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Our Professional Doctorate in Clinical Research (DClinRes) has been designed to meet the challenge of providing high quality clinical research training for Allied Health Professionals (AHPs), including those in leadership roles. Read more
Our Professional Doctorate in Clinical Research (DClinRes) has been designed to meet the challenge of providing high quality clinical research training for Allied Health Professionals (AHPs), including those in leadership roles. It is a unique collaboration between Clinical Education Development and Research ( CEDAR, http://cedar.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/), Psychology and the University of Exeter Medical School.

Delivered by leading academics and practitioners, the programme aims to educate Allied Health Professionals to shift the major focus of their research activities from a tradition characterised by work which is predominantly descriptive, cross-sectional and introspective, to one which is translational, experimental, longitudinal, generalisable and implementation focussed.

The programme includes advanced training in clinical research leadership skills and organisational practice, and is underpinned by the Medical Research Council’s mixed methods Complex Interventions Research Framework. The Doctorate offers participants the opportunity to complete a Service Related Research Project linked to their area of practice allowing them to evaluate their local clinical service. In addition, participants undertake a Major Clinical Research Project related to their area of practice and aligned with the strategic aims within their local service and organisation.

The programme is based on the latest guidance for research which investigates how to develop and determine the components, efficacy, effectiveness, applicability and translational utility of complex healthcare interventions for complex interventions in medicine. It integrates investigative methods for complex interventions through a mixed methodological process of development, feasibility/piloting, evaluation and implementation.

Responding to a challenge

Our Doctorate in Clinical Research has been developed in response to a need, identified by training commissioners and professional organisations, for specific skills training within this area of the healthcare workforce.

Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) such as nurses, physiotherapists, psychologists, radiographers and occupational therapists have a critical role to play in meeting health and social care challenges at the fore of global health concerns.
These include an
• aging population,
• chronic diseases,
• and new endemics

AHPs engage in an ever widening range of activities, many of which are highly complex and take place in multiple care environments including acute medicine, chronic care facilities, community and residential care homes. Example activities include patient education programmes, the coordination and delivery of packages of psychosocial care, and support for patient self-care.

Changes in healthcare organisation internationally (e.g. short hospital periods and growing responsibility for patient self-care) are placing more healthcare in the hands of AHPs, increasing the scope and the overall need for an underpinning evidence base.

The relevance of a Complex Interventions Research Framework

The care provided by AHPs to patients is an increasingly complicated activity and can be seen as the quintessential ‘complex intervention’ – defined as an activity that contains a number of component parts with the potential for interactions between them which, when applied to the intended target population, produces a range of possible and variable outcomes (Medical Research Council, 2008).

Complex interventions are widespread throughout all of health and social care, from the apparently simple example of pharmacological treatment with its combination of biochemical, social and psychological factors influencing patient concordance and physiological response, to more obviously complex educational or psychological interventions where a multi-layered set of dynamic features have great bearing on ultimate effectiveness.

Our programmes are underpinned by the Medical Research Council’s mixed methods Complex Interventions Research Framework, which emphasises our commitment to applied research in a healthcare context.

Programme structure

Our Doctorate in Clinical Research is run part-time over four years. The taught component of the programme has been re-structured to better enable both national and international attendance. The course commences with a 5 day block of teaching in February, with the remaining pre-thesis teaching components taking place over the next 18 months in smaller block delivery. Please see the website for up to date information at http://cedar.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/dclinres/structure/.

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The MArch at AUB explores the possibilities of architectural practices that conceive and articulate diverse processes of community development and transformation. Read more
The MArch at AUB explores the possibilities of architectural practices that conceive and articulate diverse processes of community development and transformation.

The “construction” of the “sites” of our interventions in the public sphere includes involvement with other institutions, governmental agencies and other actors at a local, regional, national, and global level.

Where are the options?

What is at stake?

Are there really options?

How should we choose?

The MArch at AUB program is structured around the idea of architectural intervention, interrogated in relationship to its duration and effects in and around the community where it takes place – indeed, in its potential to create community.

The notion that there is any singular definition of the architectural profession is, at least on the margins, continuously questioned. But the ‘middle’ is strong, and the very fact that a multiplicity of ‘other’ agendas and their attendant methodologies are marginalised attests to this strength.

So looking for something different and fresh in your route to becoming an architect in a changing world. The new MArch at AUB (RIBA*/ARB Part2) aims to produce: performative, projective enablers and architecture, cutting into societies deepest darkest myths; building interventions in the utopias and distopias past, present and future; and launching architectural careers and journey’s via its laboratory practice, where the body and somatic practice is at the fore.

Travel with MArch at AUB and @inspiredAUB, the arts campus and its cross disciplinary docks, on the ride of a lifetime with your new highly decorative AUB baggage. Join the eclectic global and local, MArch student body, be ready to catch a big one from the Portland Stone cliffs or disappear into the Mirkwood to live like a hobbit. The AUB MArch has the arts centre in Sway by the architect, Tony Fretton as a part of its portfolio of spaces AUB to the main campus and its multiple workshops, studios and laboratories. Although the course is new there is a fascinating history of drawing and representation. In former lives architects Michael Hopkins and Peter Cook were educated in Bournemouth with bright lights and late night inflatables on the beach. The emerging, social, political, and architectural in its many frightening forms, are being professionally dissected, compressed, crafted and beaten, by brave bodies in the embryonic laboratory practice ‘ROOM 101’, based in the Enterprise Pavilion.

From the first graduating cohort there many fascinating stories – ecological strategies from Haiti, Delhi and Wessex. They are now working and researching from the local practice and making/fabricating to teaching (on the BA Hons), to developing the ‘fablab’ in AUB’s workshop. They all came from different schools and found AUB & the MArch very welcoming and encouraging. The [email protected] broadens the architect’s range of activities, and empowers its community through its members’ ability to actually make a difference.

Ed Frith, Architect, MArch Course Leader & Prof Oren Liebermann, Dean of the Faculty of Art & Design

If you would like to discuss any aspect of this course, or details on the application process, please contact Astrid MacKellar on: or 01202 363384.

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Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. Read more
Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. The Institute brings together leading academics from across UCD and is the only centre of its kind in Ireland. Its members have conducted major research projects on a wide range of topics in the field of criminology and criminal justice, including work on coercive confinement, prison violence and desistance from crime. The work of the Institute has been the focus of debates in parliament, legislative and policy initiatives and numerous reports in the media.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- To understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and social policy that come to the fore in the study of Criminology and Criminal Justice;
- To apply their knowledge and understanding of Criminology and Criminal Justice to real and hypothetical factual situations;
- To conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

A specialisation in criminology and criminal justice will be of interest to graduates who want to work in one of the criminal justice
agencies and to those working in prisons, probation, policing and the courts. This specialisation will equip you with a head start for a career in criminal law and the criminal justice system.

Features

The Institute of Criminology offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Criminal Justice History considers the history of specific offences in a broad socio-political context. Offences examined will include the history of unlawful killing and the evolution of sexual offences alongside aspects of the criminal justice process.

- Advanced Criminological Theory explores key theories of crime both classic and recent, including biological, psychological and sociological explanations of criminal behaviour and their potential application in the Irish context.

- Crime and Punishment explores a number of central issues in criminal jurisprudence such as responsibility, culpability, harm and moral wrongdoing to deepen an understanding of the basis on which conduct is criminalised and criminal liability imposed.

- International and Transnational Crime focuses on the emergence of international criminal law has emerged as a distinct body of law responding to genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, before considering the impact of globalisation on crime.

Careers

This programme provides opportunities for those who wish to work or are already working in relevant areas, such as policing, youth justice, prisons, probation and voluntary organisations to enhance their knowledge of the field. It also provides a good platform for doctoral studies and a possible academic career in what has become an area of substantial growth in universities around the world.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/apply,80113,en.html

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the
world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part- time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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Global issues of environment, security and development have never been so important. Read more

Programme Overview

Global issues of environment, security and development have never been so important. A long war on terror with no end in sight, ongoing structural economic inequalities on a global scale, and the threat of climate change have brought questions of Western interventionary practices, neoliberalism and environmental sustainability to the fore. The MA in Environment, Society and Development is designed to enable students to synthesize both theoretical and practical concerns in bringing critical thinking to these vital challenges. The programme involves engagement with a number of core areas in critical human geography, including issues of geopolitics, development and political ecology, and exposes students to global concerns that encompass a complex and dynamic mesh of environmental, social and economic processes.

Field-Based Learning

Running through the MA is an overarching aim to impart understanding of how different philosophical and ideological approaches to environment-society relations influence policy formulation and implementation. In this context, our hope is to empower students to become critically informed by, and ethically engaged with, the various geopolitical, social, economic and environmental processes that shape the world in which we live. The practical emphasis of the MA is reflected in a field-based learning module in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where students intersect with the development work of UN agencies, and range of CSOs and NGOs. In connecting with the work of UN agencies like the United Nations Development Programme, a key challenge for students involves thinking through the scalar nature of all forms of development, in which initiatives on the ground are framed by broader geopolitical, economic and institutional structures that both enable and hinder development in complex ways.

Career Opportunities

The programme will prepare students for a range of workplaces including government departments, non-governmental organizations, planning and environmental management agencies and specialist research and policy institutes. The transferable and problem-solving skills gained from the field-based learning practices embedded in all modules are a particular strength for graduates. Each year, students gain vital experience working on the ground in Bosnia and Herzegovina with a variety of international development practitioners and local community leaders. Since its inception, the programme has had ICOS and other international students from a range of countries, including Ethiopia, Germany, Italy, Malawi, Norway, Russia, Sri Lanka, UAE, UK, USA and Vietnam. Many have gone on to work in NGOs and UN agencies and, in addition, to pursue PhD research in leading Geography Departments across the world. In terms of a critical human geography Masters, the depth and breadth of the programme puts students in a very strong position in applying for PhDs, and post-MA we strongly encourage applications, internationally, nationally and here at NUI Galway, where Geography has strong research clusters in Geopolitics and Justice and Planning and Sustainability.

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The MA Fine Art , provided by the School of Arts and Humanities at University of Suffolk, is a unique full or part time programme for art and design practitioners across a range of disciplines working or planning to work in arts oriented professional fields. Read more
The MA Fine Art , provided by the School of Arts and Humanities at University of Suffolk, is a unique full or part time programme for art and design practitioners across a range of disciplines working or planning to work in arts oriented professional fields.

This is a practice-based programme promoting a student-centred experience, with the emphases of the course changing year on year in response to the different profiles of its cohorts, but always maintaining a focus on the three interrelated principles of skills, concepts and contexts. The course recognises that the role of the student and the creative practitioner is constantly evolving and that educational experience and creative practice necessarily confront interests which do not necessarily coincide. Debate, discourse and intellectual argument will be provoked and encouraged, bringing to the fore some of the inevitable conflicts which arise through differences of values, beliefs and ways of working and learning.

The MA Fine Art is designed to enable students’ career development, supporting their pursuit of a variety of professional arts by means of self-employment or employment in relevant arts, design and /or educational contexts. This may mean working as organisers, promoters, facilitators, formal or informal educators and teachers, enablers, entrepreneurs, community arts workers, administrators, curators, project managers and/or researchers in arts-oriented organisations.

A firm belief in the potential of all students to prosper and to take charge of their learning journey in an environment of support, inspiration, challenge and respect underpins the course ethos.

Content and Modules

Research Methods
Concepts and Contexts in Practice
Professional Development
Independent Practice
Dissertation/ Exhibition Research Project

The course is constructed to allow students to undertake each of the three levels individually, or to make up the full Masters award. This arrangement is particularly suited to those in employment who prefer to remain flexible in modes and level of commitment to postgraduate study.

Modules at Certificate Level

At Certificate Level students are required to take two modules:

Research Methods (20 credits)

Concepts and Contexts in Practice (40 credits)
Modules at Diploma Level

At Diploma level students are required to take two modules:

Professional Development (20 credits)
Independent Practice (40 credits)

Modules at Masters Level

Modules at Masters Level students engage in a Dissertation/Exhibition Research Project (60 credits), constituting a major piece of investigative work

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The MA in Cultural Policy, Relations and Diplomacy is a trans-disciplinary programme that addresses the theory and practice of cultural policy, cultural relations, and cultural and public diplomacy- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cultural-policy-relations/. Read more
The MA in Cultural Policy, Relations and Diplomacy is a trans-disciplinary programme that addresses the theory and practice of cultural policy, cultural relations, and cultural and public diplomacy- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cultural-policy-relations/

This broad area of study and the terminology applied to it is fluid and expanding. Having culture as the underlying thread, the programme explores areas such as:

arts policy and management
globalisation
cultural relations
public diplomacy
cultural and arts diplomacy
external communications
place branding
This will provide a unique perspective into this field of study, and will examine topics such as mobility of cultural practitioners, cultural identity, intercultural dialogue, mutuality, propaganda, soft power, hegemony, influence and perceptions.

Goldsmiths' location in provides you with a unique experience of living in a multicultural world city, which is of great relevance to the study of cultural policy, relations and diplomacy.

You'll study in the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship (ICCE). ICCE's individual and institutional links with an extensive network of organisations, policy advisors and cultural practitioners in those areas in London and in Europe allow you to experience exceptional research and study resources.

Industry links

ICCE’s established organisational links include, for example, the British Council, Visiting Arts, EUNIC London Hub and Demos. ICCE is also a member of ENCATC (the leading European network on Cultural Management and Cultural Policy education). The Institute is also responsible for fostering the sharing of information and discussion of issues related to international cultural relations across disciplines on the JISCMail list cultural-relations-diplomacy.

Expert staff and invited professionals

Our staff and invited academic and professional experts will enhance your learning. They'll discuss relevant literature and will present case studies and practical examples with local, national and global dimensions involving a range of individuals and organisations, including corporations, governments, international bodies and NGOs.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact ICCE.

Modules & Structure

This MA is a 180-credit programme consisting of four 30-credit modules and a 60-credit dissertation.

The two main modules of the programme, Cultural Policy and Practice and Cultural Relations and Diplomacy are complemented by a module on Contemporary Issues in Cultural Policy that brings to the fore present themes that require further study.

The fourth module of the programme is an option from a selection of modules covering arts engagement, media, business, languages and politics - this is designed to allow you to tailor the programme to your own particular skills and/or interests.

The teaching methodologies used in these modules will be conducive to creative and independent in-depth and collaborative learning. They'll culminate in the production of a final dissertation in which you will explore in detail a topic building on your interests and knowledge.

The programme allows and encourages you to engage in work placements while attending the modules. These are not a formal part of the programme, but some support will be provided building on ICCE’s extensive experience of internship management and network of contacts.

Skills

Graduates of this programme develop a wide range of skills and competencies.

Knowledge and understanding

You'll be able to:

Describe and understand a range of practices, policies, structures and systems in the cultural policy and international cultural relations areas involving a variety of stakeholders (individuals, NGOs, foundations, corporations, governments, international and supranational organisations)
Define and understand the use of theories and key concepts in cultural policy, cultural relations and cultural and public diplomacy, such as culture, identity, globalisation, soft power, hegemony, influence, propaganda, mutuality, trust, intercultural dialogue, nation building/branding
Discuss the importance of cultural policy in relation to international cultural relations
Understand the diverse and changing relationships between culture/arts, politics and international relations
Build on your existing experience and/or interest to develop knowledge within cultural policy and international cultural relations

Cognitive and thinking skills

You'll be able to:

Analyse and evaluate the role of the 'actors' and their practices, as well as the structures and systems framing cultural policy and international cultural relations
Discern how to apply a range of trans-disciplinary concepts and theories to the understanding of policies, practices, structures and systems in the areas of cultural policy, cultural relations and cultural diplomacy
Identify and critically analyse contemporary issues
Build on your existing experience and/or interest to further develop analytical, critical and conceptual skills within cultural policy and international cultural relations

Practical skills

You'll be able to:

Analyse public policies in the areas of culture and international cultural relations at micro and macro levels
Devise, develop, conduct and deliver an independent piece of research relevant to cultural policy and international cultural relations, using a self-reflective approach
Demonstrate the origins of your thinking in cultural policy and international cultural relations by adequately referencing sources that have been evaluated for credibility, objectivity, accuracy and trustworthiness
Communicate effectively and succinctly through oral presentation and express yourself in writing for academic and other audiences, employing when necessary the appropriate ICT tools and skills

Key transferable skills

You'll be able to:

Share and exchange expertise and skills with other students and the tutors on the course employing effective written and oral communication skills
Demonstrate you are an independent and creative learner able to exercise initiative and personal responsibility for your own learning and planning processes
Conduct research methodically to find an answer that is complete, accurate and authoritative
Work effectively as part of a team

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This course covers the history of science, technology and medicine, integrating the study of these areas and addressing big historical and policy questions. Read more
This course covers the history of science, technology and medicine, integrating the study of these areas and addressing big historical and policy questions. Students are introduced to general themes and approaches to this field in a team-taught, programme-specific module which explores the development of science, technology and medicine and its implications for history in general.

Key benefits

- Programme incorporates a distinctive approach to history, integrating the study of science, technology and medicine and being particularly concerned with addressing big historical and policy questions.

- Led by staff from the Department of History, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014), including those former members of Imperial College Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHoSTM), and at the fore of innovation and excellence in the history of science, technology and medicine.

- The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/science-technology-and-medicine-in-history-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme provides teaching and research training at the postgraduate level in the history of science, technology and medicine (HSTM). It includes training in the research skills necessary for those who wish to go on to study for a PhD in the field, but is also designed for students who wish simply to study at the postgraduate level. Students are introduced to general themes and approaches to HSTM in a team-taught, programme-specific compulsory module. This explores the development of STM, its implications for history in general, and the historiographical and methodological issues that arise in studying it. Optional modules offer in-depth training in particular aspects of HSTM in different periods and places, with the opportunity to use primary sources where appropriate.

- Course purpose -

Provides a distinctive programme suitable both for those intending to proceed to a PhD and also for those who wish to study the history of science, technology and medicine at an advanced level. Encourages a distinctive approach to history, integrating the study of science, technology and medicine and being particularly concerned with addressing big historical and policy questions.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: 4-8 hours of taught classes per week.

Part-time study: 2-6 hours of taught classes per week.

The taught compulsory and optional modules are assessed by coursework and/or take-home examination. The compulsory 15,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career Prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in teaching, archives, the media, finance, politics and heritage industries.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MA Education is founded on a philosophical principle that educational work is an intellectual activity, and, as such, educators are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Read more
The MA Education is founded on a philosophical principle that educational work is an intellectual activity, and, as such, educators are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Much of our activity focuses on enriching that voice, and supporting it so that it might operate in a more assertive and substantiated way.

We encourage our students to complicate and problematise practice, to actively resist those pressures that might seek to otherwise offer reduced and simplified accounts of learning. We intend to bring to the fore your ethical sensibilities and intellectual capacities. We are committed to a sense that in doing so, we enable the kinds of creative and considered practices which make real differences to the experiences of learners.

A second core principle holds that 'practice' should be central to our exploration and analysis. Throughout your study, you will be encouraged to apply new ideas and thinking in practice, and to evaluate and explore their efficacy. Practice is a form of expertise, and it - alongside any form of more conventionally 'academic' material - can be a generator of new thinking and understanding. As such, you will be encouraged to bring your practice in to sessions, in order to generate new discussion and to nuance, enrich and even challenge 'big theory'.

Special Features

• Weekend attendance – you will only need to attend the University for one weekend per unit (Friday evening to Sunday lunchtime).
• A structure which is easily tailored to individuals’ professional priorities and personal interests.
• The course offers October and February (or June by request) start dates
• Flexibility, encouragement and support to use the focus and structures of the award to develop expertise in self-selected areas.
• The opportunity to study alongside colleagues working across a range of educational settings, learning and co-constructing expert
knowledge overtime.
• A philosophically principled approach which values the voice of the practitioner and is committed to enabling and strengthening that
voice.

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The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Sport is offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy. Read more
The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Sport is offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy.
.

Credits - 90 ECTS Credits

Length - 2 Trimesters (plus Dissertation)

Location - Paisley, Scotland and Berlin, Germany

Tuition - €9,000

Sport has come to occupy a central role in the economic, physical, psychological and socio-cultural fabric of nation states. Historical and cultural identity cannot be reflected, understood or critiqued without recourse to the place and influence of sport. Importantly, and despite the rhetoric of politicians and governing bodies, sport is a powerful political vehicle. As a driver of economic wealth, tourist attraction, business development and urban regeneration sport is a major plinth in the policy process. Moreover, in a techno-cultural age of digital and social immediacy, sport has become a key media and experiential spectacular, constantly deployed across the geo-political stage. Modern sport is now a global power player intrinsic to the perpetuation of the spectacle of consumer capitalism, which solidifies its status as a primary vehicle of cultural diplomacy.
Sport, sport events and the media are, more than ever, intrinsically linked. The trajectory of such a union is traced through the rise of the hallmark, major and mega events (e.g. Olympics and World Cup), which see the mediatisation of experience subtly mixed with the pride and prestige with identity politics and ideological power (Getz, 2014). Whether the propaganda of Nazi Germany, race relations of Mexico Olympics, terrorism of Munich Olympics, 1980s Cold War boycotts, favela clearances of 2016 Rio World Cup to human rights and FIFA allegations of 2022 Qatar World Cup sport is embedded in the arena of political contestation. The role of sport as a vehicle for peace and development are increasingly promoted by governing bodies of sport and ambassadors for developing nations. Again cultural diplomacy comes to the forefront with sport as we see governing bodies of sporting events, policy institutions and transnational corporations assert counter-discourses that see sport claimed as a supranational values vehicle for peace, human rights and equality. Whether in the bidding phase, lead up, mediatised event or post-event legacy and leverage claims sporting events bring geopolitical differences to the fore. This MA blends expertise in sport with that of cultural diplomacy to ensure the sporting leaders or diplomats of the future are prepared to deal with the global sporting arena and its potential political, social and cultural outcomes.
The program provides students with expertise in the field of International Sport and Cultural Diplomacy, a new and attractive field of studies, which is currently offered as an academic field only through the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies of the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy. This particular emphasis on Cultural Diplomacy and its historical and contemporary application in the public sector, private sector and civil society, provides students with expertise in three distinct academic fields, thus with an academic and practical advantage in the European and Global Arena.

The program addresses contemporary international issues, with classroom seminars and lectures, as well as online resources including vodcasts, recorded lecturers and presentations. Additionally, educational & cultural events, conferences, professional trainings, tours, visits and meetings with foreign officials, are further incorporated into the curriculum. Students will meet with leading experts working in international organizations, embassies, and academic institutions, and will engage with specialists in the areas of International Events, Sport, Sport Media, Sport Policy, Culture, Communication, Politics, Human Rights, Culture, Peace Building, Multilateral Diplomacy, Conflict Resolution, and Development.

The program provides students with practical experience for both academic and professional development, preparing students for careers in diverse fields, such as international sport events, sports policy, sport governing bodies, international relations, conferences and events, the humanities, politics, and culture, foreign policy and international policy. On a practical level, the international environment of the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies offers students a unique opportunity to interact with leading experts and academics at a wide variety of international organizations and research centers. This exceptional learning environment leads to original research and independent study opportunities. It allows students to create a solid professional network and form a concrete base for future academic and professional career choices, preparing students for engagement in the international arena, civil society, politics, governmental organizations and international economic organizations, as well as the private sector.

Program Structure
The program consists of 90 ECTS credits in total and has duration of two trimesters, and a Thesis to be submitted towards the completion of the program. The first trimester of the program is hosted by the University of the West of Scotland in Paisley and the second trimester is hosted by the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in Berlin.

The program follows the conventional university structure of a one year academic program divided into two trimesters, where Students are offered elective courses to accompany mandatory courses, a professional development experience and the final thesis.

Enrolments to the Program are possible towards the Fall, Winter and Spring semesters’ start each year.

For start Winter 2017 (February 8th, 2017)

Deadline for late admissions: December 31st, 2016

Next start:

Spring Semester 2017- April 11th, 2017 , Deadline for admissions: January 15th, 2017

For more information please visit: http://www.ccds-berlin.de and .http://www.ccds-berlin.de/index.php?en_uws_macd-is

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The Specializing Master Sustainable Design for Complexity is a First and Second-level Politecnico di Milano Specializing Master, born as an evolution of… Read more
The Specializing Master Sustainable Design for Complexity is a First and Second-level Politecnico di Milano Specializing Master, born as an evolution of the five editions of the Specializing Master Sustainable Environments and Architecture to give designers, architects, and engineers bespoke, specialized training for ecologically and bioclimatically compatible projects in the built environment, integrating energy planning into new and existing architectural spaces.

Operating Context

Issues of complexity, nomadism, environmental and energy resources, the crisis for cities, and the gradual acceptance of ecological compatibility principles have brought the following needs to the fore:
a design and knowledge approach inspired by sustainable development;
innovation in the principles for settling and building cities and surrounding areas;
tight synergy with the potential technological innovation;
new skills on the part of designers in social, ecological, and energy fields;
finding new ways to design the land, its towns, and a sustainable built environment.
Relation to Job Market

Training is designed to build professionals and researchers:
who can interpret and manage the complexity of new land, town, and architecture scenarios;
who own the knowledge to use renewable energy resources and advanced technology properly;
who are optimally equipped to enhance the enormous potential of new nomadism.

Main Content

This Specializing Master seeks to build opportunities to acquire and experience the following features:
interpretative evaluation of the ways of interethnic living;
innovative approaches to understanding local context and transforming the natural and built environments;
knowledge of advanced technology and the use of alternative energy sources;
integrated design of photovoltaic and thermal solar technology;
integrated design of phytopurification, botanical land use and agronomy;
integrated design of re-naturalized rivers and farmland;
Innovation in the conceptions/concept of the structures.

Starting date: October 2016.

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The aquaculture programme reflects the expansion of a modern industry that now supplies nearly 50 per cent of our annual world sea food production and is valued at $110US Billion per annum globally. Read more
The aquaculture programme reflects the expansion of a modern industry that now supplies nearly 50 per cent of our annual world sea food production and is valued at $110US Billion per annum globally. The production of fin-fish and shrimp and bivalves is now recognised as one of the fastest growing sectors of agri-business and contributes greatly to our food security agenda. Among the most important fish species are salmon and trout in temperate regions as well as numerous warm water species such as tilapia and catfish. Carp and other freshwater fish still make up the bulk of fish production with Asia and China dominating in this respect. Marine fish farming of sea bass, sea bream and exotic species such as barramundi and grouper are also at the fore- front of aquaculture development. The programme will cover the major fish species produced globally and different type of systems in use.

Aquaculture relies on high quality feeds, good nutrition and various management strategies that promote optimum health and welfare of fish. Consequently a full understanding of nutritional requirements, feed formulation and feed technology is paramount to its success. It also relies on knowledge of genetic improvements of fish stock, disease recognition, diagnostics and treatment. Good governance and compliance with legislation and standards in food safety and production is critical to the producer, retailer and consumer alike. These are all at the core of a sound and sustainable fish farming industry and central to the ethos of this course.

The programme will serve to offer a portfolio of multidisciplinary topics within a selection of specialised integrative modules to advance students’ understanding of the relevant biosciences underpinning fish farming. This will be presented within a theme of mono-gastric animal production where there are many similarities of principle and scientific approaches.

In summary the course:

Recognises the global context within which food production now operates.
Provides UK students with new insights into the global agri-food system
Covers the major fish species produced globally and different type of systems in use.
Will advance students’ understanding of the relevant biosciences underpinning fish farming.

How will it benefit me?
The course will:

Prepare students for a career in Aquaculture.
Offer vocational training in the area of applied aquaculture.
Prepare students for PhD studies.

Each modules is usually delivered as an intensive short course, taught over a one week block, with a maximum of 5 days per 15 credit module providing in the region of 35 hours of contact time.
Teaching may consist of formal lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical exercises, laboratory sessions, study visits or the use of guest speakers.
The PgC, PgD and MSc are offered full-time and part-time to allow those in work to study towards an award at a pace that suits their needs and time available.

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This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts. Read more
This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts.

It offers a discerning investigation into seemingly non­rational modes of knowing, exploring the cosmological sense of the sacred, the widespread practices of symbol interpretation and the cultural role of the creative imagination.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/myth-cosmology-and-the-sacred.aspx

Course detail

The overall aim of the course is to encourage critical, imaginative and creative ways of engaging reflexively with some of the most important questions of our time, such as the debate between science and religion, the nature of sacred reality, and the foundations of spiritual, religious and ritual experience. To do this we explore theories of knowledge and consciousness, oracular and divinatory practices (ancient and contemporary), and the cultural expression of myth in landscape, poetry, art and music.

The course has been highly praised as an outstanding example of transformative learning, as it brings personal reflection and creativity to bear on the study of spirituality in the broadest sense. It brings to the fore issues of connectivity, sustainability, ecological awareness, and the engagement of the imagination in the aid of individual, community and global understanding, wellbeing and harmony.

Canterbury is a perfect venue to study this course, with its ecclesiastical heritage, rich literary history, beauty of landscape and architecture, and easy access to both London and the continent.

Suitability

The course will appeal to all those seeking to develop and enrich their lives through the study of the history, philosophy and practices of Western sacred and esoteric traditions, and will be of particular interest to teachers, practitioners and therapists in the fields of contemporary spirituality and wellbeing who would like to engage more deeply with both the foundations of their work and their own self-knowledge.

There are many areas for potential further study, and we now have a thriving graduate environment with MPhil/PhD researchers pursing topics as diverse as the music of the spheres, Freemasonry, conflict resolution, alchemical symbolism, transformative learning and intuitive reading methods.

Content

The four taught modules, comprising seminars, learning journal groups and workshops take place at alternate weekends, in term time, from October to March, with optional workshops in the summer term.

The Creative Project assignment and dissertation module take place from April to September (for full-time students) and April to the following September (for part-time students). Each teaching weekend includes an open lecture by a visiting speaker. There are also optional sessions on Friday afternoons (compulsory for Tier 4 students).

The four taught modules will address the following topics:

• Theories and Methods
• Symbol and Imagination
• Oracular and Divinatory Traditions
• Spirit and Psyche
• Creative Project
• Learning Journal
• Dissertation

Format

Teaching methods include seminars, lectures and workshops. Students can expect eight hours of teaching each study weekend, plus two hours of learning journal groups. They also receive individual supervision for each taught and research assignment, and eight hours of research preparation seminars.

They will attend two days a year for creative project presentations and a variety of optional workshops will be offered. There will also be an open public lecture at each study weekend, on the Saturday evening, which they are encouraged to attend, and optional Friday afternoon seminars on a variety of themes.

Assessment

Four essays of 4,000 words (20 credits each), one creative project review of 4,000 words, one learning journal write-up of 4,000 words (20 credits each) and one dissertation of 12-15,000 words (60 credits).

What can I do next?

Most of the students on this course are mature adults with established careers. However, possible career opportunities might include teaching, counselling and mentoring, spiritual and wellbeing guidance, alternative healing and therapies, writing and media, the arts, and further research.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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