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Masters Degrees (Foreign Affairs)

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The University of Kent's Two Capitals Programme gives students a unique opportunity to learn about international affairs in a global context. Read more
The University of Kent's Two Capitals Programme gives students a unique opportunity to learn about international affairs in a global context. Students spend one year at the Brussels School of International Studies before moving to Washington DC, Beijing or Brasilia for their second year. On successful completion they are awarded two master’s degrees; one from the University of Kent and the other from the relevant partner institution.

The programme allows students to specialise in one of the following disciplines; international relations, conflict and security, international political economy, public policy or international development, as well as experience different approaches to international studies on different continents and in different global capitals. Students on the programme gain an insight into the nature of change as an endemic feature of politics on a national, regional and global scale; an understanding of the causes of change; and ways in which to manage that change. They also gain a firm understanding of the complex relationship between the concerns of domestic and international politics, and global and geopolitical issues.

Applicants, who should initially apply for one of the programmes listed below, will be expected to have completed the taught courses of their chosen programme and have achieved an average of a Merit before applying for one of the exchanges as part of the Two Capitals Programme. A decision on whether a student may undertake an exchange will be made in May for those students who started their masters in the previous September and in February for those students who started in January.

MA in International Relations
MA in International Conflict and Security
MA in EU External Relations
MA in International Development
MA in International Political Economy

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/twocapitals/

Washington DC

The Two Capitals Programme in Washington DC is based on agreements with Virginia Tech and George Mason University.

• Students wishing to undertake the second year of their programme at Virginia Tech (VT) will be enrolled on the Government and International Affairs programme of the School of Public and International Affairs on VT's National Capital Region Campus in Alexandria and will study towards a Masters in Public International Affairs (MPIA). Details on how the two year programme will work in practice will be published shortly.

•Students wishing to study at George Mason University will be enrolled on Master of Public Policy programme at the School of Public Policy in Arlington, VA. Details on how the two year programme will work in practice will follow.

Beijing

The Two Capitals Programme in Beijing will be based upon an agreement with the Chinese Foreign Affairs University (CFAU) which is the only institution of higher learning which operates under the guidance of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China. The University trains high calibre Chinese diplomats in the fields of Foreign Service, international studies, and international business and law and offers an unparalleled experience for foreign students. While the format of the exchange programme is developed, the Brussels School of International Studies runs a very successful and much sought after exchange programme through which two or three students experience a term in each other’s institution. To find out more about the exchange programme please contact .

Brasil

Work is currently underway to develop a version of the Two Capitals Programme in Brasil with the University of Brasilia

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/admissions/index.html

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As a leading global power, the United States and its foreign affairs have a significant impact upon international relations, both in terms of policy and academic scholarship. Read more

As a leading global power, the United States and its foreign affairs have a significant impact upon international relations, both in terms of policy and academic scholarship.

This significance has grown in the years since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and the subsequent “war on terror” in ways that have been reflected in the development of the academic literature and in the increased level of interest in the subject area. With a high concentration of US Foreign Policy experts among PAIS academics, the department is in a unique position to bring cutting-edge, in-depth knowledge and discussion to postgraduate study in this field.

Programme content

This programme focuses on US foreign policy in the context of national security as well as wider aspects of the country’s foreign policy and its impact in the areas of the economy, international relations, and particularly security. Some of the questions you will tackle include:

  • What are the main sources of US foreign policy making?
  • What is the balance between power and principle in US foreign policy?
  • How important is domestic politics in the making of US foreign policy?
  • What are the main threats to US national security and how are they confronted?
  • Why is the US fighting a "war on terror" and can it ever be won?
  • To what degree do economic imperatives drive US foreign policy?
  • What is the utility of US military force after Iraq and Afghanistan?
  • To what extent should US security policy address issues such as poverty and environmental change?
  • Is the US in relative decline as a world power?


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Our War Studies MA explores the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. Read more

Our War Studies MA explores the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. We have designed this course expressly to enhance your employability and support your professional career development

Key benefits

  • A unique opportunity to study war from a multi-disciplinary perspective.
  • Designed to provide a postgraduate-level introduction to War Studies for students who have little or no specialist background in the field.
  • A chance to develop a range of transferable skills that will enhance your employability, aid your professional-career development and help prepare you for postgraduate research.
  • You will be taught by some of the very best academics in the field. Departmental staff are internationally acknowledged experts in their areas of specialization; they are active researchers and routinely use their latest findings in their teaching.
  • An opportunity to study at a global centre of excellence that enjoys close relationships with other academic institutions, with think-tanks, non-governmental organizations and policy-making bodies around the world.
  • Opportunities to network with high-profile visitors, such as government ministers, ambassadors and generals, who frequently give talks in the Department.

Description

War is a key aspect of human experience, and people have long sought to understand it from a diverse range of perspectives. You will study alongside historians, social scientists, philosophers, jurists and artists, benefitting from their perspectives and those of the students around you.

We will provide you with an intellectual ‘toolbox’ composed of skills and techniques drawn from a range of disciplines associated with the humanities and social sciences. We will not train you as a specialist historian, philosopher, strategist, etc., but you will be introduced to elements of various disciplines that are relevant to the study of war. The challenge lies in combining them in order to achieve a sophisticated and rounded understanding of the subject.

The course will appeal if you are a student of politics, history or strategic studies or if you are a professional in defence, diplomacy or foreign affairs who wants to reflect on the broader implications of your experiences.

Course purpose

To introduce the field of war studies to graduate students and professionals who have an interest in deepening their understanding of war. You will gain an understanding of the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. The programme will appeal to students from a wide range of backgrounds including politics, history and strategic studies; and professionals in defence, diplomacy and foreign affairs wanting to reflect on the broader implications of their experiences.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For lectures, seminars and feedback you will typically have 2 hours per week for two terms per 40-credit module. This can be split into 1 lecture + 1 seminar or other combinations thereof. You will also have 360 hours of self-study. Typically, 1 credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will have our central departmental workshops (2 hours each) and three to

four sessions with the supervisor during which you will develop your dissertation topic, identify a research question, an approach to answering it, including selection of appropriate methods for gathering and using evidence. The timing of these three to four sessions is up to the student and advisor to arrange. These will complement the 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

  • Most 20 and 40 credit modules are assessed through a combination of essay, presentations, oral vivas and/or exams.
  • The dissertation module assessment will be 100% dissertation up to 15000 words.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect.

Career prospects

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, the FCO, the MOD, the Home Office, NATO, the UN or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Read more

The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the US and beyond and the analysis of intelligence collection. The M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations is offered online worldwide.

National security affairs is one of the fastest growing professions with positions open in the public sector in the federal, state and local governments and in the private sector. This program is designed for professionals in the field seeking career advancement, those who aspire to enter the field, individuals in related professions, and those retired from the military and government seeking consulting and other positions. Examples of potential students include personnel in the military, federal, state and local governments, law enforcement, corporations, and academia, as well as recent college graduates.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes. 

M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the U.S. and beyond, and the analysis of intelligence collection. Students will also develop a deep understanding of the international context in which U.S. national security issues are shaped.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes.

Following completion of the program core, students must complete 15 credits of coursework from the list of available electives. The majority of the elective offerings were developed specifically for the national security and international relations program, with a small number drawn from closely related fields. The elective list contains both courses that emphasize domestic security and courses that have a broader international focus, resulting in sufficient breadth of subject matter to allow students to tailor their choices around particular academic or professional interests.

Students interested in Cyber Security can choose to take a specific concentration in this area. Students who choose this option must complete 9 credits from the Cyber Security concentration and 6 credits from the elective list. Before choosing this option, students must secure permission from the Department of History and Political Science. After a consultation, it will be determined whether the student can enter the Cyber Security concentration, or if additional foundation courses will be required in order to enter and successfully complete the concentration.

Core Courses (21 credits)

  • NSAM 5001 - Current Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5003 - National Intelligence Collection and Analysis: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5004 - Border Protection and Military Issue (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5005 - Research and Evaluation in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5010 - US Foreign Policy and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5014 - Ethical Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5016 - International Relations: Theory and Practice (3 credits)

Electives (15 credits)

  • NSAM 5002 - Terrorists and Terrorism: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5015 - Civil Liberties and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5020 - International Law and Institutions (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5030 - American Government and Domestic Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5040 - Cyber Conflict and Statecraft (3 credits)
  • DEM 5090 - Weapons of Mass Threat and Communicable Diseases (3 credits)
  • MHS 5314 - Bioterrorism and Weapons of Mass Destruction (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5502 - Directed Readings in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5650 - Economic Statecraft in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6130 - Practicum/Internship (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6690 - Special Topics in National Security Affairs and International Relations (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6700 - Directed Thesis in National Security Affairs and International Relations (6 credits)

Optional Cyber Security Concentration

  • MMIS 0683 - Fundamentals of Security Technologies (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0684 - Information Security Management (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0685 - Information Security Governance (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0686 - Information Systems Auditing (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0687 - Information Security Project (3 credits)

Practicum

In addition to successfully completing all course work, students must pass a tabletop examination to be awarded the M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations. When a student has completed all coursework, has maintained a minimum of 3.0 GPA with no "incomplete" grades, and is a "student in good standing" with no disciplinary actions pending or disciplinary tasks to complete, the student will be eligible to take the tabletop examination. The tabletop exam is an assessment of the student's ability to integrate the knowledge and skills gained through course work.The exam tests the student's written ability to critically analyze and apply conflict assessment, theory, and research methodology to hypothetical conflict situations. The exam also tests knowledge of material specific to the academic curriculum.



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The M.A. Read more

Program Overview

The M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at the American Graduate School in Paris is a two-year program qualifying you for a broad range of careers in international affairs, from local governance to foreign affairs, to international development, human rights advocacy, global communications, international business, and many other areas involving interaction with different countries and cultures.


:A US-accredited Program in France:

The M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS combines the wide recognition of an American degree with the unique experience of a Paris-based program. It is accredited in the US as an affiliated program of Arcadia University (Pennsylvania) and taught at the American Graduate School in Paris, a private nonprofit institution of higher education recognized by the French Ministry of Higher Education.

Classes are taught in the heart of Paris. The French capital – which is also one of Europe’s capitals and an international hub – is an ideal location for the study of international affairs. The program takes full advantage of this through guest speakers, site visits, and networking events. These all represent opportunities to get exposed to the international scene and make connections with the many diplomatic missions, intergovernmental organizations, and NGOs that the city hosts.

The language of instruction is English; no knowledge of French is required to enroll. You have the opportunity to learn French through AGS’s partner institution Alliance Française Paris-Ile de France.


:Expertise in International Affairs:

The program draws on AGS’s specific expertise in the field of international relations, in which the school has specialized since it was founded in 1994. At the core of this expertise, the faculty of the program is comprised of both accomplished scholars conducting research at the forefront of their discipline, and practitioners sharing their knowledge and professional experience, such as retired Ambassadors or government officials.

See AGS faculty - http://www.ags.edu/about-ags/faculty

The curriculum strikes a careful balance between academic thoroughness and practice-oriented approaches to fully prepare you for the professional arena. It examines the interaction between State and non-State actors at an international level through a multi-disciplinary scope covering political as well as cultural, historical, economic, geographical, social, legal, and humanitarian aspects, all updated to include the most current international issues.

Required courses cover the core subjects of international relations theory, economic policy, international public law, foreign policy formulation, and methodology. A broad rage of electives is available to explore other areas of international affairs such as NGO management, environment policy, gender issues, geopolitics, conflict resolution, and area studies.

See course catalog - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/graduate-course-catalog


:A Multicultural Learning Environment:

A unique aspect of the program is the diversity of perspectives infused in the classroom, with students as well as faculty coming from many different national origins. This combined with the American-style interactive teaching methods, makes for an enriching and mind-opening class experience.


:Master’s thesis:

The program culminates in the completion of a Master’s thesis. Through the in-depth research and writing involved in the thesis process you will form a specialization in an area of your interest, as well as strengthen your ability to plan and complete a substantial project.

The thesis topic is elaborated in coordination with the Academic Committee and faculty advisors based on your area of interest and professional objectives.


:Foreign Policy component:

You may choose to include a foreign policy component in your thesis. This exercise will offer you the opportunity to apply the international relation theories and methods learned to construct new solutions to current international problems, thus leading to concrete solutions supported by solid academic research.

Degree Requirements

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy, you must meet the following conditions:

- Successful completion of the curriculum (42 credits) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 (See curriculum details - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/curriculum)
- Pre-intermediate level of French language by graduation (1 on the ALTE scale, A2 on the CEF scale French Language Proficiency Level Scale - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/master-in-international-relations/798-french-language-proficiency-level-scale).
- Note : to help you meet this requirement, AGS offers optional French language courses with its partner institution Alliance Française Paris-Ile de France (more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/optional-french-language-courses).
- Research and writing of a 25,000 to 35,000-word thesis complying with the academic standards set forth by the school.

Program options

A range of options allows you to tailor the program around your particular interests and career objectives.


:Internship:

While in the Master’s program, you have the opportunity to perform an internship in a Paris-based organization: diplomatic/consular mission, intergovernmental organization, NGO, multinational corporation news media outlet or another type of relevant international institution.

Internships are optional and can be pursued either for credit (then counting as a an elective course in the curriculum) or not-for-credit. In all cases, you may benefit from AGS’s guidance and support for internship placement. (Note that in all cases, the student is ultimately responsible for finding his/her internship.)


:Area concentrations:

You may specialize in a particular sector of international affairs and obtain, in addition to your M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy, a Certificate of Concentration in your area of specialization. The requirements for this option consist of elective courses in the said area, directed readings, comprehensive exams, and an area-focused thesis.

Area Concentrations Available include:

- African Studies
- Asian Studies
- Middle Eastern Studies


:Dual degree options:

A number of dual program options with partner universities allow you to earn a second degree in a complementary discipline in addition to your US-accredited M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy:

- European accredited Master in Diplomacy and Strategic Negotiation (with Université Paris-Sud, Sceaux, France): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/dual-program-in-international-relations-diplomacy-and-strategic-negotiation

- European accredited LL.M. in French and European Union Law and Business Ethics (with Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/dual-program-in-international-relations-and-international-law

US-accredited M.A. in Peace and Conflict Resolution (with Arcadia University, USA): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/dual-programs/international-relations-and-diplomacy-international-peace-and-conflict-resolution


:International opportunities:

You may spend one of the semesters of the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy program abroad, studying at one of AGS's partner institutions while earning credits toward your AGS degree. Options include the United States (Arcadia University) and Italy (University of Siena). You may also spend the summer at UC Berkeley Extension, completing an additional module in leadership and management.

See more information - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/international-opportunities


:Combined M.A.-Ph.D. program:

AGS offers a combined M.A.-Ph.D. program per the American model. The combined M.A.-Ph.D. program allows you to credit the required courses toward both degrees simultaneously. Ph.D. candidates having successfully completed their M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS would therefore be exempt from taking the required courses, and would only have to take seven elective courses for the Ph.D. program. Note that admission into the Ph.D. program is not automatic after obtaining the M.A.

Timeframe options

Full-time two-year track: the program is designed to be completed in two years on a full-time basis, involving nine to twelve hours of classes per week in addition to readings, assignments, and the research and writing of the thesis.

Accelerated 18-month intensive track: You have the option to complete the program in three semesters instead of four. You would then be required to take twelve to fifteen hours of classes per week.

Part-time track: EU students and other students who do not need to be enrolled on a full-time basis for visa purposes may undertake the program over a longer period of time on a part-time basis. This allows working professionals and other interested candidates to combine the program with other activities.

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The programme is directed to anyone interested in foreign politics as well as international economic relations and basic legal issues. Read more

The programme is directed to anyone interested in foreign politics as well as international economic relations and basic legal issues. Each and every student has to take the core courses in both European and Asian studies. All students are required to study either French or German. In addition, several other European languages as well as Mandarin Chinese, Japanese and Korean can be taken as free electives.

The programme is unique in the region because of its balanced attitude towards the European Union and Asia-Pacific area. Teaching is supported by research in both directions. Cooperation partners abroad include Bologna University, Stanford University, Canterbury University in New Zealand, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Pusan National University, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies and many other outstanding centres of social sciences all over the world.

 Key features

  • Latest developments in theories of political science and international relations
  • The professors are from a large variety of different regions of the world, e.g. USA, Spain, Netherlands, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, China and Ukraine
  • Staff does not only include theoreticians, but also practitioners, who have extensive experience in diplomacy, policy making, corporate business and many other fields, and who are frequent presenters and participants in international forums and conferences
  • On a regular basis, the Department organises Top Hat Lectures - the 'trade-mark' public events - during which both scholars and studentship have chances to meet foreign and Estonian Ambassadors

Course outline

The two-year Master’s program in International Relations and European-Asian Studies builds upon bachelor studies and is designed to prepare specialists with the potential to work in various areas of International Relations such as diplomacy and the conduct of foreign relations as well as mass media, policy planning or academic research etc. The program aims to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to take advantage of an increasing range of professional opportunities of an international dimension. The students can develop their specialisation in the narrower fields of political, legal and economic studies.

The students obtain a solid basic knowledge and skills in planning and doing research in their field. They learn about the basics and latest developments in theories of political science and international relations. Current issues on the scene of international life today are frequently discussed in class with a special focus on the problems concerning security, conflict resolution and terrorism. The students take a special module concerning European-Asian studies, including European/Asian politics, economy and EU law. This educational background offers them the possibility to obtain excellent qualifications for a successful career in the EU and Asian institutions. In addition, academic career is open for those willing to pursue it.

The Department of International Relations at Tallinn University of Technology offers advanced programmes in the field of International Relations at the Bachelor and Master level, which are unique in the region. International Relations as an interdisciplinary field of social science typically consists of international politics, international law and international economy. These fields are in the main focus of our programmes. Concerning teaching the law courses, we are developing cooperation with The Tallinn Law School. In addition, there is an emphasis on courses introducing the history and basics of diplomacy, security studies, political and cultural communication, etc. Our students learn about the foundation, historical development and current trends of the democratic society in the international context. Language-based area studies are becoming an important research focus of the department. This brings us into direct contact with the developing world. Our students have the requirement to learn at least two foreign languages.

In addition, our students have an opportunity to take or choose from seven Asia-related courses framed by the interdisciplinary joint educational module that is offered by our university as well as Tartu and Tallinn University. The aforementioned module is called ‘Asian Societies, Economy and Politics’.

The graduates of our programmes have a wide range of opportunities open in front them. They can work in different types of institutions ranging from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and embassies to several kinds of international organisations and companies in both public and private sectors.

Besides local Professors, the faculty comes from a large variety of different regions of the world, i.e., the USA, Spain, 1 Netherlands, Italy, New Zealand, Japan and Ukraine. The faculty members have solid academic background and substantial teaching experience. In addition, we have interesting practitioners with a background in diplomacy, foreign office and other areas of political activity as part time faculty. Our cooperation partners abroad include Bologna University, Stanford University, Canterbury University in New Zealand, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Pusan National University, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies and many other outstanding centers of social sciences all over the world.

Curriculum

Structure of curriculum

Future career options

Our graduates work in different types of foreign services, including diplomatic ones. They can be political analysts and observers in the media or work for private companies that are active internationally. Our graduates have been employed in the organisations adjacent to the EU. But we can also find a commander of an anti-piracy squad among them. We are aiming at keeping the brightest graduates as the reserve for our own faculty.

Our graduates can continue their studies in doctoral programmes of a large variety, specialising in International Relations and Political Science, European Studies, Asian-Pacific Studies, Conflict Resolution, Intercultural Communication, etc.



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Our LLM in International Law focuses on the issues facing today's international lawyers. You will study the complex and dynamic nature of the international legal system and its role in foreign affairs. Read more
Our LLM in International Law focuses on the issues facing today's international lawyers. You will study the complex and dynamic nature of the international legal system and its role in foreign affairs.

This course is one of three taught law courses (LLM) we offer and is suitable for graduates of any background. It is ideal if you’re interested in gaining a better understanding of how the law shapes and influences international affairs.

It will give you the knowledge, insights and practical skills to enhance your career in practice, the public, private or diplomatic sectors or academia. If you are pursuing another career path, it will enhance your understanding of how the law shapes and influences international affairs.

You will study contemporary issues in public international law. You will develop your knowledge and expertise in:
-International dispute settlement
-International organisations
-The role of individuals in the international legal system

You will develop both your practical and research legal skills. Through our Legal Simulation module you will work in small teams and be presented with a realistic scenario. You will be introduced to a variety of practically-focused legal skills, including:
-Analysis of complex legal problems
-Devising legal strategies
-Working with the law in real-life contexts

You will also learn a variety of legal-specific research skills through our Legal Research Skills and Methods module.

You can create your own specialised programme of study that matches your legal interests and career aspirations. You can choose from a wide range of optional modules to complement your core studies, including:
-The role of law in international affairs
-Diplomacy and dispute settlement
-Human rights law
-International crime
-The protection of foreign investment

You can also choose from a range of our other master's modules, with the permission of the Degree Programme Director.

Dedicated one-to-one support is also given to help you research and write a dissertation on an area of law you feel passionate about.

There is a field trip to international criminal courts and tribunals in The Hague as part of the optional module, International Criminal Law. This is an optional trip and is not covered by tuition fees.

There are opportunities to become an editor of The North East Law Review. This is Newcastle’s student-edited law journal which showcases outstanding student work for open-access publication. You can also join the Eldon Society, the University’s society for students with an interest in law.

Delivery

Modules are taught by our expert academic staff over the first and second semesters through a combination of:
-Interactive lectures
-Workshops
-Seminars

All of our workshops and seminars are taught in small groups, where we encourage lively discussion and debate.

During your first two weeks we encourage you to sit in on lectures across our optional law modules. This will help you to choose which areas best suit your needs and interests.

Our Degree Programme Director will also be available to offer support and guidance to help you make these choices.

Assessment is through a variety of methods, including:
-Coursework
-Essays
-Written exams
-Presentation
-Dissertation

Facilities

We are committed to pursuing academic excellence and fostering an intellectually challenging and supportive environment in which our students can excel.

We regularly host conferences and seminars with internationally renowned guest speakers. We encourage you to attend these events as they cover a wide range of important legal, political, economic and social issues.

Our facilities include:
-A dedicated Law Library
-A LLM study space with computer suite
-A student common room
-A large lecture theatre
-A purpose-built mooting room
-Wi-fi connectivity throughout the school

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Our world is shaped by big questions about global justice, war, peace, social movements, and inter-state relations. The Master of International Relations enables you to deal critically and analytically with such questions, providing a window into the dynamic world of 21st century politics. Read more
Our world is shaped by big questions about global justice, war, peace, social movements, and inter-state relations. The Master of International Relations enables you to deal critically and analytically with such questions, providing a window into the dynamic world of 21st century politics.

The course explores the security, ethical, legal and economic dimensions of international relations. You will examine key issues in foreign policy, world order, European studies, crisis management and terrorism, as well as the gender, development, migration and governance aspects of global politics. We offer four specialisations:

- Governance and security
- International diplomacy and trade
- Political violence and counter-terrorism
- General international relations studies

The Master of International Relations will help you make sense of the complexity of global politics and economics by giving you the analytical perspectives and skills to see both the 'bigger picture' and detailed aspects of specific issues, with a solid intellectual grounding in key debates, historical events and political institutions.

You will be taught by leading experts in their respective fields, who have strong networks with a number of international and local organisations. This ensures that you will be exposed to the very latest advances in international relations.

The course also provides opportunities to study and attend field schools abroad, and to develop research interests in a number of areas. You will have the opportunity to take advantage of Monash's global presence, with campuses in South Africa, Malaysia, China, and Italy. And our internship program enables you to build practical experience as well as valuable professional networks in Australia and overseas.

These active research links shape our curriculum and ensure its relevance to provide you with the best employment and research opportunities. Our graduates have gone on to a broad range of occupations and have, for example, been employed by the United Nations, the Australian Government, and non-governmental organisations such as the International Red Cross.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-relations-a6010?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

General studies in international relations
General international relations studies enables you to tailor your unit choices to suit your own interests or needs while addressing the fundamental debates framing global politics. By selecting across the range of specialisations, you will be able to examine key issues in foreign policy, international and comparative governance, world order and security, human rights, European studies, crisis management, diplomacy and trade, or terrorism.

Governance and security
The Governance and security specialisation will broaden your understanding of how power, authority, and participation are managed within and amongst states, as well as of challenges to this domestically and internationally. You will focus on the practical applications of governance, institutions and the rule of law, and how this works in the contemporary global environment.

International diplomacy and trade
The International diplomacy and trade specialisation will advance your knowledge across international trade, diplomacy, and international law. It is designed for people at the start of their careers as well as people working in the field who want to develop their careers in international public policy, NGOs and government departments such as the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Political violence and counter-terrorism
The Political violence and counter-terrorism specialisation provides students with a critical engagement with manifestations of political violence, as well as the ideologies and conditions that give rise to political violence. Focus is on understanding terrorism and political extremism, the conditions associated with preventing and combating political violence, and the impacts of these activities on democratic and civil liberties.

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced international relations studies, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced international relations studies
These studies will introduce you to International relations studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's core study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of international relations practice and research exploring the security, ethical, and economic dimensions of international relations. You will have opportunities to examine key issues in foreign policy, world order, European studies, crisis management, and terrorism.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

Partner with another course

Double degree courses allow you to study towards two different degrees at the same time, and graduate with two separate qualifications. And because a required subject in one course can count as an elective in the other, our double degrees take up to two years less than if you studied for the two degrees separately.

International Relations and Journalism - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-relations-and-journalism-a6011?domestic=true

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-relations-a6010?domestic=true#making-the-application

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MA-IR Program Summary. The UBIS MA-IR program was developed by leading professors in Geneva, Switzerland and allows students to observe and get in touch with Multilateral Organizations, UN and its branches, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), Non-Profit Associations, or Humanitarian Agencies. Read more
MA-IR Program Summary:

The UBIS MA-IR program was developed by leading professors in Geneva, Switzerland and allows students to observe and get in touch with Multilateral Organizations, UN and its branches, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), Non-Profit Associations, or Humanitarian Agencies. The program is ideal for those who want to obtain the knowledge and skills needed today by top International Relations (IR) professionals. What’s more, our on ground students benefit from our Geneva facilities and international lifestyle: live and learn in the very heart of international affairs, international organizations and diplomatic headquarters.

MA-IR Testimonials:
- “I chose this program, because I was looking for International affairs, diplomacy and several cultural issues.”-Dina M., Swiss, Master in International Relations
- “ UBIS is a great place to offer for those who need close relationship with the faculty and quality student service. The small classes can provide with more availability of instructors. As a graduate student in International Relations, I found the scheduling and activities outside of school very flexible alongside the university program. The module-based semesters at UBIS offer a win situation for those who want to progress faster.” - Yesukhei E., Mongolian, Master in International Relations

MA-IR Career Path:

UBIS provides both broad vision and practical skills. With dual capacities, MA-IR graduates will be ready to establish themselves as leaders, directors, consultants, and professionals in International Organizations (IOs), private companies, as well as social society NGOs, foundations and associations.
- Attaché, Ministry of Foreign Affairs
- Operations Assistant, International Organization
- Officer, Foreign Mission

MA-IR Faculty Profile
- Former Head News Service/Communications Manager, World Wide Fund for Nature International (WWF)
- Head of External Relations, International Committee of Red Cross (ICRC)
- Former Ambassador, Head of Delegations of the European Union, Republic of Congo, Dominican Republic, Cuba and Guinea Bissau
- Founder and Executive Director, ICVolunteers, and international non-profit organization
- Consultant/Specialist in East-West Conflicts
- Senior Economic Official, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)

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Investigative journalism is at a crossroads in theory and practice. Crises of ethics and funding have brought profound changes to the nature of long form journalism, the ways in which it is produced and the institutions that invest in it. Read more
Investigative journalism is at a crossroads in theory and practice. Crises of ethics and funding have brought profound changes to the nature of long form journalism, the ways in which it is produced and the institutions that invest in it. This innovative MA brings together leading practitioners and institutions to deliver advanced training in emergent investigative newsgathering and publishing skills applicable to a range of professional contexts, within and beyond journalism. At the same time, the degree introduces students to critical accounts of the the media's watchdog function and journalism's evolving social role.

In partnership with the Centre of Investigative Journalism (which provides bespoke training workshops for the degree's core courses) and Google (which has provided funding assistance for scholarships), this MA addresses new challenges whilst also reflecting the constants that underpin investigative journalism ethics and storytelling. Above all, it presents an opportunity to both study and do investigative journalism, under the guidance of award-winning journalists and experienced academics.

Guest lecture profiles

You will be taught by a mix of academics, writers, investigative journalists, editors and bloggers, including:

Ewen MacAskill

Ewen is The Guardian's defence and intelligence correspondent. In 2013 he was among the first journalists to meet NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and, as a result of his reporting on global surveillance, he was named co-recipient of the 2013 George Polk Award. The same reporting also contributed to the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, awarded jointly to The Guardian and the Washington Post in 2014. Ewen was featured prominently in Laura Poitras' Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour and he will be portrayed by British actor Tom Wilkinson in the upcoming biopic Snowden, directed by Oliver Stone.

Iain Overton

Iain is Director of Policy and Investigations for the London-based charity Action on Armed Violence. As well as a writer, Iain is also an investigative journalist and documentary maker who has won a number of awards, including 2 Amnesty Media Awards, a Peabody Award and a BAFTA Scotland. In 1998 he was appointed senior producer of BBC Current Affairs and in 2009 he became the founding editor of the Bureau of Investigative Journalism where he produced a number of high-profile documentaries, including Iraq War Logs based on the military intelligence files leaked by Chelsea Manning.

Siobhan Sinnerton

Siobhan is a Commissioning Editor for News and Current Affairs at Channel 4, before which she spent 4 years at the award-winning Quicksilver Productions. Two of those were as Series Editor on Unreported World, Channel 4’s flagship foreign affairs strand and as an executive producer on Dispatches and First Cut. Previously, Siobhan was a producer-director on both Unreported World and Dispatches and worked at ITV/Granada making a wide range of documentaries and current affairs.

Eliot Higgins (AKA 'Brown Moses')

Eliot is a renowned citizen journalist and blogger, known for using open sources and social media to investigate international conflicts. He first gained mainstream media attention by identifying weapons in uploaded videos from the Syrian conflict. At the time, Eliot was an unemployed finance and admin worker who spent his days taking care of his child at home. He has since won praise from human rights groups and journalists from around the world and has been profiled by The Guardian, The Independent, The Huffington Post and The New Yorker magazine, as well as the subject of television features run by Channel 4 and CNN International. In 2014 he started a new website, Bellingcat, which mobilises citizen journalists to investigate current events using open data.

Dr Justin Schlosberg

Justin is Lecturer in Journalism and Media at Birkbeck and programme director for the MA Investigative Reporting. His research takes a critical look at mainstream media coverage of a number of national security controversies, including alleged corruption in the British arms trade, the death of intelligence whistleblower David Kelly, and the release of diplomatic cables by Wikileaks. His forthcoming book Media Ownership and Agenda Control: The Hidden Limits of the Information Age will be published by Routledge in 2016.

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Our MA Intelligence & International Security examines the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century. Read more

Our MA Intelligence & International Security examines the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century. You will develop an awareness of the ways in which intelligence issues manifest themselves in security issues in peace and war. You will also gain an understanding of ethical dilemmas associated with intelligence activity.

Key benefits

  • Our MA Intelligence & International Security is excellent preparation for employment in government service or in commercial risk management and open-source intelligence providers.
  • You will be taught by visiting academics, serving and former officials and other intelligence experts who give regular public lectures and seminars.
  • Enables you to examine the nature, processes, roles and case studies of intelligence and their interaction with developments in international security.
  • You have the advantage of attending events run by the Intelligence and International Security Research Group which provides a platform for sharing ideas.

Description

Our course will enable you to examine the nature, processes, roles and case studies of intelligence and their interaction with developments in international security. In examining the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century our course offers a unique multidisciplinary approach based on the strengths of the department. We aim to provide a framework in which to understand the nature and role of intelligence in its relationship to wider issues in war and international security; an understanding of the processes, practices and institutions that have characterised intelligence in the modern era; an understanding of the problems connected with intelligence collection,assessment and ability to predict events in world affairs; and an appreciation of the particular ethical concerns generated by intelligence related phenomena.

Course purpose

Our course is for graduates and professionals with an interest in understanding the nature and role of intelligence. It is designed to have broad-ranging appeal if you are interested in pursuing graduate studies in intelligence and security studies. You will also find this programme of interest if you are a graduate in politics, history, international relations and strategic studies; if you have practical experience in the intelligence community and wish to reflect on the wider issues and implications of your experience; or are a professional in defence, diplomacy and foreign affairs.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

Per 40-credit module, you will have 40 hours of lectures, semianrs and feedback, as well as 340 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work. For the dissertation module, you will have 12 hours of supervision to complement the 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

Most 20 to 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3000-6000 words), presentation, oral vivas, and/or exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be based on a 80% dissertation assignment (up to 15,000 words) and a 20% dissertation proposal.

Career prospects

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, the FCO, the MOD, the Home Office, NATO, the UN or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.

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We live in an increasingly turbulent world, wracked by conflict, instability and insecurity. The roots of these problems are highly complex; the challenges involved in delivering greater peace and prosperity cannot be under-estimated. Read more

Why take this course?

We live in an increasingly turbulent world, wracked by conflict, instability and insecurity. The roots of these problems are highly complex; the challenges involved in delivering greater peace and prosperity cannot be under-estimated. This course is designed for those who recognise the importance of acquiring advanced intellectual skills to be able to understand and analyse current trends in global politics. It studies a broad sweep of issues in international relations, including the rise of fundamentalist terrorism, the resurgence of Russia, the spread of globalisation and the emergence of new regional powers on the world stage.

We are the only university in the UK that offers an internship with the BBC Afrique World Service in Senegal. This opportunity is available to students with French language skills on MA International Relations or MA European Politics.

What will I experience?

On this course, you will:

Deepen your knowledge of some of the most urgent political and security issues facing the world today, informed by cutting-edge research.
Make yourself stand out in an increasingly competitive job market by acquiring subject expertise and advanced research skills.
Have the opportunity to develop expertise in issues relating to Europe, ideal for students who intend to pursue careers in European institutions or with political lobbyists and thinktanks.
Benefit from expert advice from our Employability team on placements, internships, and careers. You can also choose to gain academic credit for experience in the workplace with the Work-Based Learning unit, which can be a useful way to combine postgraduate study with practical experience to create an impressive CV.

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is particularly suited for students who intend to work for:

National, European or international governance institutions
Civil service
Political parties
Non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
Security and risk analyst
Foreign affairs analyst
Political lobbyists
Thinktanks and research bodies

It also provides excellent preparation for PhD study.

Module Details

All students take the following core units:

Contemporary Security in International Relations: Providers and Challenges: The analysis of security is a fascinating field of study that tackles issues of enormous significance. This unit evaluates a number of the most pressing security issues in International Relations, focusing on challenges such as cyber war, the security implications of the ‘Arab Spring’, jihadism, insurgency, information war, humanitarian intervention, piracy and the Ukraine Crisis.

Global Governance: Today’s policy-makers struggle to grapple with challenges of unprecedented scale and complexity. The ramifications of such issues as climate change and the global financial crisis underline the need for collective action across state borders. However, policy responses at the international level are often criticised for being ineffectual and undemocratic.

Research Management: A postgraduate degree signals to an employer that you are equipped with superior analytical and communication skills and are trained in a variety of research methods.

Dissertation in International Relations: This is an extended research project on a topic of your own choice, which you produce under the guidance of a specialist supervisor.

Students also take TWO of the following options:

Protest, Dissent and Solidarity across State Borders

Nation and Identity

Europe and the World

Challenges to EU Politics and Governance

Negotiation and Lobbying in the EU

Europe: Integration and Democratisation

Independent Project

Work-Based Learning

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars in the afternoons and evenings. Part-time students who may be in employment are usually able to structure their course over two years such that tuition is concentrated on no more than two afternoons and evenings per week.

Assessment for most units on the course is in the form of an extended essay or project plus a 15,000-word dissertation at the end.

Student Destinations

Changes such as the enlargement of the EU to the East, the further integration of the EU and the emergence of the EU as an international actor have meant that more than ever there is a demand for people with an advanced knowledge of European affairs and the workings of the EU. This course therefore provides an excellent basis for those seeking careers in such areas where interdisciplinary knowledge is required.

In addition, the course provides advanced training in a range of transferable skills which can be applied in different areas of employment. Students could go on to work in various areas including local government, the UK civil service, foreign government and European and international institutions, NGOs, teaching and further research as well as applying their expertise in the commercial sector.

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The International Public Policy MSc at UCL provides students with a detailed and systematic understanding of how political institutions, processes and public policies operate in world affairs. Read more

The International Public Policy MSc at UCL provides students with a detailed and systematic understanding of how political institutions, processes and public policies operate in world affairs. The programme brings together the academic study of international relations with analysis of public policy formulation and governance beyond the nation-state.

About this degree

Students are equipped with the theoretical tools and empirical evidence necessary for an in-depth understanding of policy-making within the general theories of international relations, political science, public policy and comparative politics. They develop analytical skills for the study of world politics and the assessment of issues currently facing international policymakers.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • International Organisation: Theory and Practice (30)
  • Public Policy Economics and Analysis (PPEA) (15)
  • Introduction to Qualitative Methods or Advanced Qualitative Methods (15)
  • Introduction to Quantitative Methods or Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)

Optional modules

Choose one of the following 15 credit modules (the others remain available as options):

  • Foreign Policy Analysis (15)
  • Global Public Policy (15)
  • International Political Economy (15)
  • Theories of International Relations (15)

Choose further modules up to a value of 30 credits in total from a list available on the departmental website

The following are suggestions:

  • Non-Profit and Voluntary Sector Policy and Management (15)
  • Terrorism (15)
  • Making Policy Work (15)
  • Policy-Making and Regulation in Europe (15)
  • The European Union in the World (15)
  • The European Union, Globalisation and the State (15)
  • Agenda Setting and Public Policy (15)
  • The Political Economy of Development (15)
  • Governing Divided Societies (15)
  • Globalisation (15)
  • Rebellion (15)
  • Global Ethics (15)

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars, and includes a policy simulation and a series of talks with leading practitioners and policymakers. Assessment is through a variety of methods, including unseen examination, long essays and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: International Public Policy MSc

Careers

Graduate destinations both nationally and internationally include:

  • Civil servants in departments in central or local government in the UK and overseas
  • Policy officers and researchers for UK members of parliament and Members of the European Parliament
  • The European Commission (for example through internships)
  • Public and private sector organisations such as: Universities UK, Transport for London, The Legal Services Commission, Accenture, Japan International Cooperation Agency, Overseas Development Institute, United Nations Development Programme, Deloitte and Touche
  • Further research study at UCL or other universities in the UK or overseas

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Accredited Parliamentary Assistant, European Parliament
  • Analyst, Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Consultant, United Nations (UN)
  • EU Energy and Climate Policy Assistant, Greenpeace
  • International Trade Specialist, U.S. Department of Commerce

Employability

Students are prepared for a number of potential careers ranging from additional academic work to employment in both the public and private sector. Previous students have secured employment in government agencies in the UK and abroad. A large number of students also find work in the financial sector, including investment banking and consulting. The success of previous students is attributable to the rigorous methods training provided, as well as the diversity of the modules offered.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of international public policy.

London features an enormous range of seminars, conferences, and other events on issues related to the programme. These provide a means for students to expand their knowledge and extend their professional networks.

The research preparation and tailor-made interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary training students receive are of the highest standard available, at one of the world's top universities, as reflected in UCL's performance in a range of rankings and tables.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Political Science

89% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Interrogate the status quo with leading academics who don’t just talk and write about politics, but actively campaign to create change in the world. Read more

Interrogate the status quo with leading academics who don’t just talk and write about politics, but actively campaign to create change in the world

All around us governments are in crisis, protests are on the increase, dissent and mobilisation is widespread and relayed across the world instantaneously on a screen. Communication is at the very heart of the structures, institutions and actors that give meaning to politics in governments, in parties and on the street. 

The questions we ask

How do we live our politics on a daily basis? Who holds the power to influence political decisions that structure our lives? How might democracy be done better? What is the relationship between politics, the individual, institutions and the media? These are the kinds of questions we’re asking on this programme.

And we take an expansive view, so you’ll learn about politics and communications not just as a singular discipline, but as a subject that’s much more nuanced, moving across everything from governments and parties to NGOs and activists; from economic and environmental policy and conflict representation, to issues of race, gender, social theory and popular culture. 

The processes we use

Alongside traditional lectures and seminars we also do workshops and research exercises to reflect on how political communications are part of the rituals and rhythms of our daily lives and how this is influenced by others.

As part of the programme you may also be tasked with designing and pitching your own political campaign. We use these kinds of exercises because we think it’s only by actively engaging with political communications that we can better understand how it is part of our everyday lives. 

The approach we take

We’re active not passive so this course isn’t just about having our heads in books, it’s about applying ideas to the real world. We’ll expect you to be reading the news every day because we want you to engage with what’s happening and unravel it.

There are also opportunities to interact with industry experts, get involved in live campaigns and collaborate with people coming from all over the world. We pride ourselves on fostering a supportive environment and offering an open door throughout your time with us. At Goldsmiths the conversations are always just starting. 

Modules & structure

The programme’s core curriculum will address a range of contemporary issues, debates and theory in political communication, including work on:

  • comparative media systems
  • theories of communication and democratisation
  • global media, international governance and transnational communication
  • economic, financial and industrial policy
  • digital media and online politics
  • media sociology and news production
  • political parties, party ideologies and party-member dynamics
  • public relations, political marketing and spin
  • government communication systems and media management
  • media audiences, effects and agenda-setting
  • public opinion and public sphere debates
  • interest groups, social movements and alternative media
  • advocacy, civil society and public affairs
  • new technologies and the information society
  • citizenship and public engagement
  • the policy process and government decision-making
  • politics and culture
  • social theories of power, culture and communications

Theory is usually applied to a number of case study areas on, for example: conflict and war; elections; social and environmental debates; foreign affairs; the economy, finance and business; crime and disorder. Theory and discussion is always related to current events and debates.

Structure

The MA in Political Communications is built up of modules that must count up to 180 credits. The programme comprises:

  • Two core modules taught in the Department of Media and Communications (60 credits in total)
  • A research skills module
  • 60 credits' worth of modules chosen from the Department of Politics or Department of Media and Communications. These can be a combination of 30 and 15 credit modules
  • Up to 30 of the 60 credits of options may be chosen from the departments of Sociology, Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, and the Centre for Cultural Studies

Core modules

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Please view the website for more information.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills & careers

We know that political organisations relish thinking graduates. It’s why we focus on delivering a programme that’s rooted in a critical perspective. By the time you leave we want you to feel transformed so that you can go forward and transform the world. 

Our graduates go on to work within government organisations, political parties, NGOs and news media and across the public and private sectors - from the Houses of Parliament and BBC World Service to Google, Greenpeace and the UN. 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film. Read more

The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film.

About this degree

Russian culture is explored from a variety of perspectives. Students specialise in literature and culture, social sciences or history, or combine modules into an interdisciplinary programme. They are encouraged to develop their research skills, and many choose to learn Russian, or improve their command of Russian, through a language course.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one of a choice of three core modules (30 credits), a choice of a Russian language module (30 credits) and/or optional modules (to a total of 90 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

This is a multidisciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose between one of the following three modules:

  • Literary and Cultural Theory
  • Historical Methods and Approaches
  • Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules

90 credits from a range of options, which may include:

  • Advanced Qualitative Methods
  • Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
  • The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
  • The Nineteenth-Century Russian Novel
  • Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
  • Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance
  • Linguistic Methods
  • How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
  • Russian Foreign Policy
  • Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
  • Russian Language Module
  • Introduction to Discourse Analysis

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, film viewings, tutorials and specialist language courses. Assessment is carried out through unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Funding

AHRC Scholarships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Some graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Diplomat/Third Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of The Kingdom of Thailand
  • Editorial Intern, openDemocracy
  • Marketing Planner, Waterstones
  • Support Officer, Refugee Council
  • Principal Examiner for GCE and GCSE, Pearson-Edexcel

Employability

Russia is one of the most exciting and important countries in the world, and SSEES is the ideal place in which to study it. Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

SSEES is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located in Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.



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