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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Sports Ethics and Integrity at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Sports Ethics and Integrity at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Responding to the global crisis in sports integrity this course is a world-first innovation for sports administration and governance.

Key features of MA in Sports Ethics and Integrity

The world of sport is increasingly beset by ethical problems, from corruption and match fixing to doping and illegal betting. College of Engineering offers an MA in Sports Ethics and Integrity.

The integrity of sporting bodies and organisations at every level is being brought into question, creating an urgent need to develop a coherent, professional response to these issues.

Our response is to establish sports ethics and integrity as a new, internationally recognised profession within the field of sports administration and governance in both public and private sectors; to develop 100 new postgraduate experts between 2016-21, selected from around the world who will enrich sport federations with their expertise in ethics and integrity and revolutionise the world of sport. This may be one of the few chances to respond effectively and rapidly to the global crisis in sport integrity.

‌‌‌The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity will focus on:

- Global sports governance (e.g. FIFA, IOC)

- Anti-doping and drugs education

- Privacy and data protection issues

- Fair Play, justice and human rights

- Youth Olympics, ethics and education

- Equity, diversity and inclusion (especially age and disability issues)

- Illegal and irregular gambling

- Match-fixing and sport manipulation

- Legislation and codes of conduct

- Equality and anti-discrimination (class, race, ethnicity, religion and gender issues)

- Child protection and children’s rights

- Olympism, peace, and The Olympic Truce

Course description

The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity will equip students for high-level careers in sports administration and governance, with a focus on ethical sports, integrity and compliance. Students will receive training that enables them to identify ethical issues, engage in moral thinking, and translate decisions into moral actions – the three core skills required to develop sports integrity.

The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity will support students in developing an ethical mind-set and transferable skills that are indispensable for addressing the value and integrity issues facing national and international sporting federations, national Olympic Committees, and Paralympic Committees with a focus on:

Year 1

- Ethical theory, sports and integrity

- Anti-doping: ethics, policy and practice

- Sport integrity, corruption and gambling

- Ability, disability and athlete integrity

- Sport vales, fair play and integrity

- Summer School at the International Olympic Academy - Greece

Year 2

- Olympism and the Olympic Movement

- Research methods and skills

- Governance, law and sport integrity

- Sports, management and integrity

- Student Dissertation

- Summer School at the International Olympic Academy, Greece

The MA Sports Ethics and Integrity graduates will benefit from opportunities to undertake practical placements within the partner’s extensive network of advisory bodies, federations, policy-makers and commercial organisations, as well as from extensive international collaboration and training opportunities.

International networks

This course is a product of an international collaboration of the following universities:

- Swansea University, founded in 1920, is a rapidly growing, UK top 30, research-intensive University with world-leading sports science research and productive international partnerships. Swansea has pioneered globally the ethics of sports as an area of applied research and consultancy in elite sport.

- Charles University in Prague, founded in 1348, is the oldest University in Central Europe, and is consistently ranked first among the Universities of Central and Eastern Europe.

- Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, founded in 1477, is one of the top research universities in Germany of national and international recognition. It is a founding partner of the groundbreaking Executive Master in European Sports Governance.

-KU Leuven, founded in 1425, is one of the oldest Universities in the world, and ranks among the world’s top 100 Universities. It is a leading centre of international excellence in disability and Paralympic sport.

- The University of the Peloponnese is the most recently founded of Greek Universities, and draws on extensive links with the International Olympic Academy and the Olympic Movement. It hosts summer schools on Olympic Studies at its Ancient Olympia campus, adjacent to the archaeological site of the Ancient Olympic Games

- The University Pompeu Fabra is ranked as the 1st University in Spain, the 7th in Europe and 13th worldwide in the Times Higher Education (THE) top Universities under 50 years old. It is recognised as a “Campus of International Excellence”‌‌‌



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Why study at Roehampton. All modules are taught in the evening. Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • All modules are taught in the evening
  • Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives
  • Tailor the programme to your own needs and interests
  • Gain the Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing accredited by the British Psychological Society (optional) as part of the programme or as a stand-alone module

Course summary

The Special Educational Needs (SEN) programme investigates issues involved in the education and development of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities and disadvantages. Our programme is founded upon a commitment to forms of education which enable the participation, learning and development of all.

Students studying on the programme engage with aspects of theory, policy and practice relevant to international and local contexts. With its international profile, this programme brings together teachers and other professionals working directly with children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages, as well as policy-makers and managers in areas of SEN and Inclusive Education.

On the MA Special Educational Needs, students choose between two distinct pathways, Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives, which reflect different theoretical traditions and approaches to practice, provision and policy within the field of special educational needs, disability and inclusion. Both pathways are relevant to mainstream and special education contexts.

The Inclusive Perspectives pathway emphasises the application of inclusive and person-centred values and critical educational analysis. Concepts and theories such as person-centred education; participation and ‘voice’; the social model of disability and difference; and human rights and equalities are used to consider educational practice, provision, policy and systems relating to pupils experiencing difficulties in educational settings.

The Psychological Perspectives pathway emphasises the use and application of psychological theories. Concepts and theories of cognition, educational testing, and social and emotional development are central in developing psychologically informed understandings of children and young people experiencing difficulties in educational settings. 

Students greatly benefit from engaging with the insights, experiences and perspectives of other course members, from a diverse range of contexts and backgrounds. The combination of their own experiences, insights gained from others on the course and the theoretical resources offered by learning within the modules, enables students to deepen their understanding of, and to be able to challenge, the barriers that hinder the learning, development and participation of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages.

The teaching provided on modules is informed by active research and scholarship in the field of Inclusive Education and SEN practice and policy. All lecturers leading modules on the programme have high level specialist qualifications, teaching and leadership experience in the field of Education, SEN and Inclusive Education.

Content

All students complete a common module which takes a broad view of key perspectives and issues in SEN, it also introduces the psychological and inclusive perspectives. From here, students undertake specialist modules within the programme, depending on their chosen pathway.

Inclusive Perspectives Pathway content: Students critically explore the issues involved in children’s behaviour using sociological approaches. You will reflect on your own and society's beliefs about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ behaviour, which often relate to medical and psychological foundations of schools’ policies and practices. The social pedagogical approach is also explored as a basis for inclusive teaching and learning. A critical analysis of instrumentalist/functionalist approaches to teaching is developed with a view to enhancing holistic development and the participation of pupils as a means of addressing barriers to the inclusivity of the classroom. 

Psychological Perspectives Pathway content: On this route students engage with the idea that socially and emotionally well-adjusted students perform better at school, whilst social and emotional aspects of learning have become marginalised in a highly competitive education system. The use of psychometric testing is covered, with an exploration of its appropriate uses (students can gain a Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing, accredited by the British Psychological Society, from successfully undertaking this module). 

Optional modules are available to students on both pathways which focus on Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty and on Autism in Education. Students also have an option, instead of taking a taught optional module, to take a (non-taught) Independent Study module to learn about a specific issue relevant to their pathway and interests, which is not taught about in the programme.

The final module is an independent research-based enquiry (either a Dissertation or Practice-Based Research Project), which is founded upon the pathway perspective chosen, but is also subject to the student’s choice of topic.

Modules

Required modules for both routes

  • Perspectives in SEN and Inclusion
  • Undertaking Social and Educational Research
  • Dissertation OR 
  • Practice-based Research Project

Inclusive Perspectives

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality

Psychological Perspectives

  • Assessment and Intervention in Education
  • Social and Emotional Dimensions of Learning

Optional modules 

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality
  • Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty
  • Autism: Principles, Practices and Perspectives
  • Assessment and Intervention in Education

Career options

The Programme supports and enables:

  • Careers in professional practice and leadership: teaching, advisory work, SEN coordination, inclusion management, support assistance.
  • Careers in policy-making, implementation and development of inclusion and SEN provision.
  • Careers in research and developing the inclusion and SEN workforce in further and higher education.

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This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. Read more

Course outline

This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. The varied mix of backgrounds and interests that students bring to the course, the experience and commitment of the programme director and the friendly small-group setting allow a lively, enjoyable and intellectually rigorous exchange of ideas. Graduates have gone on to publish their own books, and to win prizes. Some have embarked on further research for the MPhil or the DPhil in Biography.

When it was founded in 1996, the Biography MA was the first of its kind. Since then Life Writing has become part of the postgraduate menu, but the Buckingham course has kept its distinctive edge. Unlike most Life Writing degrees, it is not linked to Creative Writing, and there is a strong emphasis on research and historical biography. The programme is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Location

Teaching takes place at the University’s London premises:
51 Gower Street
Bloomsbury
London
WC1E 6HJ

Timetable

The course offers entry points in September and January and runs for a calendar year if taken full-time. Teaching takes place on one day a week over three terms running from September to December, January to March and April to June; the term from July to September is devoted to independent research. The programme may be followed part-time over 2 years. In the first year part-time students follow the taught courses and the second year is normally devoted to the dissertation. A detailed programme is shown here. Suitably qualified students with a major research topic in mind may be accepted for the higher degrees of MPhil (two years full-time/four years part-time) or DPhil (three years full-time/six years part-time).

Course structure

Students have a choice between following the taught MA, or opting for the MA by Research. The taught MA gives an opportunity to produce written term papers on a variety of topics as well as a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Students accepted for the MA by Research are required to produce written work which includes an extended dissertation of up to 40,000 words. All students produce coursework for the Research Methods module: an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format.

Research support

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995); The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize; and Bertie: A Life of Edward VII (2012), for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/biography.

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COURSE OVERVIEW. The philosophy of the programme is grounded in a view of professional development through research-based activity. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

The philosophy of the programme is grounded in a view of professional development through research-based activity. In each module, you are supported to engage with the theories which guide your educational practice in the situations you encounter in your role, and to test and develop these theories through research and refl ection. The teaching and learning approach of the course is founded on the principle that learning is an active, experiential and collaborative process.

The overarching aim of the educational research you will undertake is to provide you with insight into your educational practice, sustained by evidence. The outcome of this research can infl uence the quality of your practice as an educator for the benefi t of learners, other educators and the wider educational community. This approach to study provides a solid theoretical and practical foundation that can be applied to your own teaching context.

The programme is suitable for educators working across all areas of clinical and healthcare education including, for example, clinical tutors, educational supervisors, doctors, nurses, dentists, and those wishing to develop a special interest in education or who are managing education programmes.

When you complete the course, we hope you will not only see your educational practice in new ways, with greater insight, but also share your learning in your own educational contexts to inspire and lead.

Accreditation

Accredited by the Academy of Medical Educators

Careers

Medical education is regarded as a sub-speciality in its own right; increasingly educators require additional professional qualifications. This programme develops and extends the educational practice of its students and can form the basis of a research degree or further training, including progress to EdD within the University.

Suitable for Applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and Teaching

Students present their own work and experiences, and discuss texts with each other and the tutor. External speakers are invited to present work in progress, focusing on current developments in education and medical education.

The teaching and learning methods and styles adopted are founded on the principle that learning is an active, collaborative process involving both participant and tutor, and that the subject of that learning is the professional activity of the student.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus (Winchester) or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester) 

Assessment

Assessments for each module are the equivalent of 4,000 words per 20 credits. Most assignments are in the form of a research project within a medical educational field of the student's choice. It involves a large amount of independent study, with support from a supervisor. In the final year, dissertation supervision is provided individually, face-to-face, by phone or email.

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures



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The MA Education is founded on a philosophical principle that educational work is an intellectual activity, and, as such, educators are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Read more
The MA Education is founded on a philosophical principle that educational work is an intellectual activity, and, as such, educators are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Much of our activity focuses on enriching that voice, and supporting it so that it might operate in a more assertive and substantiated way.

We encourage our students to complicate and problematise practice, to actively resist those pressures that might seek to otherwise offer reduced and simplified accounts of learning. We intend to bring to the fore your ethical sensibilities and intellectual capacities. We are committed to a sense that in doing so, we enable the kinds of creative and considered practices which make real differences to the experiences of learners.

A second core principle holds that 'practice' should be central to our exploration and analysis. Throughout your study, you will be encouraged to apply new ideas and thinking in practice, and to evaluate and explore their efficacy. Practice is a form of expertise, and it - alongside any form of more conventionally 'academic' material - can be a generator of new thinking and understanding. As such, you will be encouraged to bring your practice in to sessions, in order to generate new discussion and to nuance, enrich and even challenge 'big theory'.

This award is part of the Manchester Met Faculty of Education postgraduate Professional Development Programme.

About the Course

The programme is founded on a philosophical principle that teaching is an intellectual activity, and, as such, that teachers are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Much of our activity focuses on enriching that voice, and supporting it in operating amongst the more general principles of academic practice so that it might do so in a more assertive and substantiated way.

We encourage our students to complicate and problematise practice, to actively resist those pressures that might seek to otherwise offer a reduced and simplified account of classrooms. We intend to bring to fore the ethical sensibilities of teachers, and their intellectual capacities as sense- and judgement-makers. We are committed to a sense that in doing so, we enable the kinds of creative, considered and innovative practice which can make real differences to the experiences and outcomes of learners.

A second core principle holds that 'practice' should be central to our exploration and analysis. On one level, this is about application. Throughout your study, you will be encouraged to apply new ideas and thinking in practice, and to evaluate and explore their efficacy. This will occur both informally through the sessions, and formally in practice-based 'projects'.

This principle, however, also works in reverse. We hold firm the notion that practice is a form of expertise, and that it - alongside any form of more conventionally 'academic' material - can be a generator of new thinking and understanding. As such, you will be encouraged to bring your practice in to sessions, in order to generate new discussion and to nuance, enrich and even challenge 'big theory'.

Assessment details

Assessment is by coursework for each unit and a full assignment brief is available for each unit. Assessment tasks always allow you to pursue your own thinking and interests within the parameters of the unit and award. Formative feedback is available and built in for every unit.

For taught units (30 credits) the assessment is 5000 words equivalent. The final (60 credit) dissertation is 12-14,000 words.

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The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. Read more
The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. The department is based in the Tayside Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Technology (TORT) Centre. The current staff includes a professor, two clinical senior lecturers, two non-clinical senior lecturers, one clinical and one non-clinical lecturer, one research assistant and four clinical fellows, who are supported by various staff members.

With a tradition of teaching and research in the field of mechanisms of disease, treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system and biomedical and rehabilitation engineering. The founder, Professor Ian Smillie, gained a worldwide reputation in knee surgery and the role of the meniscus. His successor, Professor George Murdoch, founded and developed the Dundee Limb Fitting Centre and the Tayside Rehabilitation Engineering Services, which have acquired an international reputation for the treatment of the amputee and assessment of gait analysis. His successor, Professor David Rowley, sustained the department’s international reputation and innovation in the area of joints replacement complemented by a worldwide service in Clinical Audit Outcomes

Overview

The MSc in Orthopaedic Science programme will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It is the only programme amongst the few comparable MSc programmes in the UK with a specific focus on the theoretical and practical application of technology within orthopaedics. Additionally, it equips trainees with the knowledge of fundamental science required for the FRCS exit exam.

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide students with a Masters level postgraduate education in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It also aims to provide experience in the design and execution of a substantive research project in the field of orthopaedic, biomechanics and rehabilitation technology and its underlying science.
By the end of the programme, students should have a systematic understanding and knowledge of the physical sciences and technology relevant to orthopaedics, a critical awareness of current research questions in the field and the appropriate practical and analytical skills in order to be able to:

- Understand and interpret complex scientific concepts.
- Critically evaluate current research.
- Understand and utilise relevant technology, and have the ability to evaluate and critique methodologies.
- Develop and test scientific hypotheses, including the design of laboratory research projects aimed at addressing specific hypothesis-driven questions.
- Undertake the practical and technical aspects of a laboratory-based project.
- Communicate complex scientific concepts to specialist and non-specialist audiences, both verbally and in writing.
- Demonstrate an understanding of whether specific research outcomes make a significant, novel contribution to the field.

Programme Content

The programme will be taught part-time by distance learning over a period of normally 3 to 5 years, or one year full time in house. It is comprised of five compulsory 30-credit taught modules and one 60 credit research project module.

Module 1 - Mechanics
Module 2 - Biomechanics
Module 3 - Rehabilitation Technology
Module 4 - Orthopaedic Technology
Module 5 - Statistics

Methods of Teaching and Assessment

Modules 1-5:
Teaching in modules 1-5 will be delivered through distance learning module components, each comprised of a module component guide and several component units. Tutor support will be available via email, web conferencing, written correspondence and telephone.

Assessment of modules 1-5 will be by examination with the option of sitting exams upon completion of each individual module or upon completion of all five modules. Assessment is weighted (80%) by exam and (20%) by coursework.

Successful completion of the PGDip modules 1-5 is required to progress to the research project component. Successful completion of course work will normally be required prior to sitting the examination papers. Each of the two components of assessment for the PGCert and PGDip (course work and examination) must have a minimum grade of D3 to pass and progress to the full MSc programme.

Module 6 - Research Project:
During the research project, learning will be partly experiential, partly directed and partly self-directed. The research project will be assessed through the presentation of a thesis, and the final mark will be moderated through an oral exam (60 credits).

why study at Dundee?

In 2013 the MCh (Orth) Dundee, course was granted full accreditation by the Royal College of Surgeons of
England. This accreditation is extremely important and comes as the department is celebrating the 20th
anniversary of the course. This is the only face-to-face course accredited by the College outside of England.

“It was a great learning experience. Coming here, my overall
personality has changed. I have learnt the right way to write
a thesis and also got to know the recent advancements in
field of Orthopaedic surgery” International Student Barometer, 2009

Career Prospects

The programme will prepare graduates for a research-focused clinical career in the NHS or academia, and is particularly well positioned to prepare graduates for entry into a clinical academic career path.

If taken in-house, the start date for this course is September. The distance learning start date can be at any point in the year.
* The taught elements are conducted by self-directed learning modules as with distance learning but the project will be undertaken in-house. The candidate will be attached to a consultant firm as an observer.

Students wishing to pursue the MSc must complete the Diploma within 3 years part-time or 9 months full-time. The MSc must be completed within a period of 1 year full-time or 2-5 years part-time.

Fees must be paid in full prior to commencing the course (in-house only).

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Why study at MODUL University Vienna. The MODUL brand stands for more than 100 years of excellence in tourism management education. Read more
Why study at MODUL University Vienna

The MODUL brand stands for more than 100 years of excellence in tourism management education. Founded in 1908, MODUL College is the vocational training school with the longest tradition in tourism and hospitality education worldwide, with more than six thousand graduates who currently hold leading positions all over the world. Based on this knowledge, MODUL University Vienna was founded as a true international university in 2007 and has quickly established itself as the premier European Center for Tourism Research, internationally renowned for its undergraduate and graduate degree programs and research expertise in the area of tourism and hospitality management.

Program Focus

The MSc in International Tourism Management is a two-year, full-time program taught entirely in English which prepares its students for a future career in the international tourism industry – the fastest growing industry sector in the world, providing global job opportunities. Accredited by the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO.TedQual) and the European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education (ENQA), the program is the only accredited research university degree in Tourism Management in Central Europe. Students will gain a solid basis in management through subjects in finance, economics, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and information technology. Furthermore, they will specialize in the area of international tourism management through subjects such as destination management, tourism and hotel marketing, tourism market research, e-distribution, and benchmarking, which typically qualifies them to pursue a career in one of the following tourism sectors:
• International, national, or local travel and tourism authorities
• Tourism and hospitality consulting industry
• International hospitality industry

Career Opportunities

After graduation, MODUL University’s Career Center (http://www.modulcareer.at) supports alumni in their career path. With almost 500 partner companies in the international tourism and hospitality industry and an active alumni association, many Master graduates begin their professional lives in positions such as tourism consultants at partner companies like PKF hotelexperts and Kohl & Partner, in the sales and marketing departments of major international hotel chains, or return to their home country to take up employment in local, city, or national tourism marketing. Additionally, MU’s faculty has close ties to international organizations including European Cities Marketing, the European Travel Commission and the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). MODUL University serves as hub for delegates from these entities and other international tourism organizations to come together on occasions such as the prestigious annual TourMIS workshop to discuss the topic of benchmarking tourism destinations and to establish a vital network within the international tourism community.

The Ideal MSc Student

Students enrolled in the MSc in International Tourism Management come from all over the world. The program typically has a 90% international student population and class sizes of maximum 10-15 students. This intimate and multicultural study environment provides an interactive in-class experience which encourages students to engage in discussions and to share their personal views on tourism development examples from their home countries. Additionally, an overall 1:5 faculty:student ratio guarantees that faculty members know their students on a first name basis. The ideal MSc candidate has obtained an undergraduate degree (from a university or a university of applied sciences) in social sciences, economics, business administration, or tourism and hospitality management and wants to continue with a research-based university degree with a possible doctorate afterwards, and has a genuine interest in modern tourism marketing and research techniques. For more details on the curriculum, the program’s faculty, and the admission criteria visit http://www.modul.ac.at or contact our Admissions Office ().

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The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Read more

Course outline

The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Since then, in response to student demand, the available options have been extended to include postgraduate research degrees at three levels: MA by Research, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Course structure

For their first year of study students on all these courses attend the same weekly seminars as students taking the Taught MA in Biography. These provide the critical awareness of the subject which is an essential prerequisite for dissertation work and they are one of the most distinctive and valuable elements of the MA. They take place as follows:

- Autobiography (September to December)
- Special Paper in Biography (January to June)
- Research Methods (January to June)

The modules on Biography and Autobiography are designed to combine the study of classic biographies and memoirs with contemporary writing. In addition, the Research Methods module provides an invaluable and innovative training, especially devised for biographers.

Guest seminars on the course are led by leading biographers, critics, publishers and agents. Teachers and speakers on the course have included Andrew Motion, Kathryn Hughes, Frances Wilson, Frances Spalding, Jeremy Lewis, Rupert Shortt, Caroline Dawnay, Andrew Lownie and Miranda Seymour.

Research students are expected to produce, as a valuable preliminary to their own research project, written coursework for the Research Methods module (an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format), and one other piece of written work, but the full amount of termly written work required for the taught course is not compulsory. During the early part of the course, research students refine their research proposal under the individual supervision of the course director for eventual discussion with the Research Officer. Once the research proposal has been accepted students concentrate on individual research and the preparation of a dissertation, under the supervision of the course director.

Teaching methods

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995) and The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement. She is currently completing a biography of Edward VII, for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust.

Location

Teaching takes place in London. See the University's website for more information.

Timescale

The normal periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

- MA Res– 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
- MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
- DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time

Administrative arrangements

A system of preliminary registration for all research degrees is in operation to allow students to prepare a formal proposal during the early part of their course. Admission to research degrees is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met. Students for the MA degree in Biography by Research are registered initially for the taught MA until the research proposal has been accepted. Postgraduate students wishing to register for the DPhil programme in Biography must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage. Registration is upgraded to DPhil, normally between 12 and 18 months from first registration, once the student has demonstrated through the submission of draft written work that he or she has the ability to conduct research at the advanced level required for the award of the degree. All research students must also subject their work to an annual progress review.

Changing the level of the research degree after the start of the course, although not impossible, can produce complications. Prospective students uncertain about the level or length of course best suited to them are strongly advised to discuss this with the course director before applying.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/mres/biography.

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Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice. Read more
Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice.

The programme covers the areas of linguistics that inform classroom practice (such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics and phonetics), raising awareness of these fields and applying them to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).

Practical teaching opportunities are a feature of the programme, including teaching to your peer group and international students from other programmes. There is also the opportunity to visit a local language college and observe classes.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/357/applied-linguistics-and-teaching-english-to-speakers-of-other-languages-tesol

About the Department of English Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). ELL is a dynamic and growing department with a vibrant research culture. We specialise in experimental and theoretical linguistics. In particular, our interests focus on quantitative and experimental research in speech and language processing, variation and acquisition, but also cover formal areas such as syntax, as well as literary stylistics. In addition to English and its varieties, our staff work in French, German, Greek, Romani, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

Staff and postgraduates are members of the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS), a research centre that seeks to promote interdisciplinary linguistic research. We also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

Course structure

The programme starts with three linguistics modules (Sounds, Structure and Meaning) and a module on language awareness for teachers (Language Awareness and Analysis) so that you have a firm grasp of the linguistic bases of language teaching and how to apply them to the classroom.

In the spring term the focus is on how languages are learned (Second Language Acquisition), how you can improve classroom technique (The Practice of TESOL), plan for your students’ needs (Course and Syllabus Design) and provide them with materials which will be interesting, effective and motivating (Materials Evaluation and Development).

The dissertation will be an opportunity to plan and develop a piece of empirical research which can be of direct relevance to your current or planned teaching situation.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by a 3-4,000-word essay, but assessment patterns can include practical/experimental work, report and proposal writing, critiques, problem solving and seminar presentations. You also complete a 12-15,000-word research dissertation on a topic agreed with your supervisor.

Programme aims

- Provide TESOL practitioners with advanced knowledge of linguistics related to language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, which will enhance, develop and inform their understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

- To produce graduates who will contribute locally, nationally and internationally to the TESOL community.

- To prepare students to be more effective in the TESOL classroom.

- To provide students with teaching and training which is informed by research, scholarship, practice and experience.

Research areas

Alongside our research centre below, we also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

- Linguistics Lab

The newly established Linguistics Lab is currently housed in Rutherford College and has facilities for research in acoustics, sociophonetics and speech and language processing. English Language and Linguistics (ELL) members also have access to the School of European Culture and Language (SECL) recording studio and multimedia labs which can be used both for research and teaching.

- Centre for Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics is the main contributor to the Centre for Language and Linguistics. Founded in 2007, the Centre promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Careers

Postgraduate work in English Language and Linguistics prepares you for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include speech and language theory, audiology, teaching, publishing, advertising, journalism, public relations, company training, broadcasting, forensic and computational work, and the civil or diplomatic services.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Master's specialisation in Philosophical Anthropology (Research). Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophical Anthropology (Research)

In Philosophical Anthropology you study the philosophical significance of psychoanalytical hermeneutics as developed by Freud and followers (Lacan, Klein, et al.) Research focuses in particular on the phenomenological tradition (Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze and Butler).

The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium). The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.

Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.

Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasizes the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.

However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, with the potential for a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.

Clearly, this approach has far-reaching consequences for our understanding of the relation between normality and pathology. This avenue is currently being pursued at the CPPA in an endeavour to explore philosophical psychopathology and its consequences, both as a contribution to Freudian metapsychology and as a critique of it.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, nor to one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills; namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions using clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate; they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first vocational step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium), respectively. The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.

Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.

Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasises the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.

However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, harbouring the possibility of a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Our master’s program appeals to those interested in a more patient-centered approach to helping people achieve and maintain optimal wellness through focus on the whole person, rather than simply their symptoms. Read more
Our master’s program appeals to those interested in a more patient-centered approach to helping people achieve and maintain optimal wellness through focus on the whole person, rather than simply their symptoms.

Highlights:

- Accredited program offered in collaboration with the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM)
- Rigorous, clinically-applicable curriculum that is continually reviewed and updated with new research and findings
- 100 percent online format with flexible schedule options
- Engaging online learning experience featuring distinguished and dedicated instructors and an expert support network to reinforce clinical and academic skills
- Program satisfies educational requirements to sit for many national nutrition certification exams

Don’t miss your chance to enroll in our spring term!

MISSION

The mission of the UWS master’s in human nutrition and functional medicine (HNFM) program is to prepare learners to serve as outstanding health care clinicians, consultants, educators, administrators and researchers in the field of human nutrition and functional medicine.

PROGRAM

Our clinically-oriented human nutrition and functional medicine program is the only fully accredited master’s degree in functional medicine, having been granted regional accreditation from the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, the highest level of academic accreditation available in the U.S. This program is 100 percent online as offered as a collaborative endeavor between UWS and the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM), the organization which founded and developed the key functional medicine concepts used today.

Functional medicine is a science-based, patient-centered and systems-oriented approach to helping people achieve and maintain excellent health. This is accomplished primarily through natural methods, with diet and nutrition as a central focus. It is a forefront model for health care practice that seeks to address the causes of disease and dysfunction rather than suppressing symptoms. Founded on a holistic view of health, functional medicine delves deep into the biochemical and genetic individuality of each patient.

Why choose UWS for a master’s in nutrition?

This program includes advanced instruction in clinical nutrition, similar to other master’s level nutrition programs, but it goes far beyond by also presenting extensive educational content on functional medicine principles and practices derived from the Institute for Functional Medicine. These include important interdisciplinary and evidence-based perspectives, patient assessments and clinical interventions designed to enhance the function of the whole person.

It is primarily a clinically focused degree, with emphasis on treating individual or multiple conditions and their risk factors using dietary and nutritional interventions. Every course contains elements of clinical assessment and diagnosis. There is also a strong focus on wellness promotion and general health in order to meet the clinician’s primary goal of preventing disease and metabolic dysfunction before they occur.

SCHEDULE

The program consists of 50 quarter-credits of graduate coursework (33 semester credits) and can be completed in seven quarters (under two years) if taken at the recommended pace of 7-8 credits (usually two courses) per quarter, though students may move more quickly or more slowly through the program. We recognize that the life situations of our students vary considerably in terms of their family, employment and community commitments, thus we are flexible with regard to speed and prefer that students take the time they need in order to learn the material well.

Additionally, it is possible to take a leave of absence for a quarter or more if needed. As long as the intended schedule is communicated with the registrar, it is possible to extend the program to better suit a student’s individual needs.

Classes are admitted twice per year, with Fall (October) and Spring (April) starts.

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Interaction Design at Malmö University. We educate designers who can articulate and develop cutting-edge practices in key areas of interaction design. Read more

Interaction Design at Malmö University

We educate designers who can articulate and develop cutting-edge practices in key areas of interaction design: tangible and sensor-based interaction, wearable and embodied interaction, game design, participatory design practices, critical design, social innovation and collaborative media development. Students approach these genres within a broad context that considers the social, political and ethical consequences of their designs. Our education is studio-based, bringing students into close contact with our design professors.

This is a one-year programme, which is also offered as the first year of a two-year programme providing a more well-rounded combination of design practice and academic research.

Interaction Design: one-year programme

Interaction Design: two-year programme

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department School of Arts and Communication.

Practical Design Skills and Academic Research

Interaction design is a rapidly changing discipline, and we maintain the relevance of our education by working with real-world design cases and outside clients that include local industry partners, as well as cultural and civic organisations. Navigating a shifting design landscape also requires the critical mindset of a scholar, and we foster reflective design by teaching research skills and involving students in active research projects.

Internationally Recognised

Our programme was founded in 1998, making it one of the more established programmes of its kind. We focus on areas where our design and research excellence is internationally recognised: tangible and sensor-based interaction, wearable and embodied interaction, game design, participatory design practices, critical design, social innovation and collaborative media development.

Who are you?

Interaction design requires the fusion of multiple skill sets. We recruit students with different backgrounds – design, media, engineering, the arts, and social sciences – and focus our teaching on creating disciplinary synergy in the concrete design work.

Content

The programme comprises full-time study for one academic year, divided into four courses starting with a studio-based introduction to multidisciplinary collaboration and mainstream interaction design. The next two courses address embodied interaction and collaborative media, two of our signature topics. The final course is a Master’s level graduation project.

Upon graduation, you are eligible for the second year of the two-year Master’s programme to learn more about interaction design research and theory. Read more about the two-year Master’s programme

Teaching Methods

The programme is based on a learning-by-doing pedagogy. This means that we encourage an iterative practice of experimentation and reflection. As teachers, we view ourselves as coaches guiding you in this process.

Studio-based

The programme is studio-based. You will also have access to computer labs, a materials workshop and a prototyping lab for electronics, sensor and microprocessor programming.

Group work in multidisciplinary teams

The primary method of learning is through group work in multidisciplinary teams with classmates and other stakeholders. Abilities to work in teams and with others – including user communities – are important parts of our curriculum, and several projects are organised to practice doing this.

Humanistic approach

With our humanistic approach, you will be practicing qualitative research approaches to support your design of tangible artefacts as well as digital and interactive services, systems and artefacts. We emphasize an understanding of people in their use situations.

Reflective and experimental design thinking and practical doing

Prototyping in the studio and real-world contexts is an integral part of becoming an interaction designer.

To practice reflective and experimental design activity, projects and courses integrate seminars and hands-on workshops introducing students to, among other things, ethnographic fieldwork, visualisation, low- and high-fidelity prototyping, microprocessor programming and video sketching, as well as evaluation of use qualities. All these practices are backed up by literature references and examples.

The thesis project

Your thesis project will be a combination of a design project and reflective writing that will involve communicating and discussing your design work. This is one result of a student's work in Thesis Project I.

Working environments

Students have access to studio space, and we encourage a healthy studio culture. This is where we conduct group-work, seminars, workshops, presentations and discussions. Close by there is a well-equipped materials workshop and a physical prototyping lab for electronics and sensor work. Additionally, we often use the facilities at the MEDEA research centre for final presentations, exhibitions, seminars and programme-meetings.

Career opportunities

Students enter the programme with different kinds of expertise, from art and design to engineering and social sciences. Upon graduation, you will have built a strong understanding of how your particular skills play a role in interaction design and how they combine with other specialities of fellow designers.

Potential positions

Most alumni move on to positions as interaction designers, user experience specialists or usability architects in the ICT, telecom and media industries. For some, this involves fine-tuning the interfaces and interactions of current products to users' needs; other interaction designers work on concept development for future products and services. Yet other alumni find their calling in strategic positions where the role of interaction design is considered in relation to market and business development.

Some interaction designers are also found in the role of change agents in public organisations and NGOs.



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In this programme, leading academics encourage students to think across different disciplines to blend scientific, socioeconomic and policy perspectives for a stronger understanding of sustainability and how it can be achieved. Read more

In this programme, leading academics encourage students to think across different disciplines to blend scientific, socioeconomic and policy perspectives for a stronger understanding of sustainability and how it can be achieved. This wider perspective is attractive to organisations which promote sustainable development or seek to reduce humanity’s effect on the environment.

Ensuring the environmental sustainability of society is one of the major challenges facing humanity in the 21st century. How can the needs of the world’s growing population be met without threatening the ecological processes that support human wellbeing?

How can the economy and energy systems be restructured to combat climate change? What policies foster sustainability? How can the necessary changes in the behaviour of organisations and individuals be promoted? This MSc programme explores these and related, topical questions.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Environment & Society Academy.

Programme structure

This programme consists of six taught courses, studied over two semesters. Students will also undertake a research project leading to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words.

Compulsory courses typically will be:

  • Principles of Environmental Sustainability
  • Case Studies in Sustainable Development
  • Dissertation

Option courses: In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses. We particularly recommend:

  • Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
  • Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
  • Energy & Society 1: Key Themes and Issues
  • Foundations in Ecological Economics
  • Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
  • Environmental Valuation
  • Development: Principles and Practices
  • Understanding Environment and Development
  • Energy Policy and Politics
  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Forests and Environment
  • Participation in Policy and Planning
  • Political Ecology
  • Sustainability of Food Production
  • The Ecology of Ecosystem Services
  • Waste Reduction and Recycling
  • Water Resource Management

Courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change.

Learning outcomes

Students will be equipped to:

  • assess the sustainability of policies, programmes and projects at scales ranging from the local to the global
  • analyse environmental problems using knowledge from different disciplines, leading to well-founded and effective solutions
  • advocate sustainable development and engage in informed debate on current environmental controversies

Career opportunities

This programme prepares students for a wide range of roles within environmental consultancy, national and local government, non-profit organisations, education or research. The choice of option courses and dissertation projects can be tailored towards your chosen career path.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.



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The course trains students from a variety of academic backgrounds to work as statisticians in various sectors including higher education, research institutions, the pharmaceutical industry, central government and national health services. Read more
The course trains students from a variety of academic backgrounds to work as statisticians in various sectors including higher education, research institutions, the pharmaceutical industry, central government and national health services. It provides training in the theory and practice of statistics with special reference to clinical trials, epidemiology and clinical or laboratory research.

The PSI Andrew Hewett Prize is founded in memory of Andrew Hewett, an alumnus of the School and awarded by the PSI (Statisticians in the Pharmaceutical Industry) to the best student on the course.
Duration: one year full-time or part-time over two years. Modes of study explained.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/ms_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msms.html

For the MSc Medical Statistics it is preferred that students should normally have obtained a mathematically-based first degree which includes some statistics. Graduates from other fields who have quantitative skills and some familiarity with statistical ideas may also apply.

Any student who does not meet the minimum entry requirement above but who has relevant professional experience may still be eligible for admission. Qualifications and experience will be assessed from the application.

Intercalating this course

(http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Undergraduate medical students can take a year out either to pursue related studies or work. The School welcomes applications from medical students wishing to intercalate after their third year of study from any recognised university in the world.

Why intercalate with us?:
Reputation: The School has an outstanding international reputation in public health & tropical medicine and is at the forefront of global health research. It is highly rated in a number of world rankings including:

- World’s leading research-focused graduate school (Times Higher Education World Rankings, 2013)
- Third in the world for social science and public health (US News Best Global Universities Ranking, 2014)
- Second in UK for research impact (Research Exercise Framework 2014)
- Top in Europe for impact (Leiden Ranking, 2015)

Highly recognised qualification: possessing a Master's from the School will give you a focused understanding of health and disease, broaden your career prospects and allow you to be immersed in research in a field of your choice.

Valuable skills: you will undertake an independent research project (summer project) in your chosen topic, equipping you with research skills that will distinguish you in a clinical environment. While your medical qualification will give you a breadth of knowledge; undertaking an intercalated degree will allow you to explore your main area of interest in greater depth.

Alumni network: the School has a strong international and diverse alumni community, with more than 20,000 alumni in over 180 countries.

MSc vs. BSc: undertaking an MSc is an excellent opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge in your chosen topic and enhance your skills in scientific research. Postgraduate qualifications are increasingly sought after by clinicians and possessing a Masters qualification can assist you in your future career progression.

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- select appropriate study designs to address questions of medical relevance

- select and apply appropriate statistical techniques for managing common types of medical data

- use various software packages for statistical analysis and data management

- interpret the results of statistical analyses and critically evaluate the use of statistics in the medical literature

- communicate effectively with statisticians and the wider medical community, in writing and orally through presentation of results of statistical analyses

- explore current and anticipated developments in medical statistics

Structure

Term 1:
All students take five compulsory modules:
- Foundations of Medical Statistics
- Introduction to Statistical Computing (Stata/SAS/R)
- Clinical Trials
- Basic Epidemiology
- Robust Statistical Methods

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which can only be taken after consultation with the course director.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Generalised Linear Models (compulsory)

- Slot 2:
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology (compulsory)

- Slot 3:
Analysis of Hierarchical & Other Dependent Data*
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Social Epidemiology

- Slot 4:
Survival Analysis and Bayesian Statistics (compulsory)

- Slot 5:
Advanced Statistical Modelling*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology*

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tmst.html

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project, for submission by early September. This usually consists of analysing a set of data and writing a report, but methodological research can also be undertaken.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msms.html#sixth

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This course provides core training in the theoretical and practical aspects of medical parasitology, covering the protozoan and metazoan parasites of humans and the vectors which transmit them. Read more
This course provides core training in the theoretical and practical aspects of medical parasitology, covering the protozoan and metazoan parasites of humans and the vectors which transmit them. Students will gain specialised skills to enable them to pursue a career in research, control or teaching related to medical parasitology.

Graduates enter a range of global health fields ranging from diagnostics through to applied basic research and operational control to higher degree studies and academic/teaching-related positions.

The Patrick Buxton Memorial Medal and Prize is awarded to the best student of the year. Founded by relatives of Patrick Alfred Buxton, Professor in Entomology, who died in 1955.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/mp_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msmp.html

Additional Requirements

An additional preferred requirement for the MSc Parasitology is an interest in parasites of public health importance and disease transmission. Any student who does not meet the minimum entry requirement above but who has relevant professional experience may still be eligible for admission. Qualifications and experience will be assessed from the application.

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to demonstrate:

- detailed knowledge and understanding of the biology, life cycles, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of parasitic infections in humans and their relevance for human health and control

- detailed knowledge and understanding of the biology and strategies for control of the vectors and intermediate hosts of human parasites

- carry out practical laboratory identification of parasite stages both free and in tissues and diagnose infections

- specialised skills in: advanced diagnostic, molecular, immunological, genetic, chemotherapeutic, ecological and/or control aspects of the subject

- the ability to design a laboratory or field-based research project, and apply relevant research skills

- prepare a written report including a critical literature review of relevant scientific publications, and show competence in communicating scientific findings

Structure

Term 1:
There is a two-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and an introduction to major groups of pathogens, followed by three compulsory core modules:

- Parasitology & Entomology
- Analysis & Design of Research Studies
- Critical Skills for Tropical Medicine

Recommended module: Molecular Biology

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Some modules can be taken only after consultation with the Course Director.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Molecular Biology & Recombinant DNA Techniques*
Advanced Immunology 1
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries

- Slot 2:
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology*
Advanced Immunology 2
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination*
Advanced Training in Molecular Biology
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health
Tropical Environmental Health

- Slot 4:
Immunology of Parasitic Infection: Principles*
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications*
Vector Biology & Vector Parasite Interactions*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases
Genetic Epidemiology

- Slot 5 :
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy*
Integrated Vector Management*
Molecular Cell Biology & Infection*
AIDS

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tmpa.html

Residential Field Trip

There is a compulsory one week field course, after the Term 3 examinations, on vector and parasite sampling and identification methods.The cost of £630 is included in the field trip fee.

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project, for submission by early September. This may be based on a critical review of an approved topic, analysis of a collection of results or a laboratory study.Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved.

The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msmp.html#sixth

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