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Masters Degrees (Forced Migration)

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Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies. by distance learning. The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. Read more

Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies

by distance learning

The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. It is unique in being the only programme of its type offered by distance learning.

An introduction

The MA degree will enable you to acquire a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration, developing expertise through a choice of elective modules. You will hone your self-reliance in dealing with - and critiquing - law, policy and practice in the field, and will also learn how to gather, organise and deploy evidence to form balanced judgements and develop policy recommendations.

Who is the course for?

This Masters is relevant to those who already work in the area, for whom a Masters qualification would enable them to progress to higher level work within the sector, whether in multilaterals, governments or NGOs.

It will also appeal to people hoping to establish themselves in the sector - these could be people making a career change or those at an early stage of their careers.

It is also relevant to sector professionals, to provide a deeper understanding of the issues facing refugees and refugee aid organisations.

We are hoping to create a virtual meeting place for students, academics and practitioners from all parts of the globe.

How will the course benefit me?

The programme is designed to develop both academic and vocational skills and experience.

It will enable you not only to think constructively about related policy and law, but to develop actual policy recommendations.

The 'practice based' module provides the opportunity to explore of some of the key vocational aspects relevant to the sector including topics such as advocacy, campaigning, fundraising, policy, law and communications. You can then choose to focus on a specific area for your examined piece of work. In the case of fundraising, for example, you could submit a funding bid that will be assessed by a tutor with significant practical experience in the grants and trusts sector.

Other modules on the course focus on asylum law and policy in specific regions of the world, such as Latin America and Africa or the European Union, whilst others focus on specific thematic issues such as statelessness, internal displacement, healthcare, gender and sexual identity.

Overall the course seeking to provide students with a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration.

How you study

You study this online programme wherever you are in the world and access the course content through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE also gives you access to:

- Associate Tutors who provide expert academic guidance throughout your studies

- academically rigorous and up-to-date learning materials and resources

- online tasks and assessments ('e-tivities') plus seen examinations for each of the modules

- peer to peer learning in online discussion forums

- world-class online library facilities.

Ask a question

To ask a question about this programme, please contact out Student Advice Centre using this form.



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This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration. Read more
This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration.

Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. It requires the use of theoretical and methodological insights, knowledge and perspectives of different disciplines. This provides opportunities for in-depth understanding and explanation of the problem of Forced Migration and its interface with other social science disciplines, such as development studies, law, sociology, anthropology, political science and psychology.

Starting in both in September and January, this programme aims to develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understanding and explaining the causes and consequences of forced migration, analysing, critiquing and evaluating host governments’, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ (UNCHR) and NGOs’ policies on protection, assistance, reception and settlement strategies, as well as the short and long-term responses of inter -governmental organisations, such as the World Bank and others.

Throughout the course, you’ll also engage in volunteering. Students have volunteered in different organisations , including the UK Refugee Council, British Red Cross, UNHCR, Chance UK, Naz Project London and Eaves in South London. These organisations provide support, advice and advocacy to asylum-seekers, including women who’ve experienced violence, such as trafficking, prostitution, domestic and sexual violence.

MSc Refugee Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab, an internationally recognised expert on forced migration, resettlement, repatriation and development, conflict, environment, water resources governance, post-conflict reconstruction, gender and development, livelihoods, governance and civil society.

Modules

International Refugee Law
Asylum policy in the EU and Member States
Forced Migration and Human Rights
Forced Migration and Development
Contemporary Issues in Development
Research methods for development
Dissertation (triple module)

Study hours

Year 1 class contact time is typically 16 hours per week plus individual tutorial time and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days and two evenings a week.

Assessment

All modules apart from the dissertation are assessed by 5,000 word pieces of coursework.

Employability

The aims and outcomes of this course are designed to develop your knowledge and skills that are relevant to working with forced migrants, including asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and other categories of forced migrants and also for working in refugee-producing and hosting countries world-wide, inter-governmental organisations, such as the UNHCR, non-governmental orgisations, immigration lawyers, lobbying and advocacy groups. The Home Office and immigration authorities in the EU and member states are potential employers of our graduates.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations. Through our pool of visiting lecturers and practitioners, the MSc Refugee Studies networks with activists, academics and practitioners. These networks provide students an opportunity not only to learn about job opportunities but also establish contacts that may prove to be useful in search of employment opportunities. Students’ employability is enhanced by developing their transferable and problem-solving analytical and evaluative skills. Some graduates of the MSc Refugee Studies have established their own NGOs and are serving asylum-seekers, refugees and internally displaced persons in their countries of origin.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This unique course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to refugee studies and community development and is based at a university with significant refugee communities in its local area in east London. Read more
This unique course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to refugee studies and community development and is based at a university with significant refugee communities in its local area in east London.

Our approach encompasses politics, international relations, development studies, sociology, anthropology, social policy, psychology and cultural and legal theory.

We examine key issues involving forced migration as well as social, cultural, political and psychosocial aspects of community development with special reference to refugee communities in east London.

What makes our course different is that we focus on the experience of refugees and of refugee communities.
Our course will give you a deep appreciation of refugees’ experiences, achievements and needs.

It will equip you with the knowledge and skills to work in professions relating to counseling, social and community issues, refugee welfare, human rights, and legal representation of refugees.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

Forced migrants confront major obstacles in their attempt to find sanctuary. Although the majority of refugees are in countries of the developing world, structures of exclusion are most fully developed in the post-industrial societies, notably in Europe.

Your work will focus on developing an appreciation of refugee experiences, achievements and needs by approaching refugees as social actors.

You will study three core modules: Introduction to forced migration, Refugee studies and community development, and Research methods.

The course also offers you the opportunity to study one specialist option on social, cultural, political, legal and psychosocial aspects of refugee studies and community development.

This will prepare you to begin a dissertation during the summer term for submission in September.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This course will appeal to professionals and practitioners who are interested in refugees and community development, both locally and internationally.

It will give you the skills and knowledge to play an important role in NGOs, social service departments and local and international charities.

It is particularly suited to people who are professionally concerned with counseling, education, social and community issues and refugee welfare, as well as human rights, the legal representation of refugees.

If you are already working in any of these areas, the course will give you the confidence and experience to apply for more senior positions. If you are looking to enter the field for the first time, it will give you the skills to apply for jobs.

The course also provides the perfect preparation for students who wish to undertake further research in the fields of forced migration and diasporic studies, ethnicity, social, psychosocial and cultural theory, legal studies and social policy.

MODULES

The following are the core and optional requirements for this programme:

Introduction to Forced Migration (Core)
Forced Migration and Community Development (Core)
Research Methods (Core)
Approaches to Public and Community Service(Option)
Current Issues in Forced Migration(Option)
Governance (Option)
International Human Rights (Option)
International Refugee Law (Option)
Migration, Citizenship & Social Policy (Option)
Psycho-Social Perspectives On Forced Migration (Option)
Volunteering, Voluntarism and Voluntary Action (Option)
*University Wide Option (Option)
Dissertation (Core)

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Forced migration is a global phenomenon and an area of increasing concern. On this course you will study the multiple factors associated with refugee crises and the economic, political, social, cultural, and environment pressures which lie behind the search for asylum. Read more
Forced migration is a global phenomenon and an area of increasing concern. On this course you will study the multiple factors associated with refugee crises and the economic, political, social, cultural, and environment pressures which lie behind the search for asylum.

One of the major factors that makes our course stand out from others is that we focus on the perspective of the refugee. Forced migrants confront major obstacles in their attempt to find sanctuary.

Although the majority of refugees are in countries of the developing world, structures of exclusion are most fully developed in the post-industrial societies, notably within Europe.

The course highlights problems associated with limitations of asylum rights in the European states and the climate of hostility towards refugees from countries outside Western Europe. It also considers alternative, positive, approaches to asylum rights.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

The core modules give you a wide-ranging introduction to forced migration and a detailed study of research methods. You will also have the opportunity to study specialist options on social, cultural, political, legal and psychosocial aspects of refugee studies and community development.

A distinguishing feature of the course is its emphasis on the lived experience of refugees and of refugee communities. You will develop a full appreciation of refugee experiences, achievements and needs.

You will study refugees from the point of view of the law, politics and anthropology and you will analyse their experiences on a global and local scale.

The course looks at how non-governmental organisations and the United Nations work with refugees and also how some people have sought to criminalise them.

The course will equip you with advanced skills in interdisciplinary analysis and research.

You will learn from the first-hand experience of refugees and people who have worked with refugees.

Your studies will focus on two core modules: Introduction to Forced Migration and Research Methods, and two specialist option modules in the area of social, cultural, political, legal and psychosocial aspects of refugee studies and community development. This will prepare you to begin a dissertation during the summer term for submission in September.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This course is suited to people who are working in areas concerned with human rights, legal representation of refugees, counseling, education, social and community issues and refugee welfare.

If you are already working in this area, the course will give you the confidence and experience to apply for more senior positions.
If you are aiming to enter the field for the first time, it will give you the skills to apply for roles with NGOs, government departments or other organisations working closely with refugees.

Our course will also prepare students who wish to undertake further research in the fields of forced migration and diasporic studies; legal studies; and social policy.

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Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration. Read more

Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration.

Drawing on several disciplines, including political science, geography and history, you'll discover why and how migration happens and gain an in-depth understanding of the challenges and opportunities it creates. You can choose to examine topics such as the refugee crisis in Europe, labour migration, multiculturalism and immigration as an election issue.

Learning across disciplines

You'll not only gain an in-depth understanding of migration issues, you'll develop your critical thinking, communications and research skills.

If you're a Master's student, you may have the opportunity to do an internship with an organisation involved in migration policy, research or practice. Or you can choose to complete a 60-point research project instead. Take the opportunity to contribute your own perspectives to the study of migration.

Qualification family structure

The Master of Migration is part of a tiered family of qualifications:

  • Master of Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Migration Studies

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.

Staircasing allows movement in both directions—if you begin by enrolling in the Certificate or Diploma programme you can continue on to complete your Master's. Or if you enrol in the Master's but can't complete it, for whatever reason, you may be awarded the Certificate or Diploma.

What you'll study

The Master of Migration is divided into Part 1 and Part 2.

In Part 1 you'll complete four 30-point courses and you'll have some choice in what you study. In the core course—Approaches to Migration Studies POLS 488—you'll examine how migration is analysed, study the main concepts, theories and debates and prepare a research proposal. In your elective courses you might focus on a particular historical migration flow, explore the challenges of refugee resettlement in New Zealand, study the international or domestic politics of migration or choose to complete an individual research project.

In the second half of your studies, or Part 2, you'll complete a 60-point research essay that builds on your research proposal in Part 1 of the programme. Alternatively, you may have the opportunity to complete an internship and research at a workplace involved in migration.

If you're doing the Diploma, you'll complete Part 1 of the Master's.

Certificate students complete the core course in Part 1 and choose one further course from the MMigS programme.

How you'll learn

For most of your courses you'll attend one three-hour seminar each week that will include classroom discussions and sometimes student presentations.

You'll also complete your own self-directed research under the guidance of your supervisor. You'll meet with them regularly to discuss your progress.

Duration and workload

The MMigS can be completed in one calendar year of full-time study, or in two years part time. You'll need to finish the degree within three years of enrolling.

The PGDipMigS takes two trimesters of full-time study or can be studied over four trimesters part time.

You can complete the PGCertMigS in one trimester, or over two trimesters part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

In the heart of it

In the capital city of Wellington, you'll be at the centre of immigration policy and decision-making. Take advantage of Victoria's links with national organisations that deal with migration such as the Office of Ethnic Communities, the Asia New Zealand Foundation and Immigration New Zealand.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Seminars skills sessions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

People with an in-depth knowledge of migration issues are increasingly in demand in governments, NGOs, media and research organisations. You'll be able to apply your understanding of migration in a wide range of professions such as policy analysis, research, international development, community development and refugee resettlement.



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This course examines the central issues facing developing countries in today’s globalised world, giving you the skills for a job in development and the wider sectors. Read more
This course examines the central issues facing developing countries in today’s globalised world, giving you the skills for a job in development and the wider sectors.

You’ll be equipped with all the practical skills that are in great demand in development agencies. But you’ll also gain insight across the wider picture, understanding how developing countries can progress and how the poor can be mobilised to escape from the poverty trap.

The course also explores how NGOs can play a key role in promoting social and economic progress and you’ll develop the ability to identify, design and implement programmes with a view to engaging with and enhancing the situation of the poor.

Our students and staff are a diverse group from different backgrounds and your tutors have expertise in many key development regions and countries from South Asia and Latin America to Middle East and Africa.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

The course consists of four modules and a dissertation. The full-time MSc takes one year to complete and the part-time course is completed over two years.

You’ll learn about development management in the international context and the impact of globalisation. We focus on public management and the role of aid agencies and NGOs in development and encourage you to gain general conceptual, critical and evaluative skills.

Our Project and Programme Design module will give you insight into a range of approaches to development interventions, including design, implementation and management. The course introduces design methods used by NGOs and aid agencies as well as important issues such as sustainability and alternatives to the project approach.

We’ll also teach you how to examine rationales for research and a range of investigative techniques. This will help you prepare for your dissertation in which you’ll demonstrate your ability to use theories from earlier modules alongside your own research findings.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This course has a strong focus on employability and is specifically designed to give you the skills to work for development agencies, NGOs and in the wider development sector.

The experience and contacts of our staff will help you set up placements in the UK, Africa, Asia or Latin America and gain more understanding of how the sector works.

You’ll gain the experience and knowledge either to further your career in NGO and development management or to use your skills within the area to enhance the role you are already playing.

Our students who have worked in the field before have found that after the course, they are in a much better position to apply for more senior jobs across the development sector with the extra practical and critical thinking skills they have developed.

If you’ve not been involved in NGOs or development management previously, the course will give you the knowledge and practical skills which are highly sought after by development agencies.

MODULES

Development Management in the International Context (core)
Programme and Project Design (core)
Research Methods (core)
Sustainability and the Commons (option)
Introduction to Forced Migration (option)
Psycho-Social Perspectives of Forced Migration (option)
International Human Rights (option)
Global Environmental Politics (option)
Cultural Encounters in International Relations (option)
University Wide Option (option)
Dissertation (core)

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Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. Read more
Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. This interdisciplinary MSc offers the best of migration teaching from across UCL's Faculties.

Degree information

The programme combines theoretical and policy debates about migration. Students are equipped with the advanced skills, methods, concepts and theories essential for the study of global migration and gain the opportunity to apply them in both general and more specialised contexts relating to the processes, policies and politics of migration.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), a compulsory methods module (15 credits), and five elective modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Migration
-Issues in Global Migration
-Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods I

Elective modules - students choose a range of modules for courses offered across UCL which offer specialisation on migration which may include the following:
-Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods II (essential only if intending further research training)
-Thinking Space
-Migration and Urban Multiculture
-Mining Social and Geographic Datasets
-Globalisation and Security
-Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
-Ethnicity, Migration and Health
-Migration in the European Union
-International Human Rights Law
-Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
-Anthropology of Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
-Anthropology and Development
-Postcolonial Cultural Geographies
-Comparative Human Rights Law
-Globalisation in the Twentieth Century
-Equality, Justice and Difference
-Population and Development
-Economics of Migration (Economics prerequisites)

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, discussions, independent reading, practicals and workshops. The majority of modules are assessed through coursework although a small number are assessed by examination.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well equipped to work with migrants and asylum seekers in different parts of the world, and gain posts in UN, EU, national policy think-tanks, government research and policy departments, NGOs, community-based and grassroots organisations. The programme provides an excellent foundation for students wishing to pursue doctorates in the interdisciplinary field of migration studies.

Employability
Graduates have gone on to work in a range of careers related to migration. The recent destinations of students who graduated from this programme include law, research, policy making and campaigning work. One recent graduate is now a trainee barrister specialising in migration law, another works for a government agency for refugees in Norway. Other recent graduates have found employment in local government posts in the UK and in international organisatiosn such as the Migration Policy Institute. A number of graduates have also successfully received funding to complete further degrees.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has internationally recognised expertise in the field of migration. It has two established research units, the Migration Research Unit and the Centre for Research on Economic Analysis of Migration. Cutting-edge research on migration also takes place across UCL in many different disciplines including law, public policy, anthropology, development planning, area studies, humanities and health. The involvement of such a wide range of disciplines in teaching on the MSc in Global Migration MSc is unique.

Students benefit from the consolidation of migration expertise across UCL which is complemented by a departmental migration seminar series, and a vibrant and expanding body of PhD students in this field.

Migration research at UCL has a strong international dimension, benefiting from networks across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

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On this cutting-edge course, we specialise in giving our students an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the relationship between conflict, displacement and human insecurity. Read more
On this cutting-edge course, we specialise in giving our students an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the relationship between conflict, displacement and human insecurity.

We will help you to develop the skills and understanding to prepare for employment in the fields of conflict management and resolution, humanitarian assistance and displacement, human rights and development initiatives. The key aspects of your learning will be the focus on conflict and displacement. We value a people-centred approach and an emphasis on human security which combines both human rights and human development.

The course approaches development as an important security strategy and considers displacement a measure of human security. We will encourage you to adopt an independent critical approach to contemporary theories of conflict, human rights and human security.

You will work with academics involved in the latest research and have access to wide-ranging expertise in our research centres, covering human rights in conflict, social justice and change, migration, refugees and belonging and gender research.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

This course will help you to develop important skills for a key role in the area of conflict, displacement and human security.
By the time you complete it, you should have acquired advanced critical and evaluative abilities, research management skills, the ability to design and deliver substantial written reports and social research projects, and high levels of competence in library and bibliographical research.

You will also have gained skills in data collection and analysis. You will have enhanced abilities in verbal presentation, familiarity with means of dissemination and mobilising research findings, and an advanced ability to collaborate in research groups and teams.
The course provides an inter-disciplinary approach to the study of the conflict, generalised violence and social inequality in contemporary global contexts. It examines the complexities of global, regional and local structures, and the relationships to the changing character of conflict.

Your studies will focus on two core modules: Conflict; Displacement and Human Security, and Research Methods and two specialist option modules in the areas of displacement, development, human rights, global environmental politics and community development. This will prepare you to begin a dissertation during the summer term for submission in September.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Our course is specifically aimed at giving you the skills, knowledge and understanding for a career in the fields of conflict management and resolution, humanitarian assistance and displacement, human rights and development initiatives.

You will develop the critical thinking skills and flexibility for a role in an NGO or in a government department or agency, both in developing and developed countries.

The course will also develops your skills for further academic research in conflict, displacement, development and human rights fields, as well as in associated areas of social and political theory.

MODULES

The following are the core and optional requirements for this programme:

• Conflict, Displacement and Human Security ( Core)
• Qualitative Research Methods (Social Sciences) (Core)
• Dissertation (Core)
• Introduction to Forced Migration (Option)
• Development in the International Context (Option)
• Current Issues in Forced Migration (Option)
• Global Environmental Politics (Option)
• War and Human Rights (Option)

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The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. Read more
The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. It provides a thorough grounding in the development field, and its emphasis on research enables students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

The MSc Development Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab and taught by excellent research-active lecturers who specialise in social and economic development, as forced migration. See the current research projects tied to the International Development, Emergencies and Refugee Studies (IDEARS) Research Group.

Through the use of case studies you'll analyse a range of issues, crucial for Development policy and practice, such as:

• Globalisation: markets, trade and the global economy;
• Trade and Aid: the role of international institutions and agencies;
• Strategies for Industrialisation: economic growth and human development;
• Social Development: livelihoods, poverty and poverty reduction;
• Developing the Rural Sector: Agrarian Policies, migration and urbanisation;
• Environmental policies and sustainable development;
• Political empowerment, participation, and human rights.

The course develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy and project design and implementation. A research dissertation forms a central part of your work on the course.

Modules

Contemporary issues in development
Human development in a globalised world
Research methods for development
Economies in transition: strategies for industrialisation
Forced migration and development
Human rights and development
Research dissertation (triple module)

The MSc also offers a series of workshops in project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, providing these essential skills for student's Development careers

Teaching and learning

Class contact time is typically 12 hours per week on the full-time mode of the MSc, and six hours on the part-time mode plus individual tutorial and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days a week, afternoons and evenings typically two evenings a week.

All staff members teaching on the course have considerable experience of working and conducting research in developing countries. They have all published work on Development issues and are well known in their respective fields.

Placements

Our social policy students have taken up work placements at the following organisations:

• Chance UK, a unique early intervention mentoring organisation who provide adult volunteer mentors to work with children aged 5-11 years at risk of developing anti-social behaviour in later life)
• Kairos in Soho (a pan-London LGBT Community Development Organisation)
• Naz Project London (a sexual health organisation that works to mobilise Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities in relation to HIV and other sexual health concerns)
• Richmond Advice and Information on Disability (RAID)
• Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) one of the UK's largest charities and voluntary organisations who aim to give older people the opportunity and choice to get more out of life

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations gave regular presentations to MSc students.

Research in the Development field

Recent and current research by staff includes projects funded by the World Health Organisation, the World Bank, the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, the UK Department for International Development, and the Economic and Social Research Council.

In recent years, staff members have conducted research in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and Zambia. Staff teaching on the MSc regularly publish books and articles both on development issues, and on the countries in which they have expertise.

Employability

A humanities masters has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation. Many students take up posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations, or with non-governmental development organisations in the UK, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. You'll explore contemporary debates in the context of specific countries and themes.

You'll gain knowledge of the protection of international human rights within the context of international development and refugee practice and the role of a rights-based approach to international development practice.

Events

The Law Department hosts annual events such as updates on Human Rights delivered by our Visiting Professors, Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Joel Bennthan QC and Imran Khan. We also host the Young Legal Aid Lawyers Question Time and occasional events such as our recent inter-professional conference – Responding to Rape, and meetings and seminars for Burmese human rights campaigners.

Modules

Core Modules:

Images of development
Research methods
International law and human rights
International law in the developing world
Dissertation

Optional Modules:

International business, trade and less developed countries
International humanitarian law
Forced migration and resettlement
International refugee law
Case management
Advocacy
International criminal law
Forced migration in developing societies

Teaching and learning

The LSBU Law Department has a strong set of experts, consultants and international advisors in the field of Human Rights and hosts a number of annual events and conferences.

Head of the Law Department, Andy Unger, has worked as a consultant in former communist countries such as Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus and Georgia. In the South Caucuses, his most recent working has been with the British East-West Centre, designing and supervising the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office funded projects offering human rights training to lawyers and justice officials in the region.

Senior Lecturer in Law Caron Thatcher has observed elections in many parts of the former Soviet Union including Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan and also in Russia itself and monitoring the final election of Mr. Putin in 2004.

Professional links

Through our growing pool of visiting fellows and professors, the Law Department has developed a strong network of contacts with leading law practitioners in the UK. Many members of the Law Department are practitioners, or retain strong links with the legal profession. We enjoy strong links with a number of leading European Law Faculties, including Universitie Cergy Pontoise in France, INHOLLAND University in the Netherlands and Zagreb University in Croatia.

Employability

You'll graduate with the necessary knowledge and skills to work in the fields of law, human rights and development (either in the UK or abroad) as advisors, experts, researchers and policy makers.

With a background in law, you might practise in human rights, immigration and asylum, and public law.

With a development studies background you might go on to practice in the NGO sector employing a rights-based approach to development.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The course will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the forces shaping global politics and state and inter-state relations, as well as an appreciation of the context of international relations in terms of global inequalities, power and environmental risks. Read more
The course will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the forces shaping global politics and state and inter-state relations, as well as an appreciation of the context of international relations in terms of global inequalities, power and environmental risks.

Our students come to us from all over the world, so you will be working in an international environment. The course will equip you with the skills and knowledge you need for a career working in a global body, government department or organisation dealing with international policy.

You will also be encouraged to improve your research skills and learn how to take an active part in international and academic conferences and debates.

This course offers a unique combination of critical thinking in relation to international relations and the study of global environmental politics. We were the first university to offer this special focus on the environment, which has become a central issue of global relations.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

You will study three core modules leading up to a dissertation of 15,000 words. The first module focuses on the Critical Theories of International Relations and then you will look in detail at Global Environmental Politics - one of the key issues and potential crises facing the international community in the 21st century. These modules have been much enjoyed by students on the programme and described by External Examiners as “cutting edge” in their content.

The third module will give you experience of Qualitative Research Methods, equipping for your research project. For this you can choose a subject linked to your previous professional interest or a completely different area for analysis.

There are also optional modules to choose from, including Conflict, Displacement and Human Security, International Human Rights, Law and Policy in the Middle East and an Introduction to Forced Migration.

Our academic team are actively involved in shaping the global debate on many of these issues and will guide you through the modules with creative learning methods, feedback and advice.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Some of our students have already worked in an international relations environment while others are looking to start a career in the area.

Many aspire to work for the United Nations or to develop a career in international policy or development at a government level. Some have used the skills they have developed on the course to forge careers in local as well as national government.

Our course will give you the advanced skills to take your career to a new level. You will also learn how to work in an international environment and how to influence the debate.

MODULES

Critical Theories International Relations (core)
Global Environmental Politics (core)
Qualitative Research Methods for Social Scientists (core)
Cultural Encounters in International Relations (optional)
Introduction to Forced Migration (optional)
Migration, Citizenship and Social Policy (optional)
War and Human Rights (optional)
Current Issues and Research in International Law (optional)
Law and Policy in the Middle East (optional)
Dissertation (core)

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Our social world is changing all the time and there is a growing demand by employers for expert social researchers. This course is designed to give you the extra edge needed in a competitive job market. Read more
Our social world is changing all the time and there is a growing demand by employers for expert social researchers. This course is designed to give you the extra edge needed in a competitive job market.

UEL offers you a unique chance to study sociology at a university based at the heart of an area experiencing the quickest rate of social change in Europe. You will benefit from being taught by academic staff at the cutting edge of research who have excellent links to the communities developing around the campus.

We will introduce you to a variety of research methods and topics of study and give you advanced training in key sociological theories to enhance your understanding of the changes and crises associated with the modern era.

The course uniquely encourages students to consider contemporary debates through an attention to the local area and includes opportunities to carry out research in collaboration with organisations and research partners.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

During this one-year course (or two years part-time) you will receive advanced training in social research and sociological theory as well as furthering your understanding of key substantive areas of research such as urban change, class, gender, race, terrorism, nationalism and social policy.

You will also have the opportunity to carry out an original piece of research under the close supervision of one of our faculty members.

The course is designed to give you the opportunity to:
• Acquire postgraduate training in sociology and allied social sciences, particularly in relation to social research methods and theory development;
• Gain an understanding of how debates in sociology relate to local and global social contexts, as well as historical and contemporary events;
• Acquire the skills and training necessary for a wide range of employment opportunities in social research and analysis;
• Gain the knowledge and credentials necessary to conduct doctoral study in sociology and other social science disciplines.
You will complete one optional module and core modules on Theorising Modernity, Understanding Crises, Framing Questions, Locating Research and Themes and Issues in Sociology as well as writing a master’s dissertation.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Graduates with social science master’s degrees are in high demand. According to recent data, social science graduates are more likely to be in paid employment than arts or science graduates, and more likely to be in managerial roles.

This new course provides graduates with the research skills and expertise needed to respond to a wide range of employment opportunities in diverse sectors.

This includes helping local and national governments seeking to understand the impact of policy decisions, working with NGOs who are looking to inform the public about neglected aspects of society or advising corporations on how to market their products effectively.

Our academic team are involved in groundbreaking research in key areas of sociology, including culture, nationalism, race, ethnicity, gender, class and social change.

They have excellent contacts, too, which will enable you to learn practical skills in the heart of east London. We have embedded our learning and research practice in the rapid changes and complex relations of this urban laboratory.

This is a unique opportunity to develop and refine your skills of research, analysis and collaboration in an environment that reflects some of the most pressing social questions of our time. You will be well prepared for your new role and future career.

MODULES

Theorising Modernity, Understanding Crises (core)
Framing Questions, Locating Research (core)
Themes and Issues in Sociology (core)
Critical Theories of International Relations (optional)
Global Environmental Politics (optional)
Introduction to Forced Migration (optional)
Current Issues in Forced Migration (optional)
Landscapes of power and rights (optional)
Masters Dissertation (core)

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MA Development Journalism is an interdisciplinary course offered jointly by LSBU’s School of Arts and Creative Industries and School of Law and Social Sciences. Read more
MA Development Journalism is an interdisciplinary course offered jointly by LSBU’s School of Arts and Creative Industries and School of Law and Social Sciences. It brings together our established expertise in Development Studies with our industry-informed provision in journalism education.

Development issues such as migration, poverty, the environment, aid and governance are increasingly relevant in journalism, and this course develops a theoretical understanding of these issues alongside practical journalism skills.

The course also provides you with a solid grounding in key theories, concepts and debates around development and contemporary development journalism. It offers hands-on practical professional training in broadcast and podcast radio journalism, equipping you with skills in audio production, interview techniques, editing, mixing and ‘live’ studio operation.

The course also provides training in research methods, enabling you to become an effective researcher in the field of development journalism.

You'll have access to our new media facilities in Elephant Studios at LSBU. See website for more details:

http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/development-journalism-ma#course_tab_overview

Modules

Contemporary issues in development
Researching the media industries
Development journalism
Radio production for development journalism
Dissertation

Plus one optional module from:

International law and human rights
Human development in a globalised world
Forced migration and human rights
Forced migration and development

All modules are assessed by coursework.

Teaching and learning

Class contact time is typically ten hours per week plus tutorials and independent study. You'll have access to LSBU's Moodle Virtual Learning Environment, where you can access electronic versions of core texts and other resources.

Facilities

Keyworth Arts and Media Centre

Our Keyworth Arts and Media Centre has eight laboratories holding 123 Apple G5 Intel computers that run all the major software packages you'd expect to find in a professional environment, from Apple Final Cut Studio and Autodesk 3DS Max to Virtools and istopmotion.

Employability

A humanities Masters opens up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Previous Development Studies students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation. Many students take up posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations, or with non-governmental development organisations in the UK, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in development research and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. Read more
This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. It's one of few programmes worldwide to offer you the chance to study the main characteristics of modern forms of slavery, their causes/roots, impacts, and ways (legal and others) of fighting/preventing them.

The degree is unique in examining, in an interdisciplinary manner, the intersection between human trafficking and migratory flows, and forced labour, and organised crime.

The programme combines vocational and theoretical components. You'll study the social conditions in which human trafficking occurs, including wealth, social and gender inequalities; migration due to political instability, war and poverty; and the role of criminal gangs and organised crime groups in the proliferation of this crime in recent years. The modus operandi of traffickers and their networks will be explored as will the challenges raised by the role in family members and communities in this increasingly complex issue.

You'll also engage critically with existing legal frameworks and policing in place to combat human trafficking. The degree also offers te chance to examine different discourses used to analyse the issue including debates about terminology, media representations, effectiveness of anti-trafficking policies and the efficacy of rescue and rehabilitation programmes.

Why St Mary's?

The MA programme is part of a wider commitment to addressing modern slavery and human trafficking through the work of the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery, established at St Mary’s in 2015. The Centre was founded to develop an evidence based response to addressing the current intensification of human trafficking and slavery cases globally. It is part of the Santa Marta Group and has links to many external partners including Kevin Hyland, the UK’s first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner and Visiting Professor at St Mary’s University, policy makers, police, other academic institutions, safe houses, campaigners, international organizations and NGOs. Students on the MA in Human Trafficking, Migration and Organised Crime will have access to the resources of the centre, including cutting edge research and lectures by high profile experts in the field.

An inaugural conference, which took place in February 2017, was the first of an annual event, organised by the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery. With the aim of using research to fill the knowledge and evidence gaps experienced by policymakers and practitioners, the conference provides a space to promote debate and encourage collaboration on addressing the subject of human trafficking and modern slavery, with contributions from UK and international experts. Discussions between policymakers, practitioners and researchers will identify evidence gaps and tailor research to these needs. All MA students will be encouraged to engage with and contribute to future conferences and may choose to evaluate the experience and learning as part of their assessed work.

Course Content

All modules are listed on the St Mary's website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/human-trafficking

Career Prospects

This course will interest students who wish to pursue careers in the voluntary sector (in organisations that work with migrants and people who have been trafficked), in the public sector dealing with crime control and criminal justice, in law and human rights, and in campaigning and media. It will also appeal to people employed in professional and third sector organisations, such as police, health professionals, social workers and frontline support workers as part of their continuing professional development.

It will provide a critical and methodological platform for students who aim to extend their studies to doctoral level. And it will appeal to students who want to investigate the historical, social and cultural factors that contribute to the intersection of criminal justice, human trafficking and migration.

The Careers Service has more information on graduate careers and part-time work available during your course.

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The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. Read more
The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. With its emphasis on practice, the course offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the rapidly changing fields of development and emergencies.

The programme is targeted at those with, or seeking, careers in NGOs, bilateral or multilateral humanitarian, development and human rights agencies, or governmental and commercial organisations working in international development.

This programme is run by the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP), which is based within the School of Architecture.

Why choose this course?

This programme has an international reputation for excellence. It is based on the expertise developed at Oxford Brookes University in the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice. You will have the option of going on a field trip. Previous trips have been to Asia, Africa and Latin America. Many graduates go on to secure senior positions with international development or emergency organisations.

This course in detail

This Course requires 200 hours of student input, up to 40 hours of which will be devoted to lectures, seminars, or individual tutorials. The remainder of the time is devoted to self-led study. For the postgraduate certificate it is compulsory to pass the core module, Critical Inquiry, Development and Emergencies: Theory and Policy, and pass other modules to achieve a total of 60 credits. For the postgraduate diploma you must pass 120 credits from the taught modules, including both compulsory modules. For the MA you must gain at least 180 credits, including the dissertation.

As courses are reviewed regularly the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here.
-Critical Inquiry Development & Emergencies: Theory and Policy (compulsory 20 credits)
-Human Rights & Governance (optional 20 credits)
-Disasters, Risk, Vulnerability and Climate Change (optional 20 credits)
-The Refugee Experience: Forced migration, protection and humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Conflict, Violence and Humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Shelter after Disaster (optional 20 credits)
-Programming and Partnerships (optional 10 credits)
-Improving Humanitarian Action: Responding to crisis in 21st Century (optional 10 credits)
-Working with Conflict (optional 10 credits)
-Independent Study (optional 10 credits)
-Research Methods (optional 10 credits)
-Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning strategies are grounded in theory, case studies and field based experience. The programme concentrates on the development of intellectual knowledge and the cultivation of academic skills including synthesis, analysis, interpretation, understanding and judgement. The programme also focuses on the practitioner’s approach, with reference in particular to:
-The setting in which they work (poverty, conflict, power, vulnerability, capability, risk, urbanisation, environmental change and the history and dynamics of particular places, their people and their society).
-The set of approaches they adopt (community mobilisation, aid, human rights advocacy, governance, risk reduction, livelihoods, humanitarian protection, accompaniment and empowerment).
-Themselves (the personal motivations that drive and shape their own vocation, their particular personality, temperament, strengths, abilities and weaknesses).

The intention is that a deeper understanding of these factors will enable students to move beyond rigid professional boxes to become more self aware, knowledge based practitioners able to work flexibly around a variety of problems in different situations of poverty, armed conflict and disaster.

Careers and professional development

The course is an ideal platform for you to develop your career in, or move into, international development and emergency organisations. Many graduates are able to secure senior positions.

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