated into your work, as you attend studio seminars focusing on the links between theory, practice and criticism.

At the same time, you’ll develop your understanding of research methods through separate compulsory modules. As you improve your own research skills, you’ll prepare to submit your dissertation – an independent project on a topic related to your practice – by the end of the academic year.

You’ll also have the chance to expand your studies when you choose from a wide range of optional modules. You could cover topics such as contemporary art, technology and the media, feminism and culture, remembering the First World War or anthropological approaches to art among many others.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MA Exhibition 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 1 5 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 2 5 credits
  • MA Fine Art Dissertation 30 credits
  • Studio Practice 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Reading Sexual Difference 30 credits
  • Beyond the Trench: Collaborative Projects on the History, Remembrance and Critical Heritage of the First World War 30 credits
  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • The Margins of Medieval Art 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Feminism and Culture: Theoretical Perspectives 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • Aesthetics and Politics 30 credits
  • From Chagall to Kitaj and Beyond 30 credits
  • Critical and Curatorial Challenges in Contemporary Art: The Documenta Exhibitions at Kassel 1992-2012 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • The Origins of Postcolonial England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Technology, Media and Critical Culture 30 credits
  • Unmaking Things: Materials and Ideas in the European Renaissance 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • Assessing the French Revolution 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Fine Art MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Fine Art MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods. These will vary, but generally include visits to museums and galleries, lectures, seminars, tutorials and online learning.

You’ll also benefit from our extensive programme of visiting artists and speakers. Independent study is vital to this programme – not only is this where you’ll work on your practice and develop your creativity, but it is also an opportunity to build your skills in research, analysis and interpretation.

Assessment

The assessment methods you come across may vary depending on the modules you choose. However, they’re likely to include your exhibition and supporting written work, your portfolio of studio work, in-course assessment, essays and presentations.

Career opportunities

This programme will allow you to develop your practice as an artist and write thoughtfully about the practice and context of artistic work.

It will also give you the chance to gain skills in organising and curating events and exhibitions, researching, interpreting and analysing artistic work and cultural, visual and critical awareness.

All of these traits are valuable in a wide range of careers. Fine Art graduates have gone on to work in curatorial and educational roles around the world, both on a freelance basis and for major art institutions. Others have decided to develop their research interests through PhD study and academia, or pursued careers in teaching.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



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