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Masters Degrees (Forensic Archaeology)

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Forensic archaeology is the application of archaeological skills to the location and recovery of human remains and forensic evidence. Read more
Forensic archaeology is the application of archaeological skills to the location and recovery of human remains and forensic evidence. Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity.

Our MSc Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology course provides students with training in both disciplines in dedicated laboratory areas. You will have exclusive access to the unique skeletal collections in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID).

You will develop the skills and knowledge required by those who undertake searches for missing people and will be involved in the recovery of remains from clandestine burials. You will also gain the skills required to present evidence as an expert witness in court.

What's so good about this course at Dundee?

Our staff are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, forensic archaeology cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body. We are regularly contacted for advice and input in high-profile forensic cases both at home and abroad. Staff are able to bring this experience into their teaching.

Our students and staff are also involved in forensic research which is informed by casework and is thus relevant and current to modern practice.

Our student feedback reflects the outstanding facilities and teaching collections that are available to support their learning experience.

You will be supervised by a research active member of staff and have the opportunity to pursue an area of research that is of specific interest to you.

Top 10 reasons to study Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Dundee

1 - Only institution in the UK to offer a career progression pathway in Forensic Anthropology
2 - Opportunity to review forensic case work undertaken by CAHID staff
3 - Teaching by world leading forensic practitioners
4 - Access to several unique skeletal collections
5 - Opportunity to act as an expert witness in simulated courtroom exercises
6 - We teach and train towards both the standards set by the RAI accreditation standards following the approved Forensic Anthropology curriculum
7 - Multidisciplinary approach with excellent links across subject boundaries
8 - Access to cases from CAHID's virtual anthropology communication service
9 -Regular programme of seminars delivered by invited speakers from the UK and abroad
10 - Diversity of career opportunities – our graduates work in a variety of related fields

Teaching & Assessment

- How you will be taught

Content delivery will be by a mixture of lectures, tutorials and practical based work, both in the lab and externally. All of the subjects taught have a practical component and the ability to apply theory to practice has always been a strong tradition for all CAHID courses, equipping those attending for the skills for future employment.

Expert witness experience is gained through involvement in a mock trial presided over by skilled legal practitioners.

- How you will be assessed

in-course essays
paper appraisal
practical exercises
final degree examinations
MSc research dissertation

What you'll study

The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to forensic archaeology and forensic anthropology.

- Forensic Human Osteology (10 credits)
- Trauma and Taphonomy (10 credits)
- Forensic Archaeology I (20 credits)
- Disaster Victim Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Human Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Archaeology 2 (20 credits)
- Forensic Science and the Law (20 credits)
- Research Project (60 credits)

Employability

There is a significant international requirement for forensic archaeologists and forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with body recovery and identification in order to fulfil the requirements of Disaster Victim Identification deployment. This course will greatly increase the professional employment characteristics of any student undertaking it who seeks a career in forensic anthropology, forensic archaeology or DVI.

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Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains. Read more
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains.

This course is taught by staff with extensive crime scene experience who regularly work on a range of operations and are at the forefront of the professional development of the discipline.

The course will:
-Provide you with advanced practical, analytical and interpretative skills in forensic archaeology
-Provide training in discipline skills to enable graduates to pursue careers in Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (CSI)
-Prepare students for careers in non-cognate fields through emphasis on team working and application of a wide knowledge base to problem solving

This course combines approaches from different disciplines to provide students with a comprehensive forensic skill set.

It is essential that forensic archaeologists are able to appreciate their role within a wider police investigation and have a detailed understanding of crime scene management procedures. Forensic Archaeology in the United Kingdom is rapidly developing and recognised as a distinct discipline by the Home Office Forensic Science Regulator. Bradford staff have been actively involved in defining skills matrices for use by the Institute for Archaeologists as part of the process of professional regulation.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/forensic-archaeology-crime-scene-investigation-msc-part-time

Why Bradford?

-The course is underpinned by modules on English Law delivered by University of Bradford School of Law
-The course provides hands-on experience utilising simulated complex, multi-scene crime scene scenarios and is based upon direct case experience by the principal tutors working with UK police forces
-Flexible design means that the MSc award can include either a substantial research dissertation or a period of enhanced professional training
-The course can be studied full-time over 12 months or by flexible study up to 5 years

Modules

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Crime Scene Management (10 Credits)
-English Legal System and Criminal Law for Non-Lawyers (Law 1) (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Anthropology for Crime Scene Investigators (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits)
-Recording Crime Scenes: the use of photographic and survey techniques (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (70 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Research Skills (10 Credits)
-Research and Brief Writing (10 Credits)
-Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (20 Credits)
-Elements of Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits)
-Law of Evidence for Non-Lawyers (Law 2) (10 Credits)

End of Semester 2 onwards (60 Credits - 1 Module):
-Dissertation (MSc) (60 Credits)

The MSc award can be obtained with enhanced professional training (MSc without dissertation) in which case, the following modules are taken instead of the Dissertation:
-Advanced Fieldwork Programme for CSI (30 Credits)
-Independent Research Paper for CSI 1 (10 Credits )
-Independent Research Paper for CSI 2 (20 Credits)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Graduates from this programme have gone on to work in law enforcement (both as Police Officers and Scene of Crime/Scientific Support), Forensic Science as well as commercial archaeology with enhanced skill sets.

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Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains. Read more
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains.

This course is taught by staff with extensive crime scene experience who regularly work on a range of operations and are at the forefront of the professional development of the discipline.

The course will:
-Provide you with advanced practical, analytical and interpretative skills in forensic archaeology
-Provide training in discipline skills to enable graduates to pursue careers in Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (CSI)
-Prepare students for careers in non-cognate fields through emphasis on team working and application of a wide knowledge base to problem solving

This course combines approaches from different disciplines to provide students with a comprehensive forensic skill set.

It is essential that forensic archaeologists are able to appreciate their role within a wider police investigation and have a detailed understanding of crime scene management procedures.

Forensic Archaeology in the United Kingdom is rapidly developing and recognised as a distinct discipline by the Home Office Forensic Science Regulator. Bradford staff have been actively involved in defining skills matrices for use by the Institute for Archaeologists as part of the process of professional regulation.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/forensic-archaeology-crime-scene-investigation-pgdip-part-time

Why Bradford?

-The course is underpinned by modules on English Law delivered by University of Bradford School of Law
-The course provides hands-on experience utilising simulated complex, multi-scene crime scene scenarios and is based upon direct case experience by the principal tutors working with UK police forces
-Flexible design means that the MSc award can include either a substantial research dissertation or a period of enhanced professional training
-The course can be studied full-time over 12 months or by flexible study up to 5 years

Modules

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Crime Scene Management (10 Credits)
-English Legal System and Criminal Law for Non-Lawyers (Law 1) (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Anthropology for Crime Scene Investigators (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits)
-Recording Crime Scenes: the use of photographic and survey techniques (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (70 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Research Skills (10 Credits)
-Research and Brief Writing (10 Credits)
-Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (20 Credits)
-Elements of Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits)
-Law of Evidence for Non-Lawyers (Law 2) (10 Credits)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Graduates from this programme have gone on to work in law enforcement (both as Police Officers and Scene of Crime/Scientific Support), Forensic Science as well as commercial archaeology with enhanced skill sets.

Read less
Forensic Archaeology involves the use of archaeological principles and techniques for the location, recovery, and interpretation of evidence for past events within the constraints of the criminal justice system. Read more
Forensic Archaeology involves the use of archaeological principles and techniques for the location, recovery, and interpretation of evidence for past events within the constraints of the criminal justice system. It utilises both field and laboratory skills in the investigation of serious crime, missing persons, human rights and mass disasters. These skills range from searching for and excavating clandestine graves to the international investigation of crimes against humanity.

The course provides invaluable background knowledge in archaeological and forensic sciences required for criminal and human identification cases, integrating archaeological, anthropological and investigative disciplines. The course is delivered by leading practitioners who will develop and enhance your employability.

Our forensic archaeology course is unique in that it provides you with the opportunity to work with specialist equipment independently and provides you with a wealth of practical exercises simulating forensic scenarios, such as locating graves and managing an airplane crash. The course is also supported by a crime scene house, analytical labs, with extensive osteological rooms, skeletal collections, survey, excavation and geophysical equipment, geographic information systems (GIS), spatial information and cartographic suite.

Core units:
Forensic Archaeology
Advanced Forensic Archaeology
Principles & Methods in Human Osteology
Professional Practice in Forensic Science
Research Project

Optional units (1 of):
Human Functional Anatomy
Marine Environment, Heritage & Spatial Planning
Principles & Methods in Zooarchaeology
Techniques of Archaeological Recovery & Recording

And 1 of:
Advanced Zooarchaeology
Crime Scene Management
Humans, Animals & Diet

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This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the subject, rapidly advancing into the understanding of cutting-edge research and the latest methodologies. Read more

Course Description

This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the subject, rapidly advancing into the understanding of cutting-edge research and the latest methodologies. The course is highly practical and hands-on, aiming to produce forensic experts capable of giving expert witness testimonies in a courtroom situation and elsewhere.

The course consists of a two-week period of introductory studies followed by academic instruction in modular form. Most modules are of five days' duration, interspersed with weeks devoted to private study and visits to forensic science establishments.

The Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology MSc is part of the Forensic MSc Programme which has been formally accredited by the Forensic Science Society.

Course overview

The course consists of a one-week period of introductory studies followed by academic instruction in modular form. Most modules are of five days' duration, interspersed with weeks devoted to private study. Students are required to take four core modules, four role specific modules and choose three elective modules based on their particular background, future requirements or interests. This is followed by a four-month research project and either a thesis or literature review and paper.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7

Individual Project

The individual project takes four months from April to July. The student selects from a range of titles, or may propose their own topic. Most are practically or experimentally based using Cranfield’s unique facilities.

Assessment

By written and practical examinations, continuous assessment, project presentation and viva voce.

Career opportunities

Takes you on to opportunities to work in the field of forensic archaeology or anthropology within forensic laboratories, police departments, government bodies and non-governmental organisations. It is also a necessary introduction that could lead into conducting research at PhD level in the subject.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/forensic-archaeology-and-anthropology.html

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The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies. Read more
The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies.

Degree information

Students gain training in research methods and a scientific grounding in the principles, content and practice of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology, including: fossil and archaeological evidence of human evolution; temporal and spatial patterns and processes of evolutionary and environmental change; and the evolutionary background for understanding human adaptation and culture.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits) four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Themes in Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology

Optional modules - students will be encouraged to select options from the following list up to the value of 60 credits. Alternatively, they may choose from the wider range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology or the Department of Anthropology.
-Advanced Human Evolution
-Archaeology of Early Human Origins
-Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from the Emergence of Modern Humans
-Evolution of Human Brain and Behaviour
-Geoarchaeology
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
-Palaeoanthropology
-Primate Evolution
-Primate Socioecology
-Zooarchaeology in Practice

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, discussions, seminars, laboratory practicals and student presentations. Assessment is through essays, practical examination and seminar presentations, (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Careers

A significant number of the graduate students from this programme have gone on to take PhDs at UCL, elsewhere in the UK and in other countries. A number of those have been awarded prestigious scholarships to cover their costs. Other graduates have gone on to work in cultural resource management and museums, and others have used their skills to pursue careers in fields such as teaching and business.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Archaeologist, George Washington Foundation
-DPhil in Archaeology, The University of Oxford
-Senior scientist: archaeology, Tetra Tech
-Research Technician, Research Department Forensic Science.
-PhD Anthropology and Archaeology, Stockholms Universitet (Stockholm University)

Employability
The skills which students develop include the critical evaluation of scholarship across the discipline, design and management of personal research, primary data collection and analysis, and the preparation of detailed reports/dissertations up to publication standard. Although these will relate to anthropology and archaeology, they are invaluable skills for other areas of employment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology have considerable staff expertise in the fields of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology. Staff and research students are currently involved in field projects as well as museum-based studies in Britain, various parts of Europe, the Middle East, and eastern and southern Africa.

Our excellent results in the recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) show that our two departments are both very highly ranked in the UK.

Situated in central London, the university is within easy access of the British Museum and Natural History Museum and their outstanding palaeontological and archaeological collections.

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Research profile. The MSc by Research in Archaeology is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in Archaeology is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research.

The programme provides structured research training while at the same time enabling you to pursue a research project that you design yourself, in consultation with supervisors. It serves as both a self-contained research degree and a preparation for further study for the PhD degree.

Archaeology at Edinburgh has a tradition going back to the 19th century. Many aspects of that tradition are still visible in the School today: our archaeological collections were named to commemorate the great prehistorian and first holder of the Abercromby Chair Vere Gordon Childe; the annual series of Munro lectures in archaeology and anthropology were endowed in 1910 by Dr Robert Munro, a distinguished medical practitioner who, in his later life, became a keen archaeologist; and the Abercromby Chair of Prehistoric Archaeology commemorates Lord Abercromby, author of distinguished research on Bronze Age pottery.

Edinburgh’s great tradition in prehistory continues to this day, with expertise in Britain, the Mediterranean and the Near East, but we also have strengths in Classical and Byzantine archaeology, in archaeological theory, environmental archaeology, osteoarchaeology and forensic anthropology.

We are happy to supervise across the wide range of our research interests: we have particular strengths in prehistory of Europe, the Mediterranean and Near East, in classical and early medieval archaeology, as well as in archaeological theory, environmental archaeology, osteoarchaeology and forensic anthropology.

Facilities

Our home is the William Robertson Wing, an A-listed building on the southern edge of Edinburgh’s Old Town, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Designed by the distinguished 19th-century architect Sir Robert Rowand Anderson, the building – part of the University’s Old Medical School – has recently been refurbished to an exceptional standard, providing state-of-the-art facilities for research, teaching and study.

Graduate students enjoy access to:

  • a large and attractive study and computing lab, equipped with printing, copying and scanning facilities, plus two further study rooms that provide shared desk space
  • student research rooms, housing some of the School’s impressive book collections and additional IT facilities
  • teaching rooms fitted out with the latest technology
  • exhibition areas, filled with artefacts, artwork, statues, busts and casts from the School’s many collections
  • a stunning common room, used by staff as well as graduate students

All of our facilities are in addition to the multiple libraries and computer labs provided across the University’s estate. Many of our rooms overlook the Meadows, one of the city’s best-loved green spaces.

Archaeology students benefit from our laboratories for artefact analysis, environmental archaeology, osteoarchaeology, bone chemistry and computing (with a wide range of software applications).

There is an extensive reference collection of archaeological materials, such as pottery, metal, stone and glass artefacts, in the V Gordon Childe teaching collection.

You can also benefit from the facilities, archives, collections and expertise of a range of heritage agencies and commercial archaeology units based in the city of Edinburgh.

Programme structure

A long dissertation of 30,000 words is the sole form of assessment, but you will also attend compulsory training courses and may take other relevant courses.

Career opportunities

The programme’s focus on research under supervision makes this degree suitable for those contemplating doctoral study, whether in our own School or elsewhere, and many who take this degree follow that route. But undertaking a substantial and independent research and writing project is equally an excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers.



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Forensic science is a dynamic discipline that is crucial to the investigation of crime, the collection of evidence and intelligence, and in securing justice. Read more
Forensic science is a dynamic discipline that is crucial to the investigation of crime, the collection of evidence and intelligence, and in securing justice. This multidisciplinary MSc programme offers students a unique opportunity to gain forensic science skills and methods within a holistic crime science framework.

Degree information

Students will develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of crime and forensic science, together with the key conceptual and philosophical frameworks in this field. They will gain practical skills in crime scene investigation, experimental design and implementation, statistical analysis, data analysis and modelling, and will be able to evaluate the weight and applicability of forensic evidence for investigative and court purposes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). An exit-only Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Quantitative Methods
-Designing and Doing Research
-Understanding and Interpreting Forensic Evidence
-Foundations of Security and Crime Science
-Judicial Decision Making and Expert Evidence

Optional modules - students choose three of the following optional modules:
-Case Assessment and Interpretation for Forensic Scientists
-Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
-Information Security Management
-Forensic Archaeology
-Forensic Osteology
-Forensic Geoscience
-Frontiers in Experimental Physical Chemistry
-Judgment and Decision Making
-Practices of Crime Scene Investigation and Expert Testimony
-Structural Methods in Modern Chemistry

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical exercises and statistical and computer classes. Assessment is through coursework, examination and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will gain the skills necessary for a career in crime investigation, forensic science provision, consultancy, policymaking, and with public sector employers such as police forces, Home Office, and Ministry of Defence. They will also have gained the research tools necessary for a PhD or further doctoral research.

Employability
Graduates from this programme gain a solid understanding of the key principles of crime and forensic science, along with the ability to analyse problems and use appropriate scientific and professional skills to solve them. They can evaluate forensic evidence and their CSI training (developed and delivered with input from London-based police forces) gives them the edge over other applicants for crime scene investigation roles, if this is what they decide to do. They have the opportunity to learn specialist techniques in areas such as forensic archaeology and forensic geoscience, and are given a thorough grounding in academic research methods.

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/scs/degree-programmes/postgraduate/graduate-profiles

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MSc will train graduates to think strategically and critically about crime and forensic science, equipping them with transferable skills suitable for a wide range of careers.

The UCL Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science (JDI) brings together academics from across the physical sciences, social sciences and humanities. Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to share their professional experience.

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This new MSc programme equips you with the ability to excavate and analyse human remains. Learn the practical skills needed to recover human remains in the field. Read more
This new MSc programme equips you with the ability to excavate and analyse human remains.

Learn the practical skills needed to recover human remains in the field. Gain the theoretical knowledge needed to reconstruct biological profiles from hard tissue, supported by laboratory based training.

You learn from a team of internationally respected academics with extensive professional experience. You have the opportunity to access one of the largest human skeletal collections in the UK, with extensive skeletal pathology and accompanying radiographs. The collection is curated by the Skeletal Biology Research Centre, in the School's Human Osteology Research Laboratory.

The programme is suited for students from a wide range of BA and BSc backgrounds. This MSc will provide a firm foundation for continued work, or PhD research, in anthropology, archaeology and related forensic fields.

For more information about this new MSc programme please contact the programme director Dr Chris Deter:

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

With specialisation in forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes Kent is one of the largest institutions for biological anthropolgy. The School also houses the Skeletal Biology Research Centre (SBRC) which brings together innovative research, novel methodologies and international collaborations. Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) is an enterprise unit based within SBRC offers osteological analyses of human skeletal remains.

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany). We maintain an active research culture, with staff working in many different parts of the world.

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia.

Careers

Higher degrees in forensic anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, archaeology, police sector, the civil service and non-governmental organizations through work in areas such as human rights. A forensic anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

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If you have a first degree in an associated subject and want to convert your skills to pursue a career in archaeology this course will appeal to you - particularly if you have some practical experience. Read more
If you have a first degree in an associated subject and want to convert your skills to pursue a career in archaeology this course will appeal to you - particularly if you have some practical experience. Archaeology is an exciting and ever-evolving profession that requires a high level of skill and dedication. This course offers you the opportunity to build on your first degree to make yourself more marketable in the archaeological sector, while allowing you to tailor your studies to meet your personal needs and interests.

According to a report published in May 2016 by Historic England, there is an urgent need in the UK for more archaeologists following a surge in infrastructure projects, such as HS2, Crossrail 2 and major road upgrades. The report emphasises the importance of archaeological field schools to produce specifically trained graduates. Participation in the Big Dig allows you to gain a wide range of field archaeological skills.

The many optional units on this degree will allow you to broaden your skills and knowledge in areas including maritime archaeology, forensic archaeology, zooarchaeology and the core area of field archaeology. You will be taught by some of the UK’s leading practitioners in the sector, and under the guidance of this dedicated and enthusiastic team you can expect to develop your archaeological skills to reach your full potential.

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Our Forensic Anthropology course is concerned with the application of biological anthropological techniques to the analysis of human skeletal remains within a legal context and provides a vital suite of expertise and skills that can be applied to answer both modern and archaeological questions. Read more
Our Forensic Anthropology course is concerned with the application of biological anthropological techniques to the analysis of human skeletal remains within a legal context and provides a vital suite of expertise and skills that can be applied to answer both modern and archaeological questions.

Specialist anthropological skills can contribute, not only to our understanding of the past, but also to the effective investigation of serious incidents in the modern world, particularly murder, genocide and human rights violations within the constraints of the criminal justice system. Such skills have also proved increasingly useful in recent years in the wake of mass disasters, both natural and man-made.

This course was previously called Forensic Osteology.

Core units:
Bodies of Evidence-Skeletal Changes Before & After Death
Crime Scene Management & Forensic Science
Human Functional Anatomy
Principles & Methods in Human Osteology
Professional Practice in Forensic Science
Research Project

Optional units (Choose 1):
Forensic Archaeology
Techniques of Archaeological Recovery & Recording

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On this part-time, distance learning course you will learn how to evaluate and interpret different forms of forensic evidence and how to consider its relevance to police investigations. Read more

Course Description

On this part-time, distance learning course you will learn how to evaluate and interpret different forms of forensic evidence and how to consider its relevance to police investigations. You will study the scientific principles and practical application of the many and varied techniques used to forensically examine different evidence types.

You will learn how to select the most appropriate techniques for different evidence types, how to interpret the results and how to apply critical analysis to determine what that means in terms of evidential value.

The skills and knowledge you will gain on this course will enable you to confidently argue the reasoning behind the interpretation and evaluation of forensic evidence and to demonstrate in a court of law that you are credible as an expert witness.

This course is offered in association with the University of Florida and the University of Canberra.

If you have any questions about this course, join us for a live online chat with academic tutors and admissions staff.

Course Structure

If you complete all of the modules and a dissertation you will be awarded an MSc. However it is also possible to compete only the modules, without a dissertation, and receive a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), or to complete just the first year modules and receive a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) These are 'exit awards' which means that you cannot apply for them directly; you must apply for the MSc.

Core Modules:

Crime Scene Examination
Trace Evidence Analysis
Evidential Value and Interpretation
Research Methods

Option Modules (choose 4-6):

Physical Evidence modules

Fingerprint corrosion of metal
Arson investigation
Forensic engineering
Toxicology of chemical weapons (F)
Blood distribution and spatter (F)
Environmental forensics (C)

Biological Evidence modules

Biological evidence and serology (F)
Forensic toxicology (F)
Biological evidence and serology (F)

Human Remains modules

Introduction to forensic archaeology
Introduction to forensic anthropology
Forensic entomology (F)
Forensic genetics (F)

Management modules

Crime scene management
Intelligence gathering and data mining

*Modules marked F or C are taught by the University of Florida or the University of Canberra.

After completing your modules, you will complete a dissertation of approximately 15,000-20,000 words, which may be related to work-based issues you are facing.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. Read more
This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. With a solid grounding in skeletal and dental anatomy, students learn about morphological variation, development, methods for biological profiling, human disease and forensic approaches to trauma and taphonomy.

Degree information

Students will learn procedures for interpretation and analysis of human skeletal remains - considering both archaeological and modern forensic contexts. There is a unique opportunity to analyse recently excavated human remains, utilising methods and techniques learned during the programme. While the focus of this programme is primarily on modern humans, late Pleistocene hominids are also considered.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Dental Anthropology
-Forensic Anthropology
-Methodology and Issues in Bioarchaeology and Palaeoepidemiology
-Morphology and Palaeopathology of the Human Skeleton
-Variation and Evolution of the Human Skull

Optional modules
-Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
-Archaeology of Early Modern Humans
-Forensic Archaeology
-Forensic Geoscience (by arrangement with the Jill Dando Centre for Forensic Sciences)
-Funerary Archaeology
-Human Evolution (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Palaeoanthropology (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Zooarchaeology in Practice
-Other Master's options available at the Institute of Archaeology.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical classes. This MSc has strong links with the Forensic Archaeological Science MSc which gives individual programmes an interesting mix of participants and provides many opportunities for discussion. Assessment is through essays, class tests, reports and the dissertation.

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies, while others go on to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological organisations as osteoarchaeological specialists, the police, curators and political researchers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse archaeology department in the UK, offering students a range of opportunities.

This particular MSc is unique, offering a combination of bioarchaeological and forensic principles for the study of human remains unlike anything else available in the UK. Students further benefit from access to a large collection of skeletal material for study, including dental and palaeopathology reference collections. Access to sophisticated equipment and techniques (laser scanner, SEM, thin sectioning, CT) is also available.

Some lectures will take place at the Royal College of Surgeons and students have access to their teaching collections and museums, including the Wellcome Museum of Anatomy and Pathology.

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This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. Read more
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. It aims to prepare students not only for research in archaeological science, but also to further career prospects in all areas of mainstream archaeology. Students normally follow one of three pathways.
-Environmental Archaeology focuses on subsistence and health through studies of animal bones, plant remains and biomarkers in human and non-human hard tissue. It also introduces environmental issues which impact on human beings, including environmental change.
-Landscape Archaeology focuses on understanding and interpreting landscapes in the past using scientific methods.
-Biomolecular Archaeology allows students to specialise in the use of biomolecular methods to study both human remains and artefacts.

The pathways are intended to guide students through appropriate modules; they are indicative rather than prescriptive and students may choose to take the optional modules offered in any combination, subject to timetabling.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/archaeological-sciences-msc-part-time

Why Bradford?

-Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area
-This course includes hands-on experience in the Division's laboratories, a substantial individual research dissertation and has a wide range of option choices
-First destination figures indicate that about 85% of postgraduates in Archaeological Sciences achieve work or further studies in the discipline or cognate areas

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 3 x (C) Modules and 30 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Analytical Methods 1* (10 Credits) (C)
-The Nature of Matter 1 (10 Credits) (C)
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (O)
-GIS: Theory and Practice (10 Credits) (O)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (O)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits) (O)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Analytical Methods 2* (10 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Techniques and Interpretation in Instrumental Analysis (10 Credits) (C)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (C)
-Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits) (O)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Past Environments (20 Credits) (O)
-Site Evaluation Strategies (20 Credits) (O)
-Soils and Chemical Prospection (10 Credits) (O)

End of Semester 2 onwards (60 Credits - 1 x (C) Module):
-Dissertation (MSc) (60 Credits) (C)

* Students must take at least 20 credits from Analytical Methods 1 and 2. These comprise a wide choice of 10 credit modules run as short courses are shared with the MSc Analytical Sciences. These modules are run as short courses.

Semester 1:
-X-Ray Diffraction
-Separation Science
-Vibrational Spectroscopy

Semester 2:
-Mass Spectrometry
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis
-Electron Microscopy

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

The course prepares students not only for research in archaeological science, but also furthers career prospects in mainstream archaeology or scientific analysis. The course is well-suited both to students who wish to use it as a foundation from which to commence research or as vocational training to enhance employment prospects in archaeology.

Career destinations have included PhDs at Universities of York, Bradford, Oxford, Texas A&M, Catamarca; UNESCO research; archaeological project managers; conservation science and teaching.

Read less
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. Read more
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology.

It aims to prepare students not only for research in archaeological science, but also to further career prospects in all areas of mainstream archaeology.

Students normally follow one of three pathways.
-Environmental Archaeology focuses on subsistence and health through studies of animal bones, plant remains and biomarkers in human and non-human hard tissue. It also introduces environmental issues which impact on human beings, including environmental change.
-Landscape Archaeology focuses on understanding and interpreting landscapes in the past using scientific methods.
-Biomolecular Archaeology allows students to specialise in the use of biomolecular methods to study both human remains and artefacts.

The pathways are intended to guide students through appropriate modules; they are indicative rather than prescriptive and students may choose to take the optional modules offered in any combination, subject to timetabling.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/archaeological-sciences-pgdip-part-time

Why Bradford?

-Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area
-This course includes hands-on experience in the Division's laboratories, a substantial individual research dissertation and has a wide range of option choices
-First destination figures indicate that about 85% of postgraduates in Archaeological Sciences achieve work or further studies in the discipline or cognate areas

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 3 x (C) Modules and 30 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Analytical Methods 1* (10 Credits) (C)
-The Nature of Matter 1 (10 Credits) (C)
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (O)
-GIS: Theory and Practice (10 Credits) (O)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (O)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits) (O)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Analytical Methods 2* (10 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Techniques and Interpretation in Instrumental Analysis (10 Credits) (C)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (C)
-Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits) (O)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Past Environments (20 Credits) (O)
-Site Evaluation Strategies (20 Credits) (O)
-Soils and Chemical Prospection (10 Credits) (O)

* Students must take at least 20 credits from Analytical Methods 1 and 2. These comprise a wide choice of 10 credit modules run as short courses are shared with the MSc Analytical Sciences. These modules are run as short courses.

Semester 1:
-X-Ray Diffraction
-Separation Science
-Vibrational Spectroscopy

Semester 2:
-Mass Spectrometry
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis
-Electron Microscopy

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

The course prepares students not only for research in archaeological science, but also furthers career prospects in mainstream archaeology or scientific analysis. The course is well-suited both to students who wish to use it as a foundation from which to commence research or as vocational training to enhance employment prospects in archaeology.

Career destinations have included PhDs at Universities of York, Bradford, Oxford, Texas A&M, Catamarca; UNESCO research; archaeological project managers; conservation science and teaching.

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