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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Sports Ethics and Integrity at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Sports Ethics and Integrity at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Responding to the global crisis in sports integrity this course is a world-first innovation for sports administration and governance.

Key features of MA in Sports Ethics and Integrity

The world of sport is increasingly beset by ethical problems, from corruption and match fixing to doping and illegal betting. College of Engineering offers an MA in Sports Ethics and Integrity.

The integrity of sporting bodies and organisations at every level is being brought into question, creating an urgent need to develop a coherent, professional response to these issues.

Our response is to establish sports ethics and integrity as a new, internationally recognised profession within the field of sports administration and governance in both public and private sectors; to develop 100 new postgraduate experts between 2016-21, selected from around the world who will enrich sport federations with their expertise in ethics and integrity and revolutionise the world of sport. This may be one of the few chances to respond effectively and rapidly to the global crisis in sport integrity.

‌‌‌The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity will focus on:

- Global sports governance (e.g. FIFA, IOC)
- Anti-doping and drugs education
- Privacy and data protection issues
- Fair Play, justice and human rights
- Youth Olympics, ethics and education
- Equity, diversity and inclusion (especially age and disability issues)
- Illegal and irregular gambling
- Match-fixing and sport manipulation
- Legislation and codes of conduct
- Equality and anti-discrimination (class, race, ethnicity, religion and gender issues)
- Child protection and children’s rights
- Olympism, peace, and The Olympic Truce

Course description

The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity will equip students for high-level careers in sports administration and governance, with a focus on ethical sports, integrity and compliance. Students will receive training that enables them to identify ethical issues, engage in moral thinking, and translate decisions into moral actions – the three core skills required to develop sports integrity.

The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity will support students in developing an ethical mind-set and transferable skills that are indispensable for addressing the value and integrity issues facing national and international sporting federations, national Olympic Committees, and Paralympic Committees with a focus on:

Year 1

- Ethical theory, sports and integrity
- Anti-doping: ethics, policy and practice
- Sport integrity, corruption and gambling
- Ability, disability and athlete integrity
- Sport vales, fair play and integrity
- Summer School at the International Olympic Academy - Greece

Year 2

- Olympism and the Olympic Movement
- Research methods and skills
- Governance, law and sport integrity
- Sports, management and integrity
- Student Dissertation
- Summer School at the International Olympic Academy, Greece

The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity graduates will benefit from opportunities to undertake practical placements within the partner’s extensive network of advisory bodies, federations, policy-makers and commercial organisations, as well as from extensive international collaboration and training opportunities.

International networks

This course is a product of an international collaboration of the following universities:

- Swansea University, founded in 1920, is a rapidly growing, UK top 30, research-intensive University with world-leading sports science research and productive international partnerships. Swansea has pioneered globally the ethics of sports as an area of applied research and consultancy in elite sport.
- Charles University in Prague, founded in 1348, is the oldest University in Central Europe, and is consistently ranked first among the Universities of Central and Eastern Europe.
- Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, founded in 1477, is one of the top research universities in Germany of national and international recognition. It is a founding partner of the groundbreaking Executive Master in European Sports Governance.
-KU Leuven, founded in 1425, is one of the oldest Universities in the world, and ranks among the world’s top 100 Universities. It is a leading centre of international excellence in disability and Paralympic sport.
- The University of the Peloponnese is the most recently founded of Greek Universities, and draws on extensive links with the International Olympic Academy and the Olympic Movement. It hosts summer schools on Olympic Studies at its Ancient Olympia campus, adjacent to the archaeological site of the Ancient Olympic Games
- The University Pompeu Fabra is ranked as the 1st University in Spain, the 7th in Europe and 13th worldwide in the Times Higher Education (THE) top Universities under 50 years old. It is recognised as a “Campus of International Excellence”‌‌‌

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The MSc Audiology programme here at Manchester is unique to the UK in that the students learning will NOT be restricted to the study of audiology. Read more
The MSc Audiology programme here at Manchester is unique to the UK in that the students learning will NOT be restricted to the study of audiology. Students will also get the opportunity to study Neurosensory Science (audiological science, neurophysiological science, ophthalmic and vision science).This will provide students with a wide appreciation of the many related specialisms and a more holistic view of the areas which contribute to high-quality care. The MSc Audiology represents a partnership between the Universities and NHS, with practicing clinical staff delivering some components of the programme. Input from clinical staff is important and enriches the programme by ensuring students are taught by acknowledged experts in the theory and practice of Neurosensory Sciences in the modern health service. The MSc Audiology programme also offers students the opportunity to spend time in an NHS clinical placement, providing the opportunity for students to integrate theory and practice.

Please be aware that programme provides students with an academic MSc ONLY further clinical training or qualifications may be required to become a qualified Audiologist. These requirements vary from country to country so we encourage any potential applicants to check with these requirements with the Health Service in their country before applying.

The MSc Audiology Programme at Manchester may also be beneficial (but is not limited) to to the following Professionals:-

Community Paediatricians who wish to specialise in Audiology, or who wish to extend their knowledge and experience in the field.
Audiological Physicians in training grades.
Teachers of the Deaf.
Speech and Language Therapists wishing to extend their knowledge and experience or in order to develop a role as an Audiologist in Education Services.

Course Units

Vestibular Assessment and Management
Neurosensory Science
Paediatric Audiology
Professional Practice
Research Methods and Statistics
Adult Auditory Assessment and Management
Clinical Applications of Neurosensory Science
Dissertation


The programme is delivered via a combination of lectures, tutorials, case studies and presentations, seminars, practical classes and in-service clinical placements within accredited audiology departments in the NHS.
Coursework and Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of methods including written examinations, assignments, placement report, clinical log book and OSCEs (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations).

Why Study Audiology at Manchester?
The University of Manchester (http://www.manchester.ac.uk/) is part of the prestigious Russell Group of universities. It is the largest single-site university in the UK being situated within an easy walking distance of the city centre.

The Human Communication and Deafness Section (HCD) was founded as the Department of Education of the Deaf in 1919 by Sir James E Jones, in memory of his deaf son, Ellis Llywd Jones, and was one of the first such departments in the world. For nearly 100 years, Manchester has continued to be an international leader in Deaf Education and Audiology. The Deaf Education Programme –founded in 1919 was the first University based professional training programme in the UK, and Manchester currently has the only Professor of Deaf Education in the UK

Our research underpins, and is informed by our leading role in audiology education and audiological service delivery in the UK. Our multidisciplinary research team includes professionals in audiology, deaf education and medicine, in addition to scientists’ expert in psychophysics, electrophysiology, signal processing and neural imaging.
Further information on modules and the degree structure available on the department web site: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/masters/courses/list/02087/audiology-msc/

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The Special Educational Needs (SEN) programme investigates issues involved in the education and development of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities and disadvantages. Read more

Summary

The Special Educational Needs (SEN) programme investigates issues involved in the education and development of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities and disadvantages. Our programme is founded upon a commitment to forms of education which enable the participation, learning and development of all.

Students studying on the programme engage with aspects of theory, policy and practice relevant to international and local contexts. With its international profile, this programme brings together teachers and other professionals working directly with children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages, as well as policy-makers and managers in areas of SEN and Inclusive Education.

On the MA Special Educational Needs, students choose between two distinct pathways, Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives, which reflect different theoretical traditions and approaches to practice, provision and policy within the field of special educational needs, disability and inclusion. Both pathways are relevant to mainstream and special education contexts.

The Inclusive Perspectives pathway emphasises the application of inclusive and person-centred values and critical educational analysis. Concepts and theories such as person-centred education; participation and ‘voice’; the social model of disability and difference; and human rights and equalities are used to consider educational practice, provision, policy and systems relating to pupils experiencing difficulties in educational settings.

The Psychological Perspectives pathway emphasises the use and application of psychological theories. Concepts and theories of cognition, educational testing, and social and emotional development are central in developing psychologically informed understandings of children and young people experiencing difficulties in educational settings.

Students greatly benefit from engaging with the insights, experiences and perspectives of other course members, from a diverse range of contexts and backgrounds. The combination of their own experiences, insights gained from others on the course and the theoretical resources offered by learning within the modules, enables students to deepen their understanding of, and to be able to challenge, the barriers that hinder the learning, development and participation of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages.

The teaching provided on modules is informed by active research and scholarship in the field of Inclusive Education and SEN practice and policy. All lecturers leading modules on the programme have high level specialist qualifications, teaching and leadership experience in the field of Education, SEN and Inclusive Education.

Content

All students complete a common module which takes a broad view of key perspectives and issues in SEN, it also introduces the psychological and inclusive perspectives. From here, students undertake specialist modules within the programme, depending on their chosen pathway.

Inclusive Perspectives Pathway content: Students critically explore the issues involved in children’s behaviour using sociological approaches. You will reflect on your own and society's beliefs about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ behaviour, which often relate to medical and psychological foundations of schools’ policies and practices. The social pedagogical approach is also explored as a basis for inclusive teaching and learning. A critical analysis of instrumentalist/functionalist approaches to teaching is developed with a view to enhancing holistic development and the participation of pupils as a means of addressing barriers to the inclusivity of the classroom.

Psychological Perspectives Pathway content: On this route students engage with the idea that socially and emotionally well-adjusted students perform better at school, whilst social and emotional aspects of learning have become marginalised in a highly competitive education system. The use of psychometric testing is covered, with an exploration of its appropriate uses (students can gain a Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing, accredited by the British Psychological Society, from successfully undertaking this module).

Optional modules are available to students on both pathways which focus on Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty and on Autism in Education. Students also have an option, instead of taking a taught optional module, to take a (non-taught) Independent Study module to learn about a specific issue relevant to their pathway and interests, which is not taught about in the programme.

The final module is an independent research-based enquiry (either a Dissertation or Practice-Based Research Project), which is founded upon the pathway perspective chosen, but is also subject to the student’s choice of topic.

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This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. Read more

Course outline

This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. The varied mix of backgrounds and interests that students bring to the course, the experience and commitment of the programme director and the friendly small-group setting allow a lively, enjoyable and intellectually rigorous exchange of ideas. Graduates have gone on to publish their own books, and to win prizes. Some have embarked on further research for the MPhil or the DPhil in Biography.

When it was founded in 1996, the Biography MA was the first of its kind. Since then Life Writing has become part of the postgraduate menu, but the Buckingham course has kept its distinctive edge. Unlike most Life Writing degrees, it is not linked to Creative Writing, and there is a strong emphasis on research and historical biography. The programme is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Location

Teaching takes place in central London, usually at a venue close to Marylebone station.

Timetable

The course offers entry points in September and January and runs for a calendar year if taken full-time. Teaching takes place on one day a week over three terms running from September to December, January to March and April to June; the term from July to September is devoted to independent research. The programme may be followed part-time over 2 years. In the first year part-time students follow the taught courses and the second year is normally devoted to the dissertation. A detailed programme is shown here. Suitably qualified students with a major research topic in mind may be accepted for the higher degrees of MPhil (two years full-time/four years part-time) or DPhil (three years full-time/six years part-time).

Course structure

Students have a choice between following the taught MA, or opting for the MA by Research. The taught MA gives an opportunity to produce written term papers on a variety of topics as well as a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Students accepted for the MA by Research are required to produce written work which includes an extended dissertation of up to 40,000 words. All students produce coursework for the Research Methods module: an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format.

Research support

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995); The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize; and Bertie: A Life of Edward VII (2012), for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/biography.

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The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. Read more
The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. The department is based in the Tayside Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Technology (TORT) Centre. The current staff includes a professor, two clinical senior lecturers, two non-clinical senior lecturers, one clinical and one non-clinical lecturer, one research assistant and four clinical fellows, who are supported by various staff members.

With a tradition of teaching and research in the field of mechanisms of disease, treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system and biomedical and rehabilitation engineering. The founder, Professor Ian Smillie, gained a worldwide reputation in knee surgery and the role of the meniscus. His successor, Professor George Murdoch, founded and developed the Dundee Limb Fitting Centre and the Tayside Rehabilitation Engineering Services, which have acquired an international reputation for the treatment of the amputee and assessment of gait analysis. His successor, Professor David Rowley, sustained the department’s international reputation and innovation in the area of joints replacement complemented by a worldwide service in Clinical Audit Outcomes

Overview

The MSc in Orthopaedic Science programme will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It is the only programme amongst the few comparable MSc programmes in the UK with a specific focus on the theoretical and practical application of technology within orthopaedics. Additionally, it equips trainees with the knowledge of fundamental science required for the FRCS exit exam.

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide students with a Masters level postgraduate education in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It also aims to provide experience in the design and execution of a substantive research project in the field of orthopaedic, biomechanics and rehabilitation technology and its underlying science.
By the end of the programme, students should have a systematic understanding and knowledge of the physical sciences and technology relevant to orthopaedics, a critical awareness of current research questions in the field and the appropriate practical and analytical skills in order to be able to:

- Understand and interpret complex scientific concepts.
- Critically evaluate current research.
- Understand and utilise relevant technology, and have the ability to evaluate and critique methodologies.
- Develop and test scientific hypotheses, including the design of laboratory research projects aimed at addressing specific hypothesis-driven questions.
- Undertake the practical and technical aspects of a laboratory-based project.
- Communicate complex scientific concepts to specialist and non-specialist audiences, both verbally and in writing.
- Demonstrate an understanding of whether specific research outcomes make a significant, novel contribution to the field.

Programme Content

The programme will be taught part-time by distance learning over a period of normally 3 to 5 years, or one year full time in house. It is comprised of five compulsory 30-credit taught modules and one 60 credit research project module.

Module 1 - Mechanics
Module 2 - Biomechanics
Module 3 - Rehabilitation Technology
Module 4 - Orthopaedic Technology
Module 5 - Statistics

Methods of Teaching and Assessment

Modules 1-5:
Teaching in modules 1-5 will be delivered through distance learning module components, each comprised of a module component guide and several component units. Tutor support will be available via email, web conferencing, written correspondence and telephone.

Assessment of modules 1-5 will be by examination with the option of sitting exams upon completion of each individual module or upon completion of all five modules. Assessment is weighted (80%) by exam and (20%) by coursework.

Successful completion of the PGDip modules 1-5 is required to progress to the research project component. Successful completion of course work will normally be required prior to sitting the examination papers. Each of the two components of assessment for the PGCert and PGDip (course work and examination) must have a minimum grade of D3 to pass and progress to the full MSc programme.

Module 6 - Research Project:
During the research project, learning will be partly experiential, partly directed and partly self-directed. The research project will be assessed through the presentation of a thesis, and the final mark will be moderated through an oral exam (60 credits).

why study at Dundee?

In 2013 the MCh (Orth) Dundee, course was granted full accreditation by the Royal College of Surgeons of
England. This accreditation is extremely important and comes as the department is celebrating the 20th
anniversary of the course. This is the only face-to-face course accredited by the College outside of England.

“It was a great learning experience. Coming here, my overall
personality has changed. I have learnt the right way to write
a thesis and also got to know the recent advancements in
field of Orthopaedic surgery” International Student Barometer, 2009

Career Prospects

The programme will prepare graduates for a research-focused clinical career in the NHS or academia, and is particularly well positioned to prepare graduates for entry into a clinical academic career path.

If taken in-house, the start date for this course is September. The distance learning start date can be at any point in the year.
* The taught elements are conducted by self-directed learning modules as with distance learning but the project will be undertaken in-house. The candidate will be attached to a consultant firm as an observer.

Students wishing to pursue the MSc must complete the Diploma within 3 years part-time or 9 months full-time. The MSc must be completed within a period of 1 year full-time or 2-5 years part-time.

Fees must be paid in full prior to commencing the course (in-house only).

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Why study at MODUL University Vienna. The MODUL brand stands for more than 100 years of excellence in tourism management education. Read more
Why study at MODUL University Vienna

The MODUL brand stands for more than 100 years of excellence in tourism management education. Founded in 1908, MODUL College is the vocational training school with the longest tradition in tourism and hospitality education worldwide, with more than six thousand graduates who currently hold leading positions all over the world. Based on this knowledge, MODUL University Vienna was founded as a true international university in 2007 and has quickly established itself as the premier European Center for Tourism Research, internationally renowned for its undergraduate and graduate degree programs and research expertise in the area of tourism and hospitality management.

Program Focus

The MSc in International Tourism Management is a two-year, full-time program taught entirely in English which prepares its students for a future career in the international tourism industry – the fastest growing industry sector in the world, providing global job opportunities. Accredited by the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO.TedQual) and the European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education (ENQA), the program is the only accredited research university degree in Tourism Management in Central Europe. Students will gain a solid basis in management through subjects in finance, economics, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and information technology. Furthermore, they will specialize in the area of international tourism management through subjects such as destination management, tourism and hotel marketing, tourism market research, e-distribution, and benchmarking, which typically qualifies them to pursue a career in one of the following tourism sectors:
• International, national, or local travel and tourism authorities
• Tourism and hospitality consulting industry
• International hospitality industry

Career Opportunities

After graduation, MODUL University’s Career Center (http://www.modulcareer.at) supports alumni in their career path. With almost 500 partner companies in the international tourism and hospitality industry and an active alumni association, many Master graduates begin their professional lives in positions such as tourism consultants at partner companies like PKF hotelexperts and Kohl & Partner, in the sales and marketing departments of major international hotel chains, or return to their home country to take up employment in local, city, or national tourism marketing. Additionally, MU’s faculty has close ties to international organizations including European Cities Marketing, the European Travel Commission and the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). MODUL University serves as hub for delegates from these entities and other international tourism organizations to come together on occasions such as the prestigious annual TourMIS workshop to discuss the topic of benchmarking tourism destinations and to establish a vital network within the international tourism community.

The Ideal MSc Student

Students enrolled in the MSc in International Tourism Management come from all over the world. The program typically has a 90% international student population and class sizes of maximum 10-15 students. This intimate and multicultural study environment provides an interactive in-class experience which encourages students to engage in discussions and to share their personal views on tourism development examples from their home countries. Additionally, an overall 1:5 faculty:student ratio guarantees that faculty members know their students on a first name basis. The ideal MSc candidate has obtained an undergraduate degree (from a university or a university of applied sciences) in social sciences, economics, business administration, or tourism and hospitality management and wants to continue with a research-based university degree with a possible doctorate afterwards, and has a genuine interest in modern tourism marketing and research techniques. For more details on the curriculum, the program’s faculty, and the admission criteria visit http://www.modul.ac.at or contact our Admissions Office ().

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The MSc Audiology programme here at Manchester is unique to the UK in that the students learning will NOT be restricted to the study of audiology. Read more
The MSc Audiology programme here at Manchester is unique to the UK in that the students learning will NOT be restricted to the study of audiology. Students will also get the opportunity to study Neurosensory Science (audiological science, neurophysiological science, ophthalmic and vision science).This will provide students with a wide appreciation of the many related specialisms and a more holistic view of the areas which contribute to high-quality care. The MSc Audiology represents a partnership between the Universities and NHS, with practicing clinical staff delivering some components of the programme. Input from clinical staff is important and enriches the programme by ensuring students are taught by acknowledged experts in the theory and practice of Neurosensory Sciences in the modern health service. The MSc Audiology programme also offers students the opportunity to spend time in an NHS clinical placement, providing the opportunity for students to integrate theory and practice.

Please be aware that programme provides students with an academic MSc ONLY further clinical training or qualifications may be required to become a qualified Audiologist. These requirements vary from country to country so we encourage any potential applicants to check with these requirements with the Health Service in their country before applying.

The MSc Audiology Programme at Manchester may also be beneficial (but is not limited) to to the following Professionals:-

Community Paediatricians who wish to specialise in Audiology, or who wish to extend their knowledge and experience in the field.
Audiological Physicians in training grades.
Teachers of the Deaf.
Speech and Language Therapists wishing to extend their knowledge and experience or in order to develop a role as an Audiologist in Education Services.

Course Units

Vestibular Assessment and Management
Neurosensory Science
Paediatric Audiology
Professional Practice
Research Methods and Statistics
Adult Auditory Assessment and Management
Clinical Applications of Neurosensory Science
Dissertation


The programme is delivered via a combination of lectures, tutorials, case studies and presentations, seminars, practical classes and in-service clinical placements within accredited audiology departments in the NHS.
Coursework and Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of methods including written examinations, assignments, placement report, clinical log book and OSCEs (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations).

Why Study Audiology at Manchester?
The University of Manchester (http://www.manchester.ac.uk/) is part of the prestigious Russell Group of universities. It is the largest single-site university in the UK being situated within an easy walking distance of the city centre.

The Human Communication and Deafness Section (HCD) was founded as the Department of Education of the Deaf in 1919 by Sir James E Jones, in memory of his deaf son, Ellis Llywd Jones, and was one of the first such departments in the world. For nearly 100 years, Manchester has continued to be an international leader in Deaf Education and Audiology. The Deaf Education Programme –founded in 1919 was the first University based professional training programme in the UK, and Manchester currently has the only Professor of Deaf Education in the UK

Our research underpins, and is informed by our leading role in audiology education and audiological service delivery in the UK. Our multidisciplinary research team includes professionals in audiology, deaf education and medicine, in addition to scientists’ expert in psychophysics, electrophysiology, signal processing and neural imaging.
Further information on modules and the degree structure available on the department web site: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/masters/courses/list/02087/audiology-msc/

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The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Read more

Course outline

The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Since then, in response to student demand, the available options have been extended to include postgraduate research degrees at three levels: MA by Research, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Course structure

For their first year of study students on all these courses attend the same weekly seminars as students taking the Taught MA in Biography. These provide the critical awareness of the subject which is an essential prerequisite for dissertation work and they are one of the most distinctive and valuable elements of the MA. They take place as follows:

- Autobiography (September to December)
- Special Paper in Biography (January to June)
- Research Methods (January to June)

The modules on Biography and Autobiography are designed to combine the study of classic biographies and memoirs with contemporary writing. In addition, the Research Methods module provides an invaluable and innovative training, especially devised for biographers.

Guest seminars on the course are led by leading biographers, critics, publishers and agents. Teachers and speakers on the course have included Andrew Motion, Kathryn Hughes, Frances Wilson, Frances Spalding, Jeremy Lewis, Rupert Shortt, Caroline Dawnay, Andrew Lownie and Miranda Seymour.

Research students are expected to produce, as a valuable preliminary to their own research project, written coursework for the Research Methods module (an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format), and one other piece of written work, but the full amount of termly written work required for the taught course is not compulsory. During the early part of the course, research students refine their research proposal under the individual supervision of the course director for eventual discussion with the Research Officer. Once the research proposal has been accepted students concentrate on individual research and the preparation of a dissertation, under the supervision of the course director.

Teaching methods

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995) and The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement. She is currently completing a biography of Edward VII, for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust.

Location

Teaching takes place in London. See the University's website for more information.

Timescale

The normal periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

- MA Res– 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
- MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
- DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time

Administrative arrangements

A system of preliminary registration for all research degrees is in operation to allow students to prepare a formal proposal during the early part of their course. Admission to research degrees is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met. Students for the MA degree in Biography by Research are registered initially for the taught MA until the research proposal has been accepted. Postgraduate students wishing to register for the DPhil programme in Biography must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage. Registration is upgraded to DPhil, normally between 12 and 18 months from first registration, once the student has demonstrated through the submission of draft written work that he or she has the ability to conduct research at the advanced level required for the award of the degree. All research students must also subject their work to an annual progress review.

Changing the level of the research degree after the start of the course, although not impossible, can produce complications. Prospective students uncertain about the level or length of course best suited to them are strongly advised to discuss this with the course director before applying.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/mres/biography.

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Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice. Read more
Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice.

The programme covers the areas of linguistics that inform classroom practice (such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics and phonetics), raising awareness of these fields and applying them to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).

Practical teaching opportunities are a feature of the programme, including teaching to your peer group and international students from other programmes. There is also the opportunity to visit a local language college and observe classes.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/357/applied-linguistics-and-teaching-english-to-speakers-of-other-languages-tesol

About the Department of English Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). ELL is a dynamic and growing department with a vibrant research culture. We specialise in experimental and theoretical linguistics. In particular, our interests focus on quantitative and experimental research in speech and language processing, variation and acquisition, but also cover formal areas such as syntax, as well as literary stylistics. In addition to English and its varieties, our staff work in French, German, Greek, Romani, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

Staff and postgraduates are members of the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS), a research centre that seeks to promote interdisciplinary linguistic research. We also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

Course structure

The programme starts with three linguistics modules (Sounds, Structure and Meaning) and a module on language awareness for teachers (Language Awareness and Analysis) so that you have a firm grasp of the linguistic bases of language teaching and how to apply them to the classroom.

In the spring term the focus is on how languages are learned (Second Language Acquisition), how you can improve classroom technique (The Practice of TESOL), plan for your students’ needs (Course and Syllabus Design) and provide them with materials which will be interesting, effective and motivating (Materials Evaluation and Development).

The dissertation will be an opportunity to plan and develop a piece of empirical research which can be of direct relevance to your current or planned teaching situation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LL832 - Meaning (15 credits)
LL833 - Structure (15 credits)
LL834 - Second Language Acquisition (15 credits)
LL838 - Sounds (15 credits)
LL840 - Course and Syllabus Design for TESOL (15 credits)
LL841 - Language Awareness and Analysis for TESOL (15 credits)
LL842 - Materials Evaluation and Development for TESOL (15 credits)
LL843 - The Practice of TESOL (15 credits)
LL899 - Research Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by a 3-4,000-word essay, but assessment patterns can include practical/experimental work, report and proposal writing, critiques, problem solving and seminar presentations. You also complete a 12-15,000-word research dissertation on a topic agreed with your supervisor.

Programme aims

- Provide TESOL practitioners with advanced knowledge of linguistics related to language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, which will enhance, develop and inform their understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

- To produce graduates who will contribute locally, nationally and internationally to the TESOL community.

- To prepare students to be more effective in the TESOL classroom.

- To provide students with teaching and training which is informed by research, scholarship, practice and experience.

Research areas

Alongside our research centre below, we also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

- Linguistics Lab

The newly established Linguistics Lab is currently housed in Rutherford College and has facilities for research in acoustics, sociophonetics and speech and language processing. English Language and Linguistics (ELL) members also have access to the School of European Culture and Language (SECL) recording studio and multimedia labs which can be used both for research and teaching.

- Centre for Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics is the main contributor to the Centre for Language and Linguistics. Founded in 2007, the Centre promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Careers

Postgraduate work in English Language and Linguistics prepares you for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include speech and language theory, audiology, teaching, publishing, advertising, journalism, public relations, company training, broadcasting, forensic and computational work, and the civil or diplomatic services.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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In Philosophical Anthropology you study the philosophical significance of psychoanalytical hermeneutics as developed by Freud and followers (Lacan, Klein, et al.) Research focuses in particular on the phenomenological tradition (Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze and Butler). Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophical Anthropology (Research)

In Philosophical Anthropology you study the philosophical significance of psychoanalytical hermeneutics as developed by Freud and followers (Lacan, Klein, et al.) Research focuses in particular on the phenomenological tradition (Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze and Butler).
The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium). The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.
Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.
Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasizes the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.
However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, with the potential for a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.
Clearly, this approach has far-reaching consequences for our understanding of the relation between normality and pathology. This avenue is currently being pursued at the CPPA in an endeavour to explore philosophical psychopathology and its consequences, both as a contribution to Freudian metapsychology and as a critique of it.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, nor to one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills; namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions using clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate; they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first vocational step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium), respectively. The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.

Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.

Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasises the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.

However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, harbouring the possibility of a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?
The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:
- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

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This programme is aimed at those looking to pursue further research in sustainable development or develop their research skills within an employment context. Read more

MRes in Sustainable Development

This programme is aimed at those looking to pursue further research in sustainable development or develop their research skills within an employment context.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development have been growing very rapidly. The original MSc programme started with nine students in the 2009-2010 academic year and currently 30 students are registered. On this programme you attend an average number of 24 lectures lasting for three hours each in Semester 1 and an additional 15 lectures in Semester 2. There are also a number of tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. There is also a dissertation conference where you can present your research findings before you submit your dissertation.

The double MSc in Sustainable Energy takes place in both St Andrews and Moscow. The first year involves taking similar modules in the one-year programme at St Andrews with a more specific focus on energy issues. The second year challenges students to complete study abroad on a wide range of energy modules.

Sustainable Development students are extremely well catered for in several aspects. Firstly, you have the use of a dedicated postgraduate space in the Observatory. There are ports for physical laptop internet access. The room is also served by high speed WiFi connections. You have access to the room on a 24/7 basis. It offers a location for group or individual work, classes, events, receptions and even relaxation. The building is primarily for the use of Sustainable Development postgraduate students. Secondly, you have a close relationship with staff on the course. Class sizes are limited to provide a one-to-one service for students. This is a unique aspect of undertaking Sustainable Development research and teaching at St Andrews. Thirdly, the interdisciplinary nature of Sustainable Development allows you to interact with a wide range of students in other disciplines. This allows for the creation of an extended group of student and staff contacts. Fourthly, Sustainable Development students have the benefit of a number of targeted field trips, including the Glen Tanar estate trip, pictured opposite, where students reflect on issues from ecology to landownership.

St Andrews is Scotland’s first university and the third oldest in the English speaking world, founded in 1413. As well as celebrating its long history, the University of St Andrews embraces its responsibilities for the future, by placing sustainable development at the heart of its operations along four integrated fronts: governance, teaching, research and sustainable estates management. The idea is to integrate sustainability into day-to-day thinking and decision-making processes of the University. New buildings and major refurbishments of existing buildings are being designed to meet strict environmental standards. The £1.7m SALIX energy fund is helping us to achieve this. The dedicated Estates Environment Team of professionals works closely with Schools and Units to raise awareness and understanding of operational sustainability issues.

The University is working with a range of key stakeholders to promote sustainable development across the higher education sector. As an active member of the Environmental Association for Universities and Colleges (EAUC) the University shares learning across the higher education and further education sector.

Why does sustainable development matter?

Humanity faces enormous environmental and developmental challenges in the twenty-first century. The United Nations has identified five global issues of particular concern: the provision of clean water and adequate sanitation, energy generation and supply, human health, food production and distribution, and the continuing threat to biodiversity.

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunity, as people are working together across the globe to address the serious challenges facing humankind. We must learn to live within environmental limits and embrace sustainability as the key concept that will allow us to develop in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Our postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development, co-ordinated by the School of Geography & Geosciences, will enable you to develop the knowledge and understanding you need, not only to understand all these issues from multiple perspectives but also to utilise the knowledge you gain to tackle them and realise the opportunities they create.

Transition University of St Andrews

Transition University of St Andrews was launched in 2009 and is part of the UK-based Transition initiative, which has been expanding worldwide over the last five years. Transition operates within community groups on a grassroots level, founded and operated by the communities themselves, in response to the threats of climate change and peak oil. Through working on practical projects with different community groups, the initiative helps communities minimise their impact on the planet, become more self-sustaining, and strengthens community ties. It also benefits individuals by developing their skills and encouraging re-consideration of
the aspects of life that truly promote happiness and wellbeing. A number of MSc students in Sustainable Development have participated in Transition’s activities which complement a number of themes pursued in our programmes.

Careers

Your question should not be “What can I do with a degree in Sustainable Development?” but instead “Can you imagine a future where it could not be useful?” Sustainability impacts upon almost all aspects of life, so your future career could take you in one of many different directions. For example, you could:
• Work in industry addressing sustainability aspects of business management, engineering, planning, transport, project management, construction, waste, energy or environmental management.

• Make yourself heard as a sustainability researcher or policy adviser in local, regional or national government, NGOs and campaigning groups.

• Act as an adviser to supra-national bodies such as the United Nations, World Bank, European Union, and the OECD.

• Become a sustainability adviser and assessor working directly in private sector organisations, industry or as a consultant (in both mainstream and specialist businesses).

• Spread the word by outreach and education in sustainable living via public or third sector organisations (e.g. Councils or NGOs).

• Stay at university for a PhD, perhaps eventually going on to a teaching or research career.

• Recent graduates now work at: UNDP; the World Bank; Christian Aid in Africa; LCI consultancy; and at a global bank in Dubai.

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Our master’s program appeals to those interested in a more patient-centered approach to helping people achieve and maintain optimal wellness through focus on the whole person, rather than simply their symptoms. Read more
Our master’s program appeals to those interested in a more patient-centered approach to helping people achieve and maintain optimal wellness through focus on the whole person, rather than simply their symptoms.

Highlights:

- Accredited program offered in collaboration with the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM)
- Rigorous, clinically-applicable curriculum that is continually reviewed and updated with new research and findings
- 100 percent online format with flexible schedule options
- Engaging online learning experience featuring distinguished and dedicated instructors and an expert support network to reinforce clinical and academic skills
- Program satisfies educational requirements to sit for many national nutrition certification exams

Don’t miss your chance to enroll in our spring term!

MISSION

The mission of the UWS master’s in human nutrition and functional medicine (HNFM) program is to prepare learners to serve as outstanding health care clinicians, consultants, educators, administrators and researchers in the field of human nutrition and functional medicine.

PROGRAM

Our clinically-oriented human nutrition and functional medicine program is the only fully accredited master’s degree in functional medicine, having been granted regional accreditation from the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, the highest level of academic accreditation available in the U.S. This program is 100 percent online as offered as a collaborative endeavor between UWS and the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM), the organization which founded and developed the key functional medicine concepts used today.

Functional medicine is a science-based, patient-centered and systems-oriented approach to helping people achieve and maintain excellent health. This is accomplished primarily through natural methods, with diet and nutrition as a central focus. It is a forefront model for health care practice that seeks to address the causes of disease and dysfunction rather than suppressing symptoms. Founded on a holistic view of health, functional medicine delves deep into the biochemical and genetic individuality of each patient.

Why choose UWS for a master’s in nutrition?

This program includes advanced instruction in clinical nutrition, similar to other master’s level nutrition programs, but it goes far beyond by also presenting extensive educational content on functional medicine principles and practices derived from the Institute for Functional Medicine. These include important interdisciplinary and evidence-based perspectives, patient assessments and clinical interventions designed to enhance the function of the whole person.

It is primarily a clinically focused degree, with emphasis on treating individual or multiple conditions and their risk factors using dietary and nutritional interventions. Every course contains elements of clinical assessment and diagnosis. There is also a strong focus on wellness promotion and general health in order to meet the clinician’s primary goal of preventing disease and metabolic dysfunction before they occur.

SCHEDULE

The program consists of 50 quarter-credits of graduate coursework (33 semester credits) and can be completed in seven quarters (under two years) if taken at the recommended pace of 7-8 credits (usually two courses) per quarter, though students may move more quickly or more slowly through the program. We recognize that the life situations of our students vary considerably in terms of their family, employment and community commitments, thus we are flexible with regard to speed and prefer that students take the time they need in order to learn the material well.

Additionally, it is possible to take a leave of absence for a quarter or more if needed. As long as the intended schedule is communicated with the registrar, it is possible to extend the program to better suit a student’s individual needs.

Classes are admitted twice per year, with Fall (October) and Spring (April) starts.

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HKUST is a dynamic and forward-thinking University that embraces a truly global outlook and an innovative spirit. Read more
HKUST is a dynamic and forward-thinking University that embraces a truly global outlook and an innovative spirit. Founded in 1991, we have rapidly established ourselves as a top global institution and built a respectable reputation in the region by aligning our world-class educational resources with the growth momentum of Asia. The University has developed a unique East-West educational ethos centered on the core values of excellence, diversity, open-minded curiosity and an upbeat “can do” spirit. Proudly ranked as the No. 1 University in Hong Kong*, our vision and ambitions distinguish us from the rest.

* QS World University Rankings 2015

Curriculum

We provide two study mode options to help you reach your post-MBA aspirations. Both options have the same credit requirements.

FULL 16-MONTH PROGRAM
The full program is designed for students who are planning a career switch, looking to gain more international exposure or simply want to expand their career opportunities in China and Asia by equipping themselves with more solid regional knowledge. As part of the program, you will have the opportunity to participate in a summer internship and an optional one-semester overseas exchange at one of our 60 partner schools worldwide.

ACCELERATED 12-MONTH PROGRAM
Our accelerated program offers you a comprehensive, well-rounded business education to unleash your full potential while minimizing your time and opportunity costs. This program is ideal for students who already possess a wealth of professional experience or are studying under company sponsorship to enhance their career advancement.

WEEKLY PART-TIME
Students are expected to complete the program within 24 months. The MBA for Professionals (Weekly Part-time Program) operates Saturday classes at the HKUST Clear Water Bay Campus for core courses. A typical day of class starts at 9 am and ends around 6 pm. Some elective classes are offered on weekday evenings at our downtown campus in Central.

BI-WEEKLY PART-TIME
Students are expected to complete the program in 24 months. The MBA for Professionals Bi-Weekly program runs on alternate weekends (both Satruday & Sunday) on the HKUST Clear Water Bay main campus and Shenzhen campus from 9:30am to 6:00pm. Around one third of the classes will take place in Shenzhen, while the rest of the courses will be conducted in Hong Kong.

How you will learn

Various modes of teaching are used across different courses, with the aim of helping you maximize your learning through our interactive exercises and your fellow students, faculty members and external guest speakers. Lectures comprise only 30% of the course content; the remainder is dedicated to discussions, simulations, case analyses, seminars, individual and group projects and class presentations. Be prepared for innovative and experiential modes of learning founded on real-life business cases set in both Asian and global business contexts. For all courses, the language of instruction is English.

Immersion Program

Your MBA journey begins with a thoughtfully designed orientation program comprised of accelerator courses, personal assessment workshops, leadership training and experiential learning – a self-discovery and transformational step that represents the unique culture of HKUST. Within just a short time, you will acquire sound business knowledge and become well-acquainted with your fellow classmates to ease your transition into the full program.

Introducing the four pillars of our Immersion Experience:
-Academic Tone Setting and Leveling
-Professional Development Preparation
-Camaraderie and Culture Building
-Program Administration and Policy Orientation

Academic Faculty

Our academic faculty boasts some of the best scholars from top global institutions around the world. Representing more than 15 countries, our elite faculty members can broaden your perspective of global business management and share their sharp business insights about Asia. Our commitment to providing world-class education has won us first place in Asia’s research rankings for 7 consecutive years according to the Financial Times.

Meet with Recruiters

Our Career and Professional Development Office is dedicated to helping you reach your career goals by providing you with exceptional tools and connections to aim higher and further. As the leading business school in the region, our close ties with the corporate community enables us to foster exciting opportunities for you engage with potential future employers. According to the New York Times, HKUST ranks no. 16 in the world in the global employability of our graduates, so our outstanding employer recognition speaks for itself.

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In this programme, leading academics encourage students to think across different disciplines to blend scientific, socioeconomic and policy perspectives for a stronger understanding of sustainability and how it can be achieved. Read more

Programme description

In this programme, leading academics encourage students to think across different disciplines to blend scientific, socioeconomic and policy perspectives for a stronger understanding of sustainability and how it can be achieved. This wider perspective is attractive to organisations which promote sustainable development or seek to reduce humanity’s effect on the environment.

Ensuring the environmental sustainability of society is one of the major challenges facing humanity in the 21st century. How can the needs of the world’s growing population be met without threatening the ecological processes that support human wellbeing?

How can the economy and energy systems be restructured to combat climate change? What policies foster sustainability? How can the necessary changes in the behaviour of organisations and individuals be promoted? This MSc programme explores these and related, topical questions.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Environment & Society Academy.

Programme structure

This programme consists of six taught courses, studied over two semesters. Students will also undertake a research project leading to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words.

Compulsory courses typically include:

Principles of Environmental Sustainability
Case Studies in Sustainable Development
Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses*. We particularly recommend:

Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
Ecosystem Services 1: Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
Foundations in Ecological Economics
Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
Integrated Resource Management
Project Appraisal
Marine Systems and Policies
Development: Principles and Practices
Understanding Environment and Development
Energy Policy and Politics
Environmental Impact Assessment
Forests and Environment
Global Environmental Politics
Participation in Policy and Planning
Political Ecology
Sustainability of Food Production
Waste Reduction and Recycling
Water Resource Management
Climate Change and Corporate Strategy

*Please note: courses are offered subject to timetabling and availablity and are subject to change each year.

Learning outcomes

Students will be equipped to:

assess the sustainability of policies, programmes and projects at scales ranging from the local to the global
analyse environmental problems using knowledge from different disciplines, leading to well-founded and effective solutions
advocate sustainable development and engage in informed debate on current environmental controversies

Career opportunities

This programme prepares students for a wide range of roles within environmental consultancy, national and local government, non-profit organisations, education or research. The choice of option courses and dissertation projects can be tailored towards your chosen career path.
Student experience

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.

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The course trains students from a variety of academic backgrounds to work as statisticians in various sectors including higher education, research institutions, the pharmaceutical industry, central government and national health services. Read more
The course trains students from a variety of academic backgrounds to work as statisticians in various sectors including higher education, research institutions, the pharmaceutical industry, central government and national health services. It provides training in the theory and practice of statistics with special reference to clinical trials, epidemiology and clinical or laboratory research.

The PSI Andrew Hewett Prize is founded in memory of Andrew Hewett, an alumnus of the School and awarded by the PSI (Statisticians in the Pharmaceutical Industry) to the best student on the course.
Duration: one year full-time or part-time over two years. Modes of study explained.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/ms_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msms.html

For the MSc Medical Statistics it is preferred that students should normally have obtained a mathematically-based first degree which includes some statistics. Graduates from other fields who have quantitative skills and some familiarity with statistical ideas may also apply.

Any student who does not meet the minimum entry requirement above but who has relevant professional experience may still be eligible for admission. Qualifications and experience will be assessed from the application.

Intercalating this course

(http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Undergraduate medical students can take a year out either to pursue related studies or work. The School welcomes applications from medical students wishing to intercalate after their third year of study from any recognised university in the world.

Why intercalate with us?:
Reputation: The School has an outstanding international reputation in public health & tropical medicine and is at the forefront of global health research. It is highly rated in a number of world rankings including:

- World’s leading research-focused graduate school (Times Higher Education World Rankings, 2013)
- Third in the world for social science and public health (US News Best Global Universities Ranking, 2014)
- Second in UK for research impact (Research Exercise Framework 2014)
- Top in Europe for impact (Leiden Ranking, 2015)

Highly recognised qualification: possessing a Master's from the School will give you a focused understanding of health and disease, broaden your career prospects and allow you to be immersed in research in a field of your choice.

Valuable skills: you will undertake an independent research project (summer project) in your chosen topic, equipping you with research skills that will distinguish you in a clinical environment. While your medical qualification will give you a breadth of knowledge; undertaking an intercalated degree will allow you to explore your main area of interest in greater depth.

Alumni network: the School has a strong international and diverse alumni community, with more than 20,000 alumni in over 180 countries.

MSc vs. BSc: undertaking an MSc is an excellent opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge in your chosen topic and enhance your skills in scientific research. Postgraduate qualifications are increasingly sought after by clinicians and possessing a Masters qualification can assist you in your future career progression.

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- select appropriate study designs to address questions of medical relevance

- select and apply appropriate statistical techniques for managing common types of medical data

- use various software packages for statistical analysis and data management

- interpret the results of statistical analyses and critically evaluate the use of statistics in the medical literature

- communicate effectively with statisticians and the wider medical community, in writing and orally through presentation of results of statistical analyses

- explore current and anticipated developments in medical statistics

Structure

Term 1:
All students take five compulsory modules:
- Foundations of Medical Statistics
- Introduction to Statistical Computing (Stata/SAS/R)
- Clinical Trials
- Basic Epidemiology
- Robust Statistical Methods

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which can only be taken after consultation with the course director.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Generalised Linear Models (compulsory)

- Slot 2:
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology (compulsory)

- Slot 3:
Analysis of Hierarchical & Other Dependent Data*
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Social Epidemiology

- Slot 4:
Survival Analysis and Bayesian Statistics (compulsory)

- Slot 5:
Advanced Statistical Modelling*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology*

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tmst.html

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project, for submission by early September. This usually consists of analysing a set of data and writing a report, but methodological research can also be undertaken.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msms.html#sixth

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