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Masters Degrees (Forensic Criminology)

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Develop a deep insight into crime and criminal behaviour by studying this uniquely practical and applied course in criminology and forensic psychology. Read more
Develop a deep insight into crime and criminal behaviour by studying this uniquely practical and applied course in criminology and forensic psychology.

Studying applied criminology and forensic psychology at postgraduate level will allow you to develop a range of analytical and practical skills benefitting you as a practitioner or researcher.

You’ll have the opportunity of a work placement alongside specialised modules covering mediation, international criminology, assessment of offenders, child protection and advanced quantitative and qualitative research methods. These modules will give you a valuable set of skills for both employment and further research.

Your tutors will be research-active staff who are experts in their field. You’ll also benefit from external practitioners who bring their practical skills and experience to the course.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MSc-Applied-Criminology-and-Forensic-Psychology-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

You’ll develop a critical awareness of topics at the forefront of criminology and forensic psychology, and the contexts and theories that influence practice in these areas.

The applied focus of this course provides an excellent foundation in risk assessment of offenders, methods of rehabilitation, use of forensic interviewing strategies, mediation skills and facial composite construction.

Alongside these skills you’ll also learn directly from leading experts about current research and debates in criminology and forensic psychology which directly affect people at all points in the legal system.

Additionally you'll acquire excellent transferable research skills in both quantitative and qualitative methods which will enable you to carry out high quality research in a variety of contexts and with ethical integrity.

This is a one year full-time course delivered over three trimesters. You’ll learn by a variety of teaching methods including lectures, tutorials, laboratory sessions and independent study.

Modules

• Practical Forensic Psychology (assessing offenders and working with witnesses)
• Advanced Forensic Psychology (therapeutic jurisprudence and neuroethics)
• Criminal Justice in Practice
• Current Topics in Crime
• Comparative and International Criminology
• Advanced Research Skills
• Community Safety and Mediation
• Investigative Journalism
• Work Placement
• Dissertation

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

With a mix of subject specific knowledge, practical skills and technical abilities graduates will have the opportunity to develop a career in a range of occupations including:

• HM Prisons and secure units
• Probation service
• Police services
• Social work
• Court services
• Legal services
• Voluntary sector
• Community development
• Adult guidance
• Local and central government
• Academia and research
• Health services
• Forensic services
• Private practice

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study. Read more
The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study.

The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues. The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of the mentally disordered offender and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

The programme is accreditated by The British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology

Embedded within the programme are a series of optional work experience opportunities that staff members promote among the cohort. Although these opportunities will not attract course credits or extend the period of student registration, staff endeavour to generate a range of relevant opportunities and work with colleagues in the careers service to ensure that necessary paperwork and insurance are in place.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/criminologyandsociology/coursefinder/mscforensicpsychology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues.

- The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of mentally disordered offenders and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

- The assignments that we use are not only exams and traditional academic essays but also include professional reports, oral presentations and written reflections which enable you to build important skills that are critical for your future career as a forensic psychologist.

- The programme is accredited by the MSc British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology.

- We deliberately limit student numbers to ensure high standards and to enable us to develop a good relationship with each of our students.

Department research and industry highlights

The programme is delivered by a team of leading academics with expertise in their fields. The core teaching staff is made up of:

- Dr Emily Glorney is a Registered Forensic Psychologist with over 15 years of experience working in forensic practice and conducting research across secure hospitals and prisons. Emily is currently working on collaborative research projects with Broadmoor Hospital, exploring the meaning of religion and sprituality in the recovery pathways of patients and developing a quantitative observation system for the alerting of aggressive and violent behaviour.

- Professor Rosie Meek is a Chartered Psychologist and prison researcher, conducting qualitative and quantitative research throughout the UK and internationally. She works closely with a range of Criminal Justice agencies, including prisons and Immigration Removal Centres, a broad range of third sector organisations that work directly with offenders, and the Ministry of Justice. Her specialisms include prison healthcare and education, the role of the voluntary sector in reducing reoffending and promoting desistance, and the evaluation of prison-based interventions and programmes. Dr Meek’s most recent book ‘Sport in Prison’ has been used by those responsible for developing physical activity policy in prisons in England and Wales.

- Dr Laura Mickes is a Cognitive Psychologist who specialises in modelling human memory. Laura was part of the team that developed a widely-used statistical method for use in eyewitness identification research. Her current research is dedicated to identifying and developing procedures that enhance eyewitness accuracy, where she works with Identification Officers at the Metropolitan Police.

- Professor Amina Memon is a Chartered Psychologist with over 25 years of experience in higher education and research. Her research in the area of psychology and law spans cognitive, social and forensic domains. Her work is firmly grounded in policy and practice, for example she studies how to maximise the accuracy, truthfulness and credibility of witness statements, has contributed to training of the police and judiciary and has served as an expert witness in family court cases and criminal trials. Professor Memon’s background in human rights had led to her extending her research to third sector organisations such as Asylum Aid, Plan UK and Freedom From Torture.

- Dr David La Rooy is a Chartered Psychologist. He is an internationally recognised memory expert, expert in investigative interviewing techniques, and conducts research that has influenced the training of child forensic interviewers, the police, lawyers and judges around the world in how best to interview victims of child abuse. He has co-edited two volumes for the 'Wiley Series in the Psychology of Crime, Policing and Law.'

Course content and structure

The programme is made up of the following six core courses (Four delivered in the Autumn term and two in the Spring term) and the dissertation which is undertaken throughout the year.

The programme confers Stage 1 of a two-stage process of professional training in forensic psychology that is assessed by the British Psychological Society (the second stage of professional training is subsequent and external to the MSc Forensic Psychology programme at Royal Holloway). International students would be welcome on the programme of study.

The British Psychological Society requires that core knowledge domains are incorporated into the course so as to reflect the diversity of research and practice in forensic psychology. The unique selling point and emphasis of the programme at Royal Holloway is defined by the multidisciplinarity of the teaching (jointly by forensic psychologists and those carrying out research relevant to forensic psychology in the departments of Psychology and Law) and the research strengths of both departments.

Core course units:
- Research Based Practice in Forensic Psychology
- Young People in the Criminal Justice System
- The Legal Process
- Aspects of the Investigative Process
- Advanced Techniques in Social and Behavioural Research
- Statistics for Research
- Dissertation

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The MSc in Forensic Psychology at Kent is accredited by The British Psychological Society as providing the first (academic) year of professional training for those who wish to qualify as Chartered Forensic Psychologists. Read more
The MSc in Forensic Psychology at Kent is accredited by The British Psychological Society as providing the first (academic) year of professional training for those who wish to qualify as Chartered Forensic Psychologists.

The programme was introduced in October 1995, and the School of Psychology has a long tradition of research in the area of criminal justice and legal psychology. Currently, several members of the School are actively involved in research and consultancy, and several PhD students are currently conducting research under their supervision.

This MSc is the only programme that offers an entire module on offender cognition, which helps you to understand how offence-supportive thinking can increase the chances of sexual offenders, firesetters and other individuals committing offences. With the support of forensic psychology staff you will also gain real-world writing skills such as journal writing, risk assessment reports, court reports and government research reports.

We are particularly interested in receiving applications from suitably qualified graduates who have direct experience of the application of psychological principles in custodial or other forensic settings, although such experience is not essential. As a significant element of the programme involves training in advanced methodological and statistical techniques, we are unable to consider applications from candidates who do not qualify for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the BPS - Graduate Membership of the BPS is insufficient.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/69/forensic-psychology

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our long-established international reputation in social psychology is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Modules

The modules below are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

The MSc in Forensic Psychology is composed of the following six compulsory modules:

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP809 - Research Project in Criminology,Legal or Forensic Psychology (60 credits)
SP805 - Psychology of Criminal Conduct (20 credits)
SP806 - Psychology of Law and Justice (20 credits)
SP825 - Assessment and Treatment of Offenders in Forensic Settings (20 credits)

Assessment

The MSc in Forensic Psychology aims to satisfy the academic component of professional training in forensic psychology (that is, to become a Chartered Forensic Psychologist). Throughout the programme, you attend non-assessed seminars and go on site visits.

The programme includes lecture, workshop and seminar-based teaching, as well as an individually supervised empirical research project.

Advanced Statistics and Methodology is assessed by examination. All other taught modules are assessed by written work and presentations. Research is assessed by two articles: one empirical paper and one review article on your chosen topic.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster your intellectual development by providing you with specialised knowledge of a range of theoretical approaches to forensic psychology and statistical and methodological expertise in order that you should be well equipped to make your own original contribution to psychological knowledge

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as psychologists

- satisfy the academic requirements of the knowledge base specified by the British Psychological Society

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Professional recognition

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

The MSc in Forensic Psychology at Kent is accredited by The British Psychological Society as providing the first (academic) year of professional training for those who wish to qualify as Chartered Forensic Psychologists. Graduates from the programme are then required to gain the equivalent of a further two years' relevant experience under the supervision of a Chartered Forensic Psychologist before qualifying for Chartered status themselves. You should contact the BPS directly if you have enquiries about the nature of the supervised practice element of qualification.

Please note that only students who gain a mark of 40% or above in every module, with an overall mark of at least 50%, are eligible for accreditation by the British Psychological Society.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society. Read more

Why take this course?

Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society.

This is a unique course informed by research at the forefront of the field, with many opportunities to get involved with ongoing projects within the Department.

Applications for this course close 15 January 2016 to be considered for interview on 23 or 25 February and close 15 February 2016 to be considered for interview on 22 and 24 March.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by the largest group of actively researching academics at the cutting edge of forensic psychology research in the UK
Put your investigative techniques to the test in our Forensic Interviewing Suite
Benefit from our connections with a variety of custodial establishments including adult male and women's prisons, young offenders' institutions and secure hospitals

What opportunities might it lead to?

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing an important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. It aims to provide you with a systematic knowledge and understanding of forensic psychology, in accordance with the academic requirements of the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP), the British Psychological Society (BPS) for accredited courses and eventual progression to autonomous practice.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Working in prisons
Probation work
The police force
Social work
Health services
The courts
Academia
Private practice

Module Details

The course content is structured to reflect developments and priorities in the field of forensic psychology and is kept under constant review to keep it up-to-date.

Here are the units you will study:

Theory into Practice: Foundations of Professional Competence in Forensic Psychology: This unit provides a foundation for working as a scientist-practitioner. From an early introduction to concepts of reflective practice, personal development and core skills relevant to completing the course, it moves to encouraging an awareness of factors involved in criminal behaviour and their implications. The focus is on the application and development of skills in analysis and less on the learning of facts and theories. In the second part of the unit, the focus moves to tasks and challenges that forensic psychologists encounter in applied settings. Some, such as the design and evaluation of training for other personnel or consultancy skills, are of major relevance to Stage 2 of the system for progression to chartered status that usually follows the course. Others such as countering manipulation, stress and managing aggression can be crucial to survival as well as effectiveness as a practitioner.

Assessment and Interventions with Offenders: This unit is concerned with providing an understanding of the theoretical and empirical underpinnings, contents and methods of current and widely-used approaches to assessment (including risk assessment) and interventions with offenders. These approaches are linked and provide a framework for the organisation and evaluation of information, particularly in relation to efficient, useful and accurate formulation and what works in the delivery of interventions. It will build upon knowledge of factors related to criminal behaviour with a focus on effective approaches and context-related factors in the understanding and management of offenders in a variety of settings.

Empirical Research Project for Forensic Psychology: For this unit you will undertake a complete piece of empirical research in an area of forensic psychology that you find particularly interesting. It provides an opportunity to develop and integrate a range of skills and areas of knowledge including creative formulations, problem-solving, ethics, handling interpersonal demands, use of IT and analytical techniques, and writing to a publishable standard.

Investigative Psychology and the Legal Process: This focuses on the contribution made by psychology in the context of forensic investigations and the role of psychologists in criminal and civil law proceedings. It is concerned with the application of psychological research and theory in an effort to critique (and improve) practice in criminal and civil justice systems as an applied context for testing the validity and efficacy of psychological theories and innovative practice derived from these theories. Topics cover relevant procedural information to ensure you appreciate investigative, judicial and custodial processes, and the role of psychologists within these frameworks. Theory and research relevant to applied cognitive and social psychology are presented to inform an understanding of eyewitness recall and recognition memory (and memory errors), effective protocols for testing/probing witness memory, detecting deception and juror decision making.

Research Methods and Data Analysis: This unit is designed to provide a familiarity with psychological research methods and data analysis commensurate with understanding and conducting research at the postgraduate and professional level. Specific methodologies and issues of relevance to specific research areas are addressed within a perspective that emphasises creative problem-solving.

Programme Assessment

We give high priority to integrating our research activities with your teaching programme. This ensures that you learn about the most important and current issues in forensic psychology that effect real-life practice.

Teaching usually takes the form of lectures and small tutorial groups, together with practical sessions in our labs and studios.

We assess you in a variety of ways throughout the course. Here’s how:

Written examinations
Briefing reports and essays
Oral presentations
The giving of expert testimony
A research dissertation

Student Destinations

The work of forensic psychologists is varied. Depending on where practitioners work, it can range from criminal investigations to organisational change, from work with offenders to work with staff who work with offenders, and from matters of civil justice such as child access to operational emergencies such as hostage incidents.

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing the next important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. Following successful completion of this course, you will usually go on to do a minimum of two years full-time supervised practice in an employment setting.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Clinical psychologist
Forensic psychologist
Educational psychologist
Counsellor
Health planning analyst

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The Criminology with Forensic Psychology Masters at Middlesex in London combines core modules in criminology and forensic psychology with optional modules on topics including terrorism, drugs, trans-national crime, conflict, and the major institutions of criminal justice. Read more
The Criminology with Forensic Psychology Masters at Middlesex in London combines core modules in criminology and forensic psychology with optional modules on topics including terrorism, drugs, trans-national crime, conflict, and the major institutions of criminal justice.

The Forensic Psychology component of the Criminology with Forensic Psychology Masters is delivered by specialists within the Psychology department whilst the criminological core and optional modules are drawn from the longstanding and internationally known MA Criminology: Crime, Conflict and Control.

The course will be of special interest to those without a first degree in psychology (typically a requirement on Masters course in Forensic and Criminological Psychology) but with a particular interest in psychological perspectives on crime and criminal justice. Based at our Hendon Campus in London you will benefit from some of the UK's most innovative and up-to-date teaching in criminology and Psychology.

Course highlights:

Students on the MSc have the opportunity to attend common study sessions with postgraduate criminologists studying in universities across Europe including Athens, Barcelona, Ghent, Hamburg and Rotterdam and also at John Jay College in New York.

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The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Read more
The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Core courses will enable you to develop an understanding of the concepts, theories, methods and principles central to criminology and the skills to apply these in the forensic and legal area. Optional courses build on this core grounding and enable you to develop an empirical insight in an area of your choice, culminating in a research project.

This approach provides you with knowledge of the changing nature of psychology, law and criminology, and professional applications. It will also develop your ability to relate theory to practice in a way that provides more informed solutions to problems, and opportunities in the workplace. There is a valuable research grounding and a broad coverage of criminological, forensic and psychological approaches to crime and criminality.

Please note that this programme does not provide British Psychological Society accreditation or recognition. This is because the programme is a criminology programme with a strand of specialist criminal / investigative / forensic psychology and is not a postgraduate psychology degree programme. The MSc Criminology & Criminal Psychology programme meets the British Criminology Society benchmarks for postgraduate taught courses.

From time-to-time we update our programmes to reflect changes in knowledge and industry standards, so the programme structure, mode and the courses and course structure can be subject to change from what is listed below. The availability of option courses also varies from year-to-year according to student preference, staff availability and may, for some courses, also depend on a student's academic performance. Until the academic term immediately prior to the academic term in which an option is listed to run, we are not able to guarantee that an option listed will be available. In addition, please note that some courses may only be open to certain students and may also involve an application process which may include successfully passing a selection process to take the course. For these reasons, the structure (i.e. the mode(s), the courses and the course structure) of the programme shown in this information is shown for illustrative purposes only.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/crim/crimpsych

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Career opportunities

This programme encompasses criminological, legal, forensic and psychological approaches. It will appeal to those with a broad interest in criminology and criminal psychological issues, including those whose future employment is likely to involve public, private and/ or non-governmental criminological or criminal justice work or applied criminal/legal/forensic psychological work in the UK or internationally. It is relevant to careers in local government, European and international institutions, and national and international nongovernmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wishing to prepare for a research degree in humanities and social sciences.

Teaching and assessment

The programme employs a range of innovative teaching and learning methods. Lectures and seminars are dynamic and interactive. Teaching and learning activities may include:

- Role play
- Real-world problem solving
- Speed debates
- Presentations
- Project supervision
- Work-based placements and tutorials.

Where possible and depending on the courses studied, one or more field trip (please note that any field trip will be a day-time trip only, not an overnight or multi-day trip).

Assessment of learning is usually based on a mixture of examination and coursework and can include presentations/group work, the submission of essays and the sitting of examinations.

Further information

If you would like more information on this programme, please contact us at .

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The Master of Science in Forensic Psychology is a 36-credit online program that provides students with insight into the intersection of psychology and legal issues. Read more

The Master of Science in Forensic Psychology is a 36-credit online program that provides students with insight into the intersection of psychology and legal issues. Students gain an understanding of what forensic psychologists do and will learn how to apply this training in a variety of professional contexts.

This degree program will provide students with the professional training necessary to function at an optimal level in a variety of forensic settings where psychology is used including: courts, law enforcement, criminal justice, national security offices, prisons, social services agencies, child welfare agencies, and treatment facilities.

Many students in our program have specialized in law, mental health or other health services and want to work in the forensic area. Others are interested in furthering their careers and assuming more senior level positions. Some of our students use this degree to make them more competitive when applying for a doctoral program.

The online format and non-clinical curriculum make the program an excellent option for working professionals needing to integrate graduate study with job responsibilities. The program also targets those living in rural or frontier areas in and outside the United States, those with limited or no access to this type of graduate level educational program, and individuals working non-traditional shift schedules, such as those in law enforcement, corrections, national security, and the military.

Important Note

There is no licensure or certification in Florida or most states for Forensic Psychology at this time. It is considered a subspecialty of other clinical mental health or legal programs

Curriculum

The Master of Science in Forensic Psychology degree program requires a total of 36 semester hours of graduate course work. The program consists of a core of 24 credits and students are required to complete one of two possible 9-credit specialization tracks, and a 3-credit capstone course. Students can choose to complete either a thesis or a field experience for their capstone's content, although if students are looking to continue their studies it is recommended they chose the research option.

Core Courses (3 credits each)

  • PSY 0900 - Introduction to Forensic Psychological Science
  • PSY 0901 - Psychopathology, Personality Disorders, and Behavioral Interventions in Forensic Settings
  • PSY 0902 - Methods & Tools of Psychological & Violence Risk Assessment
  • PSY 0903 - Evaluation, Methodology, and Psychological Research
  • PSY 0904 - Ethical Concerns & Multicultural Issues in Forensic Psychology
  • PSY 0905 - Communication Skills and Tools in Forensic Psychology
  • PSY 0906 - Best Practices and Policies for the Mentally Ill in the Criminal Justice System
  • PSY 0907 - Gender Violence: Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault & Child Abuse

Specialisation Tracks

Students will choose one of the following two specialisation tracks:

TRACK 1: FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY IN THE LEGAL SYSTEM (9 Credits - Choose 3 courses from below)

  • PSY 0908 - Psychological Issues in Dependency & Family Law Cases
  • PSY 0909 - Therapeutic Jurisprudence & Problem-Solving Courts
  • PSY 0910 - Assessment of Psychological Injury for Legal Cases
  • PSY 0911 - Understanding Psychological Reports and Expert Witness Testimony
  • PSY 0912 - Psychological Evaluation of Competencies, Syndromes, & Sanity Issues
  • PSY 0913 / CJI 6230 - Behavioral Criminology
  • PSY 0914 - Capstone Project in Forensic Psychology in the Legal System

TRACK 2: FORSENSIC PSYCHOLOGY FOR MENTAL HEALTH WORKERS, FIRST RESPONDERS AND DISASTER TEAMS (9 Credits - choose 3 courses from below)

  • PSY 0915 - Suicide Prevention & Crisis Intervention Skills
  • PSY 0916 - Trauma Informed Assessment and Intervention
  • PSY 0917 - Child Maltreatment and Trauma Assessment and Intervention
  • PSY 0918 - Intervening in School & Workplace Violence
  • PSY 0919 - Substance Abuse, Mental Illness and Trauma
  • PSY 0920 / CJI 6220 - Police Psychology
  • PSY 0921 - Capstone Course in Forensic Psychology for First Responders and Disaster Team Workers


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This course has been designed to meet the significant growth in the job market for forensic psychologists. Read more
This course has been designed to meet the significant growth in the job market for forensic psychologists. It draws on the University's established expertise in criminology and psychology, and includes the opportunity to undertake a work placement, enabling you to put what you have learnt into practice and gain valuable skills and experience. On successful completion, you will be able to develop your career as a forensic psychologist in, for example, prison settings, probation, crime analysis units and academia.

This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS).

You can also study the joint degree of Criminology with Forensic Psychology MA.

Key features
-This course is accredited by the Forensic Psychology Division of the British Psychological Society (BPS) as an accredited Stage 1 masters programme.
-A minimum of 15 weeks will be spent on an organised placement at a number of settings including high and medium security hospitals and in-reach prison teams.
-The course content is underpinned by research, and modules will be informed by the latest research in the subject area, keeping it up to date with the latest developments.
-You will benefit from the close links our staff have with forensic settings located in the southwest of London and the surrounding area.

What will you study?

Forensic psychology is concerned with the psychological issues associated with criminal behaviour and the treatment of those who have committed offences. It refers to the investigation of deception fraud, crime and the psychological aspects of legal and judicial process. You will learn how psychology is applied in various forensic settings and will be introduced to the role of the forensic psychologist in practice. You will also gain knowledge of the legal aspects of forensic psychology, such as considerations for courts and sentencing, and will examine the aetiology of criminal behaviour in depth.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods is employed on this course, including essays, reports, presentations, evaluation of placement activities, laboratory reports and a dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Antisocial behaviours across the lifespan; Treatment and intervention
-Applications of Forensic Psychology
-Investigative and Legal Processes in Forensic Psychology
-Psychology Dissertation
-Research Design and Analysis

Optional modules to be confirmed.

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By taking this course you will study the following module Forensic Psychology module plus modules from Criminology. Investigative and Legal Processes in Forensic Psychology. Read more
By taking this course you will study the following module Forensic Psychology module plus modules from Criminology:

Investigative and Legal Processes in Forensic Psychology
This module covers a range of theoretical and applied topics regarding investigative and judicial processes. For example, psychological principles may be applied to investigative approaches to interviewing, detecting deception, bearing false witness, offender profiling, case linkage, eyewitness memory, jury behaviour and decision-making, examining the state of mind and assessment, and expert psychological testimony (ethics, code of practice, report writing and practice). By taking this approach the student develops a critical understanding of pertinent stages in the investigative process where psychology may be used to improve interviewing strategies, as in the employment of the cognitive interview to assist in the improvement of witnesses' memory recall. This course then develops upon the investigative knowledge base provided by encouraging students to identify areas within the courtroom process where psychological techniques could be utilised. Thus, students are taken on an analytical and evaluative journey of the key criminal justice processes of the investigation and presentation of evidence in cases.

For information on the Criminology side of the course, please view the Criminology page: http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate-course/criminology-ma/

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The MSc has been designed in conjunction with one of the world's leading forensic speech laboratories, JP French Associates. The director of the laboratory, Professor Peter French, will deliver some of the taught components and will supervise some research projects. Read more
The MSc has been designed in conjunction with one of the world's leading forensic speech laboratories, JP French Associates. The director of the laboratory, Professor Peter French, will deliver some of the taught components and will supervise some research projects.

Students are given the opportunity to go on site visits that will allow them to observe the working practices of the laboratory, as well as those of cognate institutions such as courts. They will carry out analyses of recordings from real forensic cases and will have the opportunity to develop expert witness communication skills by undergoing cross-examination from a practising barrister in the University’s moot court.

Areas of the MSc overlap with those central to speech and recording technology and students will have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience of the latest generation of automatic speaker recognition software used in banking and law enforcement, made available through the Department’s partnership with Nuance.

Aims

The MSc in Forensic Speech Science provides a comprehensive foundation in the aims, practices, and principles of speech analysis for forensic purposes. The course will:
-Provide a thorough grounding in the theoretical underpinnings of forensic speech analysis, especially in phonetics, acoustics, and sociolinguistics/language variation
-Introduce students to the practical techniques used in forensic speech and audio analysis
-Provide students with an appreciation of theoretical and methodological problems in performing forensic speech and audio analysis
-Enable students to apply their skills and knowledge to recorded materials from real criminal cases
-Enable students to perform original research in speaker comparison and speech content analysis
-Impart understanding of the role and responsibilities of the forensic speech scientist as expert witness

Applicants

The course will be of interest to:
-Graduates with a background in linguistics, acoustics, English or other language-based disciplines
-Graduates in law, criminology or psychology
-Professionals in legal practice, government agencies, law enforcement agencies or other branches of forensic science
-Potential practitioners of forensic speech science

Careers

The MSc is not intended as a stand-alone vocational qualification. However, successful completion of the programme will provide students with the requisite skills, understanding, and knowledge to work effectively and increase their employability in forensic domains as well as in related fields such as the police, prison service, emergency call services and security services.

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The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

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The structure of the programme will be as follows. Part I. Taught Courses. The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The structure of the programme will be as follows:

Part I: Taught Courses
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

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Are you intrigued by the behaviour of criminals? Do you question what motivates people to commit shocking crimes? As more people feel insecure with their own communities, Criminology examines how we manage crime and social disorder. Read more
Are you intrigued by the behaviour of criminals? Do you question what motivates people to commit shocking crimes? As more people feel insecure with their own communities, Criminology examines how we manage crime and social disorder. Studying Criminology offers career opportunities in the police and probation services, but also in other sectors that depend on an analytical mind.

Visit the website: http://bucks.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/health-and-social-sciences/pt/criminology-communities-and-disorder-pt-1718

Is this course for me?

Are you naturally curious and analytically minded? Studying Criminology will open your eyes to the problems we need to solve for society to be safer. You'll find out how we can use research methods to answer important questions and understand the criminal mind.

Most of our Criminology students have graduated from areas such as the social sciences, law and policing. However, the course is designed for anyone interested in taking the next steps towards an exciting career in Criminology.

This course also attracts professionals who want to expand their knowledge in a related field. A better understanding of Criminology is particularly useful if you work within the criminal justice system, local council or government. Examining research and theory will deal with day-to-day problems in the workplace in a more effective way.

Expanding your knowledge

As you learn about the key concepts of Criminology, you'll also examine the sociological, legal and criminal justice theories used to interpret the actions of criminals and the impact on society.

You will study the events of the last 30 years to determine how social, political and cultural motions have shaped our response to recent events.

What will this course cover?

The course reflects the latest policies and methods used within the criminal justice system. You will gain an understanding of the social causes of crime and how these issues can be effectively managed in society.

We will help develop your analytical understanding of the relationship between crime and community. Progressing to more complex issues such as social disorder and social tension, you'll see society from a range of perspectives.

Modules

Year One
• Theorising Disorder in Contemporary Society
• Risk, Communities and Crime
• Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis
• Advanced Quantitative Research Methods

Year Two
• Case Studies: Working with Communities
• Communication, Interaction and the Criminal Justice System
• Communities, Individuals and Disorder
• Dissertation
• Public International Law

What are my career prospects?

Criminology offers many different career paths. Jobs often involve managing members of the community in roles such as police officers, community development workers and prison governors.

However, there are also opportunities for graduates within social welfare roles supporting vulnerable members of society. You may also wish to work in areas such as mental health support and drug rehabilitation.

Other graduates continue their academic career and conduct social research to expand your knowledge in the area. This could involve working as a research assistant or completing a PhD.

How will you help me prepare for my future career?

By the end of the course, we'll make sure you have all the skills you need to impress potential employers. You'll be confident in applying theory and concept to understand the management of communities.

The nature of Criminology means it is highly topical and of interest to many, therefore your study prepares you for a wide range of opportunities.

How to apply

Apply here: http://bucks.ac.uk/applynow/

Funding

There are a range of funding opportunities for postgraduate students which include sponsorship, bursaries, scholarships and loans: http://bucks.ac.uk/fees_funding/postgraduate-masters-scholarships/

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This degree combines core modules in criminology and forensic psychology with optional modules on topics including drugs, trans-national crime and conflict, policing, terrorism and the major institutions of criminal justice. Read more
This degree combines core modules in criminology and forensic psychology with optional modules on topics including drugs, trans-national crime and conflict, policing, terrorism and the major institutions of criminal justice. The programme is delivered within the Criminology and Sociology Department in the School of Law, while the forensic psychology component is taught by colleagues with specialisms in criminological psychology.

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The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond. Read more

The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond.

What is the Master of Criminology all about?

The programme is characterised by a strong link between education and research, an explicitly international orientation, and a comparative approach, with special attention to the cross-border character of criminality. 

General subjects include criminological theories and models of law enforcement, psychology, law and criminal justice, youth criminology and juvenile justice, and research methods. The programme also offers cutting-edge courses on international police and judicial cooperation, political crimes and transitional justice, restorative justice, terrorism, and organised and corporate crime – research fields in which our Leuven Institute of Criminology (LINC) professors are internationally renowned experts.

LINC is the most recent institutional incarnation (2007) of the criminological tradition in Leuven, which began with the establishment of the School for Criminology in 1929. Excellence in criminology continues today, combining solid research with a deep commitment to society structured within ten research lines. LINC is composed of 11 professors and more than 70 assistants and fellows involved in criminological research and education. 

Is this the right programme for me?

 Prospective students should possess:

  • a critical-reflective attitude towards law (as a normative behavioural regulating framework), community and crime;
  • genuine interest in (inter)personal and social interactions;
  • theoretical knowledge of applied psychology, sociology and anthropology within the field of crime and the treatment of crime;
  • extensive knowledge of basic research methodology
  • familiarity with specific criminological sources as well as legal, psychological and sociological sources
  • the ability to formulate research questions from existing literature
  • basic knowledge concerning (quantitative and qualitative) data collection
  • the ability to independently carry out analysis and report results
  • basic skills of oral and written reporting, especially in a criminology context;
  • an ability to apply criminological theory in practice (for instance, in an internship, case study, etc.);
  • basic knowledge of English, that is, the ability to read and understand English texts and comprehend seminars and lectures taught in English

Objectives

Goals

  • the criminological program provides an appealing specialized, European and internationally oriented and research-based study of crime and the way of dealing with it as well as the study of the processes of (de)criminalization
  • to optimize methodological skills and attitudes in order to make autonomous constructive and high standing contributions to the field as well as further research possible
  • an international and comparative approach has been highlighted in the Master program, bearing in mind however the characteristic Belgian situation

Final terms

Knowledge: The graduates need 1) to obtain specialized and more in-depth theoretical insights into the criminology; 2) to know facts concerning the developments and (the possible solutions for) problems in policy and practice of institutions that are involved in dealing with criminality. 3) to have specialized knowledge of recent developments in the field of methodology that allows to examine the problems from a point of legal and empirical-criminological view.

Skills: The graduates must be able to make an autonomous contribution in the development in the search to solutions for complex social and individual questions on the field of crime and the treatment of crime. More specifically: to be able to formulate relevant challenges for further criminological research; to observe, detect and analyze the large variables and indicators; to collect information independently; to comment and report in a methodically founded statement; can possibly function in (multidisciplinary) surroundings with eye for its own input and the guarantee of its quality.

Attitude: the graduates need to develop a discerning mind and recognize the importance of theoretical, methodological and moral reflection, both to guarantee the quality of policymaking as the quality of the own vocational practice. From an ethical notion the students develop further sensitivity for the tensions which occur at the treatment of crime and (in)security, at the individual, institutional and social level on the one hand and between these levels on the other hand.

Career perspectives

The programme is intended to prepare students for research and professional employment in national and international policy and operational agencies in the fields of criminal justice and victim assistance.

Graduates find employment in the domains of:

  • safety, police, justice
  • youth care
  • execution of sentences and penal measures
  • forensic mental healthcare
  • private security and safety
  • the civil service
  • the non-profit sectors at the national, European and international level


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