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Masters Degrees (Food Economics)

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Cattolica’s Cremona campus (part of Piacenza-Cremona campus) boasts one of the world’s most renowned teams of Agriculture academics, scientists and researchers; a team at the forefront of food innovation and technology, whose expertise extends to developing tracking systems for any product transported across the European Union. Read more
Cattolica’s Cremona campus (part of Piacenza-Cremona campus) boasts one of the world’s most renowned teams of Agriculture academics, scientists and researchers; a team at the forefront of food innovation and technology, whose expertise extends to developing tracking systems for any product transported across the European Union. If you would like to study for a graduate qualification in the world’s fastest growing industry, then a beautiful city in the heart of the Italian food valley will open your doors to the world.

Learning objectives

The Agricultural and Food Economics program will prepare students to analyze the Agri-food system and to operate in the various functional areas of businesses and organizations. The program will develop your professional knowledge and skills with regards to:
● Analyzing traditional problems relating to agricultural markets and food, evaluating the implications of Agri-food and commercial policies

● Managing the liberalization processes and rules of free competition also within an international context

● Analyzing the behavior of final consumers with respect to agricultural and food products

● Understanding the different sectors of the Agri-food system, the vertical relations and the coordination of the various phases of the system (e.g. agriculture, food processing, and food retailing)

● Managing emerging issues in agricultural and food production, including the safety of foodstuffs and the environmental impact of agricultural activities, the role of quality, information and traceability, the management of technical innovations, in particular biotechnology, and of the industrialization of agriculture

● Dealing with corporate and logistical problems that affect business functions according to the peculiarities of agri- business companies.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

Graduates from the Agricultural and Food Economics program have various professional openings in:
● Agri-food corporations (multinational food companies, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs), retail chains)

● Professional associations of agricultural and food companies service and consultancy firms for agricultural and food companies

● Entrepreneurial activities

● Academic or applied research

● International organizations

Curriculum

First year credits
● Management basics (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Technology for food health and safety:
○ Principles of food protection (5 ECTS/CFU)
○ Principles of food hygiene (5 ECTS/CFU)

● Economic fundamentals of the Agri-food system:
○ Economics of the Agri-food system (6 ECTS/CFU)
○ Agricultural and food legislation (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Quantitative methods:
○ Applied statistics for the Agri-food system (6 ECTS/CFU)
○ Applied agricultural and food economics (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Industrial organization (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Financial accounting and business evaluation (6 ECTS/ CFU)

● Optional courses* (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Seminars (1 ECTS/CFU)

Second year credits
● Agricultural and food market institutions (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Agricultural and food marketing (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Economics of agricultural and food markets (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Business planning and control (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Strategy and leadership (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Final dissertation (25 ECTS/CFU)

*Suggested optional courses:

● Topics in Agricultural and Food Economics I (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Topics in Agricultural and Food Economics II (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Cultura e Lingua Italiana (Italian Culture and Language) (only for non-Italian students) (2 ECTS/CFU)

Selected students can attend one or two semesters in the following partner universities:
● Technische Universität München

● University of California, Davis

● University of Connecticut

● North Dakota State University

● Iowa State University

● Wageningen University

Location

Cremona is located in the Lombardy Region, which in itself has over 53,000 agricultural businesses and contributes €113 billion to the Agri-food industry revenue. It is also the most advanced region in Italy with regards to biotechnology, with 78 companies operating in the sector.

The school

The course is organized by SMEA Postgraduate School at Università Cattolica. The School has almost 30 years of experience in graduate education, advanced scientific research and extension, in the field of agricultural and food economics and business.

Job ready

Studying Agricultural and Food Econom- ics in Cremona will give you the precious opportunity to combine the high stan- dard education delivered by our faculty and the managerial approach developed during internships and seminars with distinguished agribusiness company managers.

Global perspective

Università Cattolica offers its students the opportunity to study abroad, both during regular terms and the summer. Our exchange and summer programs allow students to earn credits while studying abroad in one of Cattolica’s prestigious partner institutions.

Candidates need to satisfy the English language proficiency requirement in order to submit their application.

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About the course. -Critical training in applied economics, marketing, and quantitative and qualitative research techniques. -Develop an understanding of economic and marketing aspects of food, including consumers’ decisions, globalisation in food retailing and manufacturing, and policy issues. Read more
About the course:
-Critical training in applied economics, marketing, and quantitative and qualitative research techniques
-Develop an understanding of economic and marketing aspects of food, including consumers’ decisions, globalisation in food retailing and manufacturing, and policy issues
-Acquire the professional skills to work for world organisations such as the EU and FAO, NGOs, international food companies and consulting companies

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Advertising and branding
-Advanced marketing
-Consumer behaviour and food marketing
-Food policy
-Marketing research methods

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

WHAT CAREER CAN YOU HAVE?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae

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This course will give you. -Rigorous training in research methods for applied economics and marketing prepares students for doctoral studies. Read more
This course will give you:
-Rigorous training in research methods for applied economics and marketing prepares students for doctoral studies
-Excellent preparation for research careers in academia or industry and policy research in governments or international organisations
-Application of techniques to a diverse range of farm, food and rural development issues in both developed and developing country contexts

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Consumer and producer theory
-Econometrics
-Quantitative methods
-Qualitative research methods
-Market research methods

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

WHAT CAREER CAN YOU HAVE?

Our master's courses are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, marketing within the food chain and policy. We provide dedicated employability support through career workshops and have developed a personal and professional development module for international students. Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provide many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships, placements and a research dissertation provide opportunities to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. Our graduates find employment within government departments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, the media, academia and commercial companies. Some use a master's course to transition into a new career as independent consultants or as a study break from employment. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to please visit http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae

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Do you want to have an impact on what people will eat in the future? Would you like to know what makes food taste good, due to the raw materials and processing… Read more
Do you want to have an impact on what people will eat in the future? Would you like to know what makes food taste good, due to the raw materials and processing technologies? Do you want to know how we could improve the healthiness, safety, ecology and ethics of food and food processing? Are you interested in exploring innovations in food, such as "pulled oats" or using insects as food? If you answered yes, enrol in Food Sciences master’s programme.

The food industry is the 4th most important employer both in Finland and internationally. This industry is constantly looking for experts to solve new problems. With a Master’s degree in Food Sciences you could embark on a career in the food industry; in a food, agricultural or environmental control laboratory; as a teacher, researcher, or self-employed entrepreneur; or as an expert in government ministries or other expert organisations.

As a master in Food Sciences you will be able to help the food industry develop and renew itself, since you will possess know-how on:
-Raw materials and processes, including their theoretical basics.
-Different food constituents and their impact on food quality.
-Factors that ensure good quality and food safety.

You can enrol in the Food Sciences masters' programme if you hold a bachelors' degree in Food Sciences or in Molecular Biosciences. You can also apply to the programme if you have a bachelors' degree in a related area of the natural sciences from a Finnish or foreign university, or if you have a degree from a Finnish university of applied sciences within food sciences or other related areas of the natural sciences.

Your studies in the Food Sciences masters' programme will offer you a broad education covering courses in the composition and processing of food, in the structures and chemical reactions of food proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, and in food legislation and the safety of food additives.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Content

Food Sciences on the Viikki campus is a nationally unique programme that covers the whole food production chain from primary production via food processing to consumers. Food Sciences is an internationally appreciated field of education: food research at the University of Helsinki has been highly ranked.

Your masters' studies in food sciences will enable you to make an impact on the the creation of innovative solutions for the whole chain of food production. You will:
-Study the theory and applications of the broad area of food sciences in lecture courses and in group work.
-Increase your knowledge of food composition, processing, structure, and legislation.
-Deepen your knowledge of how the reactions of different food components, production processes and packaging affect the structure, sensory quality, healthiness and safety of animal and plant based foods.
-Learn laboratory working skills.
-Acquire employment skills for example by training in the food industry.

Selection of the Major

You can affect the sort of expertise you would like to gain. You can tailor your Master’s degree by choosing special studies in food chemistry, food technology, and in the science and technology relating to meat, dairy and cereals.

You can also complement your expertise in food sciences with, for example, studies in food development, food safety, food research and analysis, economics, marketing, sustainable food production, microbiology, biotechnology or nutrition.

Programme Structure

You will need 120 credits (ECTS) for the Master’s degree. Together with your faculty adviser, you will make a personal study plan consisting of:
-60 credits of advanced studies in food sciences including a Master’s thesis.
-Studies of your choice in special areas of food sciences.
-Complementary studies of your choice.
-Studies of your free choice.

You can also include career planning, an internship and studies abroad in your Master’s degree.

Career Prospects

With a Master’s degree in Food Sciences, you can find work as a product quality manager in the food industry; as an inspector in a food, agricultural or environmental control laboratory; as a teacher or researcher at a university; as self-employed entrepreneur; or as an expert in a government ministry or other expert organisation.

Internationalization

As a student in Food Sciences you have excellent opportunities for an international student exchange or internship. You can also perform part of your degree studies at a university abroad. Due to the instruction in English, the many international students on the Viikki campus, and the many international personnel in the research groups, you will be part of an international community in your daily student life.

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The MSc programme Food Safety focuses on the technical aspects, as well as on the legal aspects of food safety and integrates these in Food Safety Management. Read more

MSc Food Safety

The MSc programme Food Safety focuses on the technical aspects, as well as on the legal aspects of food safety and integrates these in Food Safety Management. The Food Safety programme of Wageningen University was the first MSc in Food Safety worldwide. The programme is unique, with a highly integrated approach to the field of food safety.

Programme summary

Wageningen University is one of the few universities in Europe able to offer education and research in all fields of food safety. This does not only include technical disciplines such as microbiology and toxicology, but also the legal, economic and communication aspects. The Food Safety programme at Wageningen University is one of the most modern and innovative in the world. Started in 2000 as the first of its kind, it is still the only two-year, full-time Master Food Safety programme offered in Europe and the only programme offering Food Safety Law. The programme prepares graduates for careers in the food industry, government or consumer organisations; the three key players in international food safety management.

The food industry is increasingly confronted with farm-to-table food safety measures, regulations, legislation and guidelines aimed at controlling food hazards. As a result, there is an increasing demand for managers with expertise in food safety evaluation who are able to survey and monitor the chemical, microbiological and physical parameters of product composition and product safety. Food safety experts are able to understand and analyse the variation in quality and safety of products. They are also able to assess the potential risks involved in the adoption of new production methods and processing techniques. Food safety evaluation concerns food constituents, agro-chemicals, environmental contaminants and natural toxins.

Food regulations are getting more and more complex, creating the need for regulatory affairs specialists in industry or in lobbying organisations. The programme is the only programme offering Food Safety Law for students with either a technical or a legal degree, thereby, fulfilling the need in society for such positions.

Specialisations

The programme offers three specialisations. All three specialisations have the courses on Food Safety Management and Food Law in common.

Applied Food Safety
This specialisation deals with the more technical (microbiology, toxicology, risk assessment) part of food safety. Food Safety Economics is also part of the programme. Thesis topics are also in these fields and graduates generally work in industry, universities and research institutes.

Food Safety Law
This specialisation is open for students with a technical or legal background. Courses focus on (international) food law, intellectual property rights and management. Theses are on food law. Graduates generally work as regulatory affairs specialists in industry.

Supply Chain Safety
This specialisation deals with safe food and ingredient supply. Globalisation leads to serious risks of contamination. In tropical countries, companies also face wars and political problems. Courses thus focus on Food Security, Risk Management in Food Chains and logistics, in addition to Microbiology and Food Law.

Your future career

The employment market is promising and all recent graduates found jobs with relative ease. The demand for university-trained professionals in this field is currently higher than the number of graduates available. Most recent graduates found jobs in the private sector, at universities or at food safety research institutes. Many graduates enter careers in government and go on to managerial positions. Due to the increased efforts of the EU in the development of national food safety organisations, there will be many more job opportunities in various European countries, both for technical as well as regulatory specialists.

Student Moath Almayman.
"The courses of the Master Food Safety consist of technical, managerial and legal aspects of food safety and are directly linked to real life situations. This in combination with the ability to perform extensive research and an internship at an international company to enhance my working experience, were reasons for me to choose this master. Even with a small population, Wageningen is a great cosmopolitan town. So many students from different backgrounds make it a very interesting place."

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Technology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City. From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Read more
Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City.

Who is it for?

From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Our students come to study the MSc in Food Policy from around the world, across the food landscape and go on to develop their careers in a variety of ways once they graduate.

The course is for students who are passionate about food policy and are open to challenging their own assumptions. We want you to graduate from this Masters with a more disciplined and rigorous approach so you can be more effective in pursuing your passions within the food domain.

Objectives

How does a coconut growing in Malaysia become a coconut drink in the UK? On this programme we explore how policy influences the trajectory of food not just from field to fork but across time and territory.

The MSc in Food Policy is about analysing, researching and informing the future of food policy from the local to global scale. It is run by the Centre for Food Policy, which has pioneered an integrated approach to food policy since 1994.

The ways in which we produce, process, distribute, market, prepare and consume food have important consequences for our health and that of the planet. We look at the positive and negative impacts of food, from the health, environmental, political, socio-economic and cultural perspective.

This Masters promotes genuine interdisciplinary because we think you need to look at the subject from all angles to make the most holistic evaluation. It draws on social sciences (sociology, politics, economics, anthropology, psychology) as well as health sciences and epidemiology. We look at the latest food policy debates and place them in a historical context.

You will be taught by a team of specialist food policy specialists who are leaders in the field. Our academic staff are actively involved in research and in policy-making on the local, national and global stage. Our teaching reflects this engagement.

Students are exposed to conflicting narratives about the problems facing the food system and the best ways to resolve them. We address important questions of our time, such as:
-Are we producing too much or too little food to feed the world population?
-How have we ended up living in a world where there are more overweight and obese people than under-nourished people?
-Why is a third of the food produced globally lost or wasted?
-How can we deal with the massive impact of agriculture on climate change?
-How do lobbyists and the media influence what we eat?

Academic facilities

As a food policy student at City, University of London you can learn from experts at leading institutions across the UK through the Innovative Food Systems Teaching and Learning (IFSTAL) initiative.

Created for postgraduate students, the initiative aims to address an urgent skills shortage in the food industry and tackle systematic failings in the food system by combining resources and knowledge. The network, which is made up of five leading higher education institutions including City and the University of Oxford, gives you the opportunity to take part in research and internship placements during your degree.

When it comes to studying food policy, London is an amazing location. Giving you one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories, it offers a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city and hone your focus towards your own area of interest and/or expertise. As part of the University of London, you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We are a passionate and engaged team who will help you understand how to change the food system for the better. You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small group activities, whole class discussions, workshops and independent study. There are a lot of group discussions in class. We encourage you to ask questions, contribute your own experiences and apply your own perspectives to the issues we explore. The programme also encourages a strong peer-to-peer community through social media.

For the distance-learning mode you will be able to watch the lectures online, which are supplemented with written exercises and one-to-one Skype tutorials with the teaching staff.

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by two pieces of written work. The first is handed in during the middle of term so that you receive useful feedback before moving on to the second assignment. In each case you will choose the topic. You will also be asked to write different kinds of documents (briefing papers, memos, reports as well as essays) that correspond to those you would have to write in policy-making organisations. Then you work on your dissertation, which is a longer (15,000 word) piece of work, enabling you to delve into a food policy topic of your choice in depth. You will gain support from a personal supervisor who is a senior academic from the Centre for Food Policy.

Modules

The course consists of four core taught modules (worth 30 credits each) and a dissertation (worth 60 credits). The dissertation gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a topic of your choice that is relevant to food policy. The course has been designed to enable you to pursue your own interests and passions. In every assignment you have the opportunity to engage with the issues you care about.

The course is flexible to fit in with your work commitments so you can study this Masters on a full-time (one year), part-time (two years) or on a distance-learning basis (two years). The taught modules take place in the first and second terms, and the dissertation starts in the third term and continues until September (December for part-time students). For each taught module there are approximately 10 three-hour teaching sessions. In addition you are expected to undertake around 270 hours of independent study. For the whole programme, you should expect to study for around 1800 hours (35 hours per week for full-time students, 17.5 hours for part-time students).

Taught modules
-FPM001 - Food and public policy (30 credits)
-FPM003 - Food, culture and society (30 credits)
-FPM002 The political economy of food (30 credits)
-FPM004 Food, public health and the environment (30 credits)

Career prospects

We are very proud of our alumni. Our employability stats – the highest within the School – reflect the range of opportunities available to our graduates. For example, our alumni run NGOs and progressive food businesses, work in government and UN agencies, and have established great careers in health advocacy, journalism and academia.

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The "Italian Food and Wine" MSc degree will focus on the understanding, management, promotion and protection of high-value food products, including wine. Read more

MSc Italian FOOD & WINE (ItF&W)

The "Italian Food and Wine" MSc degree will focus on the understanding, management, promotion and protection of high-value food products, including wine.

Programme Summary

In this MSc course, the internationally-recognised Italian food production system is analysed as a model for defining and characterising the individual elements that contribute to the unique value of food products that are inextricably linked to place (terroir) through historic, social and cultural ties. These elements also include more recent developments in technology, nutrition, food safety, diet and health, and sensory science that are at the heart of a growing international demand for terroir-related high-value foods.

The specific learning outcome is a deep understanding of the multi-faceted characteristics that distinguish these foods from others in the marketplace and that can be exploited in products’ valorisation and consumer information strategies both in the EU and international markets. The ultimate objective of this multi-disciplinary program is to train professionals who are well-versed in the complex system of producing high-value foods and wines whose quality is profoundly linked to tradition and place of origin.

Who is the MSc candidate?

This programme is open to Italian and foreign students interested in learning and implementing effective actions for the valorisation of high-quality food products and wines.

What career opportunities does the MSc provide?

Graduates will be expert in the technical and economical management, valorisation and protection of high quality agro-food products - in an export and territorial development-oriented perspective - by using the Italian system as the reference model. He/she will find employment opportunities in quality-oriented agro-food companies, in producers' organizations, and in public and private consultancy companies involved in the protection, valorisation, marketing, consulting, training and communication activities for high-quality agro-food products.
The most relevant positions concern: ii) marketing of high-quality foods and wines, on both the EU and international market; ii) design and implementation of promotion and protection strategies for these products; iii) management of producers' organizations; iv) 'off-trade' and 'on-trade' buying activities, mainly in the international market; v) information on high-quality foods and wines management; vi) planning and management of territorial development strategies based on 'terroir-related' quality agro-food products.

How is the programme organised?

During the two-years MSc course students choose 12 course units – according to their individual background and interest - among the following:

Plant biodiversity and food
Animal biodiversity and food
Quality, processing and sensorial analysis of Italian food
Quality, processing and sensorial analysis of Italian wine
Food microbiology and quality
Food safety and hygiene
Food traceability for food quality
Food, wine and nutrition

Value adding quality schemes and consumer demand
Food and Wine-based territorial valorization and rural development
Quality-oriented Food and Wine management and governance

Consumer behavior
Food, wine and society
Food and Wine history and anthropology
Food and wine: perspectives from abroad

Foreign language (Italian or English)

Teaching includes lectures, laboratory and field activities, practical exercises, and seminars by outside experts that feature a rich variety of relevant case studies of Italian foods and wines. Opportunities for intensive tutoring and for master thesis-related stages of at least six months duration will be available with outstanding companies in this sector of the food industry or with other relevant organisations in the private or public sphere.

Visit the MSc “Italian food and wine” page on the Università di Padova web-site (http://www.unipd.it/en/italian-food-and-wine) for more details.

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The Food and Resource Economics (FRE) Group offers both a research master's degree, the Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Agricultural Economics, and a professional master's degree, the Master of Food and Resource Economics (M.F.R.E.). Read more

General Information

The Food and Resource Economics (FRE) Group offers both a research master's degree, the Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Agricultural Economics, and a professional master's degree, the Master of Food and Resource Economics (M.F.R.E.). The M.Sc. is designed for careers where research is a main component, while the M.F.R.E. is designed for careers in industry or government.

In both degrees, coursework provides students with rigorous training in applied economics and quantitative methods. In the M.Sc., students develop specialized research skills by working with faculty throughout UBC on important real-world issues. In the M.F.R.E., students combine applied economics with policy analysis and agribusiness management, enabling them to analyze issues in the food and resource sectors.

FRE faculty members have direct experience working in the food and resource sectors, both domestically and internationally in Europe and Asia, particularly with developing countries.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Food and Resource Economics
- Specialization: Food And Resource Economics
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework only
- Faculty: Faculty of Land and Food Systems

About MFRE

The MFRE is a one-year course-based professional masters degree which offers a combination of applied economics, policy analysis and agribusiness management. The program is geared towards graduates and professionals such as policy analysts, market consultants and researchers looking to sharpen their skill-sets with more advanced economics and real world applications. Classes are conducted by faculty from Land and Food Systems and the Sauder School of Business, with frequent guest lectures by industry and government executives.

Why MFRE?

- Complete a professional master’s degree in 12 months
- Apply your economics to food policy, trade, and environment
- Obtain a world-recognized degree from The University of British Columbia
- Position yourself for a career in the global food & resource sectors
- Grow your professional global network – 110 alumni from 21 countries
- Experience Vancouver – one of the most livable cities in the world

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The MSc Food Quality Management programme offers an integrated approach to the study and assessment of quality processes in the agrifood chain through an exclusively developed techno-managerial approach. Read more

MSc Food Quality Management

The MSc Food Quality Management programme offers an integrated approach to the study and assessment of quality processes in the agrifood chain through an exclusively developed techno-managerial approach. The whole supply chain is studied from the primary sector to the final consumer. Food, flowers and cattle are also discussed.

Programme summary

Food quality management assures the health and safety of food and other perishable products (e.g. flowers) and has become increasingly important in today’s society, this is due to changing consumer requirements, increasing competition, environmental issues and governmental interests. This has resulted in a turbulent situation on the food market and in the agro-food production chain. The situation is further complicated by the complex characteristics of food and food ingredients, which include aspects such as variability, restricted shelf life and potential safety hazards; as well as many chemical, biochemical, physical and microbiological processes. To face this challenge, continuous improvement in food quality management methods is required wherever knowledge of modern technologies and management methods plays a crucial role.

Quality issues in food and other perishable products are generally tackled using either a technological or a managerial approach. At Wageningen, a concept has been developed that combines both aspects. This ‘technomanagerial’ approach forms the basis of the Food Quality Management programme. It provides a comprehensive and structured overview of quality management for predicting food systems’ behaviour and generating adequate improvements in these systems from a food chain perspective.

The programme prepares graduates to understand and work together with the different players in the food industry (management, Research & Development) in order to ensure high quality products.

Specialisations

You will combine Food Quality Management courses with several courses based on your educational background and interest. These courses can be in fields of food technology (e.g. product design, process design), food safety (e.g. food safety management, microbiology), management (e.g. case studies management, entrepreneurship) or logistics (e.g. food logistics management, supply chain management). The programme is thesis oriented and tailor-made to your specific interests. The thesis and internship in the second year of the programme are carried out in cooperation with the food industry.

Your future career

Graduates from this programme will be experts in the field of food quality management and can enter careers in agribusiness, research and public administration:
• Typical positions include quality assurance manager (responsible for the quality of the ingredients for a specific product).
• Designer/specialist (working on the quality aspects of fresh products in the development process), advisor/consultant (advising companies on certification).
• Researcher (studying the improvement of existing quality assurance systems in the food industry).

Student Tasioudis Dimitrios.
"It was my desire to combine my scientific background with management studies that resulted in my decision to do the Master Food Quality Management. The master gives you a useful tool in understanding the meaning of every result in a real life situation and enables you to select the best solutions to tackle specific problems. Wageningen University is a great university where science flourishes and research is of utmost importance. It is the ideal environment to gain knowledge and to accomplish your goals."

Related programmes:
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies
MSc Food Technology
MSc Food Safety

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If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes. Read more
If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes.

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA). This brings you up to the standards required to continue with MSc study. Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above then proceed to one of our MSc programmes. Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/196/economics-conversion-diploma-in-economic-analysis

Course structure

- Year 1

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA), which is a qualification in its own right, and brings you up to the standard required to continue with MSc study. The DEA consists of five compulsory modules.

- Year 2

Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above can then proceed to one of the following MSc programmes in year two:

- MSc Economics
- MSc Economics and Econometrics
- MSc Economics and Finance
- MSc Finance and Econometrics
- MSc International Finance and Economic Development
- MSc Agri-Environmental Economics and Policy

Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for students who already have a degree to proceed to study economics at Master’s level when they have not previously studied economics

- provide you with the knowledge, analytical and other skills from which you can proceed to further study in economics and develop a deeper understanding of economic theory, econometric and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential

- provide options to enable you to study selected areas of economics in depth

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional economist or in an area related to economics

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Economics and Finance MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced economic and finance theory and quantitative methods, while allowing you to specialise or take options in a range of subjects reflecting the School’s main areas of research expertise in finance. Read more
The Economics and Finance MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced economic and finance theory and quantitative methods, while allowing you to specialise or take options in a range of subjects reflecting the School’s main areas of research expertise in finance. It prepares you for work as a professional economist in the financial and banking sectors, public sector and international organisations.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/200/economics-and-finance

Course structure

The Economics and Finance MSc is studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (six of which are compulsory) and a dissertation.

There are compulosry modules in Financial Economics: Capital Market Instruments, Financial Economics and Asset Pricing, Advanced Macroeconomics, Econometric Methods, Time Series Econometrics and Research Methods. These modules build upon students’ existing knowledge, understanding and skills.

Students develop a deeper understanding of economic and finance theory, quantitative and research methods, and policy applications. The teaching and learning of skills are carefully integrated into the structure of the modules and degree programme. The final two modules are chosen from a range of options based upon the finance research interests of our academic staff.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme proceed to the dissertation stage where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on an Economics/Finance topic.

Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC805 - Advanced Macroeconomics I (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC820 - Time Series Econometrics (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC822 - Financial Economics: Capital Market Instruments (15 credits)
EC824 - Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC802 - Advanced Microeconomics of Consumers, Marketsand Welfare (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and finance, and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of economic and financial theory, econometrics, financial econometrics and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- provide options to enable you to study selected areas of economics and finance in depth

- develop your ability to apply economic and financial knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional in the fields of economics and finance or related areas

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Read more
Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Food is also essential to the social body. Who eats what, who eats with whom, and whose appetites are satisfied and whose denied, are all profoundly social dynamics through which identities, relationships, and hierarchies are created and reproduced.

The SOAS MA programme in the Anthropology of Food offers students the opportunity to explore historically and culturally variable foodways, from foraging to industrial agriculture, from Europe and North America to Africa, Asia and South America. The programme asks students to trace the passage of food from plant to palate, and to examine who benefits, and who suffers, from contemporary modes of food production, exchange, preparation, and consumption. Students examine food policy at national and international levels, as well as the role played in its formation by the food industry.

Focus is given to the study of famine and the controversial role of food aid in securing food supplies. Debates over the impact of agricultural biotechnology on agrarian livelihoods and knowledge systems, as well as on the natural environment, are assessed. Movements toward organic agriculture, fair trade, and slow food are also analysed.

An anthropological approach to the study of food draws upon and challenges the perspectives of other disciplines, whether agronomy or nutritional science, economics or law, history or literature. Dependent upon individual interests and experiences, graduates of the programme may pursue research degrees in any number of academic disciplines, or find employment in food-related government ministries, international organizations, development agencies, or non-governmental associations, as well as in the fields of public health, education, and media, or in the catering industry.

Click here for a last of past Dissertation Titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/ma-anthropology-of-food-dissertation-titles-2006---present.html)

Click here for Alumni Profiles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/foodstudies/studentprofiles/)

Course teachers Johan Pottier, Harry G. West, and Jakob Klein were awarded the 2009 Excellence in Instruction Award by the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society. West was named joint runner-up for the SOAS Director’s Teaching Prize in 2011-2012. The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Food was named a Finalist in the Best Food Initiative category in the BBC Food & Farming Awards in 2015.

Scholarships:
Applicants for the MA Anthropology of Food may be eligible to apply for Scholarships and Bursaries (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/

Programme Structure Overview

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- The Anthropology of Food - 15PANC013 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Anthropology of Food and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme, either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may then be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 147kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/file39766.pdf

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. Read more
This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. You will gain an in-depth understanding of regional, national, and international standards in regulatory processes, and the role of public institutions and policy makers in delivering safe, quality foods to consumers.

This course is designed for graduates and those working in the agri-food industries who are seeking to advance their knowledge and understanding of food safety and quality management, and progress their professional careers.

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two years.

You will study eight modules, followed by the Research Project, carried out over the summer to be submitted in September. It will be presented as a review paper and as a research paper.

If you do not wish to undertake the Research Project may choose to take a Postgraduate Diploma following successful completion of eight modules.

You will learn through a combination of lectures, guest speakers, group workshops and seminars, case studies, individual and student-led research, group projects, and field studies

Students are encouraged to participate in the RAU Enterprise Scheme where they can develop their entrepreneurial skills towards starting their own business.

This course is available to start in either September or January.

September entry

Students will study four modules in the autumn term followed by four modules in the spring term, and complete their Research Project by the end of September.

January entry

Students will study four modules in the spring term, complete their Research Project by the end of September, and study four modules in the autumn term.

Modules

• 4014 Food Chain
• 4075 Research Project
• 4206 Fundamentals of Food Science
• 4207 Systems for Food Safety Management
• 4209 Sustainability and the Food industry
• 4228 New Product Development (NPD) in the Agri-Food Industry
• 4237 The Politics and Policies of Food Assurance

Plus choice of TWO modules, selected from:

• 4040 Sustainable Management of Soil and Water
• 4084 Tourism and Development
• 4110 Fisheries and Aquaculture Management
• 4201 Poverty and Food Security
• 4211 Global Red Meat Chains
• 4212 Global White Meat Chains
• 4213 Global Dairy Food Chain
• 4238 Integrated Organic Systems

Modules will be taught in 10 week blocks.

Assessment

Modules are assessed through written examinations and coursework, including case study analysis, essay writing, oral and poster presentations, and assessed seminars. For the new product development (NPD) module, students are assessed against a food product which they develop and produce in small teams. To complete this module, students are given training in the CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety for Manufacturing, which is beneficial to them post-graduation.

Career prospects

Graduates will be equipped with the education and industry experience to progress their career and become food safety and quality management professionals within:

• An international institution – UN (World Food Programme), IFAD, FAO, IFPRI etc.
• Government and statutory bodies – Defra, DflD, FSA etc.
• Business and industry – major agricultural and food supply companies, consultancy
• NGOs – local food associations, aid and development organisations
• Academia and research – lecturer, PhD

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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'Behavioral Economics' is one of the specialized tracks of the Master's program in Economics. Tilburg University is ranked #11 worldwide in Business and Economics (Times Higher Education, 2016). Read more

Master's specialization in Behavioral Economics

'Behavioral Economics' is one of the specialized tracks of the Master's program in Economics.

Tilburg University is ranked #11 worldwide in Business and Economics (Times Higher Education, 2016).

Address economic questions around behavior and behavioral change

Many economic questions ultimately revolve around behavior and behavioral change.
•How to encourage households to waste less food?
•How to prevent fraud in organizations?
•How to stimulate employees to cooperate efficiently?
•How to foster trust in online markets?

The track ‘Behavioral Economics’ will provide you with the knowledge and skills to effectively address such questions.

Integrate insights from economics and psychology

The specialization track integrates insights from economics and psychology. It builds on the principle that policy advice should be evidence-based and cannot rely on theory alone. The starting point is that individuals are not rational self-interested maximizers but that human behavior is based on a bounded capacity to process information and on preferences that include a regard for such social norms as fairness and reciprocity.

Learn how to affect behavior by policies and strategies

In recent years it has become increasingly clear to firms, organizations, and governments that policies and strategies should take account of both the economics and the psychology of behavior. There is an urgent need for economists who have been trained to take a broader view, who have a profound knowledge of all relevant aspects of behavior and the ways it can be affected by policies and strategies.

Key courses:

•Seminar Economics and Psychology of Risk and Time
•Seminar Economics and Psychology of Social Norms and Strategic Behavior
•Methods course Experiments and Surveys

Career perspectives

This track is recommended to students who want to work in consultancy, policy advice and project management. The insights from behavioral economics are in high demand at financial institutions, insurance companies, multinational enterprises, as well as in regional and national government.

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The MSc in Agri-Environmental Economics and Policy prepares you for a career as a professional economist dealing with national and international issues in the area of food, agriculture and the environment. Read more
The MSc in Agri-Environmental Economics and Policy prepares you for a career as a professional economist dealing with national and international issues in the area of food, agriculture and the environment.

You gain a deep understanding of economic theory and policy, and their application to the environment at local, regional and global levels. The programnme develops your analytical ability to evaluate agri-environmental policy options that could be used to combat a wide range of issues including air and water pollution, bidiversity management, climate change, natural resources, and protection of rural areas.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/191/agri-environmental-economics-and-policy

Course structure

The MSc in Agri-Environmental Economics and Policy is studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (seven of which are compulsory) and a dissertation.

The compulsory modules provide a basis for you to acquire the basic skills for the programme, regardless of your first degree background, while the optional module enables you to acquire a broader understanding of the issues in growth and development, trade and development, or further your skills in econometrics. All MSc students take a module in Research Methods, which provides practical skills and knowledge for MSc-level research.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme, proceed to the dissertation stage, where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on an applied issue in environmental economics. Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC802 - Advanced Microeconomics of Consumers, Marketsand Welfare (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC829 - Environmental Valuation (15 credits)
EC831 - Rural and Peasant Economies (15 credits)
EC832 - Political Economy of Public Policy (15 credits)
EC834 - Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy (15 credits)
EC825 - Applied Microeconometrics (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of agri-environmental economics and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of economic theory, econometric and quantitative techniques, and policy and their applications to food, agriculture, environment and rural development

- provide options to enable you to study related subjects in the area of econometrics, trade and development

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of applied, national and international policy problems in the area of food agriculture and environment

- develop your independent research skills

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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