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Masters Degrees (Food Security And Development)

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About the course. -Provides a multidisciplinary understanding of food production, access and use. -Analysis of the complex challenges faced by developing countries. Read more
About the course:
-Provides a multidisciplinary understanding of food production, access and use
-Analysis of the complex challenges faced by developing countries
-Option to enrol in free, complementary Innovative Food Systems Teaching and Learning (IFSTAL) programme
-Prepares you for a range of career options in international food and development sectors
-Suitable for graduates from most disciplines

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

-Agriculture in the Tropics
-Food Security and Development
-Global Issues in Nutrition and Health
-Perspectives on Development
-Policy Analysis
-Research and Study Skills for Independent Learning

WHAT CAREER CAN YOU HAVE?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae

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This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as:

• Almost one in eight people around the world are chronically undernourished;
• Recurrent food price spikes;
• Socio-political unrest;
• Climate change;
• Land degradation;
• Scarcity of natural resources; and
• Decline in rural communities and livelihoods.

Why study Global Food Security and Development at NTU?

• Staff expertise in global agriculture, food security, environmental management, sustainability, international relations and geography
• International links with organisations such as the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly family atmosphere
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus within the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences – a leading land-based education provider for over 60 years

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This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as:

• Almost one in eight people around the world are chronically undernourished;
• Recurrent food price spikes;
• Socio-political unrest;
• Climate change;
• Land degradation;
• Scarcity of natural resources; and
• Decline in rural communities and livelihoods.

Why study Global Food Security and Development at NTU?

• Staff expertise in global agriculture, food security, environmental management, sustainability, international relations and geography
• International links with organisations such as the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly family atmosphere
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus within the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences – a leading land-based education provider for over 60 years

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• Identifying the processes and dynamics of technological and non-technological innovations in agrifood systems and assessing the impacts of such innovations on food security Dr Mofa Islam.
• Assessing the demands for emerging agrifood technologies Dr Mofa Islam.
• Analysing the characteristics of global agrifood trade networks and their role in food security Dr Mofa Islam.
• Statistical modelling of food purchasing, consumption, and waste management behaviour Dr Mofa Islam.
• Assessing the vulnerability and resilience of agrifood systems and identifying the contributing factors Dr Mofa Islam.
• Assessing the roles of social, economic and political institutions in food security Dr Mofa Islam.
• Discourse analysis of media representations of food security issues Dr Mofa Islam.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

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Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. Read more

Local food security in a globalising world

Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. rising/falling temperatures, droughts and floods, diseases and pests), market tendencies, insufficient access to food for households, unequal distribution of resources and opportunities and inadequate food distribution channels, prevent the realisation of this idealistic and often oversimplified term.

Despite a growing number of large-scale, high-external input farms and enough food production to feed the world, post-harvest losses result in less optimal yields and (locally) produced foods are often used for other purposes, such as animal feed or biofuel. Consequentially, 795 million1 undernourished people around the globe do not have access to this lost and wasted food.

Ensuring access to food for everyone is the key to ending hunger, which will require improved collaboration between various stakeholders - producer (organisations), the private sector, governments, traders and development organisations. Structures, policies and programmes must be continuously adapted to a variety of external factors, such as the economy, environment and current social structures. Rethinking of informal rules and habits is another essential step in attaining food security, considering even members of the same household are not guaranteed equal access to food. In light of these external factors and challenges, this specialisation presents various interventions needed to combat hunger and ensure food security for everyone.

Competences

At graduation, you will have the ability to:
• define the economic, commercial and marketing needs, constraints and opportunities of those in rural communities who produce for local and regional markets
• analyse food security at a local and global level
• apply tools for diagnosing food security
• analyse the livelihoods of farmers who produce for local and regional markets and understand farmers' coping strategies
• select, explain and design an appropriate development intervention leading to food security
• develop support programmes for farmers, producers and other groups
• mainstream food security within Agricultural and rural development programmes
• define the economic, commercoal and marketing needs, constraints and oppertunities for small-scale producers in rural communities
• formulate and recommend any organisational adjustments that are needed within service-delivery organisations.

Career opportunities

Rural Development and Food Security specialists explore effective responses to mal- and undernourishment, by defining needs, constraints, coping strategies and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities. In selecting appropriate context-specific interventions, which reflect understanding of the local context in its wider context, they consider stakeholder relationships and how collaboration could be organised to each stakeholder’s benefit while helping farmers to safeguard their ability to ensure local food security. In the face of globalisation, slow economic growth and political instability, specialists may design and implement responses for (non-)governmental organisations or partners in the private sector, in the form of projects, programmes, market structures or policies.

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This degree focuses on food analysis and food microbiology as well as product development and quality control. You'll be taught by members of staff who are active within the Institute of Food Science and Technology, and are regularly involved in the food industry as expert consultants. Read more
This degree focuses on food analysis and food microbiology as well as product development and quality control. You'll be taught by members of staff who are active within the Institute of Food Science and Technology, and are regularly involved in the food industry as expert consultants. You'll also learn from our food business development colleagues to gain experience in the industry through work placements. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

This food science degree provides advanced study opportunities that build on your previous experience in an appropriate first degree course enabling the upgrade of existing qualifications, while also developing knowledge and skills.

The course team has particular expertise in food analysis, food microbiology and including food safety, spoilage and fermentations, product development and quality control, as well as an excellent understanding of food sustainability, food policy and nutrition.

This expertise is reflected in the range of modules offered in the MSc with analytical facilities available for study and research, and opportunities to be involved in food analysis, food product development and food manufacturing projects.

The Microbiology Research Unit team provides vital support and research topics for the dissertation element of the course and other staff members are involved in food manufacturing consultancy. London Metropolitan University has an excellent research profile, with food science staff publishing in highly rated journals and supervising PhD students appearing on radio and television as experts.

The structure of the course gives you the essential knowledge and skills for your future career. You can choose to emphasise laboratory-based subjects such as food microbiology and food analysis or areas such as quality assurance or food production and development including sensory analysis. The course develops your knowledge of food manufacturing and processing, analysis and testing packaging, storage, distribution, legal aspects, sustainability and food security.

You'll ultimately become an independent researcher or potential manager, with the ability to critically evaluate food science and apply it to new situations, following either an academic or an industrial related career path.

The assessment strategy for this course not only assesses your knowledge, understanding and abilities but provides a wide range of experience particularly in key skill areas to prepare you for your future career in different areas of the food industry.

You'll gain experience in critical analysis, literature searches, poster presentations, data handling, and analysis and practical skills. Assessments comprise of written assignments, laboratory logs and poster presentations, and there are two exams. Students undertake a research project and submit a final dissertation that is defended in an oral exam.

Professional accreditation

The course is fully accredited by the Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST). Students are encouraged to join the IFST as associate members and to attend meetings or industrial visits that the Institute organises. They may transfer to full membership after graduation and a period of professional experience. Membership of IFST allows access to specialist publications, meetings and an international network of food scientists and technologists.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Food Analysis (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Food Processing (core, 20 credits)
-Food Microbiology and Safety (core, 20 credits)
-Food Product Development and Sensory Analysis (core, 20 credits)
-Food Safety and Quality Management (core, 20 credits)
-Food Science Research Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Scientific Research Methodology (core, 20 credits)
-Food Science Industrial Placement (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The food industry is the UK’s largest manufacturing sector and there is a massive demand for qualified professionals. The skills and knowledge developed in your MSc will enhance your career opportunities in food and related industries including manufacturing, product development, marketing, environmental health, consultancy, research or education. Graduates are also well prepared for research and for postgraduate study (PhD). Interview practice with industry support and CV development is also integrated into the course.

Our recent MSc graduates have gone on to join the following positions and companies:
-Food technologist – Haydens Bakery
-Technical legislation coordinator – United Biscuits
-Process development – Bakkavor
-Technical team member – Food Partners Group
-Quality control – Nestlé
-Nutritionist and quality analyst – Krush Global
-Business development manager – Kerry Group
-Consumer technologist – Wealmoor Ltd
-Microbiology technician – GlaxoSmithKline
-Confectionary development – Sainsbury’s
-Technical team manager – Nature’s Way Foods
-Lecturers and researchers – London Metropolitan University, Coventry University, Kyushu University, University of Trinidad and Tobago, University of Melbourne

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The MSc programme Food Safety focuses on the technical aspects, as well as on the legal aspects of food safety and integrates these in Food Safety Management. Read more

MSc Food Safety

The MSc programme Food Safety focuses on the technical aspects, as well as on the legal aspects of food safety and integrates these in Food Safety Management. The Food Safety programme of Wageningen University was the first MSc in Food Safety worldwide. The programme is unique, with a highly integrated approach to the field of food safety.

Programme summary

Wageningen University is one of the few universities in Europe able to offer education and research in all fields of food safety. This does not only include technical disciplines such as microbiology and toxicology, but also the legal, economic and communication aspects. The Food Safety programme at Wageningen University is one of the most modern and innovative in the world. Started in 2000 as the first of its kind, it is still the only two-year, full-time Master Food Safety programme offered in Europe and the only programme offering Food Safety Law. The programme prepares graduates for careers in the food industry, government or consumer organisations; the three key players in international food safety management.

The food industry is increasingly confronted with farm-to-table food safety measures, regulations, legislation and guidelines aimed at controlling food hazards. As a result, there is an increasing demand for managers with expertise in food safety evaluation who are able to survey and monitor the chemical, microbiological and physical parameters of product composition and product safety. Food safety experts are able to understand and analyse the variation in quality and safety of products. They are also able to assess the potential risks involved in the adoption of new production methods and processing techniques. Food safety evaluation concerns food constituents, agro-chemicals, environmental contaminants and natural toxins.

Food regulations are getting more and more complex, creating the need for regulatory affairs specialists in industry or in lobbying organisations. The programme is the only programme offering Food Safety Law for students with either a technical or a legal degree, thereby, fulfilling the need in society for such positions.

Specialisations

The programme offers three specialisations. All three specialisations have the courses on Food Safety Management and Food Law in common.

Applied Food Safety
This specialisation deals with the more technical (microbiology, toxicology, risk assessment) part of food safety. Food Safety Economics is also part of the programme. Thesis topics are also in these fields and graduates generally work in industry, universities and research institutes.

Food Safety Law
This specialisation is open for students with a technical or legal background. Courses focus on (international) food law, intellectual property rights and management. Theses are on food law. Graduates generally work as regulatory affairs specialists in industry.

Supply Chain Safety
This specialisation deals with safe food and ingredient supply. Globalisation leads to serious risks of contamination. In tropical countries, companies also face wars and political problems. Courses thus focus on Food Security, Risk Management in Food Chains and logistics, in addition to Microbiology and Food Law.

Your future career

The employment market is promising and all recent graduates found jobs with relative ease. The demand for university-trained professionals in this field is currently higher than the number of graduates available. Most recent graduates found jobs in the private sector, at universities or at food safety research institutes. Many graduates enter careers in government and go on to managerial positions. Due to the increased efforts of the EU in the development of national food safety organisations, there will be many more job opportunities in various European countries, both for technical as well as regulatory specialists.

Student Moath Almayman.
"The courses of the Master Food Safety consist of technical, managerial and legal aspects of food safety and are directly linked to real life situations. This in combination with the ability to perform extensive research and an internship at an international company to enhance my working experience, were reasons for me to choose this master. Even with a small population, Wageningen is a great cosmopolitan town. So many students from different backgrounds make it a very interesting place."

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Technology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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Food and drink manufacturing is vital to the UK economy. It is the single largest manufacturing sector in the UK, employing 15% of the entire manufacturing workforce. Read more
Food and drink manufacturing is vital to the UK economy. It is the single largest manufacturing sector in the UK, employing 15% of the entire manufacturing workforce.

Course details

Food and drink manufacturing companies make up 7% of all manufacturing businesses, and they buy two thirds of all the UK's agricultural produce. Food producers must address environmental concerns, social responsibility and economic viability when designing sustainable food processing techniques. Sustainable food processing is all about finding new ways of meeting present needs without compromising future viability in constantly changing economic and environmental conditions.

This is not just a corporate social responsibility issue but directly relates to efficiency, cost-saving and profitability and so the food industry must increasingly embrace sustainable food processing to succeed. The global food and agricultural biotechnology research base and product development pipeline, including genetically modified seeds, is expanding at a rapid rate as a direct response to the global food security challenge.

This innovative and topical programme is ideal for graduates new to this dynamic and exciting sector. It's also particularly suitable if you're seeking career enhancement by studying food science and biotechnology at master’s level. The programme will be of particular interest to graduates with an interest in developing knowledge and skills in subjects such as food biotechnology, food safety management and analytical techniques currently used in the food industry. It is also suitable if you already work in the industry and wish to develop your skills in these areas.

Teesside University’s School of Science & Engineering is highly praised for the links it maintains with local and national industries and businesses such as Marlow Foods (Quorn), SK Chilled Foods and Sainsbury’s. The commitment of the School to integrate with industry in the Tees Valley and beyond is reflected in the School’s record of producing employment-ready problem solvers and innovators. This postgraduate programme embeds key transferable skills through visits to industry and talks by industry speakers.

What you study

For the postgraduate diploma (PgDip) award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules. For an MSc award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project.

This programme develops comprehensive knowledge and understanding of food science and bioprocessing in the 21st century. As such it focuses on food production and processing, biotechnology and sustainability alongside food quality and supply chain management. You also have the option to explore food product development and enterprise, food microbiology and safety, or project management in great depth depending on your interest or desired career choice.

You are encouraged to take a voluntary placement within local industry to conduct real-world research projects.

Core modules
-Food Biotechnology
-Food Chemistry Composition and Analysis
-Food Product Design and Manufacturing Process Development
-Food Safety Engineering and Management

MSc only
-Project

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

Making the transition to postgraduate-level study can be challenging. Support with making this transition is seen as an important element of this programme.

Support is provided during the programme induction and within the module, Food Product Design and Manufacturing Processes. This support is designed to help you understand the requirements of academic study at postgraduate level, to enhance your skills in academic writing and referencing, and to help you develop the skills necessary to operate professionally, safely and ethically in planning and implementing a master’s-level research project.

By including work-based problem-solving projects and case study exercises this programme emphasises real-world working. This helps to blend theory and knowledge in the context of business, allowing you to develop the skills employers are seeking to set you on a successful career path.

A significant feature of the programme is the inclusion of blended learning to provide a rich and varied learning experience. This also provides additional flexibility if you are in employment.
On campus you have access to a dedicated food product development laboratory and a pilot-scale processing equipment facility, allowing you to gain valuable hands-on experience of food processing and product development. Fully equipped microbiological and chemical analysis laboratories enable you to undertake a series of relevant practical investigative projects, through which you explore a range of ingredients and food products.

You are assessed on subject knowledge, independent thought and skills acquisition through formative and summative assessment.

Assessment may include:
-Examinations
-Oral presentations
-Technical interviews
-Technical reports
-Laboratory reports
-Literature surveys, evaluations and summaries
-Dissertation or thesis (MSc only)

You are presented with an assessment schedule providing details of the submission deadlines for summative assessments.

Employability

Food and drink manufacturing is vital to the UK economy. It is the single largest manufacturing sector in the UK, employing 15% of the entire manufacturing workforce. Food and drink manufacturing companies make up 7% of all manufacturing businesses, and they buy two thirds of all the UK’s agricultural produce. The industry generates 18% of total manufacturing turnover.

To meet the demands of this dynamic sector, the food industry needs to recruit more than 49,000 new skilled professionals and managers by 2022 which is great news for the next generation of talent wanting to study toward a rewarding career in a dynamic and highly innovative sector (The National Skills Academy for Food & Drink).

Graduates can seek jobs in many areas in the food sector including:
-Food analysis
-New product development
-Quality management and food safety management
-Food production management
-Technical management.

There may be short-term placement opportunities for some students, particularly during the project phase of the course.

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There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. Read more

Food security: a global concern

There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. The Royal Society report Reaping the Benefits: science and the sustainable intensification of global agriculture published in October 2009, provided the clearest evidence of the challenge of ensuring global food security during the next 50 years. Crop yields need to rise significantly, but in a manner that requires much lower dependency on chemical intervention and fertilisers.

Meeting the challenge of sustainable agriculture

This programme was developed in collaboration with the agricultural industry, government agencies including Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), and farmers and food manufacturers, to provide a multi-disciplinary training in sustainable agriculture and global food security. Research-led teaching in molecular plant pathology, plant sciences and microbiology is strongly supplemented by Rothamsted Research, North Wyke expertise in grassland management, soil science and sustainable farming systems. Leading social scientists also provide valuable input in rural land use and the rural economy. The combination of expertise in both arable and pastureland systems ensures a truly rounded learning experience.

The curriculum takes account of the key skills shortages in the UK to train highly skilled individuals who can enter government agencies, agriculture and food industries and fulfil very valuable roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security. The programme provides opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences including field trips.

Expert teaching

Teaching is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry. Scientific staff from Fera provide specialist lectures as part of the Crop Security module, members of the Plant Health Inspectorate cover field aspects of plant pathology, and a LEAF1 farmer addresses agricultural systems and the realities of food production using integrated farm management. In addition, teaching staff from the University and BBSRC Rothamsted-North Wyke will draw on material and experiences from their academic research and scientific links with industry.

Industrial and practical experience

All students will have opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences. Teaching visits will be made to the Plant Health Inspectorate in Cornwall to see quarantine management of Phytophthora, and to a local LEAF farm to review the challenges and approaches to food production in integrated farm management systems. You will gain specialised experience in practical science or policy making through a dissertation or project placement with external agencies. Defra and Fera, for example, are offering five dissertation and/or project placements annually.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of modules. The list of modules may include the following; Professional Skills; Research Project; Sustainable Land Use in Grassland Agriculture; Crop Security; Sustainable Livestock and Fisheries; Political Economy of Food and Agriculture and Research and Knowledge Transfer for Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. Please see the website for an up to date list (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/biosciences/foodsecurity/#Programme-structure)

Addressing a skills shortage to tackle global food security

The MSc Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture curriculum has been designed in collaboration with the agricultural industry to tackle the skills shortage that exists in this vital interdisciplinary area. This programme will provide the highly skilled individuals required in government agencies, agriculture and food industries for critical roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security.

Global horizons

With food security and sustainable agriculture a global concern, opportunities for specialists in the areas of agronomy, plant pathology, plant disease and plant improvement will be worldwide. By combining expertise across the natural, social and political sciences, this programme provides valuable interdisciplinary knowledge and skills in both arable and pastureland systems. Graduates will be prepared to take on the global challenges of food security and sustainable agriculture, being able to adapt to farming systems across the world and identify cross-disciplinary solutions to local agricultural problems.

Learning enhanced by industry

The programme is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry, with specialist lectures, teaching visits to observe the practical application of techniques, and industrial placement opportunities for project work or dissertations in practical science or policy making.

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Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Read more

Introduction

Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Seafood products are provided by both aquaculture and capture fisheries and are one of the most highly traded food products globally. Including seafood in our daily diet provides an affordable source of macro and micronutrients required for optimal human health and development.
This course is designed to introduce the global issues affecting seafood production and trading, and will promote an understanding of the key factors affecting aquatic food production, post-harvest protocols, post-mortem metabolic events and microbial/chemical processes key for food safety and quality. Sensory assessment and shelf-life extension technologies will also be covered. The course will also examine other key issues in seafood trading such as traceability systems, certifications as well as the impact of governance and legislation on the global seafood sector.
This is the only aquatic food security MSc currently available in the UK. It will comprehensively follow the food chain from production through to consumer health and welfare.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Rachel Norman

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

This course shares some modules with the MSc in Sustainable Aquaculture and there is flexibility within the system to change the degree title depending on what advanced modules are taken. The course is divided into four taught modules, containing 18 subject areas or topics, and a single Research Project module.

Delivery and assessment

In addition to lectures, tutorials and seminars, a number of assignments must be completed. Laboratory-based practical sessions are also important elements of the course. Taught module assessment is continuous, involving short tests, seminars, essays, practical reports, critical and computational analysis, field assignments and set project reports. The Research Project module is examined through written dissertation and seminar presentations by both supervisors and an external examiner.

Modes of study

The course is available on a block-release basis (by selecting individual or a series of modules) over a period not exceeding five academic years.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

The Institute of Aquaculture, with a rating of 2.45 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), was graded the top aquaculture department in the UK.

Strengths

This MSc brings a unique perspective to the expertise that already exists in Stirling on global seafood production. It is the only MSc in the UK that focusses on how seafood can contribute to global food security.
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries and this will provide students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector.
We also have links within Asia and Europe which will allow the opportunity to undertake the Research Project overseas.

Academic strengths

The Institute of Aquaculture has been closely associated with the global expansion of aquaculture initially through developing and improving the existing production systems and the development of new farmed species. In recent years our research has focused on increasing the sustainability and reducing the environmental impact of these activities. In addition, we have recently invested in new posts in Aquatic Food Security whose activities also include research into food safety and quality post harvest, aquatic animal nutrition, as well as developing mathematical models of production systems. We therefore have expertise that covers the whole production cycle from farm to fork.
The Institute of Aquaculture is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and is one of only a handful of institutions devoted to aquatic food security. The goal is to develop and promote aquatic food security building on the Institute staff expertise in sustainable aquatic animal production.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
Demand for well qualified postgraduates to contribute to food production and the supply chain will continue to increase in line with demand to double food production over the coming decades. This course provides each student with the appropriate knowledge and practical experience important for a career in aquatic food security. The course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Employability
This course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Industry connections
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries which provides students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector. We also have links within Asia and Europe which allows the opportunity to undertake the research project overseas.

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The Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development aims to equip you with the marketing, organisational and management skills you will need to make innovative contributions to the development of local economies, with particular emphasis on co-operatives, social enterprises and food businesses in Ireland and overseas. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development aims to equip you with the marketing, organisational and management skills you will need to make innovative contributions to the development of local economies, with particular emphasis on co-operatives, social enterprises and food businesses in Ireland and overseas.

It is aimed at graduates from a wide range of disciplines who are interested in careers in co-operative organisations, food marketing or rural development. The Postgraduate Diploma is a full-time course that extends over 9 months. It leads to a one year MSc (masters by research) in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development in a second year.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckp01/

Course Details

This course takes an interdisciplinary, problem-centred approach to teaching and learning. It also integrates an eight week work placement, giving you the opportunity to travel if you want to. You are qualified to take up a wide range of employment opportunities on graduation.

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The Postgraduate Diploma uses a unique combination of teaching and learning methods and emphasises practical skills and learning as well as developing a solid grounding in theoretical and applied concepts. This includes lectures, ‘capstone’ seminars (involving interactive staff and student discussion and debate), field visits, case study analysis, project-based fieldwork (one week is spent conducting research in a designated location on a designated topic), analysis of new food products in class, guest lectures, group work and web-based resources.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development is delivered over 9 months.

Core Modules

Students take 50 credits as follows:

FE6109 Co-operative Organisation: Theory and Concepts (10 credits)
FE6111 Co-operative Organisation: Theoretical Application and Practice (5 credits)
FE6112 Rural Development: Theory and Practice (10 credits)
FE6113 Rural Development: Application and Practice (5 credits)
FE6115 Food Marketing and the Consumer (5 credits)
FE6116 Marketing Strategies for Local Development (5 credits)
FE6104*Practical Training Placement (10 credits) - Students will be placed for a minimum of eight weeks during the Summer in a relevant work environment.

*As part of FE6104 Practical Training Placement, a report must be submitted for the Autumn Examination on a date specified at the beginning of the academic year. Programme leadership will be provided by the Department/Associate School of Food Business and Development in association with the Centre for Co-operative Studies.

Elective Modules

Students take 10 credits from the following:

FE6114 Introduction to Food Marketing (5 credits) (for students who have not previously studied Marketing) OR
FE4205 Consumer Behaviour in Food Markets (5 credits) (for students who have previously studied marketing)
AND
FE4002 Global Food Policy (5 credits) OR
FE4008 Food Security and the Developing World (5 credits) OR
any other 5-credit module which may be made available by the School of Food Science, depending on the prior qualifications and interests of each student and subject to the approval of the Programme Leader.

Further details on the content and modules are available on the Postgraduate College Calendar - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/PGDiplomas/food/page01.html

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of continuous assessment – e.g. essays, case studies, group work, project work, presentations, reflective journal – and end-of-year written examinations.

Careers

This course provides a good critical education for those entering into a wide range of administrative, business and personnel appointments in the private, public and third sectors. It also offers a thorough and stimulating grounding in organisational studies to anybody interested in pursuing an academic career in this field.

Examples of employment destinations of graduates include Bord Bia, Concern, local authorities, Food Safety Authority, LEADER companies, VEC, HSE, IRCSET, Farm Relief Services, teaching, financial services and many more.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century. Read more

Programme description

Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century.

This programme is not suitable for applicants pursuing a career in food science or food safety/hygiene or related areas. Please read the programme description and ensure you understand the nature of the programme before you apply. Applicants who do not show a clear understanding of the programme will not be accepted.

Food security has become a critically important issue for societies around the globe. Interactions between demographics, changes in diet, trade liberalisation, an increased focus on conservation, technological innovations including GM crops, the impact of climate change and new responses to climate change resource limitations (particularly in terms of energy, water and nutrients) all affect food security.

With such a rapid growth in this area, there is an increasing demand for qualified experts to contribute to policy creation and legislation in food production and the supply chain.

This unique MSc offers students the scope and multidisciplinary approach to address all of these issues, as well as an understanding of the technical, agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security.

This programme is run in collaboration with Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC).

Programme structure

This MSc programme consists of six taught courses over two semesters, and an individual dissertation project of about 12,000 words.

Compulsory courses typically include*:
•Frameworks to Assess Food Security
•Sustainability of Food Production
•Interrelationships in Food Systems
•Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses*. We particularly recommend:
•Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
•Ecosystem Services 1: Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
•Foundations in Ecological Economics
•Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
•Integrated Resource Management
•Principles of Environmental Sustainability
•Soil Protection and Management
•Understanding Environment and Development
•Marine Systems and Policies
•Applications in Ecological Economics
•Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
•Integrated Resource Planning
•Interrelationships in Food Systems
•Land Use/Environmental Interactions
•Case Studies in Sustainable Development
•Ecosystem Services 2: Ecosystem Values and Management
•Environmental Impact Assessment
•Soil Science Concepts and Application

*Please note: courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change each year.

Field trip

Provisionally in Italy, the field trip provides an opportunity to apply some of the principles of food security to real world scenarios.

Learning outcomes

Students will be able to:

•Provide a broad understanding of agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security
•Apply scientific information and methods in the analysis of complex problems
•Formulate a research problem and independently carry out the research needed to produce an appropriate solution in a range of scientific or policy contexts
•Enhance their skills in specialist topics related to food security

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme typically go on to work in government and non-governmental agencies as well as international bodies and businesses where they can utilise the invaluable, and highly prized, skills they have acquired on the programme, such as food security assessment.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.
https://edingeoscistudents.wordpress.com/

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MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of topics supported by research active academic staff. We conduct research in all areas of food and society, including subjects which require collaboration between the social and natural sciences, and translate research into policy recommendations. Read more

Course Description

MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of topics supported by research active academic staff. We conduct research in all areas of food and society, including subjects which require collaboration between the social and natural sciences, and translate research into policy recommendations.

Our research primarily involves food systems, food consumption and food marketing:
•consumer studies in food, food provisioning and behaviour change
•perceived risk associated with food and food production
•food supply chains and territorial development
•international political economy of food and agriculture
•risk-benefit communication
•acceptance of novel food and technologies within the value chain

Opportunities are available for postgraduate research in the following areas.

Understanding and measuring societal and individual responses to risks and benefits
•food, nutrition and healthy dietary choices
•sustainable consumption and the reduction of food waste
•food safety and authenticity throughout the supply chain
•emerging food technologies

Developing new methodologies for assessing socio-economic impacts of food risks and communication strategies and other public health interventions related to food choice
•systematic review
•evidence synthesis
•systems thinking
•Bayesian networks
•rapid evidence assessment

Employing qualitative and quantitative methodologies to understand attitudes and behaviours related to food
•microbiological food hazards
•personalised nutrition
•food authenticity
•societal and consumer responses to emerging food production technologies
•behaviour change in relation to food
•food waste

Stakeholder analysis and effectiveness of public engagement
•research agenda setting
•policy and governance, in the area of emerging food technologies
•food and agricultural policy issues

Integrating social and natural science into the development of predictive models of food security to provide evidence for policy translation in the agrifood sector.
•Bayesian networks
•systems thinking

Find out more about the work of the Agr-Food and Society research group.

Modules

See our Prospectus online.

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International Security, a specialization of the master International Relations, is aimed at issues of power politics and international order, peace and war, and strategy and diplomacy. Read more
International Security, a specialization of the master International Relations, is aimed at issues of power politics and international order, peace and war, and strategy and diplomacy. Its main focus is the phenomenon of, and theoretical reflection on, 'violence' in its broader context.

Traditionally, attention for warfare and political violence, i.e. military security, has dominated the study of International Security. They still form the central issues. But especially after the Cold War other concerns occupy the agenda, such as environmental security (about climate change or industrial hazards), societal security (about group identities) and economic security (about welfare and development). These different types of concerns have their own meaning when studying the causes of violent conflict, its prevention and management, and conflict resolution and reconciliation.

Methodologically, the study of International Security has profited from the so-called constructivist turn in International Relations. In addition to traditional analyses new approaches have emerged, most notably Critical Security Studies, the Copenhagen School, and the Risk Society approach.

Why in Groningen?

The Master's specialization International Security: (a) pays attention to the theoretical developments as well as the dimensions of the contemporary security agenda; (b) offers a research-led and policy-oriented curriculum taught by a committed staff; (c) includes a career-oriented internship that prepares graduates for the labour market; and (d) provides an excellent preparation for positions at a broad variety of security-oriented and conflict-management related institutions.

Job perspectives

The Master's specialization is broad in scope and gives students a solid foundation in international relations. There is consequently a wide range of employment opportunities for International Relations graduates. The most obvious profession is a policy advisor, but you could also become a researcher, lobbyist, diplomat, or PR officer. You can work in international business, non-profit or government organizations, in the media, and at a university or a private research institute.

Research International Security

The chairgroup International Security Studies (ISS) is part of the Department of IRIO. The six permanent staff members and over 10 PhD students all contribute to the Faculty's research theme Conflict Studies. This is done at various levels of abstraction, focusing on various issue-areas and on various political contexts.

At the theoretical level the chairgroup aims to contribute to a better understanding of conceptualizations of security in time and space. How have academic debates in security studies evolved and how do they relate to security policies? This implies a focus on securitization theory, regional security complex theory, strategic studies, critical security studies and peace research.
In terms of issue-areas the group presently studies developments in military & defence policies, terrorism, peace making, peace building &peace keeping - including security sector reform -, societal security in relation to social identities and state formation, and finally securitization in energy, food, and health policies.
In terms of political contexts, the group focuses on institutional and regional settings in which security policies are shaped and implemented. Developments in Intergovernmental Organizations are studied - notably, in the European Union, NATO and the United Nations Security Council, and also in Non-Governmental Organizations in close cooperation with the research projects related to the Network on Humanitarian Action. The chairgroup has regional expertise about security politics in Europe (including Turkey), the Middle East, parts of Sub-Sahara Africa, and China.

The chairgroup brings much of its research interests together in the specialization International Security of the MA degree program IRIO.

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If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies. Read more

MSc International Development Studies

If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies.

The International Development Studies programme allows you to develop a critical understanding of development theories. You will learn to plan and conduct research. You acquire the skills to translate your finding into development policies, intervention strategies and institutional innovations. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams.

Programme summary

This programme deals with worldwide processes of development and change related to livelihoods, agro-food networks and the environment in a dynamic international context. Special attention is given to exclusion processes, equity, unequal access to resources and sustainability. Social, economic, political, technological, and environmental change is studied from various perspectives and at different levels. You will develop a critical understanding of recent development theories, learn to plan and conduct research, and acquire skills to translate research findings into recommendations for policies and intervention strategies. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams. Depending on your previous education, you can follow one of the specialisations. .

Specialisations

Students can choose one of the following three specialisations after consultation with the study advisor. The selected specialisation mainly depends on your academic background.

Sociology of Development
This specialisation focuses on social transformation processes, especially the local consequences of globalisation and environmental change, and the way people cope with uncertain circumstances. Themes studied include natural resource degradation, refugees, migration, post-disaster reconstruction, social unrest, poverty, and lack of access to resources crucial to the livelihoods of people. This specialisation applies sociological and anthropological perspectives to development problems with special attention given to understanding the differing interests and views of numerous actors. You can choose a major in Disaster Studies, Environmental Policy, Sociology of Development and Change, or Rural Sociology.

Economics of Development
The central themes in this specialisation are the role of agriculture in development, food security and the global food crisis, regional economic issues, sustainable use of natural resources, rural-urban income disparities, and issues related to poverty and the role of institutions. These themes are examined from a microeconomic perspective to gain insight into the behaviour of individuals and institutions, as well as from a macroeconomic perspective to obtain insight into development processes at regional and national levels. You can major in Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy, Development Economics, Environmental Economics and Natural Resources, or Regional Economics.

Communication, Technology and Policy
In this specialisation, social transformation and sustainable development are examined with a specific focus on communication, technological innovations, and policy processes. An important theme is how technologies and policies are developed in the interaction between various parties (e.g. governments, social organisations, and citizens) and the role of communication in these processes. Another theme is the relationship between technological change (in the agricultural and food sectors), institutional processes and social transformation. You can choose a major in Knowledge, Technology and Innovation, Law and Governance, or Strategic Communication.

Your future career

Graduates are employed in various (inter-) national organisations as a programme/ project coordinator, trainer, consultant, advisor, policymaker or researcher. You could work, for example, as policymaker in a government or semi-governmental institute, as programme coordinator or advisor in an international (non-)governmentalorganisation or (consultancy) company, or as researcher and/or teacher at a university or research institute. Examples of organisations include: FAO, World Bank, European Union, UTZ Certified, Oxfam Novib, Rabobank Foundation, CARE, Sustainalytics and UNICEF.

Alumnus Luckmore Jalisi.
“I have really benefitted from what I learnt during my studies. This master has opened doors for me." Luckmore did the specialisation Sociology of Development and conducted both his internship and thesis research in a refugee camp in Uganda. These experiences were important in getting him his job as Youth and Governance Advisor at ActionAid in Liberia. “I support postconflict youth development programmes based on a human rights approach, and develop monitoring & evaluation tools for governance and youth development work. I draw on the knowledge and skills acquired during my studies and my classmates from Wageningen remain valuable contacts in my network.”

Related programmes:
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
Health and Society (specialisation)
MSc Applied Communication Science
MSc International Land and Water Management
MSc Leisure, Tourism and Environment
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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Our course provides specialist skills and knowledge about the most important issues related to the sustainability of agricultural production and food security. Read more

Course overview

Our course provides specialist skills and knowledge about the most important issues related to the sustainability of agricultural production and food security. Our MSc is suitable if you have an interest in sustainable agriculture and food security and want to develop a broad knowledge of the subject.

Sustainable agriculture and food security focuses on the availability of food now and in the future: a major concern of scientific and commercial communities world-wide.

The prominence of this subject is driven by an increasing global population, pressure on non-renewable or scarce resources and a need to increase food production whilst minimising the impact on the environment.

The course covers all aspects of food security as outlined by Global Food Security, a multi-agency programme involving the main UK public sector funders of research and training related to food.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/sustainable-agriculture-food-security-msc/#modules

How to Apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/sustainable-agriculture-food-security-msc/#howtoapply

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