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Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City. From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Read more
Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City.

Who is it for?

From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Our students come to study the MSc in Food Policy from around the world, across the food landscape and go on to develop their careers in a variety of ways once they graduate.

The course is for students who are passionate about food policy and are open to challenging their own assumptions. We want you to graduate from this Masters with a more disciplined and rigorous approach so you can be more effective in pursuing your passions within the food domain.

Objectives

How does a coconut growing in Malaysia become a coconut drink in the UK? On this programme we explore how policy influences the trajectory of food not just from field to fork but across time and territory.

The MSc in Food Policy is about analysing, researching and informing the future of food policy from the local to global scale. It is run by the Centre for Food Policy, which has pioneered an integrated approach to food policy since 1994.

The ways in which we produce, process, distribute, market, prepare and consume food have important consequences for our health and that of the planet. We look at the positive and negative impacts of food, from the health, environmental, political, socio-economic and cultural perspective.

This Masters promotes genuine interdisciplinary because we think you need to look at the subject from all angles to make the most holistic evaluation. It draws on social sciences (sociology, politics, economics, anthropology, psychology) as well as health sciences and epidemiology. We look at the latest food policy debates and place them in a historical context.

You will be taught by a team of specialist food policy specialists who are leaders in the field. Our academic staff are actively involved in research and in policy-making on the local, national and global stage. Our teaching reflects this engagement.

Students are exposed to conflicting narratives about the problems facing the food system and the best ways to resolve them. We address important questions of our time, such as:
-Are we producing too much or too little food to feed the world population?
-How have we ended up living in a world where there are more overweight and obese people than under-nourished people?
-Why is a third of the food produced globally lost or wasted?
-How can we deal with the massive impact of agriculture on climate change?
-How do lobbyists and the media influence what we eat?

Academic facilities

As a food policy student at City, University of London you can learn from experts at leading institutions across the UK through the Innovative Food Systems Teaching and Learning (IFSTAL) initiative.

Created for postgraduate students, the initiative aims to address an urgent skills shortage in the food industry and tackle systematic failings in the food system by combining resources and knowledge. The network, which is made up of five leading higher education institutions including City and the University of Oxford, gives you the opportunity to take part in research and internship placements during your degree.

When it comes to studying food policy, London is an amazing location. Giving you one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories, it offers a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city and hone your focus towards your own area of interest and/or expertise. As part of the University of London, you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We are a passionate and engaged team who will help you understand how to change the food system for the better. You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small group activities, whole class discussions, workshops and independent study. There are a lot of group discussions in class. We encourage you to ask questions, contribute your own experiences and apply your own perspectives to the issues we explore. The programme also encourages a strong peer-to-peer community through social media.

For the distance-learning mode you will be able to watch the lectures online, which are supplemented with written exercises and one-to-one Skype tutorials with the teaching staff.

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by two pieces of written work. The first is handed in during the middle of term so that you receive useful feedback before moving on to the second assignment. In each case you will choose the topic. You will also be asked to write different kinds of documents (briefing papers, memos, reports as well as essays) that correspond to those you would have to write in policy-making organisations. Then you work on your dissertation, which is a longer (15,000 word) piece of work, enabling you to delve into a food policy topic of your choice in depth. You will gain support from a personal supervisor who is a senior academic from the Centre for Food Policy.

Modules

The course consists of four core taught modules (worth 30 credits each) and a dissertation (worth 60 credits). The dissertation gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a topic of your choice that is relevant to food policy. The course has been designed to enable you to pursue your own interests and passions. In every assignment you have the opportunity to engage with the issues you care about.

The course is flexible to fit in with your work commitments so you can study this Masters on a full-time (one year), part-time (two years) or on a distance-learning basis (two years). The taught modules take place in the first and second terms, and the dissertation starts in the third term and continues until September (December for part-time students). For each taught module there are approximately 10 three-hour teaching sessions. In addition you are expected to undertake around 270 hours of independent study. For the whole programme, you should expect to study for around 1800 hours (35 hours per week for full-time students, 17.5 hours for part-time students).

Taught modules
-FPM001 - Food and public policy (30 credits)
-FPM003 - Food, culture and society (30 credits)
-FPM002 The political economy of food (30 credits)
-FPM004 Food, public health and the environment (30 credits)

Career prospects

We are very proud of our alumni. Our employability stats – the highest within the School – reflect the range of opportunities available to our graduates. For example, our alumni run NGOs and progressive food businesses, work in government and UN agencies, and have established great careers in health advocacy, journalism and academia.

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This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. Read more
This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. You will gain an in-depth understanding of regional, national, and international standards in regulatory processes, and the role of public institutions and policy makers in delivering safe, quality foods to consumers.

This course is designed for graduates and those working in the agri-food industries who are seeking to advance their knowledge and understanding of food safety and quality management, and progress their professional careers.

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two years.

You will study eight modules, followed by the Research Project, carried out over the summer to be submitted in September. It will be presented as a review paper and as a research paper.

If you do not wish to undertake the Research Project may choose to take a Postgraduate Diploma following successful completion of eight modules.

You will learn through a combination of lectures, guest speakers, group workshops and seminars, case studies, individual and student-led research, group projects, and field studies

Students are encouraged to participate in the RAU Enterprise Scheme where they can develop their entrepreneurial skills towards starting their own business.

This course is available to start in either September or January.

September entry

Students will study four modules in the autumn term followed by four modules in the spring term, and complete their Research Project by the end of September.

January entry

Students will study four modules in the spring term, complete their Research Project by the end of September, and study four modules in the autumn term.

Modules

• 4014 Food Chain
• 4075 Research Project
• 4206 Fundamentals of Food Science
• 4207 Systems for Food Safety Management
• 4209 Sustainability and the Food industry
• 4228 New Product Development (NPD) in the Agri-Food Industry
• 4237 The Politics and Policies of Food Assurance

Plus choice of TWO modules, selected from:

• 4040 Sustainable Management of Soil and Water
• 4084 Tourism and Development
• 4110 Fisheries and Aquaculture Management
• 4201 Poverty and Food Security
• 4211 Global Red Meat Chains
• 4212 Global White Meat Chains
• 4213 Global Dairy Food Chain
• 4238 Integrated Organic Systems

Modules will be taught in 10 week blocks.

Assessment

Modules are assessed through written examinations and coursework, including case study analysis, essay writing, oral and poster presentations, and assessed seminars. For the new product development (NPD) module, students are assessed against a food product which they develop and produce in small teams. To complete this module, students are given training in the CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety for Manufacturing, which is beneficial to them post-graduation.

Career prospects

Graduates will be equipped with the education and industry experience to progress their career and become food safety and quality management professionals within:

• An international institution – UN (World Food Programme), IFAD, FAO, IFPRI etc.
• Government and statutory bodies – Defra, DflD, FSA etc.
• Business and industry – major agricultural and food supply companies, consultancy
• NGOs – local food associations, aid and development organisations
• Academia and research – lecturer, PhD

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century. Read more

Programme description

Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century.

This programme is not suitable for applicants pursuing a career in food science or food safety/hygiene or related areas. Please read the programme description and ensure you understand the nature of the programme before you apply. Applicants who do not show a clear understanding of the programme will not be accepted.

Food security has become a critically important issue for societies around the globe. Interactions between demographics, changes in diet, trade liberalisation, an increased focus on conservation, technological innovations including GM crops, the impact of climate change and new responses to climate change resource limitations (particularly in terms of energy, water and nutrients) all affect food security.

With such a rapid growth in this area, there is an increasing demand for qualified experts to contribute to policy creation and legislation in food production and the supply chain.

This unique MSc offers students the scope and multidisciplinary approach to address all of these issues, as well as an understanding of the technical, agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security.

This programme is run in collaboration with Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC).

Programme structure

This MSc programme consists of six taught courses over two semesters, and an individual dissertation project of about 12,000 words.

Compulsory courses typically include*:
•Frameworks to Assess Food Security
•Sustainability of Food Production
•Interrelationships in Food Systems
•Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses*. We particularly recommend:
•Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
•Ecosystem Services 1: Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
•Foundations in Ecological Economics
•Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
•Integrated Resource Management
•Principles of Environmental Sustainability
•Soil Protection and Management
•Understanding Environment and Development
•Marine Systems and Policies
•Applications in Ecological Economics
•Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
•Integrated Resource Planning
•Interrelationships in Food Systems
•Land Use/Environmental Interactions
•Case Studies in Sustainable Development
•Ecosystem Services 2: Ecosystem Values and Management
•Environmental Impact Assessment
•Soil Science Concepts and Application

*Please note: courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change each year.

Field trip

Provisionally in Italy, the field trip provides an opportunity to apply some of the principles of food security to real world scenarios.

Learning outcomes

Students will be able to:

•Provide a broad understanding of agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security
•Apply scientific information and methods in the analysis of complex problems
•Formulate a research problem and independently carry out the research needed to produce an appropriate solution in a range of scientific or policy contexts
•Enhance their skills in specialist topics related to food security

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme typically go on to work in government and non-governmental agencies as well as international bodies and businesses where they can utilise the invaluable, and highly prized, skills they have acquired on the programme, such as food security assessment.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.
https://edingeoscistudents.wordpress.com/

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As instances of global and local food injustice are reported with more frequency, the dysfunction of our food system and complexity of food culture is being more widely recognised. Read more
As instances of global and local food injustice are reported with more frequency, the dysfunction of our food system and complexity of food culture is being more widely recognised. Increasingly, it is understood that reductionist approaches to solving food related issues are ineffective.

A more comprehensive understanding and holistic approach is greatly needed. This MSc provides an opportunity to study food and food systems in a more complete sense. This innovative new course - the first of its kind in Scotland - acknowledges the truly complex nature of food and includes studies in nutrition, production and consumer culture, but also delves deeper to consider food culture within the contexts of anthropology, environment, sustainability, politics and communications. Through experience of diverse food related businesses - from soup kitchens to Michelin Star restaurants, community allotments to large-scale agri-business - students will gain all important exposure to the diverse dynamics affecting how we consume, produce, represent and understand food. Scotland will often be the showcase for this, however the concepts are transferable to other countries, for one thing that people require irrespective of nationhood is the ability to feed themselves. Whether you are looking to enhance your career in the food industry or are simply interested in cultivating a fuller understanding of food, please contact us. We are more than happy to discuss the course in more depth and help you discover if this is what you’ are looking for.

Teaching, learning and assessment

Modules will involve elements of inquiry (problem) based learning, report writing, visual presentations, essays and viva voce interviews. Learning therefore will be diverse and teaching will happen anywhere that there is a relationship to food and drink or ancillary industries. This may be in the University, on the streets of Edinburgh, the hills of the Scottish Borders or in a Michelin star restaurant. The course will therefore embed research-led learning, by requiring students to examine information from a diverse range of sources including academic books/journals, online blogs/wiki’s relating to food and drink agendas, and primary and secondary data. The importance of working closely with industry colleagues cannot be underestimated.

Opportunities to interact with for example, farmers, North Sea fishermen, and cooks and producers at all levels will enhance the learning experience. Class sizes are normally around 15-20 students. This ensures that students receive fantastic support from tutors and benefit from sharing experiences with classmates.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module consists of 60 hours of teaching time over a 10-week period. There are two core modules planned for each semester, plus a research module that spans the first two semesters. You will be required to carry out independent work and also complete a dissertation.

Links with industry/professional bodies

This course has been developed in collaboration with a broad range of stakeholders involved in the food and drink industries.

Modules

30 credits: Food & Drink: The Relationship to People and Food/ Science of Food/ The System: From Field to Market/ Food Communications

15 credits: Research Methods

If studying for an MSc, you will also complete a dissertation (60 credits).

Careers

Graduates will place themselves in the enviable position of having had exposure to a range of industry experiences and contemporary food issues that will enable them to make interventions and transformations in a wide variety of areas. These may range from education or community work, to advocacy and policy work within the non-profit sector.

Entry requirements

There are several routes to entry.
- Applicants may have a first degree in an associated subject, for example, a BA (Hons) in Hospitality, Culinary
Arts, or Nutrition.
- An honours degree (or equivalent) in a different discipline but where the applicant has a demonstrable passion for food and drink.
- An applicant may potentially be a mature student who has spent a considerable period of time in industry and wishes to formalise their education.

All shortlisted candidates will be interviewed as part of the application process

International: Where your honours degree has not been studied in English, you will be required to provide evidence of English language competence at no less than IELTS 6.5 with no individual component score below 5.5

Quick Facts

-This is the first MSc in Gastronomy in the UK.
-The course has 15 funded places available for potential students resident in Scotland and the EU.

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Our staff are active researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. That research informs our masters courses. As well as the usual lectures and seminars, there are practicals, lab classes, field trips and research projects. Read more

How we teach

Our staff are active researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. That research informs our masters courses. As well as the usual lectures and seminars, there are practicals, lab classes, field trips and research projects.

Facilities and equipment

A new £1m Sediment-Solute Systems lab enables geochemical analysis of aqueous and solid phases, especially in the context of biogeochemistry. We have equipment for chromatography, UV spectrometry and flow injection/auto analysis.

Our sample preparation facilities enable digestion, pre-concentration by evaporation under vacuum, and tangential flow filtration. There are alpha and gamma counters, a laser particle sizer and a luminescence dating lab. Field equipment includes automatic water samplers, weather stations, data loggers and environmental process characterisation sensors.

We have high-quality petrological microscopes for examining geological samples. We have labs for spectrometry and for palaeontological preparation, and you’ll also have access to specialist facilities in other departments at the University.

Laptops, camcorders, tape recorders and transcribers are available for your fieldwork. Our postgraduate computer labs have networked workstations for GIS research and climate modelling, ARC/INFO, ERDAS software and specialist software for remote sensing. GIS facilities are also provided by the £5m Informatics Collaboratory for the Social Sciences.

Our new postgraduate media GIS suite has facilities for Skype, video conferencing, web design, video editing and creative media.

Fieldwork

Most of our courses involve fieldwork. The MPH, MSc and MA International Development take students on a 10-day field trip where they put their research skills into practice. Recent classes visited the West Pokot region of Kenya, urban and rural areas of Nepal, the suburbs of Cairo and India.

Core modules

Theory and Debates in Food Security and Food Justice; Research Design and Methods; Food Security and Food Justice Field Course – 2015/16 Hong Kong; Dissertation with Placement; Professional Skills for Food Security and Food Justice.

Examples of optional modules

Ideas and Practice in Development; Policy and Practice; Global Politics of the Environment and Climate Change; Understanding Environmental Change; Poverty, Place and Inequality; Soil and Sustainability; Global Justice; The Politics of International Law,

Cities of Diversity; Planning for informality; Governance and Participation in the Global South; Global Social Policy and Governance; Disaster and Emergency Management; Advanced Languages 2; Open Source GIS and Spatial Data Analysis.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is delivered through a combination of workshops, lectures, seminars and practicals.

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MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of specific research topics supported by our research active academic staff. Our broad range of research areas relate to food security, farming and rural development. Read more

Course Overview

MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of specific research topics supported by our research active academic staff. Our broad range of research areas relate to food security, farming and rural development.

Food and human nutrition research areas include:

Ecological agriculture

This includes: genes and physiological traits, eg resistance to crop pests and diseases; molecular-assisted selection and breeding methods; functional biodiversity for control of pest, disease and weed pressure

Food and human nutrition

Research on food quality including: sensory evaluation; effects of agronomic and production environment on nutrient and phytochemical composition; consumer acceptability; physiological responses to diet

Integrated animal science

An internationally recognised centre of excellence in integrative animal science, drawing on fundamental research and applying it to areas of societal, industrial and policy importance. Our research primarily involves: farm livestock, domesticated animal and wildlife applied research; integrated livestock system development and evaluation; animal behaviour, health and welfare; survival, health and efficiency of nutrient utilisation

Soils, plants and environment

This includes: soil ecology and the contribution of soil biodiversity to soil qualityinterpretation of soil and landscape processes to improve understanding of recent and historical environmental change; land degradation processes and their control; water management in irrigated and dryland farming systems; plant environment interactions and their relationships to stress biology; physiological basis of crop yield and quality

Rural development in advanced economies

This includes: impact and implications of ‘local-global’ processes and relationships for rural areas; characteristics and performance of rural businesses and households; rural governance; demographic ageing and social change; living with environmental change

Food systems, consumption and marketing

This includes: consumer studies in food; risk and health; food supply chains and territorial development; international political economy of food and agriculture

Science and technology studies in food and environment

This includes: controversies in food and environment; politics of biosecurity.We offer a number of different routes to a research degree qualification, including full-time and part-time supervised research projects. We attract postgraduates via non-traditional routes, including mature students and part-time postgraduates undertaking study as part of their continuing professional development.

We offer a number of different routes to a research degree qualification, including full-time and part-time supervised research projects. We attract postgraduates via non-traditional routes, including mature students and part-time postgraduates undertaking study as part of their continuing professional development.

Off-campus, split research is also offered, which enables you to conduct trials in conditions appropriate to your research programme.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and support elements to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our Postgraduate Researcher Development Programme, doctoral training centres and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/food-human-nutrition-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/food-human-nutrition-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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In recent years interest in the relationship between international business and global politics has increased. Read more
In recent years interest in the relationship between international business and global politics has increased. There is much interest in issues such as the global financial crisis, the 'decline' of the West and rise of China and the East, tax evasion and tax havens, corporate power, global social justice, corporate social responsibility and fair trade. This new programme sets out to explore concepts, approaches and methods from a truly inter-disciplinary perspective and offers a rich and stimulating basis for postgraduate study. The degree offers a framework for exploring the changing relationship between states and markets, international institutions of global political-economic governance, transnational companies, work, geo-politics, industrialisation and development.

* This is a unique Masters course which looks at the interaction between business and politics which is vital in understanding the dynamics of the contemporary world economy
* This is a programme for students who want to understand and improve the world they live in and how it is governed
* The course provides conceptual frameworks through which to understand world events and current affairs
* This course gives students the option to study international relations, multinational firms, development studies and international trade, but with a more vocational element to prepare you for work in the modern globalising world of business

Why study with us?

This programme is run collaboratively by the School of Business and Management and the School of Politics and International Relations. The School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary was rated amongst the top 20 Politics departments in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). The School has particular strengths in international security, conflict and war, human rights, the political economy of North-South relations, international political theory, Middle East politics, and the transition from the Cold War to the post-Cold War world.

The School of Business and Management is rapidly building a strong reputation for a distinctive approach, in particular our focus on the inter-disciplinary nature of business and management. The School entered the RAE for the first time in 2008 with outstanding success, ranking joint 25th out of 90 Business Schools. This result is the highest ever recorded first-time entry.

* Joint study of business and politics is unique, this Masters programme is inter-disciplinary, allowing students to move between Social Science subjects
* This scheme looks at the theories and big picture dynamics and processes in politics and business so that you can analyse current events and look at the connections between global supply chains and politics
* The Masters provides a broad based analysis of how, and for whom, capitalism works
* The programme is case study driven, including a focus on the contemporary world economy, trade regulation, the IMF and World Bank, manufacturing in China, the global food economy, and theories of the multinational firm.

Facilities

You will have access to postgraduate only facilities which include the Lock-keeper's Cottage Graduate Centre dedicated solely to the use of graduate students in the faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, with the use of a common room and interdisciplinary training workshops. The Learning Resource centre has 200 networked PCs and is open to students round the clock, there are dedicated workstations for postgraduate students. One of the modules also makes use of a dedicated Mac Lab where you have the option of learning how to present your work in an online environment.

You will also have access to Queen Mary's comprehensive libraries and The British Library can be accessed as a research resource.

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The Food and Rural Development Research MSc is designed to provide high quality training for those interested in a research career focusing on food social science, rural development and rural sociology. Read more

Course overview

The Food and Rural Development Research MSc is designed to provide high quality training for those interested in a research career focusing on food social science, rural development and rural sociology. The research focus makes the course ideal if you are interested in gaining a Master's qualification and then continuing on to a PhD.

We provide research training and skills development specifically related to conducting research into rural areas, the environment and food markets. We are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing a 1+3 programme, which is a four year award with a research training Master's in the first year followed by a PhD.

You will study alongside students and staff in our Centre for Rural Economy, which specialises in interdisciplinary social science, researching rural development and policy, food and society and the wellbeing of rural communities. You will also undertake a postgraduate research training programme in our purpose-built Doctoral Training Suite, with facilities for lectures, workshops, seminars and computer access to specialist software required for research in the social sciences and the humanities.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/food-rural-development-research-msc/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/food-rural-development-research-msc/#howtoapply

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MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of specific research topics supported by research active academic staff. Our broad range of research areas relate to food security, farming and rural development. Read more

Course overview

MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of specific research topics supported by research active academic staff. Our broad range of research areas relate to food security, farming and rural development.

Agricultural research areas include:

Ecological agriculture

This includes: genes and physiological traits, eg resistance to crop pests and diseases, molecular-assisted selection and breeding methods, functional biodiversity for control of pest, disease and weed pressure

Food and human nutrition

Research on food quality including: sensory evaluation; effects of agronomic and production environment on nutrient and phytochemical composition; consumer acceptability; physiological responses to diet

Integrated animal science

An internationally recognised centre of excellence in integrative animal science, drawing on fundamental research and applying it to areas of societal, industrial and policy importance. Our research primarily involves: farm livestock, domesticated animal and wildlife applied research; integrated livestock system development and evaluation; animal behaviour, health and welfare; survival, health and efficiency of nutrient utilisation

Soils, plants and environment

This includes: soil ecology and the contribution of soil biodiversity to soil quality; interpretation of soil and landscape processes to improve understanding of recent and historical environmental change; land degradation processes and their control; water management in irrigated and dryland farming systems; plant environment interactions and their relationships to stress biology; physiological basis of crop yield and quality

Rural development in advanced economies

This includes: impact and implications of ‘local-global’ processes and relationships for rural areas; characteristics and performance of rural businesses and households; rural governance; demographic ageing and social change; living with environmental change

Food systems, consumption and marketing

This includes: consumer studies in food; risk and health; food supply chains and territorial development; international political economy of food and agriculture

Science and technology studies in food and environment

This includes: controversies in food and environment; politics of biosecurity

We offer a number of different routes to a research degree qualification, including full-time and part-time supervised research projects. We attract postgraduates via non-traditional routes, including mature students and part-time postgraduates undertaking study as part of their continuing professional development. Off-campus (split) research is also offered, which enables you to conduct trials in conditions appropriate to your research programme.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and support elements to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our Postgraduate Researcher Development Programme, doctoral training centres and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/agriculture-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/agriculture-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to the components of food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do food choices affect the quality of our diet? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How does food behaviour change, and how can it be changed?. Read more
Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to the components of food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do food choices affect the quality of our diet? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How does food behaviour change, and how can it be changed?

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour focuses on human nutrition and related behaviour and consumption from the perspectives of public health nutrition, nutrition physiology and the social sciences. The programme is built around human nutrition, food behaviour and consumership, as well as related research methods.

The goal of the Master’s programme is to enable you to:
-Understand the significance of nutrition to bodily functions and health.
-Understand the social and cultural aspects that affect the food choices of individuals and communities and know how to influence them.
-Form an opinion about the multifarious issues regarding nutrition and consumption.
-Be able to analyse and solve nutritional issues and related cultural questions in an ecological and socially sustainable manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/masters-programme-in-human-nutrition-and-food-behaviour-master-of-science-2-years/1.2.246.562.17.53446974973

Programme Contents

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour focuses on:
-The role of nutrition and other lifestyle factors in promoting health and preventing illness.
-The mechanisms through which food impacts our body at the level of molecular biology.
-Food services and their management.
-Consumption behaviour and food choices, and means of influencing them and communicating about them.
-Food culture, food politics and social movements.
-Research methods in the fields of nutrition and food behaviour.
-The Master’s thesis.
-Other studies, which you can choose according to your interests.

The multidisciplinary nature of the Master’s Programme at the University of Helsinki provides numerous options for other studies. You can choose studies at other Finnish or international universities.

The courses incorporate different methods of study, such as:
-Contact teaching, lectures.
-Group work.
-Oral presentations.
-Written reports (individual, pair, group).
-Independent study.
-Laboratory work and other assignments and related reports.
-Learning journals, oral group examinations, written examinations, take-home essays.
-Seminars.

The diversity of learning methods enhances your development and application of critical thought, argumentation and problem-solving skills.

Selection of the Major

In the Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour, you can choose between three focal areas:
-Nutritional physiology: The impact of nutrition and other lifestyle factors on bodily functions and health, as well as the underlying mechanisms at the level of molecular biology.
-Public health nutrition and food services: Insight into the nutritional factors affecting the health of a country’s population and population groups and the use of this insight to promote health, as well as nutritional questions related to food services and the food industry.
-Food behaviour in a changing society: The ways in which food choices are linked to individual, cultural and social factors, the construction of identity, the consumption society, as well as food and health policies.

Programme Structure

With a scope of 120 credits (ECTS), the Master’s programme can be completed in two academic years. The degree comprises:
-60 credits of advanced studies, including the Master’s thesis (30 credits).
-60 credits of other studies, which can include studies from your own degree programme or other degree programmes, a practical training period or international studies.
-Career orientation and career planning.
-A personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme qualifies you for work in expert, teaching, research and managerial positions in the public sector, NGOs and companies, and as an independent entrepreneur. The education provides you with profound field-specific competence and skills in knowledge work, as well as a solid professional identity.

Examples of duties available to graduates include:
-Expert in nutrition and food.
-Product manager.
-Product development manager, development manager.
-Director of food services.
-Researcher, special researcher.
-Planning officer.
-Senior inspector.
-Senior teacher or lecturer at a university of applied sciences.
-Growth entrepreneur.
-Journalist, press officer, content provider.

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This course offers comprehensive training addressing both international political issues and media trends in East Asia. You will learn about major international and domestic political trends in the region, while developing a comprehensive knowledge about the role media plays in these developments. Read more

About the course

This course offers comprehensive training addressing both international political issues and media trends in East Asia. You will learn about major international and domestic political trends in the region, while developing a comprehensive knowledge about the role media plays in these developments.

Your career

Our graduates hold influential positions in business, government, the arts and academia. Some of them are journalists, television producers, interpreters and translators. Others are city brokers and analysts. They work for organisations such as the BBC World Service, BNP Paribas, British Council, British Museum, Deloitte, HarperCollins, Jaguar Land Rover, Lloyds Banking Group, Nintendo, Siemens, Sony, Toyota and the World Food Programme.

Our expertise

We are one of Europe’s leading centres for the study of China, Japan and Korea. We have links with partner universities in East Asia that support our dynamic research culture. Our academics bring theories, methods and findings from their research to their teaching.

All four of our interdisciplinary research clusters inform what we teach. They are: East Asian Business Environment; East Asian Text and Culture; Human Movement and Development in East Asia; Power, Cooperation and Competition in East Asia.

The Sheffield Confucius Institute, which was named Global Confucius Institute of the year in 2015, explores Chinese language and culture. The Institute offers many opportunities for students to get involved in its activities which will help enhance their learning and deepen their cultural understanding of China.

Develop your skills

You’ll learn how to research and analyse, manage projects, write reports and give effective presentations. You will also have the opportunity to take language modules in Chinese, Japanese or Korean if you wish. Your in-depth knowledge of East Asian countries and your understanding of the region will give you an edge in the careers market.

Specialist resources

Our postgrads have their own study space and IT facilities at the Sir Sze-yuen Chung Resource Centre. The University’s libraries have an extensive selection of texts and online resources in Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Options

You can study a shorter course for a Postgraduate Certificate (four months, 60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (nine months, 120 credits). You’ll need 180 credits to get a Masters degree, including 60 credits from your extended project.

Core modules

International Politics of East Asia: Media, Culture, and Society in East Asia: Project.

Examples of optional modules

Choose from a range of modules which may include: Contemporary Chinese Society and Media: Media and Public Communication in Japan: China and Korea in the Modern World: The Political Economy of China.

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and small-group seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, exams, presentations and an extended project.



• East Asia
• Politics
• Media
• Journalism
• International relations
• Japan
• China
• Korea

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The 21st century is witnessing novel global challenges related to terrorism, food supply, climate change, migratory pressures and emerging resource geo-politics. Read more
The 21st century is witnessing novel global challenges related to terrorism, food supply, climate change, migratory pressures and emerging resource geo-politics. These challenges are complex and multi-level in nature, rendering policy solutions problematic. Political authority is also more scattered than ever, resting with actors as different as international agencies, global policy networks, public-private partnerships or transnational NGOs, in addition to the traditional nation state.

Royal Holloway’s MSc in International Public Policy provides students with a detailed and systematic understanding of how political institutions, processes and public policies operate in world affairs. The course brings together the academic study of International Relations with a practice-based analysis of public policy formulation and governance beyond the nation-state.

Drawing from International Relations, public policy and comparative politics, the MSc in International Public Policy equips students with the theoretical tools and practical skills necessary for an in-depth understanding of policy-making in to address contemporary transnational phenomena.

Students study a mixture of core units and elective options, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Optional courses for the programme may include courses on key policy areas such as US foreign policy, migration and refugees, terrorism, energy and resources or food security, in addition to south Asian politics, EU foreign and security policy, media and war, and international law. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation. The course puts a premium on bridging theory and practice, by featuring practice elements and focusing on real world challenges.

The Department of Politics and International Relations has a strong commitment to high quality, cutting-edge research which informs our teaching. We are a research community that draws on various methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of domestic, transnational, regional and global politics. This includes research into areas such as security, international diplomacy, international law, the use of military force, the European Union and the impact of new communication technology on politics, nationalism and migration.

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Climate change is as much a political issue as a scientific one, and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Those able to understand and address the social, ethical and political challenges it poses will be highly valuable citizens and employees. Read more

Overview

Climate change is as much a political issue as a scientific one, and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Those able to understand and address the social, ethical and political challenges it poses will be highly valuable citizens and employees.

This MA draws on both natural and social sciences to set these challenges in context. Core modules cover international agreements, national regulation and policymaking, NGO campaigns, and grassroots activism. Formal and informal responses to climate change are examined from economic, business, scientific, governmental, and civil society perspectives. Students develop an in-depth understanding of the complex relationships between climate politics and related areas of concern such as peak oil, resource depletion, biodiversity, gender, food sovereignty, and environmental security.

The course is hosted in the School of Politics, International Relations and the Environment (SPIRE) and primarily taught by members of the Centre for Environmental Action and Thought (CREATe), the UK’s pre-eminent cluster of environmental politics specialists. Additional expert input is drawn from other academic departments and from experts outside the University.

Keele’s large campus is undergoing a major redevelopment programme with sustainability at its heart. As a student on the MA in Climate Change Studies you will be able to see these exciting developments at first hand.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/climatechangestudies/

Course Aims

The aims of the course are to enable students to: Think, talk, and write about climate change, and the ways in which it is represented, in a systematic, critical and well-informed way. Understand, evaluate and apply a range of theories about the political consequences of climate change, and appreciate the theory and empirical reality of responses to climate change in their social and political contexts. Develop the ability to conduct and report on their own research using appropriate techniques of scholarship in the social sciences. These research skills are essential for the dissertation, but also give a good grounding for future academic or professional work.

Course Content

Completion of the MA requires 180 credits, obtained through four 30-credit modules and a 60-credit dissertation of 15,000 words. This degree is part of the overarching pathway structure for postgraduate environment degrees at Keele. Students will be eligible to undertake environment-related modules from both SPIRE and the School of Physical and Geographical Sciences.

SPIRE Modules include:
- Dimensions of Environmental Politics (Core)
- Environmental Diplomacy
- EU and the Global Commons
- Green Political Theory
- Environmental Decision-making in the UK
- US Environmental Politics and Policy
- Environmental Movements North and South

Dissertation:
15,000-word dissertation on any aspect of climate change politics, to be agreed with supervisory staff. Students may be able to undertake relevant fieldwork to research the work of an organisation working in the field of climate change.

Teaching & Assessment

Each module is assessed by a coursework essay plus a range of skills-training exercises. Students demonstrating an outstanding level of work will receive their degree with distinction.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry material, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Columbia, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK (see the ‘International Applicants’ button above).

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MSc in Environment and Development (E&D) is an interdisciplinary programme exploring the inter-dependencies between pressing environmental concerns and development pressures. Read more

Programme description

The MSc in Environment and Development (E&D) is an interdisciplinary programme exploring the inter-dependencies between pressing environmental concerns and development pressures. It explores these themes, the disputes around it and practical issues from an informed theoretical perspective, with an abiding concern for social justice claims. Conventional academic approaches focus on development or the environment as separate categories, while this programme looks at socioeconomic development as a socio-ecological and politicoecological process. In particular this E&D programme focuses on: a) grounding students in an awareness of
the contested development paradigm; and b) inculcating an awareness of economic, political and cultural links between environmental change and social inclusion. Those issues will be studied at the local and national level, but also taking into account the global scale of environmental and development agendas. In many cases the root causes of inequality and poverty, both in the Global South and in the Global North, are driven by regional or global economics far beyond the borders of a particular country, village or region.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Development Academy.

Programme structure

This MSc consists of two semesters of taught courses. Students take two compulsory and four option courses, each a balance of lectures, seminars, workshops and visits, followed by an individual dissertation.

Compulsory courses typically include:
•Understanding Environment and Development
•Development: Principles and Practices
•Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses*. We particularly recommend:
•Ecosystem Services 1: Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
•Foundations in Ecological Economics
•Frameworks to Assess Food Security
•Governing Mineral Extraction in Africa
•Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
•Principles of Environmental Sustainability
•Principles of Geographical Information Science
•Research Design in Human Geography
•Marine Systems and Policies
•EU and National Climate Change Law
•International Political Economy
•South Asia: Roots of Poverty and Development
•Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
•Governing Mineral Extraction in Africa
•Introduction To Spatial Analysis
•Principles of Environmental Sustainability
•Project Appraisal
•Soil Protection and Management
•Applications in Ecological Economics
•Energy Policy and Politics
•Environmental Impact Assessment
•Ecosystem Services 2: Ecosystem Values and Management
•Forests and Environment
•Gender and Development
•Global Environment and Society
•Global Environmental Politics
•International Security
•Land Use/Environmental Interactions
•Participation in Policy and Planning
•Political Ecology
•Sustainability of Food Production
•Waste Reduction and Recycling
•Water Resource Management
•Marine Infrastructure and Environmental Change
•Anthropology of Global Health
•Case Studies in Sustainable Development
•Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
•Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law
•Foundations of Science, Technology and Development
•Integrated Resource Planning
•Interpreting Development: Institutions and Practices
•Interrelationships in Food Systems
•The International Politics of Money

*Please note: courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change each year.

Career opportunities

This programme is suitable for students seeking roles within international and national development agencies, thinktanks, NGOs, environmental consultancies or the private sector, or those going on to PhD research.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.
https://edingeoscistudents.wordpress.com/

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Our exciting new MA in Engaged Anthropology is designed to develop students’ capacity to take anthropology out of the classroom into real-life contexts – and equip them with vocational skills to do so – while also encouraging them to take a critical approach to anthropological engagement, intervention and involvement in current social concerns and debates. Read more
Our exciting new MA in Engaged Anthropology is designed to develop students’ capacity to take anthropology out of the classroom into real-life contexts – and equip them with vocational skills to do so – while also encouraging them to take a critical approach to anthropological engagement, intervention and involvement in current social concerns and debates.

Course Overview

T‌he programme is our main advanced Social Anthropology offering, and the title ‘Engaged Anthropology’ reflects our unique approach to the discipline.

At UWTSD we encourage students to be anthropologists, apply their learning and engage with pressing issues – such as climate change, food security, globalisation and the preservation of the past – which people across the world are facing today.

As such, theory and practice are woven together as students reflect upon political and economic relations and broader power dynamics, both historically and in the contemporary world, and consider how individual and collective actions can challenge, create and/or reinforce social inequalities and injustices.

The programme is designed to encourage students to develop ethically sophisticated and sustainable approaches to social action, while also considering what sustainability – in relation to economic systems, cultural practices, community, knowledge, relations with the environment and the discipline of anthropology – and ethical practice means in cross-cultural settings.

The programme is shaped by students’ interests and currently offers three specialist pathways in Food Cultures and Practices; Heritage and Material Culture; and Human - Environment Relations.

Modules

-Engaging with Anthropological Theory
-Anthropological Research Methods in Practice
-Key Debates in Anthropological Theory
-The Politics of Food
-Food, Health and the Body
-Anthropology and the Environment
-Engaged Anthropology in Practice
-The Heritage Industry in the Modern World
-Environmental Philosophy
-Heritage Representation and Interpretation
-The Heritage Industry in the Modern World
-Exhibiting the Past: Museums, Collections and Heritage

Key Features

The programme is founded upon an established pool of expertise in Anthropology and Anthropologically-related concerns, and covers a range of projects undertaken over a number of years:
-Staff are research active and regularly attend academic conferences
-Study cutting-edge areas of academic interest, notably the anthropology of food and health
-The staff expertise represents a considerable bank of knowledge and skills that will underpin this programme and will ensure students enjoy a high-quality educational experience
-An online and distance learning option is available, students taking the distance learning route follow the same programme as residential students and have up to two years to complete full-time and four years to complete part-time

Assessment

Assessment is usually based on written work in the form of long and short essays, reports, book reviews and reflective pieces.

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