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The University of Kent's Two Capitals Programme gives students a unique opportunity to learn about international affairs in a global context. Read more
The University of Kent's Two Capitals Programme gives students a unique opportunity to learn about international affairs in a global context. Students spend one year at the Brussels School of International Studies before moving to Washington DC, Beijing or Brasilia for their second year. On successful completion they are awarded two master’s degrees; one from the University of Kent and the other from the relevant partner institution.

The programme allows students to specialise in one of the following disciplines; international relations, conflict and security, international political economy, public policy or international development, as well as experience different approaches to international studies on different continents and in different global capitals. Students on the programme gain an insight into the nature of change as an endemic feature of politics on a national, regional and global scale; an understanding of the causes of change; and ways in which to manage that change. They also gain a firm understanding of the complex relationship between the concerns of domestic and international politics, and global and geopolitical issues.

Applicants, who should initially apply for one of the programmes listed below, will be expected to have completed the taught courses of their chosen programme and have achieved an average of a Merit before applying for one of the exchanges as part of the Two Capitals Programme. A decision on whether a student may undertake an exchange will be made in May for those students who started their masters in the previous September and in February for those students who started in January.

MA in International Relations
MA in International Conflict and Security
MA in EU External Relations
MA in International Development
MA in International Political Economy

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/twocapitals/

Washington DC

The Two Capitals Programme in Washington DC is based on agreements with Virginia Tech and George Mason University.

• Students wishing to undertake the second year of their programme at Virginia Tech (VT) will be enrolled on the Government and International Affairs programme of the School of Public and International Affairs on VT's National Capital Region Campus in Alexandria and will study towards a Masters in Public International Affairs (MPIA). Details on how the two year programme will work in practice will be published shortly.

•Students wishing to study at George Mason University will be enrolled on Master of Public Policy programme at the School of Public Policy in Arlington, VA. Details on how the two year programme will work in practice will follow.

Beijing

The Two Capitals Programme in Beijing will be based upon an agreement with the Chinese Foreign Affairs University (CFAU) which is the only institution of higher learning which operates under the guidance of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China. The University trains high calibre Chinese diplomats in the fields of Foreign Service, international studies, and international business and law and offers an unparalleled experience for foreign students. While the format of the exchange programme is developed, the Brussels School of International Studies runs a very successful and much sought after exchange programme through which two or three students experience a term in each other’s institution. To find out more about the exchange programme please contact .

Brasil

Work is currently underway to develop a version of the Two Capitals Programme in Brasil with the University of Brasilia

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/admissions/index.html

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The Master of Arts degree in International Affairs can open a new world of career opportunities in an increasingly globalized world. Read more
The Master of Arts degree in International Affairs can open a new world of career opportunities in an increasingly globalized world. The graduate program provides students with a unique combination of analytic research and practical applications tools. Choose from two concentrations: International Security and Peace Studies, or International Development and Globalization. The degree track appeals to students with an intense interest in and desire for work in professional international fields and/or study at the doctoral level. Highly qualified faculty teach the latest research methods in international issues; skills to organize field projects and work in interdisciplinary teams; and theoretical and methodological tools to evaluate national or international policies. Graduates also will have opportunities to develop a complete understanding of foreign cultures.

A Master of Arts (M.A.) in International Affairs is now offered, with a concentration either in International Security and Peace Studies or in International Development and Globalization. It is the only program of its type in the state of Tennessee.

International Affairs candidates must fulfill a requirement for either a practicum or a thesis. Students also must have or obtain a degree of fluency in a foreign language relative to career goals or geographic area of interest. A study-abroad experience is encouraged, which additionally will help develop foreign-language skills.

Career

The M.A. in International Affairs prepares students for careers in international affairs; international business; domestic and international non-governmental organizations focusing on poverty alleviation, human rights, or environmental policies; foreign policy organizations; government; analysis and risk management firms; homeland security; and the military. Some potential occupations:

Charitable aid director
City development manager
Combat engineer
Diplomat
Educator
Environmentalist
Equal employment opportunity coordinator
Foreign policy advisor
Government employee
Human rights advocate
Import company representative
International trade compliance analyst
Linguist
Military official
Multinational banker
Nonprofit director
Program analyst
Public servant
Relief agency director
Senior intelligence specialist in defense
Staff assistant to members of Congress
World health advocate

Employers of MTSU alumni

The International Security and Peace Studies track could lead to work at such agencies as the United Nations or other UN agencies, the CIA and the Department of State; nongovernmental organizations like the International Red Cross and Doctors without Borders; and think tanks that research international conflicts.

Students choosing the International Development and Globalization track might pursue jobs at nongovernmental organizations, multinational corporations, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, U.S. Agency for International Development, the Department of Commerce, United Nations Development Program and other UN agencies, consulting firms, and philanthropies. Some might work with local people in villages to help with sanitation, clean water and financing for agricultural activities.

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics
• Civil Society and International Development
• Critical Security Studies
• Rights-Based Approaches to Development
• War, Technology and Culture
• Approaches to IR
• Violence, Conflict & Development
• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• The Policy Making Process
• State of Africa
• Politics in Contemporary Britain
• War in Space
• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• War, Identity and Society
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs
• Women Writers of the 1940’s
• Women Writing India
• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction
• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution
• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939
• Contemporary Women’s Writing
• Angela Carter
• Gender in Contemporary European Culture
• Literature in Social Context
• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt
• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939
• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.

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Our LLM in International Law focuses on the issues facing today's international lawyers. You will study the complex and dynamic nature of the international legal system and its role in foreign affairs. Read more
Our LLM in International Law focuses on the issues facing today's international lawyers. You will study the complex and dynamic nature of the international legal system and its role in foreign affairs.

This course is one of three taught law courses (LLM) we offer and is suitable for graduates of any background. It is ideal if you’re interested in gaining a better understanding of how the law shapes and influences international affairs.

It will give you the knowledge, insights and practical skills to enhance your career in practice, the public, private or diplomatic sectors or academia. If you are pursuing another career path, it will enhance your understanding of how the law shapes and influences international affairs.

You will study contemporary issues in public international law. You will develop your knowledge and expertise in:
-International dispute settlement
-International organisations
-The role of individuals in the international legal system

You will develop both your practical and research legal skills. Through our Legal Simulation module you will work in small teams and be presented with a realistic scenario. You will be introduced to a variety of practically-focused legal skills, including:
-Analysis of complex legal problems
-Devising legal strategies
-Working with the law in real-life contexts

You will also learn a variety of legal-specific research skills through our Legal Research Skills and Methods module.

You can create your own specialised programme of study that matches your legal interests and career aspirations. You can choose from a wide range of optional modules to complement your core studies, including:
-The role of law in international affairs
-Diplomacy and dispute settlement
-Human rights law
-International crime
-The protection of foreign investment

You can also choose from a range of our other master's modules, with the permission of the Degree Programme Director.

Dedicated one-to-one support is also given to help you research and write a dissertation on an area of law you feel passionate about.

There is a field trip to international criminal courts and tribunals in The Hague as part of the optional module, International Criminal Law. This is an optional trip and is not covered by tuition fees.

There are opportunities to become an editor of The North East Law Review. This is Newcastle’s student-edited law journal which showcases outstanding student work for open-access publication. You can also join the Eldon Society, the University’s society for students with an interest in law.

Delivery

Modules are taught by our expert academic staff over the first and second semesters through a combination of:
-Interactive lectures
-Workshops
-Seminars

All of our workshops and seminars are taught in small groups, where we encourage lively discussion and debate.

During your first two weeks we encourage you to sit in on lectures across our optional law modules. This will help you to choose which areas best suit your needs and interests.

Our Degree Programme Director will also be available to offer support and guidance to help you make these choices.

Assessment is through a variety of methods, including:
-Coursework
-Essays
-Written exams
-Presentation
-Dissertation

Facilities

We are committed to pursuing academic excellence and fostering an intellectually challenging and supportive environment in which our students can excel.

We regularly host conferences and seminars with internationally renowned guest speakers. We encourage you to attend these events as they cover a wide range of important legal, political, economic and social issues.

Our facilities include:
-A dedicated Law Library
-A LLM study space with computer suite
-A student common room
-A large lecture theatre
-A purpose-built mooting room
-Wi-fi connectivity throughout the school

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The MA in War studies enhances analytical, conceptual, research and critical thinking skills designed expressly to enhance employability and aid professional career development. Read more
The MA in War studies enhances analytical, conceptual, research and critical thinking skills designed expressly to enhance employability and aid professional career development. You will gain an understanding of the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints.

Key benefits

• Designed to provide a postgraduate-level introduction to War Studies for students who have little or no specialist background in the field.

• A unique opportunity to study war from a multi-disciplinary perspective in order to achieve a sophisticated and well-rounded understanding of the phenomenon.

•A chance to develop a range of transferable skills that will enhance your employability, aid your professional-career development and help prepare you for postgraduate research. These include analytical, conceptual, critical-thinking, research and communication skills.

• You will be taught by some of the very best academics in the field. Departmental staff are internationally acknowledged experts in their areas of specialization; they are active researchers and routinely employ their latest findings in their teaching.

• An opportunity to study at a global centre of excellence that enjoys close relationships with other academic institutions, with think tanks, non-governmental organizations and policy-making bodies around the world.

• Opportunities to network with high-profile visitors, such as government ministers, ambassadors and generals, who frequently give talks in the Department.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/war-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

War is a key aspect of human experience, and people have long sought to understand it from a diverse range of perspectives. Students of war are drawn from the ranks of historians, social scientists, philosophers, jurists and artists. Practitioners of war find instrumental value in its study. These and others have brought their particular insights and concerns to bear on the subject. However, the study of war from any single standpoint risks producing an overly narrow perspective that cannot accommodate war’s complexity. Individual issues are elucidated but we remain a long way from understanding war “in the round”. Such a goal demands a different, more holisitic, approach.

The MA in War Studies is designed to meet this demand by introducing students to a multidisciplinary approach to the study of war. As such, it provides an intellectual “toolbox” whose contents are drawn from a range of disciplines associated with the humanities and the social sciences. Students will not be trained as specialist historians, philosophers, strategists, etc., but they will be introduced to elements of various disciplines that are germane to the study of war. The challenge lies in combining them in order to achieve a sophisticated and rounded understanding of the subject.

- Course purpose -

To introduce the field of war studies to graduate students and professionals, professionals with an interest in deepening their understanding of war. You will gain an understanding of the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. The programme will appeal to students from a wide range of backgrounds including politics, history and strategic studies; and professionals in defence, diplomacy and foreign affairs wanting to reflect on the broader implications of their experiences.

- Course format and assessment -

Continuous assessment by essay; examinations and a dissertation.

Career prospects

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, the FCO, the MOD, the Home Office, NATO, the UN or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Conflict, Security and Development explores the conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding security and development and how these manifest themselves in the wider context of contemporary warfare and international security. Read more
Conflict, Security and Development explores the conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding security and development and how these manifest themselves in the wider context of contemporary warfare and international security.

Key benefits

Development and security are inextricably linked, yet all too often both academics and policy-makers address them separately. The MA in Conflict, Security, and Development is a unique globally-recognized programme that brings together these interrelated areas of study, acknowledging that conflict, insecurity, and underdevelopment interact in dynamic ways and that a full understanding of them requires a holistic approach. The programme exposes students to a variety of complex transnational issues, taking a multidisciplinary approach to some of the key questions facing policy-makers and scholars today. It is designed to enhance students’ analytical, research, and critical thinking skills, to provide them with detailed practical knowledge of conflict, security, and development around the world, and to prepare them to become leaders in the public and private sectors, government, and academia.

Course detail

- Description -

Security and development studies have remained largely unaffected by other's perspectives and priorities, and the sense that each area of study stems from a different set of assumptions and embraced a distinctive agenda has also been mirrored in the world of policymaking. This began to change in the 1990s when the importance of considering questions of security and development in their mutual interaction became increasingly recognised by practitioners and scholars alike. Our programme reflects this important trend and provides a unique course of study drawing upon the insights offered by a range of different disciplines, including international relations, history, development studies and anthropology.

This programme is designed to have broad-ranging appeal to those interested in pursuing graduate studies in security, conflict studies and development. You may find this programme to be of particular interest if you are a graduate in politics, history, international relations, economics and strategic studies; if you have practical experience in development and wish to reflect on the wider issues and implications of your experience; if you have worked with international organisations, including the UN and its specialised agencies or with NGOs in zones of conflict, and wish to reflect on your experience; or if you are a professional in development, defence, diplomacy and foreign affairs.

- Course purpose -

This programme is designed to provide students with an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the complex linkages between issues of security and development in contemporary international relations. The programme encourages you to explore the conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding security and development and how these manifest themselves in the wider context of contemporary warfare and international security. Our programme’s core course introduces you to the major debates in the fields of security and international relations, regarding the interaction between processes of political and economic development, conflict, and violent social change.

- Course format and assessment -

Most 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2,000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas and exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Students on our MA programmes have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching, and the armed forces. For more information about career prospects and graduate destinations see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/employability.aspx

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Intelligence and International Security examines the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century. Read more
Intelligence and International Security examines the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century. Students will develop an awareness of the ways in which intelligence issues manifest themselves in security issues in peace and war. Understanding of ethical dilemmas associated with intelligence activity.

Key benefits

- Intelligence & International Security is excellent preparation for employment in government service or in commercial risk management and open source intelligence providers.

- Students will be taught by visiting academics, serving and former officials and other intelligence experts who give regular public lectures and seminars.

- Enables students to examine the nature, processes, roles and case studies of intelligence and their interaction with developments in international security.

- Students have the advantage of attending events run by the Intelligence and International Security Research Group which provides a platform for sharing ideas.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/intelligence-and-international-security-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Issues of intelligence have assumed increasing prominence in world affairs as analysts and policymakers attempt to assess the nature of new threats in the international system. Our programme will enable you to examine the nature, processes, roles and case studies of intelligence and their interaction with developments in international security.

In examining the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century our programme offers a unique multidisciplinary approach based on the strengths of the department. We aim to provide a framework in which to understand the nature and role of intelligence in its relationship to wider issues in war and international security; an understanding of the processes, practices and institutions that have characterised intelligence in the modern era; an understanding of the problems connected with intelligence collection, assessment and ability to predict events in world affairs; and an appreciation of the particular ethical concerns generated by intelligence-related phenomena.

- Course purpose -

Our programme is for graduates and professionals with an interest in understanding the nature and role of intelligence. It is designed to have broad-ranging appeal if you are interested in pursuing graduate studies in intelligence and security studies. You will also find this programme of interest if you are a graduate in politics, history, international relations and strategic studies; if you have practical experience in the intelligence community and wish to reflect on the wider issues and implications of your experience; or are a professional in defence, diplomacy and foreign affairs.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2,000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas and exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Whilst this is not a vocational programme, students on our MA programmes have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching and the armed forces.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This MA offers teaching that is critical, innovative and diverse. It combines theory with practical, applied elements, and draws on a range of research and contemporary examples- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-political-communications/. Read more
This MA offers teaching that is critical, innovative and diverse. It combines theory with practical, applied elements, and draws on a range of research and contemporary examples- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-political-communications/

These come from current work in politics, political science and media studies, and also from political sociology, cultural theory and journalism. The curriculum covers political communication, from the national and international down to the local and personal, from governments and parties to NGOs and local activist groups. It engages with cultural, alternative and digital, interactive communication as well as traditional mass media.

This dynamic programme, first and foremost, offers critical engagement. It asks difficult questions about politics, economic policy, society and the media. Taking this course will not just give you an understanding of the the forms and impacts of political communications. It will also help you contextualise that knowledge in relation to the structures, institutions and actors that are at the heart of politics and media.

This course is broadly conceptual in focus, but also offers several practical, applied options as well as skills-based components. All students take a research skills course and are supervised through a dissertation with a research component. There are options, such as Campaign Skills, Social Media Campaigning, Digital News Writing and Media Law, which are entirely practice-based and taught by professionals in the field. There are also several speaker series running each year with guests from the worlds of politics, journalism, business and campaigning coming to talk.

Studying in London

Goldsmiths’ London location means that students remain in close proximity to a range of national and international political institutions, political parties, interest groups and media centres.

The MA also attracts a stimulating combination of recent graduates and experienced professionals, as well as a mix of UK and international students from across Continental Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Aeron Davis.

The programme’s core curriculum will address a range of contemporary issues, debates and theory in political communication, including work on:

-comparative media systems
-theories of communication and democratisation
-global media, international governance and transnational communication
-economic, financial and industrial policy
-digital media and online politics
-media sociology and news production
-political parties, party ideologies and party-member dynamics
-public relations, political marketing and spin
-government communication systems and media management
-media audiences, effects and agenda-setting
-public opinion and public sphere debates
-interest groups, social movements and alternative media
-advocacy, civil society and public affairs
-new technologies and the information society
-citizenship and public engagement
-the policy process and government decision-making
-politics and culture
-social theories of power, culture and communications

Theory is usually applied to a number of case study areas on, for example: conflict and war; elections; social and environmental debates; foreign affairs; the economy, finance and business; crime and disorder. Theory and discussion is always related to current events and debates.

Structure

The MA in Political Communications is built up of modules that must count up to 180 credits. The programme comprises:

Two core modules taught in the Department of Media and Communications (60 credits in total)
A research skills module
60 credits' worth of modules chosen from the Department of Politics or Department of Media and Communications. These can be a combination of 30 and 15 credit modules
Up to 30 of the 60 credits of options may be chosen from the departments of Sociology, Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, and the Centre for Cultural Studies

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

On completing the programme you'll come out with a mixture of:

-field expertise
-new analytical skills
-an understanding of research methods
-practical, applied knowledge

Careers

The programme caters to both recent graduates and those with experience who are looking for career change or advancement. Recent graduates have found (re)employment in:

-political journalism,
-olitical parties
-government institutions
-interest groups
-international bodies

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches. Read more
This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches.

A broad transnational framework allows you to combine African, U.S., Caribbean, British and Southeast Asian history under the guidance of leading researchers in English, History, Gender Studies, Spanish, and Latin American studies. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and use varied materials such as novels, films, speeches, newspapers and organisational records to explore issues of race and resistance across very different periods and cultures.

Supported by the Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, you could study the slave trade, Mexican-American identity, race and feminism in the US, political violence in India or apartheid, among many others. It’s a fascinating and vital opportunity to gain an understanding of the roles that race and resistance have played in shaping the modern world – and how this complex relationship is evolving.

More Information

We have a wide range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. Among our library resources are microfilm collections of American, Indian and South African newspapers as well as journals relating to US civil rights. British and US government papers are also on microfilm, and an extensive set of British documents on end of empire and foreign affairs.

The Church Missionary Society Archives, the Black Power Movement archive and the Curzon papers are all available, and we have access to extensive online resources to access original material for your independent research.

With the chance to participate in our active research groups – such as Identity, Power and Protest; Women, Gender and Sexuality; and Health, Medicine and Society – and benefit from an impressive range of expertise among our tutors, you’ll find that the University of Leeds is a fantastic place to gain the knowledge and skills you need.

This degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course Content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods and approaches to the study of race and resistance. You’ll explore issues such as diasporas and migration, the legacy of non-violence and sexuality and race.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules across different subject areas, on issues such as the Black Atlantic, postcolonial literature, British settler colonies in Africa and more.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ optional module

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Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines. Read more
Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines.

It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, international law firms and foreign affairs departments.

The programme is delivered at our Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) in conjunction with our law school.

- Extended programme

The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/772/human-rights-law

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The LLM in Human Rights Law allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying Human Rights Law in the context of International Relations; International Conflict and Security; International Migration, and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an LLM degree in, for example, 'Human Rights Law with International Migration'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Research areas

- European and Comparative Law

European and Comparative Law is being conducted both at an individual level as well as at the Kent Centre for European and Comparative Law, which was established in 2004 with a view to providing a framework for the further development of the Law School’s research and teaching activities in this area. Research and teaching reaches from general areas of comparative and European public and private law to more specialised areas and specific projects.

- Governance and Regulation

Legal research involves studying processes of regulation and governance. This research cluster focuses on the character of regulation and governance to critically understand the different modes through which governing takes place such as the conditions, relations of power and effects of governance and regulation. Work within this area is methodologically diverse.

Intellectually, it draws on a range of areas including socio-legal studies; Foucauldian perspectives on power and governmentality; Actor Network Theory; feminist political theory and political economy; postcolonial studies; continental political philosophy; and cultural and utopian studies.

- International Law

The starting point for research in international law at Kent Law School is that international law is not apolitical and that its political ideology reflects the interests of powerful states and transnational economic actors. In both research and teaching, staff situate international law in the context of histories of colonialism to analyse critically its development, doctrines and ramifications.

Critical International Law at KLS engages with theories of political economy, international relations and gender and sexuality to contribute to scholarly and policy debates across the spectrum of international law, which includes public, economic, human rights, criminal and commercial law. Scholars at the Centre for Critical International Law engage in the practical application of international law through litigation, training, research and consultancies for international organisations, NGOs and states.

- Law and Political Economy & Law and Development

Law and its relation to political economy are addressed from a variety of angles, including the exploration of the micro- and macrolevel of economic regulations as well as theoretical aspects of law and political economy.

- Legal Theories and Philosophy

Identifying the fact that several academics do work in cultural theory and political theory (including on normative concepts, religion and the state). While feminist and critical legal theories are focal points at Kent Law School, the departmental expertise also covers more essential aspects such as classical jurisprudence and the application of philosophy to law.

Other research areas within KLS include:

- human rights
- labour law
- law and culture
- law, science and technology
- legal methods and epistemology
- public law
- race, religion and the law.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Despite their close relationship, International Law and International Relations have traditionally been taught as discrete subjects. Read more
Despite their close relationship, International Law and International Relations have traditionally been taught as discrete subjects. This programme is based on a recognition of the need to allow each discipline to be informed by the other. The programme covers the general methods, scope and theories of International Relations and International Law.

The objective of the programme is to develop a critical consideration of traditional approaches to the discipline of International Relations. In the post-Cold War globalising world there is an increasingly apparent need for ever-more sophisticated ways of understanding the dramatic changes taking place.

At the same time the programme allows students to consider the role, potential and limitations of public international law in international affairs. For some, this will enable an undergraduate specialisation to be developed. For others, it will enable knowledge of other fields to be applied to International Relations. The programme’s interdisciplinary approach is particularly suited to those involved with, or hoping to work for, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, foreign affairs departments and international law firms.

All lectures and seminars on postgraduate modules are informed by the latest research and scholarship, and are delivered by full-time academic staff who have internationally recognised expertise in their field.

About the School of Politics and International Relations

The School of Politics and International Relations is one of the most dynamic places to study Politics and International Relations. We combine high-quality teaching with cutting-edge research in a supportive environment that welcomes students from all over the world.

The School has grown significantly in the last few years and now has over 30 academic staff based at two locations, in Canterbury and Brussels. The School is cosmopolitan, with staff originating from eight different countries, and well over half of all postgraduate students come from outside the UK.

We pride ourselves on our global outlook, which is reflected in the wide range of international partnerships . We are the only politics and international relations school in the country with a postgraduate centre in Brussels, which allows students on some of our programmes to follow part, or their entire, programme in Brussels.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Internships, Placements and Alumni Manager who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations

We are currently ranked 8th in the UK for Graduate Prospects in the Complete University Guide 2018.

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This MA gives you in-depth knowledge and capacity for gender analysis of specific themes such as. -Reproductive health. -Rights. -Identity. Read more
This MA gives you in-depth knowledge and capacity for gender analysis of specific themes such as:
-Reproductive health
-Rights
-Identity
-Environment
-Social protection

Our groundbreaking work challenges ideas about gender. We work with nuanced, fluid perspectives on gender and sex, and the ways they interact. You’ll gain the skills to participate effectively in gender- and development-related research and policy-making.

This course is jointly run by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) and the School of Global Studies.

Accreditation

This course is IAC/EADI accredited. Sussex is proud to be the first UK university to gain this accreditation.

The International Accreditation Council for Global Development Studies and Research wishes to influence proactively the process of quality assurance for global development studies and has developed a state-of-the-art accreditation system.

How will I study?

You will take core modules and options across the autumn and spring terms. In the summer, you will work on your dissertation.

Assessment is through term papers, coursework assignments, presentations, practical exercises and the final 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates become specialists and advisers in gender and human rights for governments worldwide – ­including ministries of foreign affairs in countries such as Azerbaijan and Indonesia. They work for the UN’s UNIFEM and USAID.

Some of our graduates also go on to teach gender studies in universities around the world.

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We live in an increasingly turbulent world, wracked by conflict, instability and insecurity. The roots of these problems are highly complex; the challenges involved in delivering greater peace and prosperity cannot be under-estimated. Read more

Why take this course?

We live in an increasingly turbulent world, wracked by conflict, instability and insecurity. The roots of these problems are highly complex; the challenges involved in delivering greater peace and prosperity cannot be under-estimated. This course is designed for those who recognise the importance of acquiring advanced intellectual skills to be able to understand and analyse current trends in global politics. It studies a broad sweep of issues in international relations, including the rise of fundamentalist terrorism, the resurgence of Russia, the spread of globalisation and the emergence of new regional powers on the world stage.

We are the only university in the UK that offers an internship with the BBC Afrique World Service in Senegal. This opportunity is available to students with French language skills on MA International Relations or MA European Politics.

What will I experience?

On this course, you will:

Deepen your knowledge of some of the most urgent political and security issues facing the world today, informed by cutting-edge research.
Make yourself stand out in an increasingly competitive job market by acquiring subject expertise and advanced research skills.
Have the opportunity to develop expertise in issues relating to Europe, ideal for students who intend to pursue careers in European institutions or with political lobbyists and thinktanks.
Benefit from expert advice from our Employability team on placements, internships, and careers. You can also choose to gain academic credit for experience in the workplace with the Work-Based Learning unit, which can be a useful way to combine postgraduate study with practical experience to create an impressive CV.

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is particularly suited for students who intend to work for:

National, European or international governance institutions
Civil service
Political parties
Non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
Security and risk analyst
Foreign affairs analyst
Political lobbyists
Thinktanks and research bodies

It also provides excellent preparation for PhD study.

Module Details

All students take the following core units:

Contemporary Security in International Relations: Providers and Challenges: The analysis of security is a fascinating field of study that tackles issues of enormous significance. This unit evaluates a number of the most pressing security issues in International Relations, focusing on challenges such as cyber war, the security implications of the ‘Arab Spring’, jihadism, insurgency, information war, humanitarian intervention, piracy and the Ukraine Crisis.

Global Governance: Today’s policy-makers struggle to grapple with challenges of unprecedented scale and complexity. The ramifications of such issues as climate change and the global financial crisis underline the need for collective action across state borders. However, policy responses at the international level are often criticised for being ineffectual and undemocratic.

Research Management: A postgraduate degree signals to an employer that you are equipped with superior analytical and communication skills and are trained in a variety of research methods.

Dissertation in International Relations: This is an extended research project on a topic of your own choice, which you produce under the guidance of a specialist supervisor.

Students also take TWO of the following options:

Protest, Dissent and Solidarity across State Borders

Nation and Identity

Europe and the World

Challenges to EU Politics and Governance

Negotiation and Lobbying in the EU

Europe: Integration and Democratisation

Independent Project

Work-Based Learning

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars in the afternoons and evenings. Part-time students who may be in employment are usually able to structure their course over two years such that tuition is concentrated on no more than two afternoons and evenings per week.

Assessment for most units on the course is in the form of an extended essay or project plus a 15,000-word dissertation at the end.

Student Destinations

Changes such as the enlargement of the EU to the East, the further integration of the EU and the emergence of the EU as an international actor have meant that more than ever there is a demand for people with an advanced knowledge of European affairs and the workings of the EU. This course therefore provides an excellent basis for those seeking careers in such areas where interdisciplinary knowledge is required.

In addition, the course provides advanced training in a range of transferable skills which can be applied in different areas of employment. Students could go on to work in various areas including local government, the UK civil service, foreign government and European and international institutions, NGOs, teaching and further research as well as applying their expertise in the commercial sector.

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Discover the richness and diversity of new writings in English with this distinctive degree, which focuses on literature from across the Commonwealth and the theoretical issues that emerge from colonial and postcolonial literatures. Read more

Overview

Discover the richness and diversity of new writings in English with this distinctive degree, which focuses on literature from across the Commonwealth and the theoretical issues that emerge from colonial and postcolonial literatures.

You’ll develop your understanding of research in literary studies through a core module, but then choose from optional modules which look at the histories, contexts, structures and language that give postcolonial and colonial texts their uniqueness.

We focus on literature, but the programme also introduces you to other forms of cultural production such as music and cinema – and you’ll think about the relationships between literary studies and disciplines such as geography, anthropology and history. Supported by our Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, you’ll gain a cross-disciplinary insight into how writers from around the world have engaged with issues such as identity, place, independence, development and race among many others.

The University of Leeds was the first UK university to establish ‘Commonwealth Literature’ as an academic discipline at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. We’re still leading the way in research and teaching, supported by the expertise of staff within and outside of the cross-disciplinary Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies.

You’ll study in a supportive environment with access to extensive resources for your research and placing literature and culture in their historical and political context. Microfilm collections of American, Indian and South African newspapers, parliamentary papers relating to the British Empire, US government and presidential files, the Church Missionary Society Archives, the Black Power Movement archive and British documents on the end of empire, foreign affairs and policy overseas are just some of the resources at your fingertips. You’ll have plenty of opportunities to explore your interests and gain key skills.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Course Content

You’ll take one core module in your first semester, introducing you to the challenges, methods and approaches used in researching literature and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also choose one of our optional modules, before studying another two in your second semester.

You can choose all of your modules from within postcolonial literary and cultural studies, but you also have the option to expand your studies by choosing one from those available across the School of English, from the early medieval period to contemporary literature.

By the end of the programme, you’ll demonstrate the skills and knowledge you’ve developed when you submit your dissertation or research project on a postcolonial literary or cultural topic of your choice.

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