• Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
Newcastle University Featured Masters Courses
"food" AND "regulatory" A…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Food Regulatory Affairs)

We have 24 Masters Degrees (Food Regulatory Affairs)

  • "food" AND "regulatory" AND "affairs" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 24
Order by 
Summary. Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. Read more

Summary

Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. International perspectives on Food Regulatory Affairs have become increasingly important, particularly since the formation of the World Trade Organisation and the international acceptance of Codex Alimentarius standards. This programme is designed to provide postgraduate training in Food Regulatory Affairs for individuals employed in the food sector, regulatory agencies, government departments, and trade organisations as well as those who wish to develop their career in this field.

The awards are granted jointly between Ulster University (UK), and University College Dublin (IRL), in association with University College Cork (IRL). European and global experts in science, law, economics, and policy contribute to the courses.

About

All the courses in the programme are entirely internet delivered through a modular format. Modules have a credit value of either 15 or 30 credit points. The credit rating of a module is in proportion to the effort required from the student, thus a 30 point module corresponds to 300 hours of notional learning time including viewing lectures, tutorials, discussion groups, coursework, assignment and self-study. All modules are at level 7.

For the award of Postgraduate Certificate in Food Regulatory Affairs students undertake taught modules worth a total of 60 credit points and this is delivered part-time over two semesters (i.e. over one academic year) with students taking one 30 credit core module in each semester.

For the award of Postgraduate Diploma in Food Regulatory Affairs students undertake taught modules worth a total of 120 credit points and this is delivered full-time over two semesters (i.e. over one academic year) with students taking up to 60 credit points of modules in each semester.

For the award of Master of Science in Food Regulatory Affairs students undertake taught modules worth a total of 120 credit points and complete a 60 credit research project module. Full-time students normally take three semesters (i.e. one academic year) to complete the MSc.

Work placement / study abroad

Full-time students will be advised to explore the possibility of taking a short placement in food companies and the Ulster University will facilitate such placements for students who are based in Northern Ireland.

Professional recognition

Accredited by the Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST).

Career options

The academic content of the programme helps students to develop knowledge and understanding of legislative, policy and scientific aspects of food regulatory affairs as well as to acquire skills to disseminate and implement knowledge in practice. This leads to excellent employment opportunities in government (EU and international) and non-government organisations, and in the European and international agri-food industry.



Read less
Summary. Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. Read more

Summary

Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. International perspectives on Food Regulatory Affairs have become increasingly important, particularly since the formation of the World Trade Organisation and the international acceptance of Codex Alimentarius standards. This programme is designed to provide postgraduate training in Food Regulatory Affairs for individuals employed in the food sector, regulatory agencies, government departments, and trade organisations as well as those who wish to develop their career in this field.

The awards are granted jointly between Ulster University (UK), and University College Dublin (IRL), in association with University College Cork (IRL). European and global experts in science, law, economics, and policy contribute to the courses.

About

All the courses in the programme are entirely internet delivered through a modular format. Modules have a credit value of either 15 or 30 credit points. The credit rating of a module is in proportion to the effort required from the student, thus a 30 point module corresponds to 300 hours of notional learning time including viewing lectures, tutorials, discussion groups, coursework, assignment and self-study. All modules are at level 7.

For the award of Postgraduate Certificate in Food Regulatory Affairs students undertake taught modules worth a total of 60 credit points and this is delivered part-time over two semesters (i.e. over one academic year) with students taking one 30 credit core module in each semester.

For the award of Postgraduate Diploma in Food Regulatory Affairs students undertake taught modules worth a total of 120 credit points and this is delivered full-time over two semesters (i.e. over one academic year) with students taking up to 60 credit points of modules in each semester.

For the award of Master of Science in Food Regulatory Affairs students undertake taught modules worth a total of 120 credit points and complete a 60 credit research project module. Full-time students normally take three semesters (i.e. one academic year) to complete the MSc.

Work placement / study abroad

Full-time students will be advised to explore the possibility of taking a short placement in food companies and the Ulster University will facilitate such placements for students who are based in Northern Ireland.

Professional recognition

Accredited by the Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST).

Career options

The academic content of the programme helps students to develop knowledge and understanding of legislative, policy and scientific aspects of food regulatory affairs as well as to acquire skills to disseminate and implement knowledge in practice. This leads to excellent employment opportunities in government (EU and international) and non-government organisations, and in the European and international agri-food industry.



Read less
Summary. Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. Read more

Summary

Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. International perspectives on Food Regulatory Affairs have become increasingly important particularly since the formation of the World Trade Organisation and the international acceptance of Codex Alimentarius standards. This part-time programme provides postgraduate training in Food Regulatory Affairs together with a specialism in Veterinary Public Health (VPH) and is particularly designed for veterinarians employed in the food sector who wish to develop their career in this field but who are unable to undertake study on a full-time basis. In addition, the programme fulfils the additional requirement for the training of official veterinarians as set out in European Regulation 854/2004.

This is a part-time programme which is entirely internet delivered. European and global experts in veterinary and food science, law, economics, and policy contribute to the programme. The awards are granted jointly between Ulster University (UK), and University College Dublin (IRL).

About

This programme provides students with broad knowledge and understanding of food regulatory affairs and promotes their ability to assess available evidence and data, make sound judgements and communicate findings effectively to all stakeholders in the food chain – producers, regulators, industry and consumers. Relevant EU food regulatory policy is integrated within the lectures and translated into a coherent regulatory framework so that students will grasp the complex idea of total regulation of the food chain from primary production through to consumer health issues. Core domains of VPH are addressed in relation to the regulatory responsibilities of the veterinarians and the protection of animal health and welfare and human health.

Teaching is through online lectures, online discussions, individual support, video and internet links with staff, independent learning, and work in small groups.

Attendance

There is no requirement to come on campus - the programme is delivered fully online.

Career options

The academic content of the programme helps students to develop knowledge and understanding of legislative, policy and scientific aspects of food regulatory affairs as well as to acquire skills to disseminate and implement knowledge in practice. This leads to excellent employment opportunities in government (EU and international) and non-government organisations, and in the European and international agri-food industry.



Read less
Wageningen University & Research is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The Food Safety programme of the university was the first MSc in Food Safety worldwide. Read more

Wageningen University & Research is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The Food Safety programme of the university was the first MSc in Food Safety worldwide. The programme is unique, with a highly integrated approach to the field of food safety.

Most other programmes in this field focus on the technological aspects of food safety or focus on the interaction of food safety and food quality. The programme in Wageningen focuses on the technical aspects, as well as on the legal aspects of food safety and integrates these in Food Safety Management.

Study programme

Wageningen University is one of the few universities in Europe with the ability to offer education and research in all fields of food safety. This includes not only technical disciplines such as microbiology and toxicology, but also the legal, economic, risk management and communication aspects of food safety.

On the programme Food Safety page you can find the general outline of the programme and more detailed information about courses, theses and internships.

Specialisations

Within the master programme you can choose one of the following Specialisations to meet your personal interests.

Your future career

The programme is aimed to provide the market with graduates that can work as a food safety specialist in the food industry, governmental organisations, product associations or federations, food inspection services or similar, research institutes or specialized law agencies. Read more about career perspectives and opportunities after finishing the programme.

Related programmes:

MSc Food Quality Management

MSc Food Technology 

MSc Nutrition and Health



Read less
This course aims to provide a detailed critical awareness of the risks, challenges and opportunities of providing a sustainable supply of food to the world’s population, as we move into the future. Read more

This course aims to provide a detailed critical awareness of the risks, challenges and opportunities of providing a sustainable supply of food to the world’s population, as we move into the future.

Who is it for?

This course is applicable for graduates from around the world wishing to pursue a career in food sustainability at a technical or strategic level. 

This course is concerned with a fundamental challenge of enormous importance that we all face today; in essence, the many problems of feeding a rapidly growing global population in the future given finite resources, added uncertainties such as the effects of climate change, and a general acknowledgement that our current methods for producing food are not fit for purpose. But it does more than simply describing the challenge - it sets about bringing together the diverse threads that could present pragmatic and practical answers. As such, it is designed to respond to urgent industry, institutional and government needs for individuals who can meet the complex, multi-factorial issues of global future food supply.

Why this course?

Many food companies have identified the need for a focus in their own business areas on future food sustainability, and have acknowledged a need for trained individuals, both in the form of new graduates and also in re-training professionals already established in the food industry. However, it is not just food companies that are concerned with the sustainability of future food supply;

  • government departments are concerned with food sustainability in terms of policy making and governance
  • research institutes are actively involved in the development of improved animal and plant production systems
  • various NGOs are involved in influencing policy, attitudes and communication to the public.

All of these diverse groups have an urgent need to recruit individuals with the skills set to address these challenges. This course is taught using the expertise and facilities of two Cranfield University Schools; the School of Water, Energy and Environment and the School of Management.

Informed by Industry

Our MSc in Future Food Sustainability benefits from input from an industry advisory panel (with representatives from commercial organisations and non-commercial organisations) who help to ensure the course maintains its real-world relevance to the marketplace and industry focus, making successful students highly sought after in the employment market.

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the Institution of Agricultural Engineers.

Course details

The course comprises eight compulsory assessed modules, a group project and an individual research project. The modules include lectures, practical sessions and tutorials.

Group project

The group project experience is highly valued by both students and prospective employers. It provides students with the opportunity to take responsibility for a consultancy-type project, working within agreed objectives, deadlines and budgets. For part-time students a dissertation usually replaces the group project.

Individual project

The individual thesis project, usually in collaboration with an external organisation, offers students the opportunity to develop their research capability, depth of understanding and ability to provide solutions to real industry and institutional challenges in the wider area of future food supply.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, group project 20% (dissertation for part-time students), individual project 40%.

Funding

To help students in finding and securing appropriate funding we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. Visit the funding finder.

Postgraduate Loan from Student Finance England A Postgraduate Loan is now available for UK and EU applicants to help you pay for your Master’s course. You can apply for a loan at GOV.UK

Future Finance Student Loans Future Finance offer student loans of up to £40,000 that can cover living costs and tuition fees for all student at Cranfield University.

Your career

Successful, motivated graduates from this course are expected to move swiftly into positions within food businesses, government, NGOs and research companies/institutes to engage in roles involving research, management, governance, communication and social responsibility. Specific relevant job roles may include; technical managers, sustainability managers, technical development managers, product technologists, resilience officers, supply chain/logistics analysts, commodity analysts, regulatory affairs advisers, and policy officers.



Read less
Toxicology is the study of adverse effects of chemicals and other substances on humans, other animals, plants and the environment, and how they can be avoided or minimised. Read more
Toxicology is the study of adverse effects of chemicals and other substances on humans, other animals, plants and the environment, and how they can be avoided or minimised. These courses provide an introduction to the principles of modern toxicology in relation to environmental, occupational, and public health in the context of the chemical, food and pharmaceutical industries. These courses are aimed at individuals with a scientific qualification who wish to develop their skills and knowledge of toxicology and gain a recognised third-level qualification in the area. Current practising toxicologists will also benefit from undertaking individual modules for continuing professional development (CPD), as all of the modules will contribute towards maintenance of professional toxicological accreditation. The course content has been approved by the Irish Register of Toxicologists (IRT) and is recognised as accreditation for CPD in this area.

Key Fact

These courses have been developed in close collaboration with the Irish Register of Toxicologists (IRT) and are also approved for accreditation towards becoming a registered toxicologist and for CPD credits towards maintaining IRT/ERT accreditation. The courses are run by European Registered Toxicologists (ERT), including guest lecturers delivering ‘state-of-the-art’ contributions as practising experts in a range of toxicological roles, from basic research to national and European regulatory bodies.

Course Content and Structure

• Essential Pharmacology for the Toxicologist • Experimental Toxicology and Risk Assessment in the 21st Century • Environmental and Occupational Toxicology • Professional Skills for the Modern Toxicologist • Food Toxicology • Medical and Forensic Toxicology • Regulatory Toxicology

Lectures are delivered by staff of international renown in their field, many of whom are practising toxicologists. Study days and e-learning are utilised to maximise flexibility in how students manage their study time.

Career Opportunities

This programme provides a comprehensive overview of toxicology, and current toxicological assessments, highlighting current issues in toxicology. Graduates will gain the required level of professional ability to operate as independent toxicologists by developing a sophisticated level of data interpretation, communication skills, excellence in problem solving, and ability to critically evaluate and form judgements on complex toxicological problems.

Facilities and Resources

The UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science is closely linked to the UCD Conway institute of Biomedical and Biomolecular research, which provides core technologies such as NMR spectroscopy, real-time PCR, electron microscopy, light microscopy, digital pathology and flow cytometry.

Read less
Summary. Veterinary Public Health (VPH) is a subject area which includes all aspects of public health that can be protected or improved by application of veterinary science. Read more

Summary

Veterinary Public Health (VPH) is a subject area which includes all aspects of public health that can be protected or improved by application of veterinary science. It links the animal and human health with the environment and plays a pivotal role in the development of an integrated ‘farm to fork’ approach to food safety. This programme is designed to provide postgraduate and professionally relevant advanced training in VPH. The programme focuses on the core domains of VPH in relation to the regulatory responsibilities of the official veterinarians for the protection of animal health and welfare and human health.

This programme enables official veterinarians to meet the demands for straightforward and clear answers regarding the potential risks (both microbial and non-microbial) associated with the consumption of, or exposure to, products of animal origin, issues of animal welfare and protection of the environment. This programme fulfils the additional requirement for the training of official veterinarians as set out in European Regulation 854/2004.

This is a part-time programme which is entirely internet delivered. European and global experts in veterinary science, law, economics, and policy contribute to the course. The awards are granted jointly between the Ulster University (UK), and University College Dublin (IRL).

About

This programme provides students with broad knowledge and understanding of veterinary public health and promotes their ability to assess available evidence and data, make sound judgements and communicate findings effectively to all stakeholders in the food chain – producers, regulators, industry and consumers. Relevant EU food regulatory policy is integrated within the lectures and translated into a coherent regulatory framework so that students will grasp the complex idea of total regulation of the food chain from primary production through to consumer health issues. Core domains of VPH are addressed in relation to the regulatory responsibilities of the veterinarians and the protection of animal health and welfare and human health.

Teaching is through online lectures, online discussions, individual support, video and internet links with staff, independent learning, and work in small groups.

Modules

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. 

Veterinary Public Health 1 - Regulatory

Veterinary Public Health 1 - Regulatory, will translate the requirements laid down in of EC Regulation 854/2004 on official controls on food and feed of animal origin in terms of basic tenets that underpin EU food regulatory policy into a coherent framework which will equip students with the knowledge base and skills necessary to progress to the more specific elements of Veterinary Public Health which will be studied in the second semester.

Veterinary Public Health 2 - Applied

This module builds on the knowledge base and skills from the previous module (Veterinary Public Health 1 - Regulatory) and aims to integrate the disparate elements of the documented requirements for training of official veterinarians so that students will grasp the complex idea of total regulation of the food chain from primary production, animal welfare, food processing, monitoring and surveillance, environmental and waste issues to protection of consumer health.

Career options

The academic content of this programme helps students to develop knowledge and understanding of legislative, policy and scientific aspects of VPH as well as to acquire skills to disseminate and implement knowledge in practice. Graduates of the PgCert VPH could be eligible to obtain employment as Official Veterinarians employed by the competent authorities in any of the EU Member States (or applicant country), employment by government (EU and international) and non-government organisations. On successful completion of PgCert VPH students can also proceed to register for the PgDip and MSc Food Regulatory Affairs (VPH specialisation).



Read less
Summary. The food and drink industry is a global business that is thriving; the food industry in the UK alone contributes almost £90 billion to the economy. Read more

Summary

The food and drink industry is a global business that is thriving; the food industry in the UK alone contributes almost £90 billion to the economy. While career opportunities within food and nutrition continue to expand, there is still a worldwide shortage of qualified graduates with food and nutrition knowledge and skills.

A major aim of the PgCert /PgDip /MSc course in Food and Nutrition is to provide students with an academically challenging and professionally relevant programme of study which will enable them to pursue a career in the area of food and nutrition. The course is aimed especially at those interested in the relationships between food, nutrition and health, who wish to pursue the wide variety of career opportunities within this challenging and rewarding environment.

Attendance

The Food and Nutrition MSc programme has the option of being taken as distance learning (which is fully online) or as blended learning (which mixes online modules with on campus provision). All students would be offered an on campus induction (optional).

Students undertaking the programme by blended learning would be required to attend campus 1 day per week in each semester for on-campus taught modules. Those undertaking the MSc in full-time mode would complete a research project either on-campus or by distance learning; on-campus this would require students to attend the campus at least 3 days per week during the semester in which the research project runs. Those undertaking the project in part time mode would commit equivalent total time over a longer duration.

Professional recognition

Accredited by the Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST).

Career options

The academic content of the programme helps students to develop knowledge and understanding of key topics relevant to food and nutrition, developing creative and critical thinking, research and development skills, project planning, data analysis and the application of key aspects of food regulatory affairs including policy and legislative aspects. The enhanced skills base provided by this programme will lead to excellent employment opportunities in government (EU and international) and non-government organisations, and in local, European and international agri-food industry.



Read less
Biotechnology encompasses all aspects of the industrial application of living organisms and/ or biological techniques. It is a collection of technologies that capitalise on the attributes of cells and biological molecules, such as DNA, to work for us. Read more
Biotechnology encompasses all aspects of the industrial application of living organisms and/ or biological techniques. It is a collection of technologies that capitalise on the attributes of cells and biological molecules, such as DNA, to work for us. The primary biotechnology activity carried out in Ireland is research and development. Ireland has experienced massive growth across the biotechnology sector including food, environmental and pharmaceutical industries in the last decade. Ireland is home to nine of the top 10 global pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, such as GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Merck, BristolMyers Squibb and Genzyme, with seven of the 10 world blockbuster pharmaceuticals made here. The MSc in Biotechnology is taught by leading
academics in the UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science and focuses on broadening your knowledge and understanding of the current technologies and processes in the biotechnology industry, including approaches being applied to further advance the discovery and design of new and highly innovative biotech and pharmaceutical products and technologies. It also provides modules on food and environmental biotechnology, as well as industrially relevant expertise in facility design, bioprocess technology, regulatory affairs and clinical trials.

Key Fact

During the third semester you will conduct research in an academic or industrial lab. Projects will be carried out within research groups of the UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science using state-of-the-art laboratory and computational facilities or in Irish and multinational biotechnology companies, across the spectrum of the dynamic biotechnology industry in Ireland.

Course Content and Structure

Taught masters Taught modules Individual research project
90 credits 60 credits 30 credits
You will gain experimental and theoretical knowledge in the following topics:
• Pharmacology and Drug Development
• Medical Device Technology
• Biomedical Diagnostics
• Recombinant DNA Technology
• Microbial and Animal Cell Culture
• Food Biotechnology
• Facility Design
• Environmental Biotechnology
• Regulatory Affairs
• Drug Development and Clinical Trials
• Bioprocessing Laboratory Technology
Assessment
• Your work will be assessed using a variety
of methods including coursework, group
and individual reports, written and online
exams, and presentations

Career Opportunities

This advanced graduate degree in Biotechnology has been developed in consultation with employers and therefore is recognised and valued by them. A key feature is the opportunity to carry out a project in industry which will allow graduates to develop connections with prospective employers, thereby enhancing chances of employment on graduation. You will also have the opportunity to become part of a network of alumni in the fi eld of Biotechnology. Prospective employers include Abbott; Allergan; Amgen; Baxter Healthcare; Beckman Coulter; Biotrin International Ltd.; Boston Scientifi c; Elan Corporation; Eli Lilly and Co.; Celltech; GlaxoSmithKline; Icon Clinical Research; Johnson & Johnson Ltd.; Kerry Group Plc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme; Quintiles; Sandoz; Serology Ltd.

Facilities and Resources

• The UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science is closely linked to the UCD Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, which provides cutting edge core technologies including the premier Mass Spectrometry Resource in the country, NMR spectroscopy, real time PCR, electron microscopy, light microscopy, digital pathology and fl ow cytometry.

Read less
The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. It tackles policy and regulatory change, the historical and technological evolution of energy sources, energy markets and their participants, the global governance of climate change as well as the challenges associated with transitioning to a low-carbon economy.

The programme specifically addresses the requirements of those wishing to deepen their theoretical and practical understanding of how energy and climate policies are designed, shaped, advocated and implemented and by whom across a multitude of cases drawn from the Global North and South and across multiple levels of political organisation from global to local arenas.

The MSc is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy. It prepares for a multitude of careers in public and private contexts, including in public administration and government departments, strategic policy and risk advisory, government relations and public affairs, policy advocacy, think tanks and academia.

Guest speakers on the programme's modules have included Angus Miller (Energy Advisor, UK Foreign Office), Tom Burke (Founding Director, E3G and Environmental Policy Advisor, Rio Tinto), Jonathan Grant (Asst. Director Sustainability and Climate Change, PwC), Kash Burchett (European Energy Analyst, IHS Global Insight), Chris Dodwell (AEA Technology, former Head of International Climate Policy, UK Department of Energy and Climate Change) and Andrew Pendleton (Head of Campaigns, Friends of the Earth).

The programme draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. In particular, students will be able to benefit from the expertise located at the Centre for Environment, Development and Policy (CEDEP), the Law School's Law, Environment and Development Centre (LEDC), the Centre on the Politics of Energy Security (CEPES), the Centre for Water and Development, and the SOAS Food Studies Centre.

In addition to the three core modules of Global Energy and Climate Policy (1 unit), Applied Energy and Climate Studies (0.5 units) and Global Public Policy (0.5 units) students choose a fourth module to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Paris and Brussels.

Programme objectives

- Excellent understanding of the nature and development of global energy and climate policy, drawing on a variety of contributing disciplines

- Excellent knowledge of regulatory challenges and their impact on public and private stakeholders in both the Global South and North

- Ability to critically contribute to contemporary policy debates about reforms of international energy and climate governance architectures and their interaction with national and sub-national policy and regulatory frameworks

- Development of practical skills including policy analysis and policy advocacy, risk analysis, strategic communication and media

We welcome applications from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds. It is not necessary to have a degree in a discipline directly related to global energy and climate policy.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Listen to the MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy and CISD's 1st Annual Energy and Climate Change Conference (May 2011) podcast (http://www.4shared.com/mp3/EdRUc-qq/CISD_Energy_and_Climate_Change.html), organised by students.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/2016 (pdf; 172kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/file80890.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full time employment. Participants may choose a combination of courses to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the courses for Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) accessible to part time students. The majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00 where possible however lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some courses (between evening and daytime slots) so that part time students will have access to as many courses as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each GECP course taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:

- Theory and practice of global energy and climate change policy as intertwined global issues

- Practical toolkit including policy analysis and planning, risk analysis, strategic communication, policy advocacy and negotiation skills

- Interaction with policymakers and government officials, energy industry and NGO representatives, and other practitioners

- An elective from a wide range: International Relations, International Law, International Economics, International Security, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a course offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law)

Further activities:

Also included in the degree programme:

- Week-long study trip to energy and climate change related organisations in Brussels and Paris
- Advanced media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Participation in workshops attended by public and private sector stakeholders
- Opportunity to organize and run the Centre’s annual Energy and Climate Policy conference
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners (visit the CISD website (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/all-audios/1) to listen to the podcasts)

This course is also available online and is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy and who wish to study in a flexible way. Please click here to view more information http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy-online/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Our key research areas are. air pollution and atmospheric chemistry; applied meteorology and climatology; environmental nanoscience and persistent organic pollutants. Read more
Our key research areas are: air pollution and atmospheric chemistry; applied meteorology and climatology; environmental nanoscience and persistent organic pollutants.

Our research attracts extensive funding from many sources. The collaborative nature of much of our work, together with the mix of pure, strategic and applied research, provides a dynamic and internationally recognised research environment.

The Division of Environmental Health and Risk Management (DEHRM) is based in the well-equipped, purpose-built facilities of the University's Public Health Building. Our research attracts extensive funding from many sources, including the:

- Department of Transport
- Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
- Environment Agency
- Department of Health
- Food Standards Agency
- National Environment Research Council (NERC)
- Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)
- Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
- Leverhulme Trust
- European programmes

The collaborative nature of much of this work, together with the mix of pure, strategic and applied research, often involving interdisciplinary teams spanning physical, biological, chemical, medical and social sciences, provides a dynamic and internationally recognised research environment.

About the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences

The School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences has a renowned history for international excellence in research and teaching.
Our postgraduate programmes are shaped by research that addresses global grand challenges across the fields of geography, planning, earth sciences, environmental science, occupational health and safety, and environmental and public health. With policy- and practice-focused teaching, all our programmes have high employability outcomes.
We offer excellent facilities for postgraduate study including extensive map and archive facilities, earth imaging laboratory, stable-isotope laboratory (SILLA), environmental library, fully digital drawing office, and state-of-the-art laboratories for environmental chemistry, sedimentology, ecology, groundwater and palaeobiology. Our diverse range of programmes will provide you with a thorough understanding of the discipline, high-quality training and skills development, and access to our expert staff and extensive facilities.
Our graduates go on to forge careers in areas that matter – from environmental consultancies and the hydrocarbon industries, to urban planning, policy roles in NGOs and government regulatory services – and make a real contribution to global challenges. Many graduates also go on to study for PhDs.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
This unique Master's of Public Administration degree provides professionals working in international development with the practical tools and skills to collaborate on policy that responds to the need for balanced growth, social wellbeing and environmental protection in developing countries. Read more

This unique Master's of Public Administration degree provides professionals working in international development with the practical tools and skills to collaborate on policy that responds to the need for balanced growth, social wellbeing and environmental protection in developing countries.

About this degree

Students are taught the conceptual frameworks, policy analysis tools and analytical methods to creatively develop innovative sustainable policy for developing countries. Students also study how development and innovation policies are implemented, evaluated and revised in policy cycles. A focus on leadership and the development of professional skills is emphasised throughout.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), an elective module (15 credits), and a major group project module (45 credits).

Core modules

Students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes, and a specialist module focusing on their degree topic.

  • Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
  • Analytical Methods for Policy
  • Development, Technology and Innovation Policy
  • Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules

Students must select one compulsory option from the following STEaPP modules

  • Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
  • Risk Assessment and Governance
  • Communicating Science for Policy
  • Negotiation, Mediation and Diplomacy

Students will then also select one further 15-credit graduate module which is relevant to their degree of study. This module can be selected from any UCL department.

MPA Group Policy Project

In the group project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP academic staff, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs. The Group Project is usually around 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles. During the programme, students acquire a comprehensive range of relevant skills.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Development, Technology and Innovation Policy MPA

Careers

Graduates with Development, Technology and Innovation Policy MPA degrees will typically work in government agencies, corporate regulatory affairs departments or within advocacy groups doing legislative, regulatory or policy analysis. The career path for this type of profession begins as research or policy assistant, moves through policy or research analyst, then to technical consultant or project director or other senior professional roles. Ambitious candidates can work towards top-level positions such as assistant secretary or executive director.

Employability

Through the MPA programme, students will:

  • gain a greater awareness of current issues and developments in innovation, development, science, technology and engineering
  • develop a greater awareness of the knowledge systems underpinning successful policy-making processes
  • learn how to communicate with scientists and engineers, policymakers and industry experts
  • develop the skills to mobilise development, technology and innovation policy, and science and engineering knowledge and expertise, to address the societal challenges they care about.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Developing countries face rapid technological change, increased global interdependencies, and problems such as climate change. This practical programme offers experiential learning for skills needed in innovative development policy-making.

Students undertake a week-long scenario activity on the policy-making process where they engage with external experts and UCL academics. Students go on to undertake a nine-month major project for a real-world client involved in development initiatives. Example policy problems include water or energy infrastructure, food, or telecoms.

Students will gain the opportunity to network with UCL STEaPP's broad range of international partners, expert staff and a diverse range of academics and professionals from across the department's MPA and doctoral programmes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
The Pollution Management option focuses on the interface and interaction between science, technology, and policy in the environment. There is an emphasis on local issues, but these are inescapably set within the context of regional and global developments. Read more

The Pollution Management option focuses on the interface and interaction between science, technology, and policy in the environment. There is an emphasis on local issues, but these are inescapably set within the context of regional and global developments. We draw on best practice in the UK and Western Europe, applied not only here but also in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the Americas.

Aims

In Western Europe and North America, many short-range pollution problems of past decades have been solved, but business and industry find themselves operating in an environment where the public and government demand ever more stringent environmental standards. Other parts of the world might be seen as following some way behind this trend and learning from it, including where examples of acute local and regional pollution remain in a context of a pressing need for rapid socio-economic development. Globalisation is an additional, external source of pressure on every nation to meet the highest environmental standards that are increasingly prevalent elsewhere. In many cases, however, developing countries have an opportunity to learn from our mistakes as well as our successes. In particular, the trend of the past was for environmental protection to be an expensive luxury. Today, it is possible to find a different and more efficient path to a better quality of life for everyone, now and in the future, by protecting the environment in a way that leads simultaneously to an increase in economic prosperity. There is therefore continued growth in demand for graduates with expertise in pollution management:

  • Within the UK and European Union
  • Working from the UK but exporting expertise to other parts of the world
  • World-wide, especially in the rapidly developing economies of Latin America, Africa, and Asia, and in Eastern European and Mediterranean regions having increasing levels of trade and political interaction with the European Union.

Responses to pollution at least must reassure the public it is safe, or allow adaptation to or protection from its effects. A better approach is to control concentrations of a pollutant in the environment, but the best solution is to prevent its formation in the first place.

Integrated Pollution, Prevention and Control is a major development in this area, pioneered in the UK and now led by the European Union, bringing together management, planning, and communication as well as end-of-pipe technological solutions. But this needs to mesh with other kinds of regulatory and voluntary initiatives, especially where non-industrial sources of pollution including transport and agriculture make an important contribution, in more and less developed countries alike.

Content

The Option is divided into six modules, covering all the major areas of environmental concern, and there is a significant interdisciplinary element throughout, reflecting the philosophy of the MSc as a whole. They should not be considered as stand-alone, but should be seen as a closely integrated whole:

Module Aims and Learning Outcomes

Environment and Health

  • To give the student a foundation in chemistry, microbiology and policy basics to understand aspects of environmental management and technology and their impact on health.
  • Describe the main chemical and biological processes important in the physical environment and environmental technology and parameters that define environmental quality.

Air Pollution and Climate Control

  • To familiarise students with how our incomplete but expanding scientific understanding of pollution is translated into policy and practice for Air Pollution & Climate Control management.
  • Be able to integrate understanding of atmospheric chemistry and physics together with biological implications and pollution control technology, with the application of Air Pollution modelling and monitoring for review and assessment of air quality & Climate.

Waste and Resource Management

  • To provide students with an introduction to policies that aim to manage human activities with a focus on waste management to prevent, reduce, or mitigate harmful effects on nature and natural resources.
  • Be able to understand the principal features of UK and EC environmental policies and appreciate from a management point of view the principal waste and resouce related problems today.

Environmental Decision Making and Tools

  • To introduce students to some of the most important policy tools and techniques to assist them in decision-making.
  • Be able to select and use certain management techniques and policy tools to support decision- making in environmental management and policy.

Environmental Pollution and Assessment

  • To enhance students' understanding of the pathways in the environment followed by pollutants from source to receptor
  • Be able to assess the physical and chemical processes involved in the progress of pollutants from source to receptor, and manage the impacts the pollutants may have on a range of receptors.

Water Technology and Pollution

  • To introduce the student to the various unit processes used in water and wastewater treatment, including underlying pollution theory and treatment technology.
  • Be able to describe the basic concepts of polluted water treatment technology and the selection of unit treatment processes.

Careers

The majority of the graduates enter environmental consultancy both in the UK and abroad usually within the risk assessment and contaminated land areas. A second path of graduates is to regulatory agencies/government bodies such as the Environment Agency of England & Wales and the Department of Environment, Food & Rural Affairs. Other paths have included further study, the retail sector and banking. To date, the Option has had an excellent track record of employment with over 90% of graduates employed within 12 months of completing the MSc.

 • PhD, Technical University of Athens

• Projects Manager, British Council, Brazil

• Environmental Health Officer, London Borough of Newham

• Assistant Director, Science & Technology Division, Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment Malaysia

• Field Engineer, Schlumberger (Angola)

• Senior Consultant, Arthur D. Little

• General Director, Environmental Management, Environment Ministry, Mexico

• Partner and Director of UK Environmental Services, Price Waterhouse Coopers

• Technical Director, Stanger Science & Technology

• Senior Lecturer, Roehampton University

• Quality Control Engineer, Chiyoda Corporation, Doha, Qatar

• Head of Environmental Audit, Body Shop International

• Head of Solid Waste Control, Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department



Read less
The aim of the Option is to provide graduates with the skills to enter a wide range of environmental careers, with particular emphasis on environmental consultancy and regulatory job markets. Read more

The aim of the Option is to provide graduates with the skills to enter a wide range of environmental careers, with particular emphasis on environmental consultancy and regulatory job markets. The Option is designed to train students in analysis and assessment methods applicable to environmental contamination problems.

The Environmental Analysis and Assessment (EAA) Option comprises lectures plus two practical case studies, each with a different technical emphasis.

 A large number of the lectures are from consultants, the regulators and industry professionals, many from alumni of the Option, providing the student with first-hand contact with live issues as well as the chance to discuss job opportunities with potential employers. 

The Option lectures are supported by a number of site visits plus a five-day study tour to provide practical underpinning of the Option material.

Aims

The EAA Option is designed to train students from diverse scientific and technical backgrounds in assessment methods applicable to environmental contamination and pollution problems.

The emphasis throughout the course is on the use of quantitative environmental assessment methodologies, including:

  • field sampling and laboratory analysis for direct determination of contaminant concentrations and distributions within environmental systems and;
  • predictive computer modelling techniques to assess the risks and impacts associated with either real or hypothetical contamination scenarios.

A thorough grounding in physical, chemical and biological processes of contaminant behaviour in the environment is provided as the basis for understanding the impacts of chemical contamination. This is strengthened by the introduction to, and use of, predictive modelling techniques for assessing risks and impacts associated with either real or hypothetical contamination scenarios.

To complement and enhance teaching of quantitative aspects of environmental assessment techniques, classical EIA and auditing methodologies are also an important course component.

After completion of the course the students should be able to:

  • understand the fundamental pathways and processes controlling the behaviour and fate of contaminants in environmental systems;
  • design suitable field sampling strategies for the assessment of contaminant distributions in the near-surface atmosphere, surface and ground waters and soils;
  • suggest appropriate sampling and analytical methods for inorganic and organic contaminants in different environmental media and to liaise effectively with analysts and laboratories specialising in the analysis of individual contaminating substances;
  • organise data sets obtained from field sampling and laboratory analytical studies and be able to configure these in a suitable format for higher level data analysis using a computer tool such as a Geographical Information System;
  • apply suitable computer models to evaluate critical pathways and processes of contaminant transport in the environment or to perform simulations of future impacts of contaminant releases from a variety of sources;
  • understand the legal and policy framework within which quantitative environmental assessment activities are carried out and to apply EIA and auditing methodologies where appropriate.

Module Aims and Learning Outcomes

Environment and Health

  • To give the student a foundation in science and policy basics to understand aspects of environmental management and technology and its impact on health.
  • Be able to explain the main chemical and biological processes important in the physical environment, the parameters that define environmental quality and its effect on health.

 Air Pollution and Climate Change

  • To familiarise students with how our incomplete but expanding scientific understanding of pollution is translated into policy and practice for Air Pollution & Climate Change management.
  • Be able to integrate understanding of atmospheric chemistry and physics together with biological implications and pollution control technology, with the application of Air Pollution modelling and monitoring for review and assessment of air quality & climate.

Waste and Resource Management

  • To provide students with an introduction to the legal, technical and practical issues involved in waste and resources management.
  • Be able to appreciate the principal features of legislation and policy relating to waste management and appreciate from a technical point of view the primary waste and resource management problems in the UK and European Union today.

Environmental Decision Making and Tools

  • To introduce students to some of the most important policy tools and techniques to assist them in decision-making.
  • Be able to select and use certain management techniques and policy tools to support decision- making in environmental management and policy.

Integrated Land Management

  • To provide students with an overview of problems, potential remedies and possible outcomes involved in holistic management of the environment.
  • Be able to assess environmental problems and environmental relationships in order to propose holistic solutions that maximise overall benefits and minimise adverse impacts.

Environmental Pollution and Assessment

  • To enhance students' understanding of the pollution pathways in the environment from source to receptor.
  • Be able to describe water recycling technologies and assess the physical and chemical processes involved in the progress of pollutants from source to receptor.

Careers

The majority of the graduates enter environmental consultancy both in the UK and abroad usually within the risk assessment and contaminated land areas, but this is not an exhaustive list. A second path of graduates is to regulatory agencies/government bodies such as the Environment Agency of England & Wales and the Department of Environment, Food & Rural Affairs. Other paths have included further study, the retail sector and banking. To date, the Option has had an excellent track record of employment with over 90% of graduates employed within 12 months of completing the MSc.

Fieldwork

One piece of fieldwork is undertaken in collaboration with the WM and Health and HGWEoptions of the MSc, and provides a "real-world" case study of contaminated land and water on Hounslow Heath, near Heathrow Airport, in close collaboration with Hounslow London Borough Council. The second piece of fieldwork is a waste management project in collaboration with Veolia Waste Management Services Ltd., providing an opportunity for students to work on a typical waste management problem.

At the end of the Option term the EAA students will spend a week on location at a city somewhere in the UK visiting a variety of industrial facilities, plants and operations.



Read less
Your programme of study. The University of Aberdeen is highly regarded for Clinical Pharmacology as the discipline has been taught and delivered for 30 years and research spans 50 years. Read more

Your programme of study

The University of Aberdeen is highly regarded for Clinical Pharmacology as the discipline has been taught and delivered for 30 years and research spans 50 years. The programme draws on strengths within the university and medical area within disease discovery and treatment. The major innovation of Insulin was first developed at University of Aberdeen in the 1920s, winning the inventors a Nobel Prize and giving the world a major step forward in the management and regulation of insulin. Since this time the discovery of drug process, treatment and design has been developed and researched at Aberdeen. The University is also known for its research in food and nutrition, bacteria, gut issues researched at the world famous Rowett Institute and growing knowledge of disease process and latest innovative treatments.

Clinical pharmacology forms a critical part of the drug development process and our graduates are employed in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. These industries are now in rapid growth due to a combination of innovations and strength within customised and other types of medicine and treatment industry areas. The industry is also a major contributor of GDP in the UK. Further innovations which link into this industry come from easier upscaling processes, customisation and the Internet of Things and more ability to treat and diagnose at source.

There is always a strong need for the discipline to provide a foundation to any new innovations which often come from multidisciplinary teams. Our aim is to train students in the major areas of clinical pharmacology including molecular pharmacology, drug metabolism and toxicology, therapeutics, pharmacokinetics, pharmcovigilance, regulatory affairs and experimental medicine. The programme aims to achieve this by a multi-disciplinary approach.

This programme is ideal for newly qualified graduates in medical science disciplines such as biomedical sciences, biochemistry, pharmacology, pharmacy, medicine and similar degrees. Careers can include work in clinical trials and NPD in pharmaceutical industries, doctoral research towards teaching, spin-outs and major innovations, regulation in the pharmaceutical industry and more.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Molecular Pharmacology
  • Drug Metabolism and Toxicology
  • Therapeutics
  • Applied Statistics
  • Basic Skills- Induction
  • Generic Skills

Semester 2

  • Pharmacovigilance
  • Drug Development to Evidence Based Medicine
  • Pharmacokinetics
  • Basic Research Methods
  • Business of Science

Optional

  • Health Informatics (distance learning

Semester 3

  • Research Project

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by one of the top 10 medical schools in the UK with one of the largest campuses in Europe
  • Teaching is from academic and clinical teachers within a clinical setting
  • You get a great range of multidisciplinary learning from our research
  • We are in the top 10 for university spin out and company formation

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X