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Masters Degrees (Food Journalism)

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Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City. From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Read more
Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City.

Who is it for?

From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Our students come to study the MSc in Food Policy from around the world, across the food landscape and go on to develop their careers in a variety of ways once they graduate.

The course is for students who are passionate about food policy and are open to challenging their own assumptions. We want you to graduate from this Masters with a more disciplined and rigorous approach so you can be more effective in pursuing your passions within the food domain.

Objectives

How does a coconut growing in Malaysia become a coconut drink in the UK? On this programme we explore how policy influences the trajectory of food not just from field to fork but across time and territory.

The MSc in Food Policy is about analysing, researching and informing the future of food policy from the local to global scale. It is run by the Centre for Food Policy, which has pioneered an integrated approach to food policy since 1994.

The ways in which we produce, process, distribute, market, prepare and consume food have important consequences for our health and that of the planet. We look at the positive and negative impacts of food, from the health, environmental, political, socio-economic and cultural perspective.

This Masters promotes genuine interdisciplinary because we think you need to look at the subject from all angles to make the most holistic evaluation. It draws on social sciences (sociology, politics, economics, anthropology, psychology) as well as health sciences and epidemiology. We look at the latest food policy debates and place them in a historical context.

You will be taught by a team of specialist food policy specialists who are leaders in the field. Our academic staff are actively involved in research and in policy-making on the local, national and global stage. Our teaching reflects this engagement.

Students are exposed to conflicting narratives about the problems facing the food system and the best ways to resolve them. We address important questions of our time, such as:
-Are we producing too much or too little food to feed the world population?
-How have we ended up living in a world where there are more overweight and obese people than under-nourished people?
-Why is a third of the food produced globally lost or wasted?
-How can we deal with the massive impact of agriculture on climate change?
-How do lobbyists and the media influence what we eat?

Academic facilities

As a food policy student at City, University of London you can learn from experts at leading institutions across the UK through the Innovative Food Systems Teaching and Learning (IFSTAL) initiative.

Created for postgraduate students, the initiative aims to address an urgent skills shortage in the food industry and tackle systematic failings in the food system by combining resources and knowledge. The network, which is made up of five leading higher education institutions including City and the University of Oxford, gives you the opportunity to take part in research and internship placements during your degree.

When it comes to studying food policy, London is an amazing location. Giving you one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories, it offers a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city and hone your focus towards your own area of interest and/or expertise. As part of the University of London, you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We are a passionate and engaged team who will help you understand how to change the food system for the better. You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small group activities, whole class discussions, workshops and independent study. There are a lot of group discussions in class. We encourage you to ask questions, contribute your own experiences and apply your own perspectives to the issues we explore. The programme also encourages a strong peer-to-peer community through social media.

For the distance-learning mode you will be able to watch the lectures online, which are supplemented with written exercises and one-to-one Skype tutorials with the teaching staff.

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by two pieces of written work. The first is handed in during the middle of term so that you receive useful feedback before moving on to the second assignment. In each case you will choose the topic. You will also be asked to write different kinds of documents (briefing papers, memos, reports as well as essays) that correspond to those you would have to write in policy-making organisations. Then you work on your dissertation, which is a longer (15,000 word) piece of work, enabling you to delve into a food policy topic of your choice in depth. You will gain support from a personal supervisor who is a senior academic from the Centre for Food Policy.

Modules

The course consists of four core taught modules (worth 30 credits each) and a dissertation (worth 60 credits). The dissertation gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a topic of your choice that is relevant to food policy. The course has been designed to enable you to pursue your own interests and passions. In every assignment you have the opportunity to engage with the issues you care about.

The course is flexible to fit in with your work commitments so you can study this Masters on a full-time (one year), part-time (two years) or on a distance-learning basis (two years). The taught modules take place in the first and second terms, and the dissertation starts in the third term and continues until September (December for part-time students). For each taught module there are approximately 10 three-hour teaching sessions. In addition you are expected to undertake around 270 hours of independent study. For the whole programme, you should expect to study for around 1800 hours (35 hours per week for full-time students, 17.5 hours for part-time students).

Taught modules
-FPM001 - Food and public policy (30 credits)
-FPM003 - Food, culture and society (30 credits)
-FPM002 The political economy of food (30 credits)
-FPM004 Food, public health and the environment (30 credits)

Career prospects

We are very proud of our alumni. Our employability stats – the highest within the School – reflect the range of opportunities available to our graduates. For example, our alumni run NGOs and progressive food businesses, work in government and UN agencies, and have established great careers in health advocacy, journalism and academia.

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Magazines today offer a wide range of possibilities for anyone looking to start a career in journalism. Read more
Magazines today offer a wide range of possibilities for anyone looking to start a career in journalism. From glossy fashion monthlies and quirky independent quarterlies to weekly titles for business people, customer magazines for retailers and brands, purely digital magazines, websites and even freelancing – our MA Magazine Journalism prepares you for all these possibilities.

When you finish studying Magazine Journalism with us you will feel prepared to meet any challenge your first job on a magazine throws at you. Print, digital, social media – you will know how to handle the multimedia platforms a modern magazine uses.

You will be prepared to sit in your first editorial conference and know what is expected of you and how to pitch your ideas clearly and confidently.

You will gain a set of knowledge and skills that will not only enable you to compete effectively for any entry-level job in magazine journalism but also set you up for a rapid career trajectory.

Distinctive features:

• Magazine Journalism is accredited by the Professional Publishers Association (PPA)
• Industry placements in the second semester
• An outstanding alumni network across the media

Structure

The course is one year long and covers:

Feature and news writing in print and online
Interviewing techniques
Cross-platform media and multimedia
Design & layout
Subediting and production
Magazine brand development
How to be a successful freelance

Magazine journalism skills are acquired through a series of lectures, workshops, practical exercises and feedback sessions of increasing complexity and realism - from 'paper exercises' in the early days to complex features that report on real events. These sessions are supplemented by seminars, group discussions and guests from the magazine industry.

Basic writing, reporting and technical skills for both print and digital are taught in the first semester against a background of Media law and journalism Ethics. Shorthand is also available as an option.

The second semester offers more creative practice where you will plan, create and launch a brand new magazine brand across print and digital platforms, producing three issues to a fortnightly deadline.

During the Easter break you will test your skills against the real world in a work placement (or placements) of a minimum two weeks' duration.

The Major Project core module provides you with the opportunity to undertake:

• a Feature Project in which you will employ investigative journalism techniques and research skills acquired during the taught element of the course to explore a topic in depth by writing long-form feature articles, or

• an Enterprise Project in which you will develop the editorial and business plan for an innovative media product in print or purely digital/online.

You will also create a brand new magazine in groups. Starting from scratch you will:

Research the market
Develop an effective design
Plan and write editorial content
Create and execute a comprehensive digital and social media policy
Produce three issues of the magazine

Please visit the website to see the modules taught on this course:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/magazine-journalism-ma

Teaching

You will be taught through a variety of practical workshops, seminars and lectures as well as production days that replicate an industry environment.

You will be required to find and research stories in and around the local area, interviewing sources via a mix of methods and producing original multimedia content and photography.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a wide range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. These range from practical classroom activities, varied journalistic articles and packages, class tests and examinations.

Career prospects

Graduates of the MA in Magazine Journalism at Cardiff University have an excellent track record when it comes to getting jobs.

Potential entry-level jobs in magazine media range from editorial assistants to web editors, community managers and content producers to sub-editors, staff writers and even self-starting entrepreneurs!

We are passionate about the industry and maintain an excellent alumni network, plus students have won several publishing awards for their work in the past.

As a graduate of MA Magazine Journalism you may move into almost any industry to produce in-house or public magazines or digital content. Typical industries include: fashion, craft, food, sport, film, music, games, news, wildlife, finance, business, history, travel, TV, health and celebrity.

Possible job opportunities include: Editorial assistant, Editorial intern, Features writer, Freelance reporter, Web and Social Media Editor, Junior reporter, Chief sub, Online content coordinator and Production assistant.

Placements

Placements are required as part of the Professional Development module and Programme Accreditation through the PPA. Placements will take place during the Easter Recess period. You will be required to complete a minimum of two weeks on placement(s), though you are free to do more.

All placements will be coordinated in correspondence with course directors ahead of the recess period. We will look at your CV, portfolio and covering letters and provide guidance. Our excellent alumni and industry network often offer placement opportunities that you wouldn’t get access to outside of the course.

You will be expected to cover any expenses associated with the placement(s), though some companies do cover travel or food expenses.

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-Benefit from a convenient and flexible curriculum. -Choose from two career-focused tracks. -Earn your degree as quickly as 16 months with a fall start, including summer courses. Read more
-Benefit from a convenient and flexible curriculum
-Choose from two career-focused tracks
-Earn your degree as quickly as 16 months with a fall start, including summer courses
-Learn from faculty committed to your success
-Expand your professional network
-Opt for a dual master’s degree in a related field

FEED AND FUEL YOUR FUTURE AS A NUTRITION PROFESSIONAL

Use the knowledge you gain from this program to expand your practice in health-related fields or compliment your background in areas such as biology, education, exercise science, journalism, marketing, and more to meet your career goals. If you are already a registered dietitian or food service professional, obtaining your master’s degree will improve your leadership opportunities.

Our MS in Food and Nutrition focuses on human and applied nutrition, critical for real-life situations. For those interested in pursuing a doctorate at another institution or improving your knowledge and skills in a specific research area, select the thesis option.

The MS in Food and Nutrition online degree will prepare you to:
-Provide leadership that influences and contributes to the food and nutrition arena.
-Translate important nutrition information for the public.
-Utilize new knowledge to reduce nutrition-related chronic diseases and promote nutrition and wellness.

GAIN SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE, GREATER OPPORTUNITY

Our 36-credit MS in Food and Nutrition can be tailored to meet your career goals.

Take required core courses focusing on the essential nutrients and nutrition research methods, and identify elective courses to further your needs and interests.

Select from two tracks to enhance your specialization.
-Administration if you would like to: (a) Apply management and leadership principles to foodservice, clinical and community nutrition services; and (b) Evaluate emerging research to advance evidence-based clinical nutrition knowledge, skills, and practice.
-Education if you would like to: (a) Apply emerging research to advance evidence-and theory-based knowledge, skills and practice in implementation, and evaluation; (b) Use community and public health nutrition research and methods to support optimal nutritional status for individuals, groups, and populations; and (c) Advocate for food and nutrition public policy at local, state and national levels.

Choose between the thesis and non-thesis options.

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The Graduate Diploma in Agriculture is particularly appropriate for students who are re-directing their careers towards agriculture. Read more
The Graduate Diploma in Agriculture is particularly appropriate for students who are re-directing their careers towards agriculture. In addition to developing the pure agriculturist, the course provides students with a detailed knowledge of the UK agricultural industry.

Students are able to handpick their modules from a broad range of subject areas, to create a bespoke course, tailor made to meet their individual requirements. The ability to customise course content makes this the ideal opportunity for graduates, and professionals from other disciplines, looking to re-direct their career towards agricultural and associated rural industries.

A summer study tour, and £250 worth of rural skills training, are included in the cost of the course.

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over one academic year, or part-time over two, three or four years.

You will complete three compulsory modules, followed by four modules selected from a wide range of undergraduate modules allowing you to tailor the course to meet your career aspirations. You can undertake practical skills training courses at the Rural Innovation Centre to further enhance their employability.

You will participate in lectures, farm walks and visits, case studies, assignments, and management projects to develop your knowledge across curricular themes. You will also take part in a summer study tour, which exposes you to a variety of agricultural enterprises.

Prospective students are strongly encouraged to complete pre-course reading in order to secure a minimum basic knowledge of agriculture and to highlight possible areas of weakness.

Modules

• 2256 Applied Agricultural Science
• 3100 Farm Business Management
• 3227 Agricultural Management

Plus choice of FOUR elective modules from:

• 1008 Agricultural Mechanisation and Buildings
• 1046 Human Nutrition, Health and Society
• 1054 Introduction to Food Production
• 2086 Red Meat Chains
• 2087 White Meat Chains
• 2232 Entrepreneurship, Intrapreneurship and Enterprise Development
• 3006 Emerging Agricultural Issues
• 3008 Advanced Livestock Production
• 3009 Agricultural & Equine Journalism
• 3010 Game & Deer Management
• 3011 Rural Business Diversification
• 3020 Advanced Crop Production
• 3067 Farm Machinery Management
• 3084 Entrepreneurship
• 3087 Advanced Dairy Food Chains
• 3090 Forestry and Woodland Management
• 3093 Farmland Ecology
• 3096 Wine Industry
• 3097 Small Scale Farming and Local Food Supply
• 3104 Food and Agri-business Strategies
• 3205 Management Information Systems for Farming Businesses
• 3207 Farming and Integrated Environment Local Delivery
• 3210 Applied Agricultural Finance
• 3218 Sustainable Business and Agrifood Supply Chains
• 3228 Integrated Organic Systems

Career prospects

Many graduates enter practical farming or take up commercial or administrative posts in the related land-based industries. Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers as:

• Farm Managers
• Farm Workers
• Senior Planners
• Project Managers
• Livestock Skills Instructors

Graduates may qualify for progression on to a Masters course.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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Government and private companies are working to develop new ways to improve existing food and animal feed crops, and to develop novel crops to meet future challenges. Read more
Government and private companies are working to develop new ways to improve existing food and animal feed crops, and to develop novel crops to meet future challenges. The last decade has seen rapid developments in our understanding of plants and their significance to our wellbeing and this has been achieved through advances in a range of disciplines including genetics, genomics, cell biology, physiology, ecology and studies on climate change.

Graduates of this one-year MSc will be equipped with the knowledge and skills in these recent advances to rise to the future challenges in academia, industry and policy development. Innovation and entrepreneurship permeate the course as central themes and, in addition, a specific module on entrepreneurship in plant biology is delivered. This MSc covers a wide diversity of both topics and approaches, and is taught by a high-profile research-oriented group of academics. Students will have full involvement in active research groups and access to, and experience of, a large array of state-of-the-art facilities and technologies.

Key Fact

Researchers from the UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science represent the single largest grouping of plant scientists in Ireland, with research interests ranging from genetics and molecular biology of the cell to plant physiology and ecology. They actively work with organisations such as Coillte (Forestry), the Irish Agricultural and Food Development Authority (Teagasc), the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, and industry partners.

Course Content and Structure

Modules include:
• Entrepreneurship in Plant Biology
• Future Crops and Sustainability
• Current Developments in Plant Biology
• Insect-Plant Interactions
• Biological Invasions
• Plant-Atmosphere Climate Interactions
• Ecological Significance of Different Photosynthetic Pathways
• Plant Development
• Programmed Cell Death in Plants
• Plants and Stress

Career Opportunities

Graduates will have a distinct advantage when applying for PhD studentships or other more advanced graduate training in the area of plant biology and biotechnology. This MSc is ideal for graduates interested in pursuing scientific careers in academia, agriculture and plant science-based or biotechnology industries. Graduates will haveo pportunities to pursue postgraduate education and research and work in areas such as plant biotechnology, scientific journalism/publishing and for government agencies involved in governmental and non-governmental policy.

Facilities and Resources

• UCD Rosemount Environmental Research Station
• Controlled plant growth facility and bioreactors
• Plant Metabolomics Technology Platform
• Plant Cell and Tissue Culture Facility

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New economic powers are rising. We face a growing number of challenges, including. -Climate change. -Financial instability. -Food, energy and security crises. Read more
New economic powers are rising. We face a growing number of challenges, including:
-Climate change
-Financial instability
-Food, energy and security crises

Can the global political economy cope with these issues? You’ll examine the emergence of the global political economy, what economic crisis means for capitalism, and the distribution of wealth and power. Our unique MA analyses the impacts of these contemporary transformations.

How will I study?

You take taught modules and options. You may also do a research placement. You will be assessed by term papers, and write a supervised 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Meet the people teaching and supervising on your course.

Careers

This MA is ideal for you if you wish to pursue a career in international organisations, development agencies or NGOs, or journalism. Or if you’d like to take up a role in the private sector that requires knowledge of the global political and economic system.

We also offer excellent background and training should you wish to pursue doctoral studies and/or an academic career. We are committed to helping to identify placements for our students.

Our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in:
-Government foreign, economics and trade ministries
-International organisations such as the UN
-NGOs such as Oxfam, CAFOD, Amnesty International and the Red Cross
-International development such as World Bank
-International media or journalism
-Academia and research institutes

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​The programme is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and is accredited by the British Dietetic Association. Read more

Course Overview

​The programme is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and is accredited by the British Dietetic Association. It enables nutrition graduates to study dietetics so that they can apply to the HCPC to register as a Dietitian at Postgraduate Diploma or MSc level.

The Postgraduate Diploma programme is closely aligned to the BSc (Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics programme and contains three compulsory placements in NHS Dietetics Departments in Wales.

Students exiting with the Postgraduate Diploma can return to undertake the dissertation on a part-time basis to gain the MSc Dietetics.

Applications for September 2016 entry open October 2015. Deadline for applications: 15th January 2016.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Dietetics---MSc-PgD-.aspx

Entry Requirements​

Applicants should have an honours degree (1st class or 2:1) in human nutrition, or a degree that includes nutrition in the awards title, with sufficient emphasis on physiology and biochemistry (50 credits in total required, with at least 20 credits in human physiology and 20 credits in human biochemistry).

It is also preferable for candidates to have 10 credits in sociology and 10 credits in psychology, however this can be taken alongside other modules on the programme if successful.

Students should have completed their degree not more than five years before their proposed entry to this Masters.
Applicants who have a first or upper second-class honours degree in nutrition, which does not contain either sufficient biochemistry or physiology (but not both), can undertake further relevant modules at undergraduate level, prior to applying for the programme.

Applicants who do not have a degree award in nutrition (1st or 2:1) but meet the requirements for biochemistry and physiology, will need to undertake a further relevant taught course of study to at least to postgraduate diploma level prior to applying for the course.

Applicants who speak English as a second language must have adequate command of English, with an IELTS score of 7, with at least 6.5 in all elements.

​Course Content​​

During the programme students are educated to be responsive practitioners, able to adapt to the changing needs of society. The course is designed to produce critically thinking and reflective professionals who have comprehensive theoretical knowledge, along with a spirit of enquiry and an analytical and creative approach to problem solving.

The programme has two main parts; the Postgraduate Diploma and MSc.

Postgraduate Diploma in Dietetics:
This part contains the taught academic element, which is closely aligned to the BSc (Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics programme and three periods of practical training. On completion students can graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Dietetics, which leads to eligibility to apply to the HCPC to register as a Dietitian.

MSc:
Students can undertake the dissertation to obtain MSc Dietetics, which can be achieved straight after the Postgraduate Diploma element. On completion students can be awarded MSc Dietetics, which also leads to eligibility to apply to the HCPC to register as a Dietitian. Alternatively the dissertation can be taken after being awarded the Postgraduate Diploma, within 5 years of initial enrolment; this can be taken on a part-time basis.

The taught academic part of the course contains six modules at Level 7 (Masters). In addition, students study professional body modules (level 5) in order to fulfil the requirements of the Health and Care Professions Council and the British Dietetic Association curriculum guidelines.

Learning & Teaching​

​The taught element of the programme involve lectures, tutorials and practical work. Tutorials are mainly case study based where students apply the theoretical knowledge gained in lectures to problem solve case scenarios. Practical sessions are either food based, involve giving presentations or practice in consultation skills. The practicals take place in the specialist food facilities and the clinical simulation suite.

It is expected that students undertake independent reading and self-study; this is aided by the use of Moodle, the Virtual Learning Environment in use at the University.

In addition students undertake 3 periods of practical training in NHS Dietetics departments in Wales. Full preparation is given prior to the placements and students are supported and visited during the placements by Dietetic Academic staff.

All students are allocated a personal tutor who offers pastoral support and guides the student through personal development planning.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by examination and/or assignment. All the modules are externally assessed. The clinical training placements have to be successfully completed to proceed and graduate.

Employability & Careers​

Dietitians normally begin their career in the National Health Service where they progress to the main clinical grades. The opportunity exists for specialisation in various aspects of dietetics by means of post-registration education. In addition there are opportunities for dietitians to be involved in health education/promotion, education, research and journalism.

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global. Read more

Why take this course?

The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global.

This is what our course sets out to do and thanks to our close proximity to many types of temperate marine habitats and internationally protected conservation areas, we offer the perfect location for investigation.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Research at our internationally-renowned Institute of Marine Sciences or carry out microbiological work at the University’s Field Centre for Environmental Technology at Petersfield Sewage Works
Rear coldwater species for restocking programmes or trial fish food at Sparsholt College’s National Aquatics Training Centre
Study abroad through Erasmus or various other conservation and research schemes

What opportunities might it lead to?

You’ll be taught by leading international researchers and the course has been designed with strong input from outside agencies including environmental consultancies, a range of government bodies and industry. This ensures your training links directly to UK and international employment opportunities.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Consultancy work
Government-based research
Conservation
Teaching
Further study

Module Details

You will cover a variety of topics in advanced laboratory and field skills, and choose from units that cover marine ecology, aquaculture, ecotoxicology and pollution, and scientific journalism. A large amount of your time will also be spent on the research project that will enable you to apply the skills and knowledge you have gained.

Core units are:

• Research Toolkit: This covers a range of key professional skills for research methods (communication skills, ethics and report writing), advanced field skills (boat sampling, taxonomy, and marine and freshwater sampling methods), advanced laboratory skills (genomics, monitoring and pollution monitoring methods) and remote sensing technology (such as GIS).

• Research Project: Your final project allows you to select from a range of marine and freshwater projects provided by staff within the School, government research laboratories, NGOs and private research companies. During the project you will write literature reviews and develop skills in data analysis and presentation.

Then choose any three optional units from:

• Ecotoxicology and Pollution: This provides an introduction to environmental toxicology using model and non-model organisms.

• Aquaculture: This unit focuses on the principles of aquaculture production, global production and diversity of aquaculture species. It is taught by academic staff and staff from the National Aquatics Training Centre at Sparsholt College. Areas covered include larval culture, diseases and pathology, feeding and growth, reproductive manipulation, and business and management.

• Marine Policy, Planning and Conservation: Planning and Conservation: This unit explores contemporary debates on coastal and marine management with a specific focus on marine policy, planning and conservation.

• Science and the Media: Science communication is increasingly becoming an important part of science. This unit firstly addresses the skills required by scientists to effectively communicate with the media and general public and secondly, provides an understanding of the skills needed for a career in science journalism.

• Subtidal Marine Ecology: Selected topics of current interest in marine ecology, incorporating both theory and applied aspects, culminating in a week-long practical field course in the Mediterranean Sea. The unit carries an additional cost for the field trip, and requires a minimum level of training and experience in SCUBA diving to participate.

Programme Assessment

Hands-on laboratory-based work teamed with field trips means that practical learning underpins the theory learned in lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. You’ll also find that some aspects of your course may be taught online using our virtual learning environment.

You will be assessed using a range of methods from exams to coursework and presentations, with great opportunities to present your final-year projects to industry and researchers from other departments and organisations.

Student Destinations

Once you have completed this course, you will be particularly well placed to enter a wide range of interesting and rewarding careers in the UK and abroad. We will ensure you have all the relevant knowledge and skills that employers require, giving you the opportunity to either pursue a scientific career, enter the teaching profession, or further study should you want to continue your research.

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IN BRIEF. Train for a career in the newly emerging industries of the post-genomic eraWork at the interface between biology and chemistryExcellent career prospectsPart-time study optionInternational students can apply. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Train for a career in the newly emerging industries of the post-genomic eraWork at the interface between biology and chemistryExcellent career prospectsPart-time study optionInternational students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Following completion of the Human Genome Project, the pharmaceutical industry is preparing for a revolution in cancer and inherited disorder therapies. This course is training a new generation of bioscientists to meet challenges at the interface between biology and chemistry, and to apply pharmaceutical and analytical knowledge directly to improve quality of life.

The course develops a broad knowledge and conceptual base in the field of drug design and discovery, with an emphasis on new developments and advances in drug identification, understanding drug pharmacology and novel therapeutics, and appreciating how these topics interact with bioscience businesses and enterprise.

This programme is designed to enable you to gain systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current problems and new insights regarding the analysis of biomolecules. There is particular reference to drug design and discovery, along with a comprehensive and critical understanding of applied techniques and their current application in research in the field of biomolecule analysis and drug design.

This course is aimed at students who wish to acquire the specialised skills needed to design drugs for the 21st century. It is ideal for anyone with primarily either a chemistry or biochemistry based undergraduate degree wishing to broaden their knowledge base. The part-time route is well suited to those who already work in industry as it is possible to carry out research projects within the place of work. Prospective students must be committed to developing their skills and knowledge for a career in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology sectors.

TEACHING

Teaching is through:

  • Lectures to provide thorough grounding in the techniques of biomolecule characterisation and drug design.
  • Practical sessions and workshops to demonstrate techniques and methods used in biomolecule characterisation and drug design, and provide a structured opportunity for you to practice techniques and methods in analytical biosciences and drug design.
  • Guided reading that will recommend texts, key articles and other materials in advance of, or following, lecture classes.  
  • The research project which will enable you to practice the application of appropriate, and selected, bioscientific techniques in an academic or industrial context, and demonstrate research methodologies and skills appropriate to and valuable with biomolecule characterisation and drug design. During your research project You will be supervised by expert staff who are actively engaged in international research programmes.

ASSESSMENT

There are eight taught 15 credit modules each of which have only one assessment (100%). Each exam is 2 hours.

EMPLOYABILITY

Although particularly relevant to those looking for a career in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, this course will also equip you for a career in research, teaching and many other professions including cosmetic science, animal health, food science, medical laboratory research, patent law, scientific journalism and health and safety.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

Research projects may be carried out at other institutions (recently Universities in Bremen or France and the Paterson Institute, UK). We also invite visiting lecturers to share their expertise on the subject areas.

FURTHER STUDY

After completion of this course you may wish to specialise in a chosen subject area in one of the School’s two main research centres: Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre (EER) or Biomedical Research Centre (BRC).



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Our MSc in Intercultural Communication for Business and the Professions (ICBP) is for anyone who wants to develop their intercultural skills, and apply those skills to the world of business or beyond. Read more

Are you ready for the global workplace?

Our MSc in Intercultural Communication for Business and the Professions (ICBP) is for anyone who wants to develop their intercultural skills, and apply those skills to the world of business or beyond. With research increasingly showing a need for employees who can work across cultures, the intercultural skills you’ll learn on the course will prepare you for wherever you want your career to take you.

A programme tailored to your needs

With a wide variety of modules to choose from, our MSc ICBP lets you tailor your studies to your own career aspirations. Want to apply your intercultural knowledge in a role within marketing? Or perhaps you’re interested in issues in intercultural politics?

Our core modules focus on culture and communication, developing your ability to analyse, explain and research intercultural communication, as well as strengthening your practical cultural skills. You can also choose from optional modules that enable you to specialise in various communication and/or professionally oriented areas, including marketing, international business and even learning and working in a new language.

What’s more, you can choose the pace of your studies, with full-time and tailored part-time study options available.

Apply your intercultural skills in the real world

On our MSc ICBP, our programme is rooted in the understanding that teaching needs to be informed by research and practice alike. Our research with organisations across a wide range of industries is reflected in both our course content and our approach to teaching. That’s why each module on our programme gives you the chance to apply your intercultural skills and knowledge in a practical way – from in-class discussions and group projects, to case studies or an experiential placement.

As an MSc student you’ll also have many opportunities to gain first-hand insights into challenges that organisations face, thanks to our guest speaker series that runs through all terms. In previous years, we’ve hosted speakers from businesses and organisations from around the world, on a wide range of intercultural, international issues.

Experiential placements: go beyond the classroom

In today’s competitive workplace, opportunities to put theory into practice when studying are invaluable. As a student on our MSc ICBP, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake an experiential placement as part of your degree programme – giving you hands-on experience of applying the skills you’ve learned in the real world.

Our students have undertaken placements ranging from visiting our partner universities around the world, to organising their own work placement. Whether you want to study in China, or work with an international business in South Africa, you’ll have the chance to gain a real edge in taking the next step in your global career.

Where will our course take you?

Our students have gone on to follow a huge range of career paths in including the following:

Marketing
- Fashion & Lifestyle
- Mobile communications
- Web technology
- Education management
- Arts

Public Relations and Media
- Editing & Publishing
- Primary sector industries
- Education
- Consulting
- Journalism

Consulting
- Management & Business
- Electronics
- Insurance
- Translation & Interpreting
- Food

Management/HR
- Oil & Energy
- Investment
- Medical devices
- International recruitment
- Tourism

Education
- Secondary education
- Central administration
- Teaching
- Higher education
- Research

To find out more about where our course can take you, send us an email (), or visit our website: MSc Intercultural Communication for Business and the Professions (http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/al/study/msc/)

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Do you want to enhance your understanding of the cultural, political and economic history of Pakistan? The MA in the Study of Contemporary Pakistan provides a comprehensive and critical approach to Pakistan. Read more
Do you want to enhance your understanding of the cultural, political and economic history of Pakistan? The MA in the Study of Contemporary Pakistan provides a comprehensive and critical approach to Pakistan: its complex and vibrant culture, politics, economics, law, religious history and current trends. SOAS hosts one of the biggest concentration of research and teaching staff who specialise on Pakistan related topics. You will have an opportunity to interact and work closely with them. The Programme of Study will introduce you to the latest research topics, methods and debates in the field. It will prepare you to critically assess the diverse complexities of one of the most reported on countries in the world.

Optional language training is available for those who aspire to a research degree.

The degree is enhanced by the activities of a Research Centre dedicated to the Study of Pakistan. The Centre is part of the wider South Asian research cluster at SOAS.

- Centre for the Study of Pakistan:
Students are encouraged to join in the activities of the vibrant centre (http://www.soas.ac.uk/csp/), which runs fortnightly seminars and workshops, and an Annual Lecture.

- MUSA:
The Centre for Pakistan supports MUSA, recently launched, a postgraduate research forum for the study of Muslim South Asia.

- Internships:
Several summer internships are currently available to run alongside the MA degree. Please contact the convenors or the SOAS careers office for details.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/ma-in-the-study-of-contemporary-pakistan/

Structure

The programme will consist of three course units (1 core + 2 options) and a dissertation.

The core course (Imagining Pakistan) will introduce the main topics, approaches and possible lines of enquiry for a cultural history of Pakistan from 1947 to the present.

Students will choose two courses from a list of options that includes courses on modern Muslim thinkers and Contemporary Islamism in South Asia, Law and Society in South Asia, Urdu language, and Urdu literature in Pakistan.

Students will also write a 10,000 dissertation on the Study of Contemporary Pakistan, applying and developing the knowledge acquired in the core courses to an independent topic of research.

MA in the Study of Contemporary Pakistan - Programme Specifications 2013/14 (msword; 88kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/ma-in-the-study-of-contemporary-pakistan/file85899.doc

Employment

The MA prepares students for a wide range of career destinations. Graduates will benefit from interdisciplinary cultural and linguistic training that is widely sought after in the business and public sector. It is suited for those seeking employment as management consultants, policy advisers in Government and the Civil Service, Think Tanks, Charities, NGOs, as well as journalism and media related openings, more broadly in the culture industry, or for those who aspire to a Research degree.

- Standard Chartered - International Bank
- Bestway – Food Wholesaler
- Gallager Heath - Insurance Broker
- Citizen’s Foundation – Education Support in Pakistan Charity

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights. Read more
Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights.

International law and human rights have been at the heart of teaching and scholarly work at Regent’s for many years: this new programme offers a truly unique opportunity to be guided by special guests from Doughty Street alongside our talented team of academics.

You will be introduced to a range of topics in the field including, a history of human rights law, international relations, humanitarian intervention, free speech, prohibition of torture and inhumane treatment and international criminal law, with all theory supplemented by cutting edge research and case studies.

Why should I choose this programme?

The issues covered within this programme have never been so pertinent and in demand. The programme will enable you to address some of the contemporary challenges faced in operational environments which aim to protect and promote human rights. The programme informs those already in professional practice or those aspiring to work in this field with the skills and knowledge and the ability to introduce changes that will improve human rights policies at an international, regional and domestic level.

This programme is unique in its close link with practising professionals and real life cases, allowing you to really explore and understand what’s happening in the world today. We have an exceptionally talented team of lecturers including:

‌•Dr. Sara Bazoobandi, an author on food security and Associate Fellow of Chatham House.
‌•Dr. Mireille Hebing, an expert on migration and refugees.
‌•Dr. Neven Andjelic, recently elected to the Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities.
‌•Professor Yossi Mekelberg, expert and author on human rights issues ranging from right for self determination, gender, freedom of speech, refugees, collective punishment and house demolitions, rights of minorities and others. Professor Mekelberg has been a member of the London Committee of Human Rights Watch for the last 7 years and is regularly asked to write in international media about abuses of human rights.

As well as being guided by our team of experts, you will benefit directly from visiting lectures from renowned barristers from the Doughty Street Chambers who include:

‌•Geoffrey Robertson, QC
‌•Kirsty Brimelow, QC
‌•Professor Marc Weller
‌•Graeme Hall
‌•Edward Fitzgerald OBE, QC
‌•Professor Geraldine Van Beuren, QC
‌•Andrea Saccucci
‌•Jen Robinson

Engaging with these distinguished professionals will really bring the subject to life and provide you with a deep and comprehensive understanding of human rights law.

Key skills, aims and objectives

You will gain:

A systematic and comprehensive knowledge of international human rights law
The ability to identify and critically evaluate contemporary issues relating to international human rights
An understanding of how theory relates to practice, with extensive use of current and relevant case studies
The ability to interpret principal source materials as well as understanding relevant concepts, cases, statutes and treaties
Exposure to world renowned human rights lawyers who will share their knowledge and experience of working on landmark cases in the field

Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a number of careers, in areas such as diplomacy, international relations, domestic and international legal practice, international charities, and non-governmental organisations, as well as practising professionals in law, journalism, politics and economics.

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/ma-international-human-rights-law.aspx#tab_course-overview

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This course brings together the science of nutrition and the innovation of business to expand student’s horizons beyond the more traditional approaches to public health nutrition. Read more
This course brings together the science of nutrition and the innovation of business to expand student’s horizons beyond the more traditional approaches to public health nutrition. It will enhance your public health and nutrition knowledge and skills.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The increase in non communicable diseases across the globe, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity and malnutrition is inextricably linked to poor diet. This has led to an increasing demand for graduates who have an in-depth knowledge of the impact of dietary intake on the risk factors of disease, as well as the ability to apply this knowledge through education and influencing policy to improve the population’s health.

If you choose this course you will benefit from:
-A focus on the science of nutrition and public health policy and practice
-Innovative and creative approaches to tackling public health nutrition issues, including a focus on business and media
-A diverse teaching team including a range of public health nutrition academic experts who are committed to providing a range of excellent teaching and learning experiences
-Access to the broad research interests of the teaching team, which include food poverty, obesogenic environments, behaviour change and whole-person care including spirituality
-Opportunities to apply for work experience in public health nutrition

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Throughout your course you will study key issues in public health nutrition and the influence of policy and the wider environment:
-Human nutrition, including nutrients in health and disease: ‘hot’ topics in nutrition
-Public Health Policy and Practice
-Whole-Person Nutrition including the role of spirituality
-Nutritional Journalism
-Entrepreneurial Nutrition
-Research methods to enable you to undertake your own research and use research

The first semester of the course provides you with the opportunity to critically explore key nutrition issues pertinent to public health. You will also critique the role of public health policy, at international, national and local level alongside exploring a range of public health nutrition programmes. This provides a platform for you then to develop business acumen and a critical understanding on the role of media and other communication in public health nutrition. The final semester of the course provides you with the opportunity to carry out your own public health nutrition research project.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR AN INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

The University runs a number of specific schemes to allow students periods of overseas study or work experience and the University offers a limited number of International Experience and Mobility Grants to enable such visits. A number of students in our School, across a range of courses, have been successful in securing places via these schemes.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more

The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This exciting and timely multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

What will you study?

Planned Law modules include:

  • Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management 
  • Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
  • Disaster Management
  • Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
  • Public International Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict  
  • International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building 
  • Climate Change Disasters 
  • Technologies and Weaponry
  • Research project 
  • Professional placement 

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as: 

  • Development (including, foundational concepts, food security, gender)
  • Political (including, contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
  • Economic (including, macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
  • Preparing for Floods 

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from.)

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

Practical training opportunities

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers

What career can you have?

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.



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