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Masters Degrees (Food Security)

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In this century, food security and the need to develop sustainable agriculture will become dominant issues affecting the whole world. Read more

In this century, food security and the need to develop sustainable agriculture will become dominant issues affecting the whole world. The global population is projected to increase dramatically from 7 to 9 billion in the next 30 years, causing an unprecedented demand for food and increased pressure on land. The aim of this Food Security Degree is to provide you with knowledge and skills relating to the broad topic of food security, incorporating socio-economic, animal and crop aspects. 

Why this programme

  • This exciting Food Security MSc is taught through collaboration between academics with world class expertise in diverse aspects of food security.
  • It discusses the demographic, social and economic issues, the challenges of achieving sustainable agriculture and presents the factors affecting food production from crops and animal sources.
  • The programme will include guest lectures on a range of topics and site visits.
  • Students will acquire knowledge of technology transfer and commercialisation.
  • Students will gain practical laboratory skills in molecular biology and in genetic modification.
  • Students will undertake a project that will develop their investigative skills and their ability to critically appraise and integrate information from different sources. 
  • A key feature of this Food Security degree is that it provides a very broad perspective on Food Security. 

Programme structure

We welcome students from diverse educational backgrounds and we anticipate that many will be unfamiliar with all the topics in this programme. We have therefore designed the programme so that it provides you with both a broad understanding of the major issues in food security and the opportunity to selectively focus on aspects of particular interest.

The programme is made up of courses totalling 180 credits. The programme starts with three compulsory courses (totalling 60 credits) that introduce fundamental issues in food security. You then choose from a range of optional courses (usually 10-credit) that expand on key topics, including production of food from animal sources and crop improvement. Some courses provide practical skills and there is an opportunity to learn about commercial issues relating to food production. Finally, you will undertake a 60-credit investigative project, which will allow you to focus on a selected topic.

The programme comprises the following courses:

Compulsory courses (totalling 60 credits)

  • Introduction to Food Security
  • Food Security Fundamentals: Food of Animal Origin
  • Food Security Fundamentals: Crops

Optional courses (totalling 60 credits*) selected from

  • Role of Insects in Food Security
  • Global Animal Production
  • Hygienic Production of Food
  • Animal Ethics
  • Policies for Sustainability and Development
  • Technology Transfer and Commercialisation
  • Plant Genetic Engineering
  • Crop Biotechnology Applications
  • Molecular Lab Skills
  • Omic Technologies
  • Production of Food from Animals
  • Quantitative Methods

*Most of the optional courses are 10 credit courses

Food security project (60 credits)

Teaching methods

Most courses are taught through lectures and tutorials, in which there will be discussion of key concepts, and training in the critical appraisal of published information. In addition, some courses include guest lectures and site visits. The course on Technology Transfer and Commercialisation of Bioscience Research will include workshop sessions. Two courses provide training in laboratory skills: Molecular Lab Skills and Plant Genetic Engineering. The project will involve an independent investigation of a selected topic in food security under supervision from an expert in the field.

Career prospects

Food security is a major challenge of this century and hence there will be opportunities to develop careers in several areas. Career prospects include working in Agri-industry, research institutes, government advisory, international advisory, media and research positions.

The breadth of knowledge, understanding and skills you will acquire in this Masters programme will help you obtain employment or undertake research in the food security sector.



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Food security is concerned with the availability, access, and utilisation of safe, nutritious and sustainable food to all, especially vulnerable groups within society. Read more

Food security is concerned with the availability, access, and utilisation of safe, nutritious and sustainable food to all, especially vulnerable groups within society. The challenges related to food are not only the existence of approximately 795 million undernourished people in the world (Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO)) but also the increasing presence of diet related non-communicable diseases (e.g. diabetes and heart disease); the contribution of agriculture to greenhouse gas emissions and land use change. Understanding the interconnection of food, health and the environment, as well as their trade-offs is vital to formulate policies that enable us to achieve food security in a sustainable manner. 

The MSc in Global Food Security and Nutrition recognises that food security concerns not only food policy and food production issues but other aspects such as land tenure, immigration, demographics, diet and nutrition, technology, natural resources (e.g., pressures on water and soil) and climate change. UoE and SRUC offer expertise and research on these topics, and the team have good working relationships with international organisations that are at the cutti g edge of addressing food security issues, such as FAO, World Food Programme (WFP) and the International Federation of Red Cross/Crescent.

Suitable participants include students with a background in agriculture, development, food systems or other food related studies, as well as professionals within a broad range of disciplines such as food production, distribution, policy, or international development. However, experience of a broad range of food and nutrition related topics will also be considered when applying.

Programme Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of, and critical evaluation and assessment of the main theories, principles and concepts related to agronomic, environmental, economic, nutritional, and socio-political factors that influence food security.
  • Apply food security and nutrition practical methods to scientific information and methods in the analysis of complex
  • Develop critical analysis skills to review complex issues relating to food security and nutrition, and formulate an original research problem and independently carry out the research needed to produce an appropriate solution in a range of scientific or policy contexts.
  • Apply and enhance a range of communication, ICT and numeracy skills applicable to food security and nutrition problems.
  • Working individually or as part of a group, make informed judgements about the complex problems connected to global food security and nutrition.

Structure

This programme is delivered part time through online learning, over a period of between three and six years.

This MSc programme is modular in structure, offering a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied. You can exit with the award of post-graduate (PG) Certificate (60 credits), PG Diploma (120 credits) or MSc (180 credits). The programme is composed of 180 credits . For the MSc you will complete a (60 credit) dissertation project.

Flexible learning

You may undertake the programme by Intermittent Study (flexible progression route), accruing credits within a maximum time limit of six years for the MSc which will include a maximum period of 12 months from the start of your dissertation to it being completed. If you wish to study for the PG Diploma by intermittent study, the maximum time period for this is 4 years and for the PG Certificate only, the maximum time period is 2 years.

In summary, times for completion are as follows:

  • Master of Science: 36-72 months
  • Postgraduate Diploma: 24-48 months
  • Postgraduate Certificate: 12-24 months  


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Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Read more

Introduction

Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Seafood products are provided by both aquaculture and capture fisheries and are one of the most highly traded food products globally. Including seafood in our daily diet provides an affordable source of macro and micronutrients required for optimal human health and development.
This course is designed to introduce the global issues affecting seafood production and trading, and will promote an understanding of the key factors affecting aquatic food production, post-harvest protocols, post-mortem metabolic events and microbial/chemical processes key for food safety and quality. Sensory assessment and shelf-life extension technologies will also be covered. The course will also examine other key issues in seafood trading such as traceability systems, certifications as well as the impact of governance and legislation on the global seafood sector.
This is the only aquatic food security MSc currently available in the UK. It will comprehensively follow the food chain from production through to consumer health and welfare.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Rachel Norman

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

This course shares some modules with the MSc in Sustainable Aquaculture and there is flexibility within the system to change the degree title depending on what advanced modules are taken. The course is divided into four taught modules, containing 18 subject areas or topics, and a single Research Project module.

Delivery and assessment

In addition to lectures, tutorials and seminars, a number of assignments must be completed. Laboratory-based practical sessions are also important elements of the course. Taught module assessment is continuous, involving short tests, seminars, essays, practical reports, critical and computational analysis, field assignments and set project reports. The Research Project module is examined through written dissertation and seminar presentations by both supervisors and an external examiner.

Modes of study

The course is available on a block-release basis (by selecting individual or a series of modules) over a period not exceeding five academic years.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

The Institute of Aquaculture, with a rating of 2.45 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), was graded the top aquaculture department in the UK.

Strengths

This MSc brings a unique perspective to the expertise that already exists in Stirling on global seafood production. It is the only MSc in the UK that focusses on how seafood can contribute to global food security.
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries and this will provide students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector.
We also have links within Asia and Europe which will allow the opportunity to undertake the Research Project overseas.

Academic strengths

The Institute of Aquaculture has been closely associated with the global expansion of aquaculture initially through developing and improving the existing production systems and the development of new farmed species. In recent years our research has focused on increasing the sustainability and reducing the environmental impact of these activities. In addition, we have recently invested in new posts in Aquatic Food Security whose activities also include research into food safety and quality post harvest, aquatic animal nutrition, as well as developing mathematical models of production systems. We therefore have expertise that covers the whole production cycle from farm to fork.
The Institute of Aquaculture is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and is one of only a handful of institutions devoted to aquatic food security. The goal is to develop and promote aquatic food security building on the Institute staff expertise in sustainable aquatic animal production.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
Demand for well qualified postgraduates to contribute to food production and the supply chain will continue to increase in line with demand to double food production over the coming decades. This course provides each student with the appropriate knowledge and practical experience important for a career in aquatic food security. The course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Employability
This course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Industry connections
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries which provides students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector. We also have links within Asia and Europe which allows the opportunity to undertake the research project overseas.

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Local food security in a globalising world. Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. Read more

Local food security in a globalising world

Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. rising/falling temperatures, droughts and floods, diseases and pests), market tendencies, insufficient access to food for households, unequal distribution of resources and opportunities and inadequate food distribution channels, prevent the realisation of this idealistic and often oversimplified term.

Despite a growing number of large-scale, high-external input farms and enough food production to feed the world, post-harvest losses result in less optimal yields and (locally) produced foods are often used for other purposes, such as animal feed or biofuel. Consequentially, 795 million1 undernourished people around the globe do not have access to this lost and wasted food.

Ensuring access to food for everyone is the key to ending hunger, which will require improved collaboration between various stakeholders - producer (organisations), the private sector, governments, traders and development organisations. Structures, policies and programmes must be continuously adapted to a variety of external factors, such as the economy, environment and current social structures. Rethinking of informal rules and habits is another essential step in attaining food security, considering even members of the same household are not guaranteed equal access to food. In light of these external factors and challenges, this specialisation presents various interventions needed to combat hunger and ensure food security for everyone.

Competences

At graduation, you will have the ability to:

• define the economic, commercial and marketing needs, constraints and opportunities of those in rural communities who produce for local and regional markets

• analyse food security at a local and global level

• apply tools for diagnosing food security

• analyse the livelihoods of farmers who produce for local and regional markets and understand farmers' coping strategies

• select, explain and design an appropriate development intervention leading to food security

• develop support programmes for farmers, producers and other groups

• mainstream food security within Agricultural and rural development programmes

• define the economic, commercoal and marketing needs, constraints and oppertunities for small-scale producers in rural communities

• formulate and recommend any organisational adjustments that are needed within service-delivery organisations.

Career opportunities

Rural Development and Food Security specialists explore effective responses to mal- and undernourishment, by defining needs, constraints, coping strategies and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities. In selecting appropriate context-specific interventions, which reflect understanding of the local context in its wider context, they consider stakeholder relationships and how collaboration could be organised to each stakeholder’s benefit while helping farmers to safeguard their ability to ensure local food security. In the face of globalisation, slow economic growth and political instability, specialists may design and implement responses for (non-)governmental organisations or partners in the private sector, in the form of projects, programmes, market structures or policies.

Scholarships

Our Master programmes are eligible for the Orange Knowledge Programme (OKP), formerly the Netherlands Fellowship Programme. The Orange Knowledge Programme (OKP) is targeted at professionals from selected developing countries who, after their studies in the Netherlands, will be able to further develop and strengthen the organisations at which they work.

Top rated master programme 2018

The Master's programme Management of Development received 78 out of 100 points for its agriculture and food programme in the information guide 'Keuzegids Masters 2018' and was consequently awarded top programme status (the information guide is based on the outcome of the National Student Survey of 2017)! 



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Food security. a global concern. There has never been a more urgent need to train food security researchers who are equipped with skills in agronomy, plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics, and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. Read more

Food security: a global concern

There has never been a more urgent need to train food security researchers who are equipped with skills in agronomy, plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics, and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. As outlined in The Royal Society’s 2009 report Reaping the Benefits: science and the sustainable intensification of global agriculture, it is of vital importance that we increase crop yields significantly over the next 50 years, while also decreasing our dependency on chemical intervention and fertilizers.

Meeting the challenge of sustainable agriculture

This interdisciplinary programme was developed in collaboration with a variety of stakeholders, including: the agricultural industry, government agencies (including Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (defra) and The Food and Environment Research Agency (fera)), and farmers and food manufacturers. Research-led teaching in molecular plant pathology, plant sciences, and microbiology is strongly supplemented by Rothamsted Research, North Wyke expertise in grassland management, soil science, and sustainable farming systems. The combination of expertise in both arable and pastureland systems ensures a truly rounded learning experience. Leading social scientists also provide valuable input on land use and economic practices in rural areas.

The curriculum is designed to address critical shortages of experts capable of working in government agencies, agriculture, and the food industry as researchers, advisers, policy developers, and managers. The programme provides opportunities to gain industrial and practical experience and observe food security issues first-hand during field trips.

Expert teaching

Teaching is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry. Scientific staff from Fera provide specialist lectures as part of the Crop Security module, members of the Plant Health Inspectorate cover field aspects of plant pathology, and a LEAF1 farmer addresses agricultural systems and the realities of food production using integrated farm management. In addition, teaching staff from the University and BBSRC Rothamsted-North Wyke will draw on material and experiences from their academic research and scientific links with industry.

Industrial and practical experience

All students will have opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences. Teaching visits will be made to the Plant Health Inspectorate in Cornwall to see quarantine management of Phytophthora, and to a local LEAF farm to review the challenges and approaches to food production in integrated farm management systems. You will gain specialised experience in practical science or policy making through a dissertation or project placement with external agencies. Defra and Fera, for example, are offering five dissertation and/or project placements annually.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of modules. The list of modules may include the following;

  • Professional Skills;
  • Research Project;
  • Sustainable Land Use in Grassland Agriculture;
  • Crop Security;
  • Sustainable Livestock and Fisheries;
  • Political Economy of Food and Agriculture
  • Research and Knowledge Transfer for Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. Please see the website for an up to date list (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/biosciences/foodsecurity/#Programme-structure)

Addressing a skills shortage to tackle global food security

The MSc Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture curriculum has been designed in collaboration with the agricultural industry to tackle the skills shortage that exists in this vital interdisciplinary area. This programme will provide the highly skilled individuals required in government agencies, agriculture and food industries for critical roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security.

Global horizons

With food security and sustainable agriculture a global concern, opportunities for specialists in the areas of agronomy, plant pathology, plant disease and plant improvement will be worldwide. By combining expertise across the natural, social and political sciences, this programme provides valuable interdisciplinary knowledge and skills in both arable and pastureland systems. Graduates will be prepared to take on the global challenges of food security and sustainable agriculture, being able to adapt to farming systems across the world and identify cross-disciplinary solutions to local agricultural problems.

Learning enhanced by industry

The programme is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry, with specialist lectures, teaching visits to observe the practical application of techniques, and industrial placement opportunities for project work or dissertations in practical science or policy making.



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Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century. Read more

Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century.

This programme is not suitable for applicants pursuing a career in food science or food safety/hygiene or related areas. Please read the programme description and ensure you understand the nature of the programme before you apply. Applicants who do not show a clear understanding of the programme will not be accepted.

Food security has become a critically important issue for societies around the globe. Interactions between demographics, changes in diet, trade liberalisation, an increased focus on conservation, technological innovations including GM crops, the impact of climate change and new responses to climate change resource limitations (particularly in terms of energy, water and nutrients) all affect food security.

With such a rapid growth in this area, there is an increasing demand for qualified experts to contribute to policy creation and legislation in food production and the supply chain.

This unique MSc offers students the scope and multidisciplinary approach to address all of these issues, as well as an understanding of the technical, agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security.

This programme is run in collaboration with Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC).

Programme structure

This MSc programme consists of six taught courses over two semesters, and an individual dissertation project of about 12,000 words.

Compulsory courses typically will be:

  • Frameworks to Assess Food Security
  • Sustainability of Food Production
  • Interrelationships in Food Systems
  • Professional and Research Skills in Practice
  • Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses.

  • Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
  • Ecosystem Services 1: Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
  • Foundations in Ecological Economics
  • Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
  • Integrated Resource Management
  • Principles of Environmental Sustainability
  • Soil Protection and Management
  • Understanding Environment and Development
  • Marine Systems and Policies
  • Applications in Ecological Economics
  • Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
  • Integrated Resource Planning
  • Interrelationships in Food Systems
  • Land Use/Environmental Interactions
  • Case Studies in Sustainable Development
  • Ecosystem Services 2: Ecosystem Values and Management
  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Soil Science Concepts and Application

Field trip

The programme typically includes a field trip providing an opportunity to apply some of the principles of food security to real world scenarios. In previous years, the tour has taken place in locations such as Italy, Morocco and Kenya.

Learning outcomes

Students will be able to:

  • provide a broad understanding of agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security
  • apply scientific information and methods in the analysis of complex problems
  • formulate a research problem and independently carry out the research needed to produce an appropriate solution in a range of scientific or policy contexts
  • enhance their skills in specialist topics related to food security

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme typically go on to work in government and non-governmental agencies as well as international bodies and businesses where they can utilise the invaluable, and highly prized, skills they have acquired on the programme, such as food security assessment.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.



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Our course provides specialist skills and knowledge about the most important issues related to the sustainability of agricultural production and food security. Read more
Our course provides specialist skills and knowledge about the most important issues related to the sustainability of agricultural production and food security. Our MSc is suitable if you have an interest in sustainable agriculture and food security and want to develop a broad knowledge of the subject.

Sustainable agriculture and food security focuses on the availability of food now and in the future: a major concern of scientific and commercial communities world-wide.

The prominence of this subject is driven by an increasing global population, pressure on non-renewable or scarce resources and a need to increase food production whilst minimising the impact on the environment.

The course covers all aspects of food security as outlined by Global Food Security, a multi-agency programme involving the main UK public sector funders of research and training related to food.

Delivery

On the MSc approximately half of your credits will be gained through taught modules, which offer an opportunity to learn about a wide range of problems in food security. This is ideal if you have an interest in the subject and do not want to specialise in one topic, or if you want to gain a wide range of knowledge in this area for your career. If you know which area you want to specialise in and are confident that you want to pursue a career in research, then you may find our Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security MRes more suitable.

The course is comprised of compulsory and optional modules. The compulsory modules provide a detailed overview of the most important issues related to the sustainability of agricultural production and food security. Optional modules allow specialisation in one or more of the following five topic areas:
-Socio-economics, marketing and policy development
-Environmental and water management
-Soil and crop management
-Animal production, health and welfare management
-Food quality, safety and nutrition

This course is taught in a block format:
-A five-week teaching block
-Then two-week teaching blocks

You will be taught through lectures, seminars, practical and field classes, tutorials, case studies and small group discussions. We expect you to undertake independent study outside of these structured sessions. Your knowledge and understanding will be assessed through written examinations, coursework, presentations and your final major project.

You will be supported through training in designing and delivering a project based on a laboratory or field-based investigation. After choosing your topic you will collect, analyse and interpret data to produce a thesis reporting your investigation and results in a critical manner.

We offer flexible learning for those already working in industry, or you can study through the Credit Accumulation Transfer Scheme which is a framework that enables us to award postgraduate level qualifications using credit-bearing stand-alone modules as 'building blocks' towards a qualification. This means that the credits from modules undertaken within a five-year period can be 'banked' towards the award of a qualification.

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Our course provides specialist skills and knowledge about the most important issues related to the sustainability of agricultural production and food security. Read more
Our course provides specialist skills and knowledge about the most important issues related to the sustainability of agricultural production and food security. Our MRes is suitable if you have a strong interest in a specific related topic and are confident that you want to pursue a career in research.

Sustainable agriculture and food security focuses on the availability of food now and in the future: a major concern of scientific and commercial communities world-wide.

The prominence of this subject is driven by an increasing global population, pressure on non-renewable or scarce resources and a need to increase food production whilst minimising the impact on the environment.

The course covers all aspects of food security as outlined by Global Food Security, a multi-agency programme involving the main UK public sector funders of research and training related to food.

Delivery

On the MRes the majority of your credits will be gained from the dissertation module, which is self-directed research. Your studies are supported by a smaller number of taught modules compared to the Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security MSc. This course is most suitable if you have a strong interest in a particular topic and are confident that you want to pursue a career in research. If you want to gain a broad knowledge of sustainable agriculture and food security or are not sure if you want to specialise in a specific topic, then you may find our Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security MSc more suitable.

The course is comprised of compulsory and optional modules. The compulsory modules provide a detailed overview of the most important issues related to the sustainability of agricultural production and food security. Optional modules allow specialisation in one or more of the following five topic areas:
-Socio-economics, marketing and policy development
-Environmental and water management
-Soil and crop management
-Animal production, health and welfare management
-Food quality, safety and nutrition

This course is taught in a block format:
-One five-week block
-Then two-week teaching blocks

You will be taught through lectures, seminars, practical and field classes, tutorials, case studies and small group discussions. We expect you to undertake independent study outside of these structured sessions. Your knowledge and understanding will be assessed through written examinations, coursework, presentations and your final major project.

You will be supported through training in designing and delivering a project based on a laboratory or field-based investigation. After choosing your topic you will collect, analyse and interpret data to produce a thesis reporting your investigation and results in a critical manner.

We offer flexible learning for those already working in industry, or you can also study through the Credit Accumulation Transfer Scheme which is a framework that enables us to award postgraduate level qualifications using credit-bearing stand-alone modules as 'building blocks' towards a qualification. This means that the credits from modules undertaken within a five-year period can be 'banked' towards the award of a qualification.

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COURSE DESCRIPTION. This online Global Food Security (Food Safety) postgraduate programme will be delivered by leading research active staff within the internationally recognised. Read more

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This online Global Food Security (Food Safety) postgraduate programme will be delivered by leading research active staff within the internationally recognised Institute for Global Food Security (IGFS) based at Queen’s University Belfast.

This unique food safety course will comprise specialist modules such as chemical and microbiological feed and food safety, health, global food legislation, food fraud and advanced analytical methods for detecting food safety issues. The course is particularly suitable for those working in the agri-food industry, regulatory agencies and analytical communities who wish to develop their knowledge to a higher level.

Awards will be available at Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) level, and to Masters level following completion of a dissertation-based module.

COURSE DELIVERY

On-line module delivery is currently planned to be 15 weeks long, with required estimated student time per week of between 15-20 hours.

Each module is available for a specified 20 week period each academic year. On-line material will be released over a 15 week content delivery period with a further 5 weeks for completion and submission of the final assessment element.

Module content will be opened up on a block-by-block basis every 3 weeks and students will work at their own pace through content completing continuous assessment tasks to agreed schedules.

Start dates for next DL modules are:

  • Food safety and health: Monday 24th September 2018
  • Food integrity, fraud and traceability: Monday 4th March 2019 
  • Advanced Analytical Tools for Food Security: Monday 23 September 2019
  • Global food standards and legislation: Monday 2 March 2020

For further information email or send us a message on WhatsApp

COURSE DETAILS

Students can study the Masters part-time over a period of 3 years, the Postgraduate Diploma part-time over a period of 2 years and the Postgraduate Certificate part-time over a period of 1 year. You can also enrol initially for a 1 year Postgraduate Certificate and if successful continue to the Postgraduate Diploma and /or Masters.

Students aiming for MSc qualification will study 60CATS each year, normally the two Postgraduate Certificate modules [60CATS] in the first year, the additional two modules for the Postgraduate Diploma [60CATS; total 120CATS] in second year, and the Dissertation [60CATS; total 180CATS] in third year as described below:


YEAR 1 MODULES

Food Safety and Health 

The contents of this module will centre on the exploration of various chemical and microbiological risks associated with animal feed and human food safety, and an examination of the reported links to health defects/disease progression.

Food Integrity, Fraud and Traceability 

This module will investigate examples of highly varied, internationally relevant and difficult to detect incidences of food fraud and compromised food traceability. The range and types of food fraud will be discussed and the means of detecting such incidences to ensure that food is safe, wholesome and authentic demonstrated. The economic consequences of food product recall due to food contamination incidents will be assessed highlighting the need for traceability across the whole food supply chain, together with an exploration of consumer willingness to pay for improvements to aspects of food safety and traceability.

YEAR 2 MODULES

Advanced Analytical Tools for Food Security 

This module will review the principles behind current and emerging monitoring technologies for rapid/early detection of feed/food contamination incidents and disease. Overviews and applications of various screening and confirmatory test platforms for food security analysis will be covered in this module.

Global Food Standards and Legislation

This module introduces international food standard setting, with a focus on the Codex Alimentarius Commission standard setting process and its impacts on international trade and World Trade Organisation agreements related to food in addition to trends of modernisation of food safety legislation internationally.

YEAR 3 MODULES

Dissertation

This module (60CATS) consists of research work and a written dissertation carried out around a hypothesis, case study, critical incident or other significant activity relevant to the programme. Students will prepare a project proposal for approval before registering on the module and develop a full project proposal upon which they are interviewed before carrying out the project work. Interim reports and a draft introduction will be submitted at required intervals in addition to regular contact with an assigned IGFS academic supervisor and submission of a completed thesis by an agreed deadline. Online teaching delivery will relate to project management skills, plagiarism, researching and writing techniques.

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About this course. Almost one in eight people around the world are chronically undernourished. Read more

About this course

Almost one in eight people around the world are chronically undernourished. Recurrent food price spikes and socio-political unrest, climate change, land degradation and scarcity of natural resources – coupled with decline in rural communities and livelihoods – have placed food security high on the development agenda. This course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitude needed to deal with these challenges.

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying food security, using insights from agroecological sciences, geography, social and political sciences, and innovation studies. The course will use research-informed teaching to explore and analyse global food security issues, the factors that affect food security outcomes, the solutions to food security problems, and the planning and execution of food security interventions.

Your study is designed to be practice-oriented and aims to enhance your employability within development organisations working on food security. This means that you will not only explore the status, drivers and solutions of global food insecurity, but also focus on how these aspects could be systematically analysed and acted upon in a real world setting. You’ll draw on examples from both developing and developed countries.

NTU has links with various universities and international development institutions such as the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). The course pulls together staff expertise in various relevant disciplines from within the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences, and also from other schools across NTU, including the School of Arts and Humanities, the School of Social Sciences, and Nottingham Business School.

How do you study

You’ll be taught through a mixture of interactive lectures, detailed case studies, tutorials, workshops, seminars, study visits, and placements. You’ll also have opportunities to present your work to peers and academic staff. Independent learning is required, and you’ll undertake high- quality research. You’ll research your chosen topic in depth, then design and implement a relevant research project, before communicating the findings to an informed audience in a comprehensive scientific report.

Teaching is supported by our Brackenhurst Campus – a 200-hectare country estate and working farm. The campus is part of the DEFRA Environmental Stewardship scheme, which supports the effective environmental management of farm land and countryside estates. The farm includes sheep, a poultry unit, and a herd of Lincoln red beef cattle, as well as arable and protected crop production. The farm promotes sustainable land use and management, demonstrating modern farming techniques whilst achieving high conservation value.

You’ll also have access to modern, bespoke scientific facilities, teaching resources, and accommodation.

Find out more about our Brackenhurst Campus on our website

Visit us

Want to find out more about studying with us? Find out more at one of our upcoming open days. Reserve your place.

More information

For more information on our courses, please visit our website.



Read less
About this course. Almost one in eight people around the world are chronically undernourished. Read more

About this course

Almost one in eight people around the world are chronically undernourished. Recurrent food price spikes and socio-political unrest, climate change, land degradation and scarcity of natural resources – coupled with decline in rural communities and livelihoods – have placed food security high on the development agenda. This course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitude needed to deal with these challenges.

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying food security, using insights from agroecological sciences, geography, social and political sciences, and innovation studies. The course will use research-informed teaching to explore and analyse global food security issues, the factors that affect food security outcomes, the solutions to food security problems, and the planning and execution of food security interventions.

Your study is designed to be practice-oriented and aims to enhance your employability within development organisations working on food security. This means that you will not only explore the status, drivers and solutions of global food insecurity, but also focus on how these aspects could be systematically analysed and acted upon in a real world setting. You’ll draw on examples from both developing and developed countries.

NTU has links with various universities and international development institutions such as the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). The course pulls together staff expertise in various relevant disciplines from within the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences, and also from other schools across NTU, including the School of Arts and Humanities, the School of Social Sciences, and Nottingham Business School.

How do you study

You’ll be taught through a mixture of interactive lectures, detailed case studies, tutorials, workshops, seminars, study visits, and placements. You’ll also have opportunities to present your work to peers and academic staff. Independent learning is required, and you’ll undertake high- quality research. You’ll research your chosen topic in depth, then design and implement a relevant research project, before communicating the findings to an informed audience in a comprehensive scientific report.

Teaching is supported by our Brackenhurst Campus – a 200-hectare country estate and working farm. The campus is part of the DEFRA Environmental Stewardship scheme, which supports the effective environmental management of farm land and countryside estates. The farm includes sheep, a poultry unit, and a herd of Lincoln red beef cattle, as well as arable and protected crop production. The farm promotes sustainable land use and management, demonstrating modern farming techniques whilst achieving high conservation value.

You’ll also have access to modern, bespoke scientific facilities, teaching resources, and accommodation.

Find out more about our Brackenhurst Campus on our website

Visit us

Want to find out more about studying with us? Find out more at one of our upcoming open days. Reserve your place.

More information

For more information on our courses, please visit our website.



Read less
The world’s climate is rapidly changing due to global warming, and will continue to do so for the decades and centuries ahead. This poses major challenges for future agricultural systems to provide food and other bioresources for the 9 billion people that will occupy the planet by 2050. Read more
The world’s climate is rapidly changing due to global warming, and will continue to do so for the decades and centuries ahead. This poses major challenges for future agricultural systems to provide food and other bioresources for the 9 billion people that will occupy the planet by 2050.

The 1 year MSc in Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) provides students with the skills and tools for developing agricultural practices, policies and measures addressing the challenge that global warming poses for agriculture and food security worldwide.

The MSc CCAFS programme is a partnership with the international CGIAR Research Programme on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), which is led by the CGIAR and Future Earth, and currently involves over 700 partners worldwide http://www.ccafs.cgiar.org.

Graduates of the MSc CCAFS programme will be equipped to pursue roles associated with local, national and international efforts to promote sustainable agricultural production, global food security and climate change adaptation.

There is now a growing recognition of how different agriculture systems can contribute to climate change, past and present. Hence, the dual challenge of adapting future agricultural systems to climate change, must also include mitigation of the effects of agriculture on climate change.

The MSc in Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) is aimed at students who want to combine scientific, engineering, technical, social or policy skills so that they are better equipped to understand and make significant contributions regarding adaptation and mitigation of climate change impacts on global agriculture and food security.

As the climate change challenge for sustainable development and sustainable business on the planet intensifies, there will be a need in all organisations for personnel skilled in both climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies/approaches for the development of greener economies, agrifood systems and low-environmental footprint supply chains.

Graduates of the MSc CCAFS will be well positioned and competitive for positions in research, policy, enterprise, business, administration and other activities across a wide range of public and private sector institutions internationally. Career mentoring, advice, strategy and facilitation will be provided to all students on the MSc CCAFS to ensure that MSc CCAFS graduates rapidly enter employment in relevant institutions and activities where they can build from their interests, experience and training.

Weblinks:

http://www.plantagbiosciences.org/msc-ccafs
http://www.nuigalway.ie/ccafs/
https://twitter.com/MScCCAFS_NUIG

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Our Masters programme will equip you with the specialist skills and knowledge to engage with one of the most significant challenges currently facing a growing human population. Read more

Our Masters programme will equip you with the specialist skills and knowledge to engage with one of the most significant challenges currently facing a growing human population: making and supplying enough food for all to sustain an active healthy lifestyle.

Our Masters in Food Security is a distance learning programme designed for people with an interest in the global food system and for professionals in the food supply industry. This exciting course explores important issues related to food security, focusing on production, distribution, and waste.

The course is highly flexible so that you can fit study around your day job. Teaching is done largely online; all materials are supplied and you can work through them at your own pace. You will also have the opportunity to meet tutors and fellow students at short workshops during the year.

To gain an MSc you need to complete eight modules, and a significant dissertation project. The programme starts with an introductory module every February, which covers a broad range of issues related to food security. After that, you will develop a breadth of knowledge and depth of expertise by studying an additional seven modules. These modules cover a range of topics and will allow you to develop specialist knowledge of the factors impacting upon food security and environmental effects on food production.

Alongside topics such as crop production science and ethical food systems, you will take study skills modules such as a literature review. These will introduce you to a higher level of research skills which are essential to your dissertation project and when exploring new opportunities within your career.

Finally, you will cement your learning and put theory into practice in a major research project. Your dissertation will be guided by a supervisor from Lancaster and will normally be undertaken with an industry partner. This module will develop a range of transferable, highly employable skills. You will enhance your planning and written presentation skills, learn to concisely and effectively communicate complex concepts and ideas, as well as learn to handle and present quantitative and qualitative information and data.

Undertaking these modules and research project will ensure you have the breadth and depth of knowledge required to support your career. Upon graduation, you will have a range of specialist skills, advanced knowledge, and experience, allowing you to engage with and tackle the food challenges of the 21st century. By completing the programme, you will be equipped to make informed decisions, progress in your career, affect change in culture and best practice, or continue into PhD study and research.

If you enrol at MSc level you may exit early with an interim award at PGCert or PGDip level.

Applications for a February start must be completed before the end of December.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.



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Delivering global food security is one of the critical challenges of the 21st century. Each nation needs to balance local and national production with imports and consider the environmental and economic impact of their policies. Read more
Delivering global food security is one of the critical challenges of the 21st century. Each nation needs to balance local and national production with imports and consider the environmental and economic impact of their policies. This MSc draws together critical components such as the contribution of climate change, biodiversity, water, soil, land use, labour, nutrition transition and urbanisation. The course will appeal if you want to influence global food security and enjoy contributing to cutting-edge research.

The course is science-led, but includes options in business, social sciences and international environmental law, which provide insight to contemporary food production systems. You’ll undertake seven core modules (Crop Physiology & Production; Advances in Crop Protection; Soil, Water & Plant Mineral Nutrition; Climate Change; Environmental Accounting; Organic & Low Input Systems; Challenges of Global Food Security) and up to three further optional modules. You’ll also undertake a laboratory- or desk-based project or a placement at a host organisation.

You’ll leave prepared for a career in a wide range of public and commercial enterprises such as government agencies, NGOs, food businesses and consultancies related to food production and the supply chain.

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The course will provide students with a detailed understanding of the principles and processes of sustainable food production, including its social and environmental contexts. Read more
The course will provide students with a detailed understanding of the principles and processes of sustainable food production, including its social and environmental contexts. It will equip students who already have work experience in the food supply chain to implement the latest research into sustainable systems thinking, and will facilitate cutting edge careers for those who want to enter the food production and supply chain.

The Food Security in the Changing Environment MSc has been created with funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the Advanced Training Partnership (ATP). Please visit the ATP website. Please also visit the Aberystwyth MSc website offering the MSc in Sustainable and Efficient Food Production. Modules from the Bangor MSc and the Aberystwyth MSc can be interchangeable between the two programmes. Bursaries are available for those employed in the UK agri-food industry.

Students studying the course will:

Examine the environmental, economic and social responsibility of farming in the context of food security and the changing environments.
Study how selected management practices can improve the resource-efficiency and overall sustainability of food production.
Gain a global perspective to question whether and how growing demand for food from limited land resources can be met through sustainable intensification.
Students will have the opportunity to study from 3 to 6 modules per year, depending on their status as part time or full time students. For the Masters degree, students will complete a total of 6 modules of study, detailed below, and a dissertation project.

Students may begin their study at the beginning of any module, either at the end of September, the end of January or the middle of May.

In the event of compulsory modules changing from year to year, existing students may choose from either the compulsory modules extant at the time of registration, or the new ones, and are advised to discuss their options with the Course Director.

Professionals in the agri-food industry, conservation and environment, farmers, and agricultural policy decision makers may be interested in the modules of this degree, as will full-time students wishing to pursue a post graduate degree that culminates in employability in these sectors.

Teaching and learning is supported by study guides with journal articles, online lectures, podcasts, and discussion forums. The wide range of backgrounds and expertise of staff and students make a hugely enriching learning experience.

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