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Masters Degrees (Foreign Language)

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The main aim of the Master's Degree in Spanish as a Foreign Language is to train students to teach Spanish to speakers of other languages. Read more
The main aim of the Master's Degree in Spanish as a Foreign Language is to train students to teach Spanish to speakers of other languages. It provides students with the theory and practical tools they need to teach Spanish as a foreign language at home or abroad. The programme guarantees that students will have a thorough knowledge of Spanish and will be familiar with the most suitable techniques and methods for satisfactory teaching.

The subjects are taught entirely in Spanish, as is the training programme, but this may not be the case of the optional subjects.

In addition to the professional track, the course also offers a research track for those who are interested in pursuing any theoretical or practical aspects of foreign language teaching with a view to taking a doctorate.

Student Profile

The master programme is aimed at future language teachers who wish to work in Spain and abroad.

Student profile is in general graduates in Spanish Filology or similar (Translation, Foreign Language Teacher, etc). However, it may also be admited othe candidate profiles if a teaching vocation does extist.

Career Opportunities

Graduates in the University Master's degree in Teaching languages: Spanish as a Foreign Language are capable of working in:
-Teaching Spanish in language schools in Spain or abroad
-Teaching Spanish in foreign universities
-Teaching Spanish in civic centres
-Posts as Spanish language assistants at foreign universities
-Cultural mediation in official refugees centres and immigrant services
-Tourism field
-Translation field
-Correction of media texts

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This . Teaching English as a Foreign Language programme (TEFL, also known as TESOL in some countries) . based in the School of Education, offers you the opportunity to study for a qualification which links teaching English to wider issues of school-based education. . Read more

This Teaching English as a Foreign Language programme (TEFL, also known as TESOL in some countries) based in the School of Education, offers you the opportunity to study for a qualification which links teaching English to wider issues of school-based education. 

The modules will provide you with a strong grounding in theoretical literature as well as appropriate classroom methodology, course design and an introduction to the key research tools. The programme is designed to be practical and you will have opportunities to create bespoke teaching and learning materials as well as visit British schools to observe classroom teaching.

The TEFL programme is aimed at individuals with knowledge and understanding of current debates relevant to the teaching and learning of English as a Foreign Language. The aim is to support you in becoming a reflective TEFL practitioner, a competent educational researcher and an active member of the international academic and professional TEFL community.

Programme content

There are three core modules for the Teaching English as a Foreign Language programme:

  • Communicative Language Teaching, Syllabus Design and Assessment
  • Language, Discourse and Society
  • Second Language Learning

These modules give you a strong grounding in appropriate classroom methodology, and course design with the opportunity to create your own teaching and learning materials. Other modules provide opportunities to visit British primary, secondary and language schools, and prepare you for your dissertation. The MA Education TEFL Dissertation Prize is awarded annually to the best TEFL dissertations in the School of Education whose work demonstrates significance, originality and methodological rigour.

We offer a wide range of options to choose from, including Curriculum Design in Global Contexts, Leadership for School Improvement, Personal and Professional Skills for Education Management, Online Learning, ICT in Education, Education as an International Issue, and Special Educational Needs of Children with Autism. You will have the chance to participate in events organised by our research centre MOSAIC, such as conferences and popular seminar series with renowned international TEFL researchers.

Please note that the acronym TEFL is mainly used in the UK, whilst TESOL is often used as an acronym in Australia or the USA. TESL is another term you may hear.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed with a 4,000 word written assignments in which students are asked to explore a topic of their choice, review relevant literature and collect and analyse some data in a small-scale research project. This will help you gain a deeper understanding of an aspect of the teaching and learning process and suggest practical implications. For some modules, assessment will take the form of a design and evaluation of curriculum or teaching materials. There will be an early opportunity to submit a short piece of written work and receive constructive feedback from the tutor.

The dissertation is 15,000 words in length, and encourages students to explore an aspect of TEFL which is personally relevant to them and their teaching contexts. It usually includes a description of the context, a literature review, a methodology chapter and the discussion of findings. Students will have an individual supervisor to offer advice and support. The MA Education TEFL Dissertation prize is annually awarded to the best TEFL dissertations in the School of Education whose work demonstrates significance, originality and methodological rigour

Employability

Our graduates typically find work as EFL teachers in schools and universities in countries around the world, return to their English teaching jobs in their home countries, are promoted to more senior roles within their teaching contexts, or pursue a research qualification (usually a PhD degree). Graduates from the MA Education TEFL are consistently successful in winning prestigious PhD scholarships and awards and present their MA TEFL work at international conferences and in publications.



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This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language. Read more
This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language. These awards have contributed substantially to the professionalising of Arabic teaching in the UK and elsewhere and to the recognition of the expertise of teachers of Arabic as a Foreign or Second Language.

The Certificate in Teaching Arabic is designed:

- to meet the rapidly growing demand in the UK and elsewhere for trained and qualified teachers of Arabic as a foreign language.

- to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills which will enable them to teach Arabic to a broad spectrum of Arabic learners in UK, European and worldwide educational contexts.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Arabic is designed to:

- equip trainees to be able to deal professionally with the teaching of Arabic in different contexts and through the integration of different varieties of the Arabic language.

- familiarise trainees with the theoretical principles underlying the content and design of instructional materials and teaching/testing techniques.

- provide trainees with the knowledge and skills and the supported teaching practice to enable them to teach Arabic using the latest communicative methods.

- show trainees how to create coherent and progressive schemes of work and design effective and efficient lesson plans that are adapted to students’ learning needs.

- show trainees how to analyse empirical data in order to evaluate second language learners’ performance objectively and how to describe achievement and proficiency levels using appropriate terminology.

- enable trainees to fulfil supervisory and pedagogical lead roles such as those of syllabus designer, course co-ordinator, teacher mentor and materials developer.

Graduates will be qualified and well-prepared for teaching Arabic in higher education in the UK, Europe and other parts of the world, for teaching Arabic at private institutions or companies, for fulfilling administrative or consultative roles in educational organisations and for undertaking commissioning and editing in companies which create and market Arabic language courseware.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/arabic/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-arabic-as-a-foreign-language.html

The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in sessions at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The course requires attendance on normally three days per week, depending on assignments set and appointments to observe live teaching which may be on an evening or on a Saturday. The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in session at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The days where no presence at SOAS is required are to be devoted to lesson planning and materials preparation, writing of self-reflections and peer appraisals, readings of theoretical applied linguistics and teaching theory books/journal articles, self-access learning, specified VLE learning activities, guided independent study, assigned homework tasks and completion of formal assessments. The programme is very demanding and students will be expected to spend at least 20-30 hours of study outside of class every week.

Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Arabic is equivalent to 3 post-graduate level course units carrying 135 CATS credits.
The Postgraduate Certificate in teaching Arabic is equivalent to 1.5 post-graduate level course units carrying 67.5 CATS credits.
Trainees take compulsory courses in two main areas.

1. Principles and Practice in Communicative Language Teaching for Arabic:
- Arabic Applied Linguistics (0.5 unit)
- Language Awareness, Methods and Techniques in Teaching Arabic (1 unit)

2. Knowledge and Skills for Second Language Teaching:
- Theories of Language Learning and Acquisition (0.5 unit)
- Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching and Language Assessment (1 unit)

Teaching Practice

A key component of the course is the opportunity for live observation of experienced teachers, followed by teaching practice of Arabic with different types of student groups, covering a range of levels. Trainees will observed and assessed in teaching Arabic, including the quality of lesson plans and teaching materials they have created, competencies in using a range of different communicative teaching techniques and ability to create rapport and establish a co-operative learning environment.

All our teacher trainers are expert classroom teachers themselves. Have a look at one of them teaching (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/) and see the kinds of classroom skills you will learn to use yourself.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/arabic/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-arabic-as-a-foreign-language.html

Closing Date for Applications:
Overseas Applicants - Friday 23rd September 2016
UK and EU Applicants - Friday 7th October 2016

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This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language. Read more
This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language. These awards have contributed substantially to the professionalising of Chinese teaching in the UK and elsewhere and to the recognition of the expertise of teachers of Chinese as a Foreign or Second Language.

The Certificate in Teaching Chinese is designed:

- to meet the rapidly growing demand in the UK and elsewhere for trained and qualified teachers of Chinese as a foreign language.

- to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills which will enable them to teach Chinese to a broad spectrum of Chinese learners in UK, European and worldwide educational contexts.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Chinese is designed to:

- equip trainees to be able to deal professionally with the teaching of Chinese in different contexts and through the integration of different varieties of the Chinese language.

- familiarise trainees with the theoretical principles underlying the content and design of instructional materials and teaching/testing techniques.

- provide trainees with the knowledge and skills and the supported teaching practice to enable them to teach Chinese using the latest communicative methods.

- show trainees how to create coherent and progressive schemes of work and design effective and efficient lesson plans that are adapted to students’ learning needs.

- show trainees how to analyse empirical data in order to evaluate second language learners’ performance objectively and how to describe achievement and proficiency levels using appropriate terminology.

- enable trainees to fulfil supervisory and pedagogical lead roles, such as those of syllabus designer, course co-ordinator, teacher mentor and materials developer.

Graduates will be qualified and well-prepared for teaching Chinese in higher education in the UK, Europe and other parts of the world, for teaching Chinese at private institutions or companies, for fulfilling administrative or consultative roles in educational organisations and for undertaking commissioning and editing in companies which create and market Chinese language courseware.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-chinese-as-a-foreign-language.html

The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in sessions at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The course requires attendance on normally three days per week, depending on assignments set and appointments to observe live teaching, which may be on an evening or on a Saturday. The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in session at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The days where no presence at SOAS is required are to be devoted to lesson planning and materials preparation, writing of self-reflections and peer appraisals, readings of theoretical applied linguistics and teaching theory books/journal articles, self-access learning, specified VLE learning activities, guided independent study, assigned homework tasks and completion of formal assessments. The programme is very demanding and students will be expected to spend at least 20-30 hours of study outside of class every week.

Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Chinese is equivalent to 3 post-graduate level course units carrying 135 CATS credits.
The Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching Chinese is equivalent to 1.5 post-graduate level course units carrying 67.5 CATS credits.
Trainees take compulsory courses in two main areas.

1. Principles and Practice in Communicative Language Teaching for Chinese:
- Chinese Applied Linguistics (0.5 unit)
- Language Awareness, Methods and Techniques in Teaching Chinese (1 unit)

2. Knowledge and Skills for Second Language Teaching:
- Theories of Language Learning and Acquisition (0.5 unit)
- Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching and Language Assessment (1 unit)

Teaching Practice

A key component of the course is the opportunity for live observation of experienced teachers, followed by teaching practice of Chinese with different types of student groups, covering a range of levels. Trainees will be observed and assessed in teaching Chinese, including the quality of lesson plans and teaching materials they have created, competencies in using a range of different communicative teaching techniques and ability to create rapport and establish a co-operative learning environment.

All our teacher trainers are expert classroom teachers themselves. Have a look at one of them teaching (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/) and see the kinds of classroom skills you will learn to use yourself.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-chinese-as-a-foreign-language.html

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This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world. If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence. Read more
This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world.

If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence.

You explore teaching methods and the description of English used in the investigation of language learning and teaching, and study additional topics according to your needs. These might include:
-How second language learners acquire vocabulary, and how vocabulary can be taught
-Computer-assisted language-learning
-Literature and language-learning
-Materials design and evaluation
-Teaching Writing in EFL/ESL

You also gain hands-on teaching experience through our Teaching Practice I and Teaching Practice II modules.

Whether you have no prior teaching experience or are already an English language teacher, this course can be adapted to suit you. If you have little or no previous teaching experience, you receive ‘hands on’ teaching practice throughout the course via TEFL, while if you already have more than two year’s full-time teaching experience, you can undertake specialist study through TESOL instead.

You'll be part of our Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), a unique research centre specialising in all aspects of language learning and development.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned. Florence Myles authored the best-selling Second Language Learning Theories, and Bob Borsley wrote both Syntactic Theory: a Unified Approach and Modern Phrase Structure Grammar.

Other teachers on this course include Christina Gkonou, who has conducted extensive research into the effects of individual factors like anxiety on success in language learning, and Julian Good and Tracey Costley, who have taught English in Europe, the Far East and South America for many years before coming to Essex.

Karen Roehr-Brackin is a leading expert on the relationship between metalinguistic knowledge (conscious awareness of the rules of language) and language learning ability, and Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez is a leading expert on the use of computers and the role that interaction in the classroom plays in language learning.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Takers of our MA TEFL and other courses in English Language Teaching come with the specific intention of entering the ELT/TESOL profession, which they duly go on to do.

Students on these courses often join us after a career in English teaching, to update their expertise and return to the classroom with a career enhancement.

The specialist knowledge you gain enables you to take senior or specialist roles (for example in computer-assisted language-learning, ESP or teaching young learners), not necessarily only in the classroom but also in educational advice and management, programme evaluation, syllabus design and teacher education.

We also work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Teaching Practice I
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL
-Research Methods I
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Research Methods II
-MA Dissertation
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Foundations of Computer Assisted Language Learning (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-Teaching and Learning Grammar (optional)
-Teaching English to Young Learners: Principles and Practice (optional)
-Teaching Practice II (optional)
-Reflective Practitioner (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)

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Develop an understanding of teaching English as a foreign language and the key role intercultural business communication plays in the global economy. Read more
Develop an understanding of teaching English as a foreign language and the key role intercultural business communication plays in the global economy.

English is a business language for global communication among people who do not share the same native tongue.

This course understands that cultural differences can create barriers, even when English is used as a common language. It thus combines a systematic approach to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) with a solid understanding of intercultural business communication.

On completion of the course you’ll be well prepared for a career in international business.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MSc-Intercultural-Business-Communication-with-TESOL-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

There is an increasing demand for proficient speakers of English and for highly qualified teachers of English as a foreign language. An advanced command of English alone does not ensure the success of cross-cultural business: this course involves a critical examination of issues related to English language teaching and learning, along with cross-cultural business behaviour, cultural dimensions, critical cultural awareness, the key role of languages and training for intercultural sensitivity.

You’ll develop your understanding of approaches to the teaching of English as a foreign language and your ability to critically apply teaching practices to training for intercultural sensitivity. You’ll learn from both disciplines and develop the necessary skills to mentor colleagues who need cross-cultural training.

You’ll also gain an in-depth introduction to research methodology appropriate to undertaking research at this level.

This course has an international outlook and attracts students from a wide range of cultural backgrounds.

This is a one year full-time course starting in September and is split up into three trimesters. You'll learn by a variety of teaching methods including lectures, tutorials and independent study.

Modules

• Teaching English as a Foreign Language
• Intercultural Business Communication
• Understanding Language in the Global Workplace
• Teaching English as a Foreign Language
• Developing Intercultural Competence in the Workplace
• One option
• Research Methods
• Dissertation

One option from:
• Advertising as Cultural Discourse
• Tourism, Society and Visual Culture
• Case Studies in International Tourism
• Postgraduate Language -French, German, Spanish or Italian

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

You could find employment in areas of international business acting as a trainer for colleagues in cross-cultural skills or as a negotiator of international business ventures.

Additionally, you could pursue a career in English language teaching or progress to further academic study on a higher research degree.

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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This unique and innovative programme is designed to develop students’ knowledge of the key areas of Islamic Studies. This programme will introduce Islam in terms of its fundamental beliefs, history and development from the Arabian Peninsula to other parts of the world. Read more
This unique and innovative programme is designed to develop students’ knowledge of the key areas of Islamic Studies. This programme will introduce Islam in terms of its fundamental beliefs, history and development from the Arabian Peninsula to other parts of the world. Students will examine the key teachings of Islam as a religion and a civilisation that has come in contact with other cultures and civilisations. They will also explore other areas such as women and Islam, Islamic core sources and Islamic ethics in light of contemporary developments.

This programme is SCQF credit-rated by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA). It is available on a full-time or part-time basis.

Future Study and Careers

This programme is relevant to any candidate who wants to learn about Islam and its connection with other revealed religions such as Christianity and Judaism.

Through establishing a foundation and some critical thinking on the subject matter, candidates will become confident in addressing various challenges in response to their personal or professional situations through working in a multicultural society.

Additional Information
For students requiring a Tier 4 student visa, an overall score of 6 in IELTS for UKVI (with 6.0 in writing and 5.5 in all other areas) is required.
The programme is comprised of five compulsory units (+ 1 optional unit).

The whole programme is equal to 72 credit points with 12 credit points for each unit. The Advanced Diploma will be awarded to students who successfully pass all units.

The compulsory units are as follows:

Introduction to Islamic Studies will introduce students to Islam, its history, important personalities in the early history of Islam, the development of Islam, its main sources and basic teachings. The students will also be introduced to the skill of transliterating for correct pronunciation of some Arabic/Islamic terms. On successful completion of this unit, students should know the basic teachings and the main sources of Islam. In addition, students will be able to understand some of the similarities and differences between Islam and other religions.

Islamic Core Sources and Approaches will give students a comprehensive understanding of the Islamic core sources and approaches. They will be introduced to the different sciences developed within Islamic studies from exegesis (tafsir) to Islamic law (fiqh) and principles of jurisprudence (usul al-fiqh). On successful completion of this unit, students should know the different methodological approaches developed by Muslim scholars within the Islamic tradition.

Islamic Ethics (Akhlaq) has always been an intrinsic and fundamental part of Islamic thought, manifested in both Muslim jurisprudence and Islamic theology. This unit will look at the centrality of ethics in the Islamic core sources and how early and classical Muslim scholars have conceptualised it. Modern debates about the significance of ethics in Islamic core sources will be critically examined.

Women and Islam is a lively subject used by those in both the Islamic and western worlds. It is a subject often used by critics to portray Islam as a misogynistic and oppressive religion. In their arguments, their first point of reference is the plight of Muslim women in many Islamic societies. The advocates of women’s rights in Islam encourage differentiation between the teachings of Islam and diverse cultural practices.

Research Methodology in Social Sciences and Islamic Studies is designed to strengthen students’ critical thinking while writing or reading scientific research, to familiarise students with theories and the practical application of research methodology, methods, design and strategy while conducting a research proposal. The unit also includes aspects of methodology of Muslim scholars in searching for the truth by considering the revealed knowledge of the Qur’an and Sunnah, evidence from iltizamand qiyas (logic) or even disputed sources

Core Units 

•Introduction to Islamic Studies (SCQF 9)
•Islamic Core Sources and Approaches (SCQF 10)
•Islamic Ethics (SCQF 10)
•Women and Islam (SCQF 10)
•Research Methodology in Social Sciences and Islamic Studies (SCQF 10)”

Optional Units 

•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 5)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 6)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 7)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 8)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 9)
•Arabic for Special Purposes (SCQF 10)
•Islamic Economics and Finance (SCQF 11)
•Islamic Commercial Law (SCQF 11)
•Applied Islamic Banking and Insurance (SCQF 11)
•Islamic Accounting and Auditing (SCQF 11)

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A TESOL MA can enhance the career prospects of a second or foreign language teacher and contribute to professional development. Students will explore the latest developments in the theory, policy and practice of TESOL, working with leading experts in the field and other MA students from around the world. Read more

A TESOL MA can enhance the career prospects of a second or foreign language teacher and contribute to professional development. Students will explore the latest developments in the theory, policy and practice of TESOL, working with leading experts in the field and other MA students from around the world.

About this degree

This programme will give you the opportunity to discuss and debate issues related to teaching second and foreign languages. You will also develop your knowledge of how theory can inform practice in second and foreign language education. You will deepen your understanding of key concepts and ideas, and develop your ability to select, design and evaluate language teaching materials.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core module

The core module for the MA TESOL is Fundamentals of Second and Foreign Language Teaching (30 credits).

  • Fundamentals of Second and Foreign Language Teaching

Optional modules

  • Bilingualism and Multilingualism
  • Discourse, Society and Culture
  • English in Diverse World Contexts
  • Language at Work: Communication in Professional, Institutional and Cultural Contexts
  • Language and Identity
  • Language Testing and Assessment
  • Materials Development for Language Teaching
  • Multimodal Communication
  • Second Language Acquisition
  • Sociolinguistics and Sociocultural Theory
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Education and Development in Asia
  • Education Traditions and Systems in Europe
  • Internet Cultures: Theory and Practice
  • Language Development
  • Learning and Teaching with Technologies
  • Literacy Development
  • Perspectives on Adult Literacy, Language and Numeracy
  • Technology and Education Beyond the Classroom
  • Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas

Dissertation/report

All students submit a 2,500-word research proposal and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

Teaching combines various forms, such as lectures, workshops, projects, student presentations, and student-led discussions. Within sessions, students often engage in individual, pair and group task which are then fed back to the leanly. Assessment is by coursework and presentation. Various coursework types are used as appropriate to the module.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as English language teachers from early years to higher education, while others have jobs as senior managers and directors of study in the private sector and in state schools. Graduates can also be found working as textbook writers, editors, publishers, education journalists, NGO and development officers, education consultants, policy advisers, researchers and PhD students.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • English Teacher, King's College London
  • Language School Director, LSI (Language Studies International)
  • Secondary School Teacher (English Language), Fuji Higashi Senior High School
  • Teaching Fellow, UCL
  • PhD Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)

Employability

The programme provides graduates with a rigorous, research-based education based on the latest developments in the area of TESOL. This will give them a natural advantage when applying for teaching or other TESOL-related posts. We also help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example, through departmental talks and other networking opportunities within the department and the wider UCL community.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This TESOL degree combines research-informed learning with the opportunity to reflect on and enhance your own professional practice. You will receive strong support throughout from our team of tutors all of whom have international experience in EFL and ESL.

You will also become part of one of the oldest and most well-known centres for English language teacher development, and will have the opportunity to work with leading researchers from the UCL Centre for Applied Linguistics as well as MA students from all around the world.



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Our Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) MA will provide you with a thorough introduction to current research, teaching theory, principles and practices in English language teaching. Read more

Our Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) MA will provide you with a thorough introduction to current research, teaching theory, principles and practices in English language teaching. You will have the opportunity to observe actual language classes, plan and teach real lessons and carry out research on language learning and teaching.

Key benefits

  • Develop theoretical knowledge and practical skills for teaching English in different contexts.
  • Four weeks of supervised teaching practice.
  • Gain a professional certificate in TEFL at the same time as your MA in TESOL.
  • Observe lessons and learn from experienced teachers at International House London.
  • Excellent tutorial support and extensive course-specific training in research methods and academic writing.
  • Staff have extensive experience of teaching and training teachers in a wide variety of contexts.

Description

Through our Master’s course you will learn sophisticated approaches to second-language pedagogy, second-language learning theories, linguistic analysis and research methods. This will give you a solid foundation of professional knowledge and expertise in preparation for a teaching placement and provide skills to continue your professional development. Our optional modules and dissertation module will allow you to connect this knowledge to specialist areas such as language assessment, the development of teaching materials and teaching English in a variety of contexts. You will also have the option of four weeks of supervised teaching practice through our collaboration with International House, the leading provider of the initial teacher training certificate. If you are successful in the placement you will gain an additional qualification through International House, either the Cambridge English CELTA or the IH Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language.

This course provides you with a thorough introduction to current research, theory, principles and practices in English language teaching. It will enable you to acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English as a second/foreign language, and will prepare you to engage independently and critically with current language teaching and research issues. It will give you the basic research skills you need to investigate language learning, and to help you to develop your individual pedagogic style by reflecting on practice.

Course purpose

The programme provides students with a thorough introduction to current research, theory, principles and practices in English language teaching. It enables students to acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English as a second/foreign language, and prepares students to develop the capacity to engage independently and critically with current language teaching and research issues. It will provide students with basic research skills to investigate language learning, and help students to develop their individual pedagogic approaches by reflecting on practice.

Course format and assessment

We will teach you through lectures, teacher-led class discussions and group work, and you will typically have 40 hours of this for every 30-credit required module. We also expect you to undertake 260 hours of independent study per 30-credit required module. Contact hours for optional modules may vary slightly. During your dissertation we will provide you with seven hours of one-to-one contact with a supervisor and 20 hours of lectures on research skills to complement your 573 hours of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

We will assess your performance on our required modules through essays, language analysis tasks, oral presentations and lesson planning tasks. We assess most of our optional modules through one 3,500-word essay per module, although assessment methods may vary depending on the optional modules you choose. You will also write a 15,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

The skills and knowledge that you develop over the course of our MA will prepare you for a career in English language teaching, a research-oriented career, or a mixture of the two.



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This Course is a unique programme in the UK higher education sector. It is based on a special agreement signed by a Consortium of nine global universities and supported by the European Commission's Socrates Programme as well as Erasmus MUNDUS. Read more
This Course is a unique programme in the UK higher education sector. It is based on a special agreement signed by a Consortium of nine global universities and supported by the European Commission's Socrates Programme as well as Erasmus MUNDUS. It covers analytical and research skills in economics, particularly skills relevant to business analysis, and the opportunity to apply these skills to specialist areas of international trade and European integration.

Students on the award are from all nine partner universities and the teaching is rotated between all partners. Upon completion of teaching block II, students return to their home universities for dissertation work. All modules are taught in English.

Partner universities in addition to Staffordshire University are:
-Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium
-Università degli Studi di Bari ‘Aldo Moro’, Italy
-Vrije Universiteit Brussel,Belgium
-Universidad de Cantabria, Spain
-Université Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, France
-Vysoká škola ekonomická v Praze, Czech Republic
-Xiamen University, P.R. China
-Universidade de Brasília, Brazil

Erasmus MUNDUS Scholarships
This MA has recently been awarded 'Erasmus MUNDUS' status from the European Union. This prestigious status is given to a limited number of masters programmes in Europe. The benefit of the status is that we can offer scholarships to students from both WITHIN AND OUTSIDE THE EU to cover fees and full living expenses (including travel). For details of the 'Erasmus MUNDUS' scholarships, see the consortium website.

Course content

The first term of this programme covers the important theoretical background in economic analysis that will be used in analysing applied topics covered in the remainder of the programme. The second and third terms are taught by staff from partner institutions. Students spend a significant amount of their studies on applying their theoretical economics to analyse issues facing EU policy makers or policy makers in Central and East European countries which have embarked on transition to the market system. The final part of the programme, the dissertation, is usually undertaken at Staffordshire University.

The degree structure:
Term I:
-Advanced Microeconomics
-Advanced Macroeconomics
-Applied Econometrics
-‘Skills’ optional courses: e.g. Mathematics for Economists or Foreign Language

Term II:
-Economics of European Integration
-Open Economy Macroeconomics
-Economics of Globalisation
-‘Advanced subjects’ optional course: Special Topics in Applied Econometrics
-‘Skills’ optional courses: e.g. Foreign Language or Academic Writing

Term III:
-International Trade: Theory and Policy
-‘Advanced subjects’ optional courses: e.g. Special Topics in International Finance, Special Topics in International Trade and/or
-Economics of Regulation
-‘Skills’ optional course: Foreign Language

Dissertation

Employment opportunities

This bespoke award is suitable for graduates who have aspirations for careers in European or international organisations. Many of our postgraduate students are developing high ranking careers in government, international organisations, business and universities. For instance, we have had students who are now employed in the National Statistical Office in Cyprus, with Deutsche Bank and IBM and who have had internships with the EU Commission. Many have also gone on to register for PhDs.

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The Banking and Finance program is a specialized degree designed for students who wish to concentrate their career in financial markets and institutions. Read more

The Banking and Finance program is a specialized degree designed for students who wish to concentrate their career in financial markets and institutions. The program provides advanced training in the key areas of trading and risk management. A significant feature of this program is the combination of strong analytical foundations and applications that deal with real world issues.

Learning objectives

Students will learn to integrate financial models, firm-specific as well as industry and economic factors in their decision making process. In this program, students will have access to meetings with highly qualified speakers from areas such as the financial industry, internship programs in major Italian and international financial institutions, and exchange programs in European and US universities.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

Graduates from the Banking and Finance program will gain both the technical knowledge and the methodological tools suited to pursue professional and managerial careers in banks, asset management companies, security firms, large corporations (particularly in the Treasury and Finance departments), and regulators. Professional consulting positions in all areas of Banking and Finance represent another option for graduates.

Curriculum

First year credits

● Advanced financial accounting (5 ECTS/CFU)

● Advanced microeconomics (5 ECTS/CFU)

● Applied econometrics (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Applied statistics for finance (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Corporate finance (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Derivative securities pricing (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Monetary economics (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Principles of financial regulation (10 ECTS/CFU)

● Quantitative methods for finance (8 ECTS/CFU)

Second year credits

● Investment risk management (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Foreign language (French, German, or Spanish)* (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Market microstructure (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Risk management (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Electives (12 ECTS/CFU)

● Thesis (20 ECTS/CFU)

* The foreign language course can be anticipated to the first year. The language of instruction of the French and Spanish foreign language course is taught in English. German is taught in Italian.

Elective courses list Business area

● Corporate governance and social responsibility - I part (4 ECTS/CFU)

● International corporate finance (8 ECTS/CFU)

● International financial markets (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Project management (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Real estate finance (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Stage/Internship (8 ECTS/CFU)

NB: Upon submitting the study program for the first Master’s degree year, students may insert up to 12 ECTS relative to the teachings of the second year.

Location

The financial district, including the Italian Stock Exchange, is located only ten minutes from our campus, a prime vicinity for those students who plan on studying in the field of Banking and Finance.

Our experts

Cattolica takes great pride in its program contributors. Both academics and professionals from the field teach at our University. Special guests and renowned experts will enhance your learning experience at Cattolica.

Career service

Cattolica’s Career Service will help orientate you along the paths of research, internships and employment, providing you with highly valuable information and support.

International Student Services

At Cattolica, international students should never fear being alone. We have invested in a range of services which ensure that our international visitors are fully supported. Our objective is to guarantee that the unique Cattolica welcome is there for all.



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The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

It typically suits students falling into one of the following three categories:

- students planning to pursue further research, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education;

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of the religions of Asia and Africa and of the theoretical and practical issues involved in their study is essential: arts, media, teaching, NGOs and charities, interfaith dialogue, consultancy for governmental agencies or the private sector, religious institutions, museums, and more.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments: religious ministers and clerics from all confessions, believers, yoga and meditation practitioners; anyone interested in specific religious traditions or in religion as an essential dimension of life, and in the critical and experiential enhancement that their academic study may offer.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa at SOAS is the premier postgraduate curriculum in the U.K. for the study of the religions of Asia and Africa. It covers a wider range of religious traditions than most comparable programmes, whether in the U.K. or abroad: Buddhism in nearly all its doctrinal and regional varieties, Asian and African Christianities, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto, Taoism, Zoroastrianism as well as the local religious cultures of Asia and Africa. It is strongly interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, offering advanced learning in the theory of religion as well as in historical, anthropological, philosophical, sociological and textual approaches to the study of particular religious traditions.

It provides a unique opportunity to tap cutting-edge academic expertise and library facilities on Asian and African religions as part of a spirited, cosmopolitan student community and within the intense religious and cultural scene of London.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

For the Japanese pathway please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page at: http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students are generally required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses (which may include one language course), and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units.

Programme Specification

MA Religions of Asia and Africa and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 300kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/file93574.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:

- Advanced knowledge and understanding of selected approaches, methods and theories in the study of religions, with particular reference to the religious traditions of Asia and Africa.

- Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in religious studies, also as a platform for further research at doctoral level.

- Advanced skills in presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religious studies.

- Specialisation in one area from among those covered by the units listed in the programme structure.

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically, locate and synthesise source materials, critically evaluate conflicting interpretations and sources, use research resources (library catalogues, journal databases, citation indices) and other relevant traditional sources.

- Subject specific skills, such as manuscript transcription, textual bibliography, the editing of texts; familiarity with the study of religions as an academic field of study and its varieties.

- Aspects of literature in the Study of Religions, philosophy, learning, iconography and history, the impact of religion on society.

- Acquisition of language skills.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

- Students will develop the capacity to discuss theoretical and epistemological issues in an articulate, informed, and intellectual manner.

- Students will learn to become precise and critical in their assessment of scholarly arguments and to question interpretations, however authoritative, in order to reassess evidence for themselves.

- Students will learn to present complex theoretical arguments clearly and creatively.

- Those students who take a language option should be able to assess primary sources in foreign languages and critically evaluate interpretations proposed by different scholars.

- Students will acquire both theoretical and regional expertise in order to develop and apply self-reflexive approaches to the issues raised by the cross-cultural study of religions.

Subject-based practical skills:
The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

- Academic writing.

- IT-based information retrieval and processing.

- Presentational skills.

- Examination techniques.

- Independent study skills and research techniques.

- Reflexive learning.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
The programme will encourage students to:

- Write concisely and with clarity.

- Effectively structure and communicate ideas (oral and written).

- Explore and assess a variety of sources for research purposes.

- Work to deadlines and high academic standards.

- Assess the validity and cogency of arguments.

- Make judgements involving complex factors.

- Develop self-reflexivity.

- Develop an awareness of the ethical complexity of representational practices.

- Question the nature of social and cultural constructs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. While the course is open to students from a broad range of backgrounds, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History (or a related discipline), some knowledge of foreign, including Asian or African languages, and preferably some relevant background in the region of specialism.

Graduates will find a wide range of career options open to them, in particular those involving inter-cultural or international contact, such as in international organizations, government institutions, non-profit organizations, and journalism, but also museums, educational institutions, or the publishing sector more generally. It would also be a suitable preparation for students considering embarking on a research degree focusing on one of the regional or topical areas of expertise represented in the department.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

This is the only Master-level programme in History focusing on the study of Asia, the Middle East and Africa in the UK, and can therefore offer an unrivalled breadth of courses on the history of these regions. The programme provides a sound training in the historical sciences.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/

Structure

The programme includes the following elements totalling four units: Courses totalling at least two units from List A [History courses], including a half or full unit designated as the Major course; further minor courses totalling one unit from Lists A [Major and minor history courses], B [Courses from other departments], C [Language courses] or D [Intercollegiate courses]; and a dissertation of 10,000 words written in conjunction with the Major course (one unit).

There are five regional pathways within the MA History: Africa, East Asia, Near and Middle East, South Asia and South East Asia. To meet the pathway requirement, students must choose courses from the relevant regional section in List A to the minimum value of 1.5 units, including their Major.

In the two-year intensive language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

MA History and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 362kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/file93560.pdf

Aims and Outcomes

- An advanced understanding of the historical sciences and its various methodologies and approaches in general, and specialist knowledge of Asian and African history in particula

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- The critical, conceptual, and analytical skills required for historical research as well as for positions of responsibility in all other professions

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:
1. Factual knowledge about the histories of Asian and African societies, the ways they interacted with each other and other world regions of the world, and the major historical forces that shaped our contemporary world.

2. Familiarity with a variety of different approaches to historical research and current scholarly debates, and, on that basis, the ability to formulate a valuable research question.

3. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

4. Language skills appropriate to chosen region and field of study (recommended).

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should be able to synthesize different kinds of information, become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and analyse and reassess evidence and research questions for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, including relevant professional databases, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Ability to formulate research questions and design an independent research project, including the use of primary sources.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme is run on a modular basis to suit students with little or no training in linguistics who. - Wish to acquire a more profound knowledge of the discipline or take the degree as a conversion course before proceeding to a research degree. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is run on a modular basis to suit students with little or no training in linguistics who:

- Wish to acquire a more profound knowledge of the discipline or take the degree as a conversion course before proceeding to a research degree.

- Are looking to gain a working knowledge of an Asian, Middle Eastern or African language.

This two-year programme is meant for students who wish to combine rigorous training in the discipline of linguistics, with the intensive study of one or more African or Asian languages. At the end of the programme students will be able to embark on professional careers in language-related fields with emphasis on the region in which the language chosen for the programme is spoken. They will also be able to undertake further study, e.g. for a research degree in linguistics.

The programme is built on the MA Linguistics and includes all parts of this programme (4 units). It may be combined with Intensive Language (Japanese), Intensive Language (Korean) and Intensive Language (Arabic). Relevant departments deliver 4 units of language study, which may include a summer abroad in a country where the language is spoken. Please click on the links to view their webpages for further information.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-lingandlang/

Structure

The MA Linguistics and Intensive Language consists of three components: core courses, optional courses and dissertation research.

Students take seven full units of taught courses and write a 10,000 word dissertation on the topic of their choice in linguistics in consultation with the supervisor. Three units are taken in the Linguistics department, and four units are taken in other SOAS departments and involve the practical study of a language at any level. Students also attend the weekly Research Training Seminar in Year 1.

Programme Specification

MA Linguistics and Intensive Language - Programme Specifications 2015/16 (pdf; 334kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-lingandlang/file91061.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Programme Aims:

- To provide students with knowledge of the discipline of linguistics and research methodology in the study of language, both from a theoretical and practical viewpoint

- To provide students with sufficient transferable skills to enable them to function in other professional environments related to language

- To provide either a further qualification in linguistics or a preparation for research (MPhil/PhD) study. By the end of the course students are able to pursue further research or training, at either PhD or professional level

- To provide the opportunity of studying one or more Asian, Middle Eastern and African languages. By the end of the course students are able to have an intermediate-level command of at least one language

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge

1. Acquiring a solid foundation in the ‘core’ areas of theoretical linguistics, syntax, phonology and semantics

2. Familiarity with the basic concepts and assumptions of different theoretical frameworks in the discipline, and the ability to critically question and evaluate these assumptions

3. Familiarity with the relevant conventions and methodology applicable to working with both raw linguistic data and linguistic descriptions

4. Opportunity to specialise in the area of interest

5. The student will have the opportunity to gain knowledge (or further knowledge) of one or more Asian, Middle Eastern or African languages

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
Having completed the programme, students should have:

1. The ability to formulate appropriate linguistic problems, propose and evaluate analyses and present evidence (for and/or against) these analyses

2. Knowledge of how to assess data and evidence critically from the literature and original sources, how to formulate analyses and arguments within the system of concepts and assumptions in the discipline, how to solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations

Subject-based practical skills:
Having completed the programme, students should be able to:

1. Practise research techniques in specialised research libraries and through consultant work

2. Retrieve and select information from a variety of linguistic sources such as specialised papers and reference grammars

3. Have strong practical language skills which will help them in any context where the language is used and which will also be of benefit if they need to learn another language in the future

Transferable skills:
Having completed the programme, students should be able to:

1. Locate materials and use research sources (library holdings, ‘raw’ language data, periodicals, internet)

2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively in writing

3. Question, understand and evaluate competing proposals

Employment

Many linguistics graduates continue their studies and go to do a PhD, either at SOAS or elsewhere. Others work in the domains of education, translation, information and media technology, journalism, publishing, consultancy for law and medicine, product-naming companies, as well as governmental organisations concerned with language planning, language policy and foreign affairs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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We've designed this programme for teachers, teacher trainers and materials writers in the field of Foreign Language Teaching (particularly English as a Foreign Language). Read more
We've designed this programme for teachers, teacher trainers and materials writers in the field of Foreign Language Teaching (particularly English as a Foreign Language).

More particularly, the programme aims to:

Increase your awareness and knowledge of relevant areas of applied linguistics research and theory

Help you to apply relevant applied linguistics research and theory to the practicalities of language teaching

Assist you in developing a deeper understanding of current classroom methodology, as well as of current developments in testing, in course design and in materials development

Increase your awareness and knowledge of the latest approaches to language analysis, and of their potential for application to language teaching.

Normally you’ll need a first degree and relevant professional experience before applying for this programme.

Our academic staff have extensive experience of teaching internationally and working on projects and have active research interests and publications. Student feedback consistently indicates how much they appreciate our tutors’ friendly and patient support as well as their excellent academic and professional abilities.

You’ll take four core modules, along with three further taught options from a wide selection offered each year. There’ll also be a dissertation to write, normally on a subject related to the topics covered in the taught modules.

Why English?

Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), we ranked 10th out of 89 in the UK for 4* (world-leading) and 3* (internationally excellent) research.

Strong postgraduate community

With over 150 taught and research students from all over the world, you will be part of a genuine international community. You will be able to participate in our lively research culture through attending regular seminars and lectures by guest speakers as well as our own staff and students. A legacy from former tutor Miriam Allott has allowed the department to host a creative writing fellow (currently the poet Sean Borodale), and a vibrant series of international poetry readings. Recent conferences include ‘On Liberties’ at St Deiniol’s Library, and ‘Renaissance Old Worlds’ in collaboration with the British Library. As a doctoral student you can participate in the optional English Graduate Teaching Programme, which allows doctoral students to get the best of the teaching opportunities available without making significant demands on their time.

Career prospects

The independence of study, clarity of expression and management of time demanded by all our taught programmes equip the successful graduate with the skills and knowledge base required for further academic study and research in English and other areas.

However, many graduates choose to enter careers such as teaching, publishing and journalism, or to work in the business sector, often in human resources, administration, marketing or sales.

Successful alumni have gone on to teach English at elementary, secondary and tertiary levels in schools around the globe. A significant number of MA graduates have also continued their studies to PhD level.

Successful alumni have gone on to teach English at elementary, secondary and tertiary levels in schools around the globe. A significant number of MA graduates have also continued their studies at PhD level.

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