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Masters Degrees (Food Economics)

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Cattolica’s Cremona campus (part of Piacenza-Cremona campus) boasts one of the world’s most renowned teams of Agriculture academics, scientists and researchers; a team at the forefront of food innovation and technology, whose expertise extends to developing tracking systems for any product transported across the European Union. Read more

Cattolica’s Cremona campus (part of Piacenza-Cremona campus) boasts one of the world’s most renowned teams of Agriculture academics, scientists and researchers; a team at the forefront of food innovation and technology, whose expertise extends to developing tracking systems for any product transported across the European Union. If you would like to study for a graduate qualification in the world’s fastest growing industry, then a beautiful city in the heart of the Italian food valley will open your doors to the world.

Learning objectives

The Agricultural and Food Economics program will prepare students to analyze the Agri-food system and to operate in the various functional areas of businesses and organizations. The program will develop your professional knowledge and skills with regards to:

● Analyzing traditional problems relating to agricultural markets and food, evaluating the implications of Agri-food and commercial policies

● Managing the liberalization processes and rules of free competition also within an international context

● Analyzing the behavior of final consumers with respect to agricultural and food products

● Understanding the different sectors of the Agri-food system, the vertical relations and the coordination of the various phases of the system (e.g. agriculture, food processing, and food retailing)

● Managing emerging issues in agricultural and food production, including the safety of foodstuffs and the environmental impact of agricultural activities, the role of quality, information and traceability, the management of technical innovations, in particular biotechnology, and of the industrialization of agriculture

● Dealing with corporate and logistical problems that affect business functions according to the peculiarities of agri- business companies.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

Graduates from the Agricultural and Food Economics program have various professional openings in:

● Agri-food corporations (multinational food companies, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs), retail chains)

● Professional associations of agricultural and food companies service and consultancy firms for agricultural and food companies

● Entrepreneurial activities

● Academic or applied research

● International organizations

Curriculum

First year credits

● Management basics (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Technology for food health and safety:

○ Principles of food protection (5 ECTS/CFU)

○ Principles of food hygiene (5 ECTS/CFU)

● Economic fundamentals of the Agri-food system:

○ Economics of the Agri-food system (6 ECTS/CFU)

○ Agricultural and food legislation (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Quantitative methods:

○ Applied statistics for the Agri-food system (6 ECTS/CFU)

○ Applied agricultural and food economics (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Industrial organization (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Financial accounting and business evaluation (6 ECTS/ CFU)

● Seminar on Theological issues

Second year credits:

● Agricultural and food market institutions (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Agricultural and food marketing (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Economics of agricultural and food markets (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Business planning and control (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Strategy and leadership (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Seminars

● Optional courses:Suggested optional courses:

● Topics in Agricultural and Food Economics I (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Topics in Agricultural and Food Economics II (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Cultura e Lingua Italiana (Italian Culture and Language) (only for non-Italian students) (2 ECTS/CFU)

● Thesis

Selected students can attend one or two semesters in the following partner universities:

● Technische Universität München

● University of California, Davis

● University of Connecticut

● North Dakota State University

● Iowa State University

● Wageningen University

Location

Cremona is located in the Lombardy Region, which in itself has over 53,000 agricultural businesses and contributes €113 billion to the Agri-food industry revenue. It is also the most advanced region in Italy with regards to biotechnology, with 78 companies operating in the sector.

The school

The course is organized by SMEA Postgraduate School at Università Cattolica. The School has almost 30 years of experience in graduate education, advanced scientific research and extension, in the field of agricultural and food economics and business.

Job ready

Studying Agricultural and Food Econom- ics in Cremona will give you the precious opportunity to combine the high stan- dard education delivered by our faculty and the managerial approach developed during internships and seminars with distinguished agribusiness company managers. Graduates from the Agricultural and Food Economics program have various professional openings in:

  1. Agri-food corporations (multinational food companies, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises [SMEs], retail chains)
  2. Professional associations of agricultural and food companies service and consultancy firms for agricultural and food companies
  3. Entrepreneurial activities
  4. Academic or applied research
  5. International organizations

Global perspective

Università Cattolica offers its students the opportunity to study abroad, both during regular terms and the summer. Our exchange and summer programs allow students to earn credits while studying abroad in one of Cattolica’s prestigious partner institutions.



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Critical training in applied economics, marketing, and quantitative and qualitative research techniques. Develop an understanding of economic and marketing aspects of food, including consumers’ decisions, globalisation in food retailing and manufacturing, and policy issues. Read more
  • Critical training in applied economics, marketing, and quantitative and qualitative research techniques
  • Develop an understanding of economic and marketing aspects of food, including consumers’ decisions, globalisation in food retailing and manufacturing, and policy issues
  • Acquire the professional skills to work for world organisations such as the EU and FAO, NGOs, international food companies and consulting companies

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Advertising and branding
  • Advanced marketing
  • Consumer behaviour and food marketing
  • Food policy
  • Marketing research methods

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae" target="_blank">http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae



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Rigorous training in research methods for applied economics and marketing prepares students for doctoral studies. Excellent preparation for research careers in academia or industry and policy research in governments or international organisations. Read more
  • Rigorous training in research methods for applied economics and marketing prepares students for doctoral studies
  • Excellent preparation for research careers in academia or industry and policy research in governments or international organisations
  • Application of techniques to a diverse range of farm, food and rural development issues in both developed and developing country contexts

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Consumer and producer theory
  • Econometrics
  • Quantitative methods
  • Qualitative research methods
  • Market research methods

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae" target="_blank">http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae



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Goal of the pro­gramme. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Do you want to have an impact on what people will eat in the future? Would you like to know what makes food taste good, due to the raw materials and processing technologies? Do you want to know how we could improve the healthiness, safety, ecology and ethics of food and food processing? Are you interested in exploring innovations in food, such as "pulled oats" or using insects as food? If you answered yes, enrol in Food Sciences master’s programme.

The food industry is the 4th most important employer both in Finland and internationally. This industry is constantly looking for experts to solve new problems. With a Master’s degree in Food Sciences you could embark on a career in the food industry; in a food, agricultural or environmental control laboratory; as a teacher, researcher, or self-employed entrepreneur; or as an expert in government ministries or other expert organisations.

As a master in Food Sciences you will be able to help the food industry develop and renew itself, since you will possess know-how on:

  • Raw materials and processes, including their theoretical basics
  • Different food constituents and their impact on food quality
  • Factors that ensure good quality and food safety

You can enrol in the Food Sciences masters' programme if you hold a bachelors' degree in Food Sciences or in Molecular Biosciences. You can also apply to the programme if you have a bachelors' degree in a related area of the natural sciences from a Finnish or foreign university, or if you have a degree from a Finnish university of applied sciences within food sciences or other related areas of the natural sciences.

Your studies in the Food Sciences masters' programme will offer you a broad education covering courses in the composition and processing of food, in the structures and chemical reactions of food proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, and in food legislation and the safety of food additives.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

Food Sciences on the Viikki campus is a nationally unique programme that covers the whole food production chain from primary production via food processing to consumers. Food Sciences is an internationally appreciated field of education: food research at the University of Helsinki has been highly ranked.

Your masters' studies in food sciences will enable you to make an impact on the the creation of innovative solutions for the whole chain of food production. You will:

  • Study the theory and applications of the broad area of food sciences in lecture courses and in group work 
  • Increase your knowledge of food composition, processing, structure, and legislation
  • Deepen your knowledge of how the reactions of different food components, production processes and packaging affect the structure, sensory quality, healthiness and safety of animal and plant based foods
  • Learn laboratory working skills
  • Acquire employment skills for example by training in the food industry

Se­lec­tion of the study track

You can affect the sort of expertise you would like to gain. You can tailor your Master’s degree by choosing special studies in food chemistry, food technology, and in the science and technology relating to meat, dairy and cereals.

You can also complement your expertise in food sciences with, for example, studies in food development, food safety, food research and analysis, economics, marketing, sustainable food production, microbiology, biotechnology or nutrition.



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The Rome Business School’s Master in Food and Beverage Management is the ideal academic course for professionals seeking a . Read more

The Rome Business School’s Master in Food and Beverage Management is the ideal academic course for professionals seeking a world-class degree programme in these disciplines, leading to a successful global career in the Food & Wine industry.

With the Rome Business School’s international perspective, the programme offers a unique learning experience and a global professional exposure, enabling participants to study in one of the best cities of the world or online. The programme’s quality teachingand networking services all contribute to make it the perfect fit for anyone who is looking to rise to the top in the world of food and beverage industry.

 

Objectives

In particular, on completing the programme, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and develop effective managerial strategies for food & beverage industry companies
  • Develop a business plan for food & beverage industry companies
  • Utilise the most advanced marketing techniques to promote food & beverage industry companies and products
  • Apply planning, financial management, and management control principles to the food & beverage industry
  • Understand and utilise project management techniques
  • Understand and apply process and supply techniques to the food & beverage context
  • Master the use of new technologies within food & beverage industry companies
  • Understand the food & beverage industry start-up ecosystem

 

Target Recipients

The Master in Food and Beverage Management is a course of excellence designed for young persons who wish to start a career in the Food & Wine industry, and to professionals in the food & beverage production chain and restauration industries —or in other sectors closely linked to them—who aspire to set out on a path to grow within their organisation, to start up an enterprise in an opportunity rich but ever more complex context, and/or to complete their training path by obtaining a certification specifically conceived for the food and beverage industry.

On completion of this training course, the attendees will be able to work, among other profiles, as:

  • Consultants for the creation of start-ups within the restauration industry
  • Consultants for corporate repositioning
  • Food & Wine Managers
  • Banqueting Managers
  • Hotel chain Retail & Sales Managers
  • Public Relations Managers

Contents

Introduction and Scenario

The Food and Beverage and Agri-Food System

Food and Beverage Industry Management

Basics of management: elements of corporate strategy and organisation

Economics and food company management

Marketing management and digital marketing

Accountancy and management control

Basics of Project Management

Business Planning

Human Resource Management

From the concept to the project: defining a project’s guidelines through the creation of the Concept

Geomarketing analysis

Aesthetic and functional design: identifying structural needs/required spaces and their distribution / defining a layout

Administrative requirements to set up a business / verifying the suitability of a location

Job Health and Safety: regulations and documents

 

Food Management

Retail & sales management

Supplier selection

Food cost control

Menu engineering

Restaurant and Kitchen layout

Practice Lab: visits to producers

 

Beverage Management

Retail & sales management

Supplier selection

Beverage cost control

Wine and beverage list engineering

Wine cellar layout

Practice Lab: visits to producers

 

Marketing and Communication for Food and Beverage

Food and Beverage industry marketing

Restauration services marketing

Digital marketing

Brand management – Image and Brand Identity

Food, Wine, and Mass Media – communication tools (food guides, industry publications/websites, newsletters)

Storytelling applied to Food & Wine products and services

Content management

Social media management for the Food and Beverage industry

Food & Wine audio-visual communication

Customer care

Food and Beverage events and the role of Public Relations

Case studies

Agri-food product marketing and brand management

Wine marketing and brand management

Marketing strategies applied to industry contents: case histories and testimonials

Food and Beverage industry innovation and strategies

Internationalisation strategies

New technologies: from production chain to service

Launching a start-up in the Food and Beverage industry

Extracurricular activities

As part of the course, a Cooking Teambuilding and/or Gastronomic Walking Tour event is organised in Rome’s Old Town to understand the cultural context within which the various made in Italy Food and Beverage service and restauration of excellence activities insert themselves, with the aim of understanding its various formats and business models.

 

Structure (12 months)

The Rome Business School’s Master’s Degree in Food and Beverage Management is structured in:

  • 6 months of lectures (twice a week)
  • 6 months of international internship and project work
  • Company visits
  • Personalized career services
  • Cultural programme
  • Seminars and events



Attendance formulas

The Master in Food and Beverage Management may be attended in the following formulas:

  • On Campus, at the Rome Business School Rome headquarters.
  • Online (Distance Learning), through a cutting edge e-learning platform with live lectures and a great teacher-student interaction.


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This programme has been designed to provide students with knowledge and understanding of key steps in the development and launch of new ingredients and products to contribute to healthy living and lifestyles. Read more

This programme has been designed to provide students with knowledge and understanding of key steps in the development and launch of new ingredients and products to contribute to healthy living and lifestyles. It is based upon the strengths and expertise of staff working in the Faculty of Engineering and Science, e.g. human nutrition and public health, food chemistry and biochemistry, functional foods, marketing and economics, new product and process development, food packaging, food safety and quality management, food legislation, applied food microbiology, creative thinking, sustainability and entrepreneurship.

This programme is aimed at graduates who want to develop a career path in the food industry in the area of product development, for students who have not followed an undergraduate programme in food science or technology, and for professionals working in the food industry who want to participate in the programme, either in a part-time mode or by following a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) route. Students with backgrounds in Biology, Chemistry, Nutrition, Biotechnology and Hospitality are encouraged to join the programme.

This new programme is intended to prepare graduates from a life science or catering background for careers as professional Product Development Scientists, based upon a clear understanding and competency of science-based subjects.

Please note that as part of the compulsory courses below students will sit the Level 3 award in Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) for Food Manufacturing course offered by the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH).

Outcomes

The aims of the programme are to:

  • Innovate and find practical solutions in value added activities
  • Develop insight into the development of healthy and nutritious food
  • Provide the ability to enhance creativity and sustainability within the food chain
  • Enhance employability skills and tools required by the food chain.

Full time

Year 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Students are required to choose 45 credits from this list of options.

Part time

Year 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Year 2

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Students are required to choose 45 credits from this list of options.

Assessment

Assessments will take the form of:

  • Examinations and essays
  • Class based tests
  • Presentations and tutorials
  • Reports of (tutor-led) laboratory and field-based activities
  • Reports of independent project work.

Careers

Graduates from this programme will have the knowledge and skills to pursue careers at government level, working in competent authorities; in the food industry as food technologists, including in the area of product development; or in hospitality sectors.



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The Food Quality Management Master of Science study programme offers an integrated approach to the study and assessment of quality processes in the agrifood chain through an exclusively developed techno-managerial approach. Read more

The Food Quality Management Master of Science study programme offers an integrated approach to the study and assessment of quality processes in the agrifood chain through an exclusively developed techno-managerial approach. The whole supply chain is studied from the primary sector to the final consumer. Food, flowers and cattle are also discussed.

This two-year MSc gives you the chance to analyse problems using both the social and life sciences. This allows you a higher level of approach on the topics of food quality, quality management, quality design, quality control, quality improvement, quality assurance, quality policy and business strategy.

Study programme

Food quality analysis is different from the analysis of 'normal' products. Food, food products, flowers, cattle and crops are living matter that changes continuously over time due to (bio) chemical, physical and microbiological influences.

On the Programme of Food Quality Management page you can find the general outline of the programme and more detailed information about courses, theses and internships.

Specialisations

Within the master's programme you can choose one of the following Specialisations to meet your personal interests.

Your future career

What are your possibilities after graduating? Read more about career perspectives and opportunities after finishing the programme.

Related programmes:

MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

MSc Food Technology 

MSc Food Safety



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MSc Italian FOOD & WINE (ItF&W). The "Italian Food and Wine" MSc degree will focus on the understanding, management, promotion and protection of high-value food products, including wine. Read more

MSc Italian FOOD & WINE (ItF&W)

The "Italian Food and Wine" MSc degree will focus on the understanding, management, promotion and protection of high-value food products, including wine.

Programme Summary

In this MSc course, the internationally-recognised Italian food production system is analysed as a model for defining and characterising the individual elements that contribute to the unique value of food products that are inextricably linked to place (terroir) through historic, social and cultural ties. These elements also include more recent developments in technology, nutrition, food safety, diet and health, and sensory science that are at the heart of a growing international demand for terroir-related high-value foods.

The specific learning outcome is a deep understanding of the multi-faceted characteristics that distinguish these foods from others in the marketplace and that can be exploited in products’ valorisation and consumer information strategies both in the EU and international markets. The ultimate objective of this multi-disciplinary program is to train professionals who are well-versed in the complex system of producing high-value foods and wines whose quality is profoundly linked to tradition and place of origin.

Who is the MSc candidate?

This programme is open to Italian and foreign students interested in learning and implementing effective actions for the valorisation of high-quality food products and wines.

What career opportunities does the MSc provide?

Graduates will be expert in the technical and economical management, valorisation and protection of high quality agro-food products - in an export and territorial development-oriented perspective - by using the Italian system as the reference model. He/she will find employment opportunities in quality-oriented agro-food companies, in producers' organizations, and in public and private consultancy companies involved in the protection, valorisation, marketing, consulting, training and communication activities for high-quality agro-food products.

The most relevant positions concern: ii) marketing of high-quality foods and wines, on both the EU and international market; ii) design and implementation of promotion and protection strategies for these products; iii) management of producers' organizations; iv) 'off-trade' and 'on-trade' buying activities, mainly in the international market; v) information on high-quality foods and wines management; vi) planning and management of territorial development strategies based on 'terroir-related' quality agro-food products.

How is the programme organised?

During the two-years MSc course students choose 12 course units – according to their individual background and interest - among the following:

Plant biodiversity and food

Animal biodiversity and food

Quality, processing and sensorial analysis of Italian food

Quality, processing and sensorial analysis of Italian wine

Food microbiology and quality

Food safety and hygiene

Food traceability for food quality

Food, wine and nutrition

Value adding quality schemes and consumer demand

Food and Wine-based territorial valorization and rural development

Quality-oriented Food and Wine management and governance

Consumer behavior

Food, wine and society

Food and Wine history and anthropology

Food and wine: perspectives from abroad

Foreign language (Italian or English)

Teaching includes lectures, laboratory and field activities, practical exercises, and seminars by outside experts that feature a rich variety of relevant case studies of Italian foods and wines. Opportunities for intensive tutoring and for master thesis-related stages of at least six months duration will be available with outstanding companies in this sector of the food industry or with other relevant organisations in the private or public sphere.

Visit the MSc “Italian food and wine” page on the Università di Padova web-site (http://www.unipd.it/en/italian-food-and-wine) for more details.

Scholarships and Fee Waivers

The University of Padova, the Veneto Region and other organisations offer various scholarship schemes to support students. Below is a list of the funding opportunities that are most often used by international students in Padova.

You can find more information below and on our website here: http://www.unipd.it/en/studying-padova/funding-and-fees/scholarships

You can find more information on fee waivers here: http://www.unipd.it/en/fee-waivers



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The Food and Resource Economics (FRE) Group offers both a research master's degree, the Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Agricultural Economics, and a professional master's degree, the Master of Food and Resource Economics (M.F.R.E.). Read more

General Information

The Food and Resource Economics (FRE) Group offers both a research master's degree, the Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Agricultural Economics, and a professional master's degree, the Master of Food and Resource Economics (M.F.R.E.). The M.Sc. is designed for careers where research is a main component, while the M.F.R.E. is designed for careers in industry or government.

In both degrees, coursework provides students with rigorous training in applied economics and quantitative methods. In the M.Sc., students develop specialized research skills by working with faculty throughout UBC on important real-world issues. In the M.F.R.E., students combine applied economics with policy analysis and agribusiness management, enabling them to analyze issues in the food and resource sectors.

FRE faculty members have direct experience working in the food and resource sectors, both domestically and internationally in Europe and Asia, particularly with developing countries.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Food and Resource Economics
- Specialization: Food And Resource Economics
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework only
- Faculty: Faculty of Land and Food Systems

About MFRE

The MFRE is a one-year course-based professional masters degree which offers a combination of applied economics, policy analysis and agribusiness management. The program is geared towards graduates and professionals such as policy analysts, market consultants and researchers looking to sharpen their skill-sets with more advanced economics and real world applications. Classes are conducted by faculty from Land and Food Systems and the Sauder School of Business, with frequent guest lectures by industry and government executives.

Why MFRE?

- Complete a professional master’s degree in 12 months
- Apply your economics to food policy, trade, and environment
- Obtain a world-recognized degree from The University of British Columbia
- Position yourself for a career in the global food & resource sectors
- Grow your professional global network – 110 alumni from 21 countries
- Experience Vancouver – one of the most livable cities in the world

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Who is it for?. From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, our students come to study the MSc in Food Policy from around the world, across the food landscape and go on to develop their careers in a variety of ways once they graduate. Read more

Who is it for?

From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, our students come to study the MSc in Food Policy from around the world, across the food landscape and go on to develop their careers in a variety of ways once they graduate.

The course is for students who are passionate about food policy and are open to challenging their own assumptions. We want you to graduate from this Masters with a more disciplined and rigorous approach so you can be more effective in pursuing your passions within the food domain.

Objectives

How does a coconut growing in Malaysia become a coconut drink in the UK? On this programme we explore how policy influences the trajectory of food not just from field to fork but across time and territory.

The MSc in Food Policy is about analysing, researching and informing the future of food policy from the local to global scale. It is run by the Centre for Food Policy, founded by Prof. Tim Langin 1994. Read this report for a summary of the Centre's past work and vision for the future.

The ways in which we produce, process, distribute, market, prepare and consume food have important consequences for our health and that of the planet. We look at the positive and negative impacts of food, from the health, environmental, political, socio-economic and cultural perspective.

This Masters promotes genuine interdisciplinary because we think you need to look at the subject from all angles to make the most holistic evaluation. It draws on social sciences (sociology, politics, economics, anthropology, psychology) as well as health sciences and epidemiology. We look at the latest food policy debates and place them in a historical context.

You will be taught by a team of specialist food policy specialists who are leaders in the field. Our academic staff are actively involved in research and in policy-making on the local, national and global stage. Our teaching reflects this engagement.

Students are exposed to conflicting narratives about the problems facing the food system and the best ways to resolve them. We address important questions of our time, such as:

  • Are we producing too much or too little food to feed the world population?
  • How have we ended up living in a world where there are more overweight and obese people than under-nourished people?
  • Why is a third of the food produced globally lost or wasted?
  • How can we deal with the massive impact of agriculture on climate change?
  • How do lobbyists and the media influence what we eat?

Teaching and learning

We are a passionate and engaged team who will help you understand how to change the food system for the better. You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small group activities, whole class discussions, workshops and independent study. There are a lot of group discussions in class. We encourage you to ask questions, contribute your own experiences and apply your own perspectives to the issues we explore. The programme also encourages a strong peer-to-peer community through social media.

For the distance-learning mode you will be able to watch the lectures online, which are supplemented with written exercises and one-to-one Skype tutorials with the teaching staff.

Read this report for a summary of the CFP's past work.

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by two pieces of written work. The first is handed in during the middle of term so that you receive useful feedback before moving on to the second assignment. In each case you will choose the topic. You will also be asked to write different kinds of documents (briefing papers, memos, reports as well as essays) that correspond to those you would have to write in policy-making organisations. Then you work on your dissertation, which is a longer (15,000 word) piece of work, enabling you to delve into a food policy topic of your choice in depth. You will gain support from a personal supervisor who is a senior academic from the Centre for Food Policy.

Modules

The course consists of four core taught modules (worth 30 credits each) and a dissertation (worth 60 credits). The dissertation gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a topic of your choice that is relevant to food policy. The course has been designed to enable you to pursue your own interests and passions. In every assignment you have the opportunity to engage with the issues you care about.

The course is flexible to fit in with your work commitments so you can study this Masters on a full-time (one year), part-time (two years) or on a distance-learning basis (two years). The taught modules take place in the first and second terms, and the dissertation starts in the third term and continues until September (December for part-time students). For each taught module there are approximately 10 three-hour teaching sessions. In addition you are expected to undertake around 270 hours of independent study. For the whole programme, you should expect to study for around 1800 hours (35 hours per week for full-time students, 17.5 hours for part-time students).

Career prospects

According to the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, previous graduates in employment six months after completing the course earn an average salary of £34,750.

We are very proud of our alumni. For example, our alumni run NGOs and progressive food businesses, work in government and UN agencies, and have established great careers in health advocacy, journalism and academia.



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Foodborne diseases are a growing public health concern worldwide. The contamination of food with microorganisms or chemicals may occur at any stage in the process from food production to consumption (“farm to fork”) and as a result of environmental contamination, including pollution of water, soil or air. Read more

Foodborne diseases are a growing public health concern worldwide. The contamination of food with microorganisms or chemicals may occur at any stage in the process from food production to consumption (“farm to fork”) and as a result of environmental contamination, including pollution of water, soil or air. The global burden of foodborne diseases worldwide is very high affecting every year around 600 million people with 420,000 deaths. Therefore, the World Health Organisation (WHO) highlighted the importance of producing safe food that saves human lives, saves resources and has a positive impact on the economy of every country.

This is a online learning programme aimed at students with relevant agricultural and food related background keen to acquire in-depth knowledge on food safety. The MSc is specifically designed to provide a true holistic food safety approach to the food chain that incorporates to the pre and post-harvest stages of food production, crop safety, animal welfare and economics of the supply chain.

This programme would be suitable for those with an undergraduate degree in agricultural sciences, biological science, food systems, veterinary medicine and human medicine, as well as professionals from agriculture, rural industries, the food industry, government officials, international organisations, researchers in food safety and the third sector.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh's excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

The programme has been designed to use a range of assessment tools, both formative and summative, with multiple feedback. opportunities across the programme. Summative assessment and feedback has been designed to help students develop the key skills associated with the learning outcomes and tied to practical applications such as report and grant writing. Formative assessment (e.g. MCQs and discussion groups) will be included in each course to provide opportunities for feedback before assessment deadlines. Opportunities will be provided for formative feedback on assessment drafts.

Programme structure

Year 1 will consist of 4 core courses: Food Supply Chain and Food Safety, Data Analysis for Food Safety, Food Safety Hazards and Food Safety Management Systems, Food Production Systems. These courses will be developed and delivered by specialists in the field from the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies (RDSVS), the Roslin Institute and the Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC). Students successfully completing Year 1 and exiting the programme will be awarded a PG Certificate (PG Cert) in Food Safety.

Year 2 will consist of 2 core courses: Food Processing and Waste Management, and Research Methods and Statistics. You will also choose 2 to 3 elective courses (10 or 20 credits) from the Postgraduate Taught (PGT) portfolio of courses. These include: Zoonotic Disease, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Animal Welfare and Food Production and Food Security.

Students successfully completing Year 1 and 2 and exiting the programme will be awarded with a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Food Safety.

Year 3 will consist of a final dissertation to gain the award of MSc.

Career opportunities

This programme aims to equip students with the fundamental knowledge and expertise to be able to influence and promote food safety at different levels of their organisation.

It gives solid grounds to enhance their career or to secure a position or to pursue a different career in food safety related organisations. Whether for the government, for the industry or in research (e.g. to prepare for a PhD in Food Safety or to have a more hands-on experience).



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Programme Description. Foodborne diseases are a growing public health concern worldwide. Read more

Programme Description

Foodborne diseases are a growing public health concern worldwide. The contamination of food with microorganisms or chemicals may occur at any stage in the process from food production to consumption (“farm to fork”) and as a result of environmental contamination, including pollution of water, soil or air. The global burden of foodborne diseases worldwide is very high affecting every year around 600 million people with 420,000 deaths. Therefore, the World Health Organisation (WHO) highlighted the importance of producing safe food that saves human lives, saves resources and has a positive impact on the economy of every country.

This is a online learning programme aimed at students with relevant agricultural and food related background keen to acquire in-depth knowledge on food safety. The MSc is specifically designed to provide a true holistic food safety approach to the food chain that incorporates to the pre and post-harvest stages of food production, crop safety, animal welfare and economics of the supply chain.

This programme would be suitable for those with an undergraduate degree in agricultural sciences, biological science, food systems, veterinary medicine and human medicine, as well as professionals from agriculture, rural industries, the food industry, government officials, international organisations, researchers in food safety and the third sector.

Programme Structure

Year 1 will consist of 4 core courses: Food Supply Chain and Food Safety, Data Analysis for Food Safety, Food Safety Hazards and Food Safety Management Systems, Food Production Systems. These courses will be developed and delivered by specialists in the field from the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies (RDSVS), the Roslin Institute and the Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC). Students successfully completing Year 1 and exiting the programme will be awarded a PG Certificate (PG Cert) in Food Safety.

Year 2 will consist of 2 core courses: Food Processing and Waste Management, and Research Methods and Statistics. You will also choose 2 to 3 elective courses (10 or 20 credits) from the Postgraduate Taught (PGT) portfolio of courses. These include: Zoonotic Disease, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Animal Welfare and Food Production and Food Security.

Students successfully completing Year 1 and 2 and exiting the programme will be awarded with a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Food Safety.

Year 3 will consist of a final dissertation to gain the award of MSc.

Postgraduate Professional Development

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course(s), without the time or financial commitment of a full Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.

English language requirements

All applicants must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of their English language ability:

  • an undergraduate or masters degree, that was taught and assessed in English in a majority English speaking country as defined by UK Visas and Immigration
  • UKVI list of majority English speaking countries
  • IELTS Academic: total 6.5 (at least 6.0 in each module)
  • TOEFL-iBT: total 92 (at least 20 in each module)
  • PTE(A): total 61 (at least 56 in each of the "Communicative Skills" sections; the "Enabling Skills" sections are not considered)
  • CAE and CPE: total 176 (at least 169 in each module)
  • Trinity ISE: ISE II with distinctions in all four components

Degrees taught and assessed in English must be no more than three years old at the beginning of your degree programme. Language tests must be no more than two years old at the beginning of your degree programme.

Find out more about our language requirements:



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If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes. Read more

If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes.

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA). This brings you up to the standards required to continue with MSc study. Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above then proceed to one of our MSc programmes. Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/196/economics-conversion-diploma-in-economic-analysis

Course structure

- Year 1

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA), which is a qualification in its own right, and brings you up to the standard required to continue with MSc study. The DEA consists of five compulsory modules.

- Year 2

Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above can then proceed to one of the following MSc programmes in year two:

- MSc Economics

- MSc Economics and Econometrics

- MSc Economics and Finance

- MSc Finance and Econometrics

- MSc International Finance and Economic Development

Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for students who already have a degree to proceed to study economics at Master’s level when they have not previously studied economics

- provide you with the knowledge, analytical and other skills from which you can proceed to further study in economics and develop a deeper understanding of economic theory, econometric and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential

- provide options to enable you to study selected areas of economics in depth

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional economist or in an area related to economics

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics

Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance

Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour

Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics

Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics

Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics

Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/



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The Economics and Finance MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced economic and finance theory and quantitative methods, while allowing you to specialise or take options in a range of subjects reflecting the School’s main areas of research expertise in finance. Read more
The Economics and Finance MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced economic and finance theory and quantitative methods, while allowing you to specialise or take options in a range of subjects reflecting the School’s main areas of research expertise in finance. It prepares you for work as a professional economist in the financial and banking sectors, public sector and international organisations.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/200/economics-and-finance

Course structure

The Economics and Finance MSc is studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (six of which are compulsory) and a dissertation.

There are compulosry modules in Financial Economics: Capital Market Instruments, Financial Economics and Asset Pricing, Advanced Macroeconomics, Econometric Methods, Time Series Econometrics and Research Methods. These modules build upon students’ existing knowledge, understanding and skills.

Students develop a deeper understanding of economic and finance theory, quantitative and research methods, and policy applications. The teaching and learning of skills are carefully integrated into the structure of the modules and degree programme. The final two modules are chosen from a range of options based upon the finance research interests of our academic staff.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme proceed to the dissertation stage where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on an Economics/Finance topic.

Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC805 - Advanced Macroeconomics I (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC820 - Time Series Econometrics (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC822 - Financial Economics: Capital Market Instruments (15 credits)
EC824 - Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC802 - Advanced Microeconomics of Consumers, Marketsand Welfare (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and finance, and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of economic and financial theory, econometrics, financial econometrics and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- provide options to enable you to study selected areas of economics and finance in depth

- develop your ability to apply economic and financial knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional in the fields of economics and finance or related areas

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Read more
Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Food is also essential to the social body. Who eats what, who eats with whom, and whose appetites are satisfied and whose denied, are all profoundly social dynamics through which identities, relationships, and hierarchies are created and reproduced.

The SOAS MA programme in the Anthropology of Food offers students the opportunity to explore historically and culturally variable foodways, from foraging to industrial agriculture, from Europe and North America to Africa, Asia and South America. The programme asks students to trace the passage of food from plant to palate, and to examine who benefits, and who suffers, from contemporary modes of food production, exchange, preparation, and consumption. Students examine food policy at national and international levels, as well as the role played in its formation by the food industry.

Focus is given to the study of famine and the controversial role of food aid in securing food supplies. Debates over the impact of agricultural biotechnology on agrarian livelihoods and knowledge systems, as well as on the natural environment, are assessed. Movements toward organic agriculture, fair trade, and slow food are also analysed.

An anthropological approach to the study of food draws upon and challenges the perspectives of other disciplines, whether agronomy or nutritional science, economics or law, history or literature. Dependent upon individual interests and experiences, graduates of the programme may pursue research degrees in any number of academic disciplines, or find employment in food-related government ministries, international organizations, development agencies, or non-governmental associations, as well as in the fields of public health, education, and media, or in the catering industry.

Click here for a last of past Dissertation Titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/ma-anthropology-of-food-dissertation-titles-2006---present.html)

Click here for Alumni Profiles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/foodstudies/studentprofiles/)

Course teachers Johan Pottier, Harry G. West, and Jakob Klein were awarded the 2009 Excellence in Instruction Award by the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society. West was named joint runner-up for the SOAS Director’s Teaching Prize in 2011-2012. The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Food was named a Finalist in the Best Food Initiative category in the BBC Food & Farming Awards in 2015.

Scholarships:
Applicants for the MA Anthropology of Food may be eligible to apply for Scholarships and Bursaries (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/

Programme Structure Overview

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- The Anthropology of Food - 15PANC013 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Anthropology of Food and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme, either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may then be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 147kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/file39766.pdf

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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