• University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Northampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
University of Warwick Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
"free" AND "scholarship"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Free Scholarship)

We have 93 Masters Degrees (Free Scholarship)

  • "free" AND "scholarship" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 93
Order by 
This course leads to the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) for the 11-to-16 age range, which qualifies you to be a teacher in secondary schools in England and Wales. Read more

This course leads to the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) for the 11-to-16 age range, which qualifies you to be a teacher in secondary schools in England and Wales. Where possible, we also give you the chance to gain experience in the 11-to-18 age range.

The way computing is taught in schools has changed. Children in schools now learn about programming and information technology from the age of five.

The new computing curriculum is a blend of traditional ICT and computer science.

As part of the new curriculum, you will get to use your knowledge and creativity to help young people develop the skills they need to succeed in the everyday world and to excel in thriving UK creative industries such as games design and visual effects.

You will learn to show pupils not only how to interact with software and hardware, but teach them the skills to shape the innovations of tomorrow. And you will teach students how to use technologies and digital media responsibly and creatively.

You could be eligible for the highest range of tax-free training bursaries. If you have a 2:1 or above, you could be eligible for a tax-free scholarship of £25,000 from BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT.



Read less
Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live. Read more

About the course

Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live.

In short, Medical Anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and practices associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups.

Literally hundreds of students – doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and other medical professionals among them – can testify to the quality of our programme, having used it either to enhance their professional practice, to change career or to develop their research interests for future studies.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

The degree aims to equip students with a broad, general understanding of anthropology and how it might be applied to medical and health-related problems.

You will develop a deeper understanding of how people’s ideas about the world, as well as the structural constraints within which they find themselves, have an impact on their understanding and experience of health, sickness and disease.

You’ll achieve this through close study of key texts in medical anthropology, the original fieldwork experiences of your lecturers, and through designing and undertaking your own research project.

If you’ve wondered about some or all of the questions below – all of which are addressed in the degree – this could be the course for you:

How does poverty contribute to the profiles of diseases such as diabetes and tuberculosis?
Why are some diseases, such as leprosy or AIDS/HIV, feared and stigmatized?
Why do some biomedical interventions seeking to control infectious and non-infectious diseases work, and others fail?
What might stop some patients seeking conventional treatments for cancers and other conditions – even when they are offered for free – despite the apparent efficacy of the medicines available?
How does one make the distinction between the healthy and the pathological? Is being ‘disabled’, for example, always a negative state, or might some consider it just another, equally valid, way of being?
What are the effects of political, economic and other social conditions on people’s experiences of what, from a biomedical perspective, might be considered the same diseases?
How and why is it appropriate to combine insights emerging from clinical and epidemiological research with ethnographic understandings of health, illness and disease?

The Brunel Medical Anthropology MSc addresses these issues and more in a lively and challenging way, through a programme of lectures, class discussions, and your own – personally directed – final dissertation research project.

Course Content

The main objectives of the course are to provide a rigorous grounding in key topics and perspectives in medical anthropology, and to equip candidates with a range of research skills to enable them to complete research successfully.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Optional modules:

The Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War
Ethnicity, Culture and Identity

Part-time

Year 1

Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health

Year 2

Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise) and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Special Features

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to up to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Special scholarships

Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund
Set up to honour the life and work of leading light in international medical anthropology Professor Cecil Helman (1944-2009), the Doctor Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund provides fieldwork support for between two and four students on our MSc Medical Anthropology course.

Dr Helman taught at Brunel University London from 1990, and became a Professor of Social Sciences in 2005. In 2004, he was awarded the American Anthropological Association’s career achievement award, and the following year he won the Royal Anthropological Institute's Lucy Mair medal.

As well as leading the way in Medical Anthropology, Dr Helman exercised his artistic talents through his paintings, poems, fables, and short fiction – all of which revolved around a theme of the human side of medicine and the narratives that surrounded the doctor-patient relationship.

Scholarship
The Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund offers between two and four students up to £1,000 to help them to complete field research for their dissertations.

Selection
The scholarship will be awarded to MSc Medical Anthropology students who demonstrate excellent academic performance and the ability to undertake an original field research project.

Read less
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

Read less
The Master of Fine Art in Fine Art (MFA) provides postgraduate studio-based arts practice, critical theory in fine arts and access to the professional skills and knowledge to succeed in a career in the fine arts. Read more

The Master of Fine Art in Fine Art (MFA) provides postgraduate studio-based arts practice, critical theory in fine arts and access to the professional skills and knowledge to succeed in a career in the fine arts. The programme will appeal to independent artists wanting to extend their practice within a critical research framework supported by practicing tutors. Artists looking to extend their career path into curatorial practice in the contemporary arts, collaborative projects with arts organisations, arts in socially engaged practices and/or further research will find support for this trajectory in this broad-based programme. Teaching involves lectures, seminars, and group and individual tutorials from active artists with research profiles. The programme will equip you with creative, interpretive, critical and analytical skills to develop an advanced understanding of contemporary art and its social, cultural and historical contexts.

The image above shows a close up of the work Nova by Saad Querishi, a former student of Fine Art at Oxford Brookes. Saad has been commissioned to produce a piece of work for the new areas of the campus and will be acting as a resource for the students on the programme.

Why choose this course?

Your artistic practice – An independent studio environment enables you to further your work within a supported critical framework. Through group and individual tutorials, staff/peer critique and presentations, an incremental approach is applied whereby you will confidently develop your work towards public exhibition/dissemination. There are two formal exhibitions during the MFA programme.

Flexible studio options – Students may select to locate their studio either at Oxford Brookes or elsewhere. Students working from their own studios will be eligible for a reduced tuition fee. 

Technical resources – The School of Arts’ workshops offer supported working environments in a range of specialist areas including: sculpture, photography, video, sound, printmaking and book-works. All our workshops are staffed by highly skilled and creative Technical Specialists.

Extra-curricular activities – You will gain exposure to a range of contemporary artistic practice through the thriving creative student community in the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes. You will participate in the lectures and film screenings set up by the Fine Art Research (FAR) Group. These include visiting contemporary artists, critics, curators and notable alumni. Free life drawing classes extend your drawing skills and optional local, regional and international field trips provide further stimulus.

Theoretical framework – Your ability to articulate your own creative position is enabled through a critical engagement with a range of scholarship informed by diverse practices by nationally and internationally recognised artists, collectives and movements. An early theoretical module explores contemporary art discourse through seminars informed by selected readings and in a later module you develop a more intense involvement with theory related to your individual research interests.

Professional development – The programme enables you to identify a professional focus which is likely to inform your subsequent career trajectory. This might involve research preparation, a placement, a collaborative project or exhibition management/curatorial practice. With the guided experience in this module our graduates are better prepared for a successful career as a professional artist.

Careers and professional development

How this course helps you develop

In addition to the support, teaching and development opportunities afforded by the curriculum, as a student you will be immersed in the active arts environment of the School. During your studies with us you will have access to the visiting speakers arranged for this and for other arts programmes, for the seminars and conferences in diverse fields, including publishing, film, music and digital production in the School. The field trips, visiting artists, PhD students and opportunities in the programme’s Professional Experience module offer a rich network of individuals and organisations that enable you to make useful contacts for your future career. 

Careers

Graduates from this programme will be well equipped to pursue their practice as independent artists who have a well-developed understanding of the theoretical and professional contexts of the current and contemporary landscape of the arts and creative industries. 

This programme is delivered within the School of Arts, which offers a vibrant environment for the creative industries including film, photography, music and publishing. Through the modules, which address practice, theory and professional experience, students are provided with links to engage with employment and further study opportunities, either as independent practitioners, facilitators or participants within a range of group and collaborative practices and contexts. 

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:

  • studying at a Brookes partner college
  • studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.


Read less
This market-leading Master's course in Environmental Management addresses the management principles necessary for the successful implementation of sound environmental management practice and legal processes involved in environmental control at a range of scales. Read more
This market-leading Master's course in Environmental Management addresses the management principles necessary for the successful implementation of sound environmental management practice and legal processes involved in environmental control at a range of scales.

The course develops understanding of environmental processes and applies this to both the legal framework and management decision-making activities. The course seeks to raise your ability to understand and analyse environmental problems at Master's level, in order to develop solutions.

You will be presented with the tools needed for environmental management, including project management, life cycle analysis, accounting and reporting, environmental reviews and audits. The course includes the processes and legislative approaches related to the reduction of emissions to air, land and water, and the effects of pollution together with the legislative framework in which they are set.

Accreditation

The MSc in Environmental Science: Legislation and Management is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM). This entitles students to free student membership of the IES and CIWEM.

Scholarships

For our September intake we have 2 specific scholarship schemes available: the Queen's Anniversary Prize Scholarships provide 6 x £3000 fee waiver scholarships to our best applicants (no additional application is required for these); and the £4000 Water Conservators Bursary is awarded to one student who writes the essay on water and the environment (some years we split the scholarship between 2 exceptional applicants). Brunel Univeristy London also has some scholarship schemes available for applicants to any MSc programme.

Designed to suit your needs

This MSc course can be taken in part-time (from 1 day a week for 2 years) or full-time (from 2 days a week for 1 years) mode. Students can start in September or January.

Employability

Our alumni have gone on to work in key public and private sector organisations as well as more entrepreneurial pursuits. Employability is a major focus within the university with support for transferable skills, CV and application writing, interview skills and opportunities for internships and work placements.

Course modules

Compulsory modular blocks

- Environmental Law (15 credits)
- Environmental Hazards and Risk (15 credits)
- Environmental Management (15 credits)
- Sustainable Development in Practice (15 credits)
- Biosphere (15 credits)
- Research and Critical Skills in Environmental Science (15 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modular blocks
Students normally choose 1 module from Group A and 1 module from Group B. (If desired, students are also able to choose “no modules from Group A and 2 modules from Group B” or “2 modules from Group A and no modules from Group B” but must understand that this unbalances the 2 terms: 45:75 or 75:45 credits as opposed to 60:60.)

Group A (pick 1)
- Environment, Health and Societies
- Climate Change: Science and Impacts
- Chemical Regulation and Legislation in the EU
- Environmental Modelling

Group B (pick 1)
- Current Practice in Chemical Risk Assessment
- Clean Technology
- Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation
- GIS and Data Analysis

Dissertation (60 credits)

Read less
The MSc in Children's Nursing is a qualifying programme for graduates with a suitable and relevant first degree. Children's nursing is a challenging but highly rewarding career choice, and the programmes offered at Oxford Brookes are very popular. Read more
The MSc in Children's Nursing is a qualifying programme for graduates with a suitable and relevant first degree. Children's nursing is a challenging but highly rewarding career choice, and the programmes offered at Oxford Brookes are very popular.

You will focus on developing a knowledge base in children’s nursing, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

Graduates from this course contribute significantly to high-quality client care, the continued development of patient-centred care/therapy, and theory-practice integration.

If you are interested in this course you can find out more at an undergraduate open day.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/childrens-nursing-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Facilities in Oxford and Swindon both include state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills simulation suites.

- Oxford Children's Hospital provides an exceptional clinical environment. There is a wide range of other children's care settings in Oxford.

- Our courses are open to a wide range of health and social care professionals providing highly flexible continuing professional development (CPD) study opportunities with part-time, full-time and mixed-mode options.

- We support multi and interprofessional learning and teaching, and many of our courses are either fully multiprofessional or offer excellent opportunities for shared learning.

- Our lecturers maintain excellent practice links with specialist practice areas locally and regionally.

- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent.

This course in detail

You will focus on developing a knowledge base in children’s nursing, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

During Year 1 you will undertake modules at Level 6 (honours level), and in the subsequent two years your modules will be at Level 7 (masters degree level). You may be able to complete the degree in less that three years if you offer evidence of relevant prior learning (AP(E)L). This may have been achieved through relevant degree level study and/or experience. If you wish to study part-time, you can complete the degree over a maximum duration of five years.

You will develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of children’s nursing. This will be informed by scholarship and research as well as critical awareness of current issues/development in the field. You will acquire specific skills, knowledge and competence in relation to children’s nursing. Your learning will be enquiry focused, helping you to develop as a reflective, innovative, confident and self-aware practitioner.

You will complete a master’s-level research project involving primary data collection; a critical review of the literature; or other scholarly output.

Teaching and learning

Oxford Brookes teaches a very wide range of pre-qualification and foundation courses including health and social care, nursing, midwifery, occupational therapy, osteopathy, operating department practice, paramedic emergency care, and social work. You will share your learning with these other health care students. This is a key component of the course as it is essential to developing your teamwork skills and your understanding of the other roles you will encounter in practice.

We offer a very friendly and supportive environment in which to learn; we consistently receive very high satisfaction ratings for our student support and learning resources in student surveys. We have excellent teaching facilities, dedicated clinical skills suites and simulation resources, which include a very well equipped movement laboratory, a family of computerised simulation manikins (including a simman©, simbaby© and birthing mother©), and an extensive range of anatomy models.

We have excellent library resources, accessible both online and through a range of locally based facilities on university and NHS sites.

An extensive range of learning resources can be accessed through the Brookes virtual learning environment - Moodle - including lectures, handouts, information and learning exercises.

How this course helps you develop

Throughout the course, you will benefit from an inter-professional approach to learning. This includes participation in action learning sets and in modules where learning is shared with other health and social care students. This type of learning will help to prepare you for work in the current health care environment.

Upon successful completion of the MSc in Children’s Nursing, you will be able to:
- Deliver complex care to service users in your field of practice demonstrating an ability to conceptualise the potential impact of associated factors.

- Act to safeguard the public and be responsible and accountable for safe, person-centred, evidence-based nursing practice, demonstrating a clear understanding of your personal responsibility in professional practice.

- Act with professionalism and integrity and work within agreed professional, ethical and legal frameworks and processes to maintain and improve standards, managing the implications of ethical dilemmas, working proactively with others to formulate solutions.

- Practise in a compassionate, respectful way, maintaining dignity and wellbeing and communicating effectively and act autonomously in planning, implementing and evaluating person centred care.

- Act on your understanding of how people’s lifestyles, environments and the location of care delivery influence their health and wellbeing, being able to adapt existing and new information to solve problems in a creative and innovative way.

- Seek out every opportunity to promote health and prevent illness.

- Work in partnership with other health and social care professionals and agencies, service users, carers and families ensuring that decisions about care are shared.

- Use leadership skills to supervise and manage others and contribute to planning, designing, delivering and improving future services, demonstrating an ability to negotiate and handle conflict with confidence.

- Demonstrate an ability to critically evaluate evidence and an ability to utilise a range of techniques and research methods applicable to professional activity.

Careers

Graduates from this course contribute significantly to high-quality client care, the continued development of patient-centred care/therapy, and theory-practice integration.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our research staff collaborate with researchers from across Oxford Brookes University and from the Institute of Health Sciences at Oxford University, along with research teams from many other UK and international centres.

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent. The university has been careful to nurture emerging research strengths, and the international standing achieved by subjects allied to health demonstrates significant progress since 2008.

Research areas and clusters

Areas of research include cancer care, children and families, drugs and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, and interprofessional education and collaborative practice.

Read less
Do you want to work with children from birth to five years old (including Reception) in the public and private sectors? Achieve Early Years Teacher Status (EYTS) in just one year with this Masters-level course. Read more
Do you want to work with children from birth to five years old (including Reception) in the public and private sectors? Achieve Early Years Teacher Status (EYTS) in just one year with this Masters-level course.

Early Years learning primarily focuses on the following ideas:
-What constitutes ‘quality’ in Early Years education?
-Equity, inclusion and justice for the pre-school child and the wider family
-Ideas of communication, imagination, language and literacy, and provision for the bi/trilingual child
-Understandings of early mathematical and scientific development
-Discourses of nurture, care and attachment

How will I study?

Choose from two routes through this course:
-If you follow the Employment route, you’ll work part or full time in an Early Years setting during your period of study. Your employer receives remuneration to support your studies.
-If you follow the Graduate route, you’ll be placed full time in an Early Years setting and you may be eligible for a bursary.

Over your study period, you spend up to 120 days working in an Early Years setting (this will vary depending on whether you are taking the Employment route or the Graduate route to achieve EYTS).

You’ll have experience of an alternative Early Years setting and a Key Stage 1 placement within the year. On average, you spend one day per week at the University where taught components of the course are delivered.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

PGCE First-Generation Scholars Award (2017)
-£600 maintenance award to PGCE students with a household income below £42,875

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

This MA with Early Years Teachers Status (EYTS) offers the opportunity to combine Masters-level study with practical experience of teaching and researching in the Early Years Foundation Stage. You deepen your knowledge and understanding of educational theory and practice, and develop your skills in:
-Research and analysis
-Presentation and communication
-Critical reflection

With these skills you’ll have a wide range of educational careers open to you – nationally and internationally.

If you’re a professional in employment, this course gives you excellent opportunities for career development and progression into Early Years leadership in a range of private and state-maintained settings.

If you’re a new graduate, it provides a springboard into Early Years teaching in both the public and private sector.

As a qualified Early Years Teacher with EYTS, you can teach within private nursery and day-care settings. Free Schools and Academies can employ you to teach Reception children as a full class teacher, while in state-maintained nurseries or Reception classes, you will be qualified to teach with the support of a member of staff with Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

The terrain of Early Years educational provision is fast changing. This Masters course has been designed to equip you with all the necessary skills and dispositions to lead in this sector.

Read less
Engineering Doctorates in Advanced Manufacturing for Engineers and Scientists. University of Strathclyde – Advanced Forming Research Centre (AFRC) Department for Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management (DMEM). Read more
Engineering Doctorates in Advanced Manufacturing for Engineers and Scientists

University of Strathclyde – Advanced Forming Research Centre (AFRC) Department for Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management (DMEM)

(4 year programme) fully funded scholarships available for an Engineering Doctorate in Advanced Manufacturing (EngD)

September 2014

This Engineering Doctorate is offered by the Advanced Manufacturing Industrial Doctorate Centre (AMIDC) (http://www.strath.ac.uk/afrc/amidc). The Centre, which focuses on developing new and enhanced manufacturing techniques within the forming sector is a joint collaboration between Strathclyde’s Advanced Forming Research Centre (AFRC) and the Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management (DMEM). The AMIDC is the only established forging and forming research centre in the UK.

Students will undertake focused research to understand and develop solutions to the technical issues associated with manufacturing in an industrial context. The outputs from these projects will contribute valuable research to support the Manufacturing Industry, and working within sponsored companies will enable EngD candidates to help resolve issues and push the boundaries of current manufacturing techniques.

We are currently looking for outstanding graduates to join our September 2014 cohort who have achieved or are expected to achieve a first or second class Honours degree in Engineering, Science or Technology subject, or a Masters in Engineering.

Funding Opportunities

UK applicants are eligible to apply for the full scholarship (covering fees and stipend) The annual tax-free stipend starting at 15k.

EU applicants who have been resident in the UK for 3 years or more are also eligible for the full (stipend and fees) scholarship. EU applicants who have not been resident in the UK for 3 years or more are eligible for fees only support but can apply for partial University funding.

Overseas applicants are not eligible for EPSRC funding support as part of this programme, but can apply for partial University funding or on a self funded basis.

For more information on Strathclyde University tuition fees please visit:
http://www.strath.ac.uk/tuitionfees/

Other criteria for Eligibility for more information on eligibility please visit the
EPSRC studentship pages.

Please visit our website: http://www.strath.ac.uk/afrc/amidc/, or contact our Programme Coordinator: for more information.

Read less
Do you want a career that enables you to help pupils master skills that are vital to their success, not just during their education, but for life? If so training to teach maths on our PGCE in Secondary Mathematics is course for you. Read more

Do you want a career that enables you to help pupils master skills that are vital to their success, not just during their education, but for life? If so training to teach maths on our PGCE in Secondary Mathematics is course for you.

What's covered in the course?

You’ll learn techniques to inspire students around maths, making it enjoyable and ensuring they’re equipped with skills they’ll need for in the future. You’ll teach across a range of ages and abilities on daily basis so we’ll train you to be handle changing effortlessly between number patterns and sequences to calculus depending on who you’re teaching.

After interview you may be advised you need to take a funded Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) course, which we offer in mathematics on 24- and 16-week routes before you start your PGCE (shorter courses of between two and 12 weeks may be available according how much enhancement of your knowledge is needed).

Our aim is to help you become a committed, confident and creative teacher so we’ll train you in the essential tools you need to kick-start your career in education. As you progress, you’ll increase your ability to handle the ever-evolving teaching environment, and by the time your course is complete, you’ll be in a position to continue developing your understanding, knowledge and skills throughout your professional life.

Assignments and school-centred activities are structured around the development of your School Experience Progress Journal (SEPJ) which demonstrates your progress against the nationally agreed competences (the Teachers’ Standards), which all teachers must meet throughout their career. A system of continuous review and assessment of progress in the SEPJ will support your growing ability to take responsibility for your own development. 

Why choose us?

  • At least 120 days across a minimum of two placements, in line with the National College for Teaching and Learning (NCTL) requirements, supported by a subject mentor in your school and a personal development tutor at the University
  • If you have a minimum of a 2:2 in your undergraduate degree, a Master's or a PhD, in a subject area relevant for teaching mathematics, you may be eligible for a bursary from the National College for Teaching and Learning (NCTL)For 2017 entry this bursary is £25,000. A higher level scholarship of £27,500 may be available from the Institute of Mathematics and its Application (IMA) subject to application and deadlines.
  • We’re proud of our high employability rates, with 100 per cent of students in employment or further study six months after completing this course (latest DLHE survey 2015/16)
  • 100 per cent of our 2016 graduates said we prepared them ‘very well’ for employment (latest DLHE survey 2015/16)
  • If you accept an offer from us you’ll be able to take part in our free Skills Test ‘bootcamps’ to make sure you’re ready to start your PGCE in September.
  • You'll gain Master's level credits gained as part of this course that you can then use towards a full Master's degree, such as our Master’s in Teaching and Learning or Educational Leadership.

Entry requirements

You must have a good degree (minimum 2:2) from a UK higher education institution or equivalent, at least 50 per cent of which is in mathematics or a mathematics-related subject area. You must have a GCSE grade C or above (or equivalent) in both English language and mathematics prior to application and if you are offered an interview you will take a written test to assess your standard of English.

You will also be required to pass the Skills Tests in Literacy and Numeracy.

There is an expectation that you will have had some general experience of working with secondary age students in a school setting. In preparation for the selection interview you are required to engage in a teaching episode, observed by an experienced qualified teacher.

As part of the selection procedure, the interview panel will expect you to demonstrate your knowledge of mathematics and will assess personal qualities such as the potential to relate well to secondary age students, enthusiasm, sensitivity, communication skills and robustness and resilience for teaching.

Applicants must also meet The National College for Teaching and Leadership requirements for initial teacher training, which means being medically fit and completing successfully an enhanced disclosure via the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS).

Assessment

Modules are assessed through a range of directed tasks and targeted assignments. Trainee teachers are also required to complete a profile of evidence towards the achievement of the standards required by the National College for Teaching and Leadership for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Evidence for the Standards is verified by mentors.

How do I apply?

All applications need to be made via the UCAS Teacher Training website.

Course code: G1X1



Read less
About the course. Join our Broadcast MA and you'll learn journalism by doing journalism. Our outstanding teaching staff will show you how to hunt down stories on your own. Read more

About the course

Join our Broadcast MA and you'll learn journalism by doing journalism. Our outstanding teaching staff will show you how to hunt down stories on your own. They'll develop your interview technique, so you can ask the high-impact questions that matter. Our experts in media law, regulation and public administration will make sure your journalism is responsible and ethical as well as hard-hitting.

We've invested heavily in audio and video facilities, creating a purpose-built Broadcast Zone right here in the department. Our knowledge of the media industry means you'll be immersed in TV and radio techniques right from day one.

We'll nurture your skills using our TV news studio and gallery, radio studios and production booths, and high-tech editing suite – all laden with the same industry-standard equipment and software used by the professionals. You'll learn how to record and film material and edit it using a desktop software package, and how to tell stories online. We'll show you mobile journalism techniques, so you can create and publish digital content wherever you are.

Then, on production newsdays, you'll work against the clock as part of a team that goes out into the city to find the news, shoot footage and create bulletins to meet tough deadlines back at the Broadcast Zone. It's demanding work – but that's how our students finish the degree newsroom-ready, as complete broadcast journalists.

Your career

MA Broadcast Journalism is for students who are determined, articulate, fascinated by news and current affairs, and at ease in front of a camera and mic.

This degree is accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC). Sheffield's reputation combined with the prestige of BJTC accreditation means your degree will have extra clout in the jobs market.

A masters from Sheffield is the mark of someone who thinks differently. Graduates from our applied courses are creative, disciplined journalists.

They’re working in radio and television, newspapers and magazines, print and online, across the UK and internationally.

The BBC, Guardian, Daily Mail, Channel 4, Sky and Wall Street Journal all employ Sheffield journalists.

About us

Our teaching staff are professionals who have worked at the highest level in newspaper, magazine, radio, television and online journalism. This is a great place to learn practical skills. Three quarters of our research is rated world-leading or internationally excellent. The discussion of ideas about journalism, its past, present and future, is part of all our courses.

We have strong links with the industry. We send our masters students on a three-day field trip to London, visiting national news organisations for briefings on current developments with senior editors and meeting politicians and political journalists.

Guests from the media industries, regulators, campaigning groups and research institutes give lectures in the department. Broadcast editors run radio and television newsdays, and print and online production editors bring their expertise to newspaper, web and magazine exercises.

Work experience

On this course you'll undertake a substantial work experience placement. This is a chance to give a real test to the skills and knowledge you'll be developing back here in the department. The Department of Journalism Studies has a dedicated work placement co-ordinator whose job it is to match you up with a good employer suited to your areas of interest. Check out #jusplacement to see what our students are saying about their current work experience posts.

Professional accreditation

All our applied postgraduate courses are accredited by the main professional bodies representing the media industries: the National Council for the Training of Journalists, the Broadcast Journalism Training Council and the Professional Publishers Association.

Real-world learning environment

The University has invested £3 million in a superb new home for the department in 2014, with four large newsrooms designed to simulate a real working environment. The print newsroom is equipped with 30 PCs, all of which have access to the latest print production software such as Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. You’ll also have access to a Press Association newsfeed, telephones, daily newspapers and Sky TV.

The broadcast newsroom is equipped with industry-standard software for radio production. We have a state-of-the-art radio studio and digital audio recorders. Students on the applied MA courses learn how to create packages, put together live news bulletins, shoot professional news pieces on HD TV cameras, and use Apple Final Cut X to cut rushes together. They acquire the skills needed to prepare text, audio and video content for publication online. These degrees also show how to use audio recorders, video and stills cameras to gather content. In the web newsroom, students use audio, video and image editing software to create their own sites.

Studentships

Postgraduate student loans are available for UK and EU students to a current value of £10,280.

  • Dan Walker Journalism Scholarships offer £10,000 in funding and personal mentoring from the BBC presenter and Sheffield journalism alumnus. More info
  • The Sheffield Postgraduate Scholarship is also worth £10,000 and open to high-achieving students and those from groups that are underrepresented in higher education. More info
  • Sheffield scholarships for international students are designed to support talented applicants from all over the world. More info
  • British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) scholarships are available for students from the UK, China and Hong Kong, with funding, mentoring and free access to BAFTA events. More info: UK | China and Hong Kong
  • The George Viner Memorial Fund exists specifically to help broaden the ethnic diversity of journalists working in the UK and Ireland. More info

Please see the Department of Journalism Studies' taught postgraduate funding page for more general details on the above, including an overview of deadlines.

Other sources of funding may be available – please see the University's postgraduate funding pages to investigate.

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures, seminars, group workshops, individual and team assignments.

You’re assessed on essays, examinations and practical broadcast journalism – producing news stories, radio and TV news items and features, web pages and portfolios.



Read less
Religion has become a force to be reckoned with in the contemporary global geopolitical landscape and as such demands a reassessment of once predominant understandings of processes of secularisation, as well as the meanings of, and tensions inherent within, secular assumptions and secularist positions. Read more
Religion has become a force to be reckoned with in the contemporary global geopolitical landscape and as such demands a reassessment of once predominant understandings of processes of secularisation, as well as the meanings of, and tensions inherent within, secular assumptions and secularist positions. The so-called ‘resurgence’ of religion in the public sphere in recent decades is now a significant area of interdisciplinary scholarship eliciting a complex array of responses, ranging from vehement opposition to the very idea that religious concepts and commitments have a right to expression in political debates, to a reassessment of the origins and implications of divisions between the secular and the religious and their relationship to the nation state. The notion that there is no singular secularism, but rather a plurality of secularisms, and of ‘religion’ as an invention of European modernity and colonial interests are two of many emerging efforts to reconceptualise the meanings of religion and the secular and the entangled relationship between them.

About the MA

The MA Religion in Global Politics offers an opportunity to examine these questions and issues at an advanced level by studying the complex relationships between religion and politics in the histories and contemporary political contexts (both national and international) of the regions of the Asia, Africa and the Middle East. A core objective is to challenge the Eurocentrism of current debates around secularism, secularisation, the nature of the public sphere within modernity, by indicating the plurality and contested nature of conceptions of both religion and the secular when considered in a global framework.

The programme is unique: it has a regional focus and disciplinary breadth rarely addressed in similar programmes in the subject area, draws on a wealth of multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives (Law, International Relations and Politics, History, Philosophy, Development, Anthropology, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and Gender Studies, amongst others) and has a rigorous theoretical basis built in, such that students will be familiarised with the current state-of-the-art debates regarding religion in the public sphere, secularisms, postsecularism, and political theology and their relevance to issues of democracy, war, violence, human rights, humanitarianism and development, multiculturalism, nationalism, sectarianism, religious extremism, and free speech amongst others. The range of course options available on the programme is unparalleled, ensuring that students will benefit from a truly interdisciplinary, intellectually rigorous, and regionally focused programme.

Course detail

Designed as a professional development qualification as well as a platform for doctoral research, this programme will give you the opportunity to examine the complex relationships between religion and politics in the histories and contemporary political contexts (both national and international), across the globe.

You will engage in current topical debates regarding religion in the public sphere, secularisms, post-secularism, and political theology and their relevance to issues including democracy, war, human rights, humanitarianism, nationalism, sectarianism, religious extremism and free speech.

You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

The unparalleled range of course options available will allow you to benefit from an intellectually rigorous and globally focused programme which provides a disciplinary breadth rarely addressed in similar programmes. A wealth of multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives are drawn upon including Law, History, Philosophy, Development, Anthropology and Diaspora Studies.

Expert at where the world is changing

With our highly diversified expertise, our comprehensive resources and our interdisciplinary approach, we offer a unique learning and research environment for a truly inter-cultural approach to systems of belief and thought.

Programme Aims

The programme’s inter-disciplinary focus aims to provide students with advanced training in the area of religion and politics through the study of a wide range of theoretical and regional perspectives. It will serve primarily as a platform for professional development and further (MPhil/PhD) graduate research. The programme offers students:

• Advanced knowledge and understanding of significant approaches, methods, debates, and theories in the field of religion and politics, with particular reference to the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

• Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in and theorisations of religion and politics;

• Advanced skills in the presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religion and politics as they pertain to regional, international, and transnational contexts

Format

Students are required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words. Courses are assessed through a variety of methods including short and long essays, examinations, oral presentations, and response papers. An overall percentage mark is awarded for each course, based on the marks awarded for individual assessment items within the courses.

The MA may be awarded at Distinction, Merit or Pass level in accordance with the common regulations for MA/MSc at SOAS.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Course description. Read more

Course description

If you're interested in learning how the media is both victimised and weaponised, if you want to be introduced to some hands-on practical experience, if you're interested in how journalism is practised across the globe, and if you want to study with peers from around the world, then MA Global Journalism is for you!

MA Global Journalism combines theoretical and practical concerns with regard to the principles of a free press and its relationship to political and civil institutions. It examines, compares and contrasts the diverse forms of regulation and restrictions – both legitimate and illegitimate – surrounding the practice of journalism around the world.

Take the course and you'll engage in debates about the key issues facing news journalism in a comparative global context. You'll also get hands-on practical experience in writing for various media platforms and communicating news in the contemporary global environment.

This far-reaching journalism degree combines research on media practice and freedom around the world with some practical newswriting experience and events.

Students have recently visited BBC studios and conferences, and collaborated with the European Parliament. Join up and you’ll look at journalism within the context of globalisation, comparing and contrasting media practice around the world, immersed in vital discussions around the relationship between media, society and government – at a hugely critical moment for freedom of expression.

About us

Our teaching staff are professionals who have worked at the highest level in newspaper, magazine, radio, television and online journalism. This is a great place to learn practical skills. Three quarters of our research is rated world-leading or internationally excellent. The discussion of ideas about journalism, its past, present and future, is part of all our courses.

Guests from the media industries, regulators, campaigning groups and research institutes give lectures in the department. Broadcast editors run radio and television newsdays, and print and online production editors bring their expertise to newspaper, web and magazine exercises.

Professional accreditation

All our applied postgraduate courses are accredited by the main professional bodies representing the media industries: the National Council for the Training of Journalists, the Broadcast Journalism Training Council and the Professional Publishers Association. Our International Public and

Political Communication and Global Journalism programmes are not accredited and have limited practical content.

Real-world learning environment

The University has invested £3 million in a superb new home for the department in 2014, with four large newsrooms designed to simulate a real working environment. The print newsroom is equipped with 30 PCs, all of which have access to the latest print production software such as Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. You’ll also have access to a Press Association newsfeed, telephones, daily newspapers and Sky TV.

The broadcast newsroom is equipped with industry-standard software for radio production. We have a state-of-the-art radio studio and digital audio recorders. Students on the applied MA courses learn how to create packages, put together live news bulletins, shoot professional news pieces on HD TV cameras, and use Apple Final Cut X to cut rushes together. They acquire the skills needed to prepare text, audio and video content for publication online. These degrees also show how to use audio recorders, video and stills cameras to gather content. In the web newsroom, students use audio, video and image editing software to create their own sites.

Studentships

Postgraduate student loans are available for UK and EU students to a current value of £10,280.

Several scholarship funding awards are also available to MA Global Journalism students. These include the following.

  • The Sheffield Postgraduate Scholarship (for UK and EU students) is worth £10,000 and open to high-achieving students and those from groups that are underrepresented in higher education. More info
  • Sheffield scholarships for international students are designed to support talented applicants from all over the world. More info

Please see the Department of Journalism Studies' taught postgraduate funding page for more general details on the above, including an overview of deadlines.

Other sources of funding may be available – please see the University's postgraduate funding pages to investigate.

Teaching and assessment

We teach through lectures, seminars, workshops and research exercises. You’re assessed by essays, examinations and a dissertation.



Read less
The MSc in Facility and Environment Management is Europe's longest-established programme for facility managers, providing a first-class education and training for the fast-moving field of the built environment. Read more
The MSc in Facility and Environment Management is Europe's longest-established programme for facility managers, providing a first-class education and training for the fast-moving field of the built environment. Directors of facilities management at most of the recent landmarks on London are likely to have graduated from this programme.

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016

As the programme is designed to enhance the knowledge base of practitioners in facility management, it is useful for candidates to have some knowledge, demonstrable competence, and a skill set related to facility management practice, in addition to the above requirements.

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Standard
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

Our philosophy is to base our teaching on real-world issues in facilities management (FM) at high-performing organisations in both the private and public sectors. Our students develop the ability to think critically about all facets of the FM services - maintenance, engineering, projects, catering, cleaning, security and property management, by considering engineering and management theories and concepts and their applications to FM situations in these service lines. This allows our students to use their experience to explore these applications in their current or future careers.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and an original dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

- Core Modules
Introduction to Facility Management
Management Concepts for Facilities
Environment Management and Sustainability
Service Operations Management
Space and Workplace Management
Facility Management Law

- Options
Asset Management and Capital Projects
Facility Management Finance and Governance
Building Information Modelling and Management for Sustainability
Or any other MSc module from the extensive list within the faculty.

- Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word report on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and Learning

The programme is delivered through interactive, small-group discussions, seminars, visits and self-directed work, all supported by UCL's Moodle-based e-learning portal. There are parallel programmes in London and Singapore and students in the two locations can meet virtually and share leading-edge perspectives on green and sustainable FM operations.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site Facility and Environment Management MSc http://www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/iede/programmes/postgraduate/mscdiploma-facility-environment-management

Funding

The International Facility Management Association (IFMA) provides scholarship opportunities, which can be reviewed on their website at: http://www.ifma.org.
Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

Careers

The majority of graduates are engaged at a senior level in facility management operations, consultancy or design. Some students use the MSc as a foundation for subsequent MPhil/PhD research. The programme has helped participants to improve career prospects and keep ahead of developments in this field.

The students from this programme move into a variety of facility positions, ranging from assistant facility managers, property managers, contract managers, consultants (normally engineering based students) to directors of facilities (both public and private sector). For overseas students the degree normally leads to taking positions with international property management companies or multi national companies, depending on the level of experience.

Top career destinations for this degree:
- Software Engineer, BSkyB (2013)
- Assistant Facility Manager, Cushman and Wakefield (2013)
- Facilities Manager, Shell (2011)
- Facilities Manager, Transport of London (2011)
- Environmental Logistics Manager, NHS King's College Hospital (2012)

- Employability
The students from this programme move into a variety of facility positions, often depending on their previous work experience and management capabilities, these jobs range from Assistant Facility Managers, Property Managers, Contract Managers, Consultants (normally Engineering based students) to Director of Facilities (both public and private sector). For Overseas students the degree normally allows them to take positions with international property management companies or multi-national companies, again depending on the level of experience. The more successful students do go on to become Facility Directors in the public and private sectors.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multi-disciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together dozens of scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

This programme is accredited by: the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the International Facility Management Association (IFMA). RICS provides free student membership to those joining the programme for the duration of their studies.

UCL Bartlett staff are assisted by distinguished external contributors and students gain a multi-disciplinary perspective in facility management.

Student / staff ratios › 25 staff including 10 postdocs › 100 taught students › 45 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The programme is directed at facility professionals, as well as architects, service engineers, surveyors, building scientists, interior designers, management professionals and property administrators wishing to acquire a specialist qualification within facility management. It attracts participants from a wide range of professional backgrounds at all management levels, including office, healthcare, retail, education and residential.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Facility and Environment Management at graduate level
- why you want to study Facility and Environment Management at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to the chosen programme
- how your academic and professional background meets the demands of this challenging programme
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

Read less
The ERASMUS MUNDUS M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration is a specialised academic training programme. Read more

About the programme

The ERASMUS MUNDUS M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration is a specialised academic training programme. The objective is to develop competences in the core subjects of the Programme for European and third country economists with career aspirations in universities, government and international organisations, and in research departments of large banks and economic research departments of large industrial or commercial corporations. Third country students will especially profit from an increased awareness of the place of the EU in the world economy in general, and with respect to worldwide globalisation and international trade in particular.

Content

in the field of economics of globalisation, international trade and European economic integration. It provides a profound insight into the current scientific knowledge in this field and is supported by scientific research at the partner universities, both at these universities individually and in a network context. The Programme leads to an in-depth understanding in the following core fields: Advanced Microeconomics, Advanced Macroeconomics, Open Economy Macroeconomics and International Finance, Economics of Globalisation, Economics of European Integration, and International Trade: Theory and Policy. As a master degree in economics should also include a strong quantitative component, Applied Econometrics is taught as an additional core discipline.

Added value

The M.A. focuses on conveying the new insights that come from recent economic research with respect to the impact on the relations with the emerging economies in East Asia and Latin America of social evolutionary processes like trade globalisation, globalisation on international financial markets, globalised governance and the ‘knowledge economy’. In doing so, the M.A. programme adds to university excellence and yields European added value, thereby, at least indirectly, contributing to European competitiveness.

The M.A. programme also creates specific European added value and is completely in line with the Bologna declaration, the Berlin Communiqué and with EUA Joint Master Recommendations through 6 specific features:
- European integration is one of the two core subjects of the Master Programme Economics of Globalisation and European Integration;
- a joint European degree: 7 European universities from 6 EU countries, together with 2 universities from BRICS countries, jointly award a consortium diploma;
- ECTS: the joint degree programme in entirely conceived within the philosophy and practice of the ECTS grading system;
internal and external quality control is in place in accordance with ENIC-NARIC recommendations;
- mobility: students move during the academic year as a group over three locations to three different countries, at least two of which are European; there is also teacher mobility;
- language: students stay during the year in three different language environments and they are offered the possibility to receive free and credited language courses in the corresponding countries.

Structure

The study-programme is full-time and runs over one year. The language of instruction is English. Courses are taught by professors from all partner universities. Professors from all partner universities act as supervisors and evaluators of the final dissertation.
The Programme consists of 60 ECTS credits, the taught part of the programme consisting of 45 credits and the dissertation having a weight of 15 credits. One credit is roughly equivalent to 25 working hours (lectures, assignments and study time).
Optional, but credited, language courses are offered in each of the languages of the countries involved in the Consortium (English excepted).

More details on http://www.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.EGEI&n=96030

Degree awarded

The programme leads to a master degree called M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration.
The diplomas are certified jointly by the partners and are signed by the Rector, President or Vice-chancellor of each partner university.

Student profile

The programme is aimed at students with career aspirations in research, in government and international organisations, and in research departments of large banks and industrial and commercial corporations.

Admission requirements

The programme is open to students who have earned 240 ECTS credits in an economics or applied economics university study programme or have a bachelor degree in these areas that is considered by the Joint Studies Board to be equivalent.
Applicants who are enrolled in the final year of their academic programme should submit an official letter in English from their university confirming that they are expected to finalise their course at the end of the current academic year, and submit up-to-date authenticated transcripts with the results of the previous years.

The proficiency in English of the students of the participating universities is checked by the local academic co-ordinators. Students from other universities should submit proof of an internet-based TOEFL level of minimum 90 (or its equivalent in another TOEFL score system), or a IELTS grade of at least 6.5, or should submit proof of having studied at least one academic year in an English-language programme.

The selection procedure of all students (with and without an EM scholarship) is a common one. After having passed the eligibility check (see above) the candidates are first ranked according to their study results (GPA and/or class of degree). The weights used to differentiate those applicants who passed the eligibility tests, are the following: 30% for the type of diploma, 30% for the GPA average, 20% for fluency in English and 20% for the reputation of the home university based on the Shanghai ranking. This ‘reputation’ criterion is applied in conjunction with the requirement to strive for regional balance in the student population. The global intake of new students (with and without a scholarship) is limited to 45.

Application form: http://www.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.EGEI&n=93777

Read less
The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. Read more
The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. You learn to report for newspapers, websites, radio and television in a live newsroom environment. Using state-of-the-art technology located in dedicated radio/television studios and multimedia newsrooms you work to real deadlines to make news programmes and upload your work to the internet. Your tutors are award-winning journalists with decades of front-line experience in national and international news. Every day starts with an editorial conference and the degree programme balances focus on journalism as practical reality with intense academic study and reflection.

This programme is especially designed for those students who do not intend to practise journalism in the United Kingdom.

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

Compulsory modules in Reporting and Writing, Journalism and Free Expression and Practical Multimedia Journalism introduce you to the intellectual and professional challenges of reporting for newspapers, radio, television and the internet. You choose optional academic modules from a range including: History of Journalism; Reporting Conflict; Communication and Humanitarianism, Political Reporting and Propaganda - Media, Manipulation and Persuasion.

You may choose to complete a dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year.

JN800 - Reporting (45 credits)
JN802 - Practical Multimedia Journalism (45 credits)
JN804 - Dissertation in Multimedia Journalism (30 credits)
JN814 - Journalism and Free Expression (30 credits)
JN815 - Political Reporting (15 credits)
JN816 - Propaganda-Media, Manipulation and Persuasion (15 credits)
JN806 - Reporting Conflict (15 credits)
JN807 - Advanced Multimedia Storytelling (15 credits)
JN808 - Communication and Humanitarianism (15 credits)
JN813 - Sports Journalism (15 credits)

Assessment

The degree is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, news days, tutorials and editorial conferences. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, reporting exercises and presentations) and examinations. The optional dissertation counts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- teach the professional and academic skills required to practise multimedia journalism to those wishing to pursue a career in the news industry

- educate you to think critically about the ethics, duties and responsibilities of journalism in democratic societies and in emerging democracies and thus improve the quality of journalism as a profession

- produce graduates with a courageous and principled vision of the purpose of journalism and its constitutional value in contemporary democratic societies

- develop a detailed and systematic understanding of particular forms of journalism and their historic and contemporary role in the shaping of culture and society

- develop a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the impact of new technologies on journalism

- develop an appropriate range of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills and research skills

- foster lifelong learning skills that will enable you to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to journalism and society

- bring scholarly and critical insights to bear on the subjects, activities and processes associated with multimedia journalism

- provide teaching and learning opportunities that are informed by high quality research and scholarship from within the Centre for Journalism and elsewhere.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, documentary film, journalism technology, democracy, propaganda, global media

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Our students have obtained jobs at places such as Sky News, The Daily Mail, BBC Newsround and the Huffington Post.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X