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Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Mind (Research). Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves. Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Mind (Research)

Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves: What does it mean to have a mind? How is the brain related to the mind? What is consciousness? How can our mental states drive our actions? Do we have free will?

Traditionally, philosophy of mind is part of the analytical method in philosophy. Recently, however, a more phenomenological approach to typical questions in the philosophy of mind has provided a refreshing new look on old topics. Additionally, the advance of cognitive neuroscience is providing a new method to address old questions. Philosophy of Mind and Cognition in Nijmegen combines traditional analytical theorizing with insights from phenomenology and the empirical sciences.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Philosophy of Mind and Science you study problems such as mental causation, phenomenal consciousness and the nature of mental state attribution from the viewpoint of neurophenomenenology and the embodied embedded cognition paradigm.

The research carried out in this section (‘cognitiefilosofie') covers a number of traditional topics: mental causation, perception of, for example, colour, phenomenal consciousness and qualia, theories of mind, mental content and the nature of folk-psychology.

These subjects are specifically addressed against the backdrop of the idea that cognition is essentially embodied. This is the basic premise of the 'embodied embedded cognition paradigm', the 'enactive' approach to cognition and specific body-based forms of neurophenomenology.

Three smaller research projects take place within this section: (1) 'The Bisected Mind', the idea that folk psychology can be regarded as an interpretation of body-based behavioural tendencies and tries to reconcile indeterminacy of mental state attribution with mental realism (Slors). (2) 'Phenomenal Consciousness and Mental Causation', which addresses the problem of the causal efficacy of phenomenal states as well as the possibility of a science of consciousness (van de Laar). (3) 'Colour Perception', which aims to reconcile different theories on the nature of colour and colour perception by developing the idea that the concept of colour is multi-layered, instead of monolithic (van Leeuwen).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The MA in Celtic Studies is a unique distance learning programme which offers students interested in Welsh and Celtic Studies the opportunity to study various aspects of the history, literature and cultural heritage of the Celtic regions in their own homes. Read more
The MA in Celtic Studies is a unique distance learning programme which offers students interested in Welsh and Celtic Studies the opportunity to study various aspects of the history, literature and cultural heritage of the Celtic regions in their own homes.

Course Overview

This multidisciplinary Master's degree allows students to study a wide variety of subjects in the following fields: early and late medieval history and literature, folklore, gender studies, the sociology of language, Arthurian literature, religion, spirituality and iconography.

In Part One students will be introduced to the study and research methodology skills required to undertake a postgraduate programme and they will complete modules on the history of the Celts and the legends of the Mabinogi. In addition to these three compulsory modules students will choose from one of the following pathways:
-Culture and society (Welsh Folk Life, the Sociology of the Welsh Language)
-Medieval (the Celtic Arthur, Women in the Middle Ages: sources from the Celtic regions)
-Sanctity and Spirituality (The Cult of Saints in Wales, Celtic Otherworlds – from the druids to the monastic voyage tale)

Students will then be allowed to take any other module from one of the above pathways or Beginners' Welsh (a total of six modules in all). In Part Two students are given the opportunity to research in detail a topic which has particularly appealed to them and write an extended dissertation. They will be allocated a supervisor to help guide them through their dissertations.

No previous knowledge of the Celtic languages is required for this programme, as students study texts in translation and the programme is taught through the medium of English. However, students may choose to study Welsh as part of the programme and it is also possible for students who are fluent in Welsh to study their modules entirely through the medium of Welsh (see MA Astudiaethau Celtaidd) or receive supervision and communication in Welsh, but opt to write their assignments in English.

Modules

-CYCS7020 Conceptualizing the Celts
-CYCS7015 Y Mabinogi
-CYCS7021 The Celtic Arthur and the Matter of Britain
-CYCS7005 Women in the Middle Ages
-CYCS7004 Welsh Folk Life
-CYCS7016 The Sociology of the Welsh Language
-CYCS7007 The Female Saints of Wales
-CYCS7019 Celtic Otherworlds
-CYCS7018 Welsh for Beginners

Key Features

If you would like to learn more about the history, literature, religion and cultural heritage of the Celtic regions, this course is ideal for you. You’ll be able to choose from a wide range of interesting topics and choose to specialise in a pathway that suits you. Since the course is a distance learning programme, you do not need to move to Lampeter and sacrifice your day job, as you can study from the comfort of your own home using our VLE (virtual learning environment) and the course content and reading material we provide.

We’ll guide you through some of the most important texts ever written in the Celtic languages and help you read critically. You’ll learn where to find the most important sources on the Celtic peoples, Arthurian literature, modern folklore, druids and Celtic saints and how to question the various versions of the past that have been put forward by historians, linguists, folklorists and archaeologists. You’ll gain research skills which will be a sound basis for further study, as well as a range of important skills which can be easily transferred to the workplace.

If you would like to work quickly, you can register on the programme on a full-time basis, but if you have a full-time job and family commitments, you can complete as few as two modules per year. This also allows you to spread the cost over a number of years and makes the course very affordable. If you are interested in learning one of the Celtic languages, you can choose to learn Welsh with us and you will be able to attend our intensive language residentials if this suits you.

We have students in America, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Belgium and Mongolia, as well as many in Wales, England, Scotland and Ireland. You do not have to come to Lampeter to follow this course, but you are always very welcome to come and meet your tutors. We also collaborate with the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies and some of our MA students are supervised by staff from the centre who also offer great expertise in Celtic Studies.

Assessment

The modules are assessed by a variety of assessment methods: 5,000-word essays, short assignments, linguistic exercises, reviews, reports and one 15,000-word dissertation.

Career Opportunities

This course is ideal for those who want to learn more about the history, literature and cultural heritage of Wales and the Celtic regions in order to improve their job prospects. Many of the students who undertake the course on a part-time basis are already in employment and wish to gain a postgraduate qualification as a possible means to promotion or change of job role. Former students include journalists, writers, storytellers, teachers, lecturers, editors and people who work in the tourist or heritage industries. Many of our students have also gone on to further research in Celtic Studies at PhD level.

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About the course. Ethnomusicology is the study of music’s relationships to the social and cultural contexts in which it occurs, seeking to understand what music is, and the role it plays in human interactions and experiences. Read more

About the course

Ethnomusicology is the study of music’s relationships to the social and cultural contexts in which it occurs, seeking to understand what music is, and the role it plays in human interactions and experiences.

We boast one of the UK’s largest ethnomusicology sections, and our staff’s specialisms are unusually diverse, including: the music of Korea; folk music, dance and song of England, and of the British Isles, and North Indian classical music.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course tutors

Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick are at the forefront of their specialist fields.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Seminars, individual tutorials and fieldwork. Assessment takes a variety of forms such as reports and essays. They are usually individual assessments, even if they concern the processes and outcomes of group work.



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We're proud to have been awarded The Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2015 for ‘world-leading work to promote, produce and present contemporary music to an international audience'. Read more

We're proud to have been awarded The Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2015 for ‘world-leading work to promote, produce and present contemporary music to an international audience'. This represents one of the most coveted distinctions in UK Higher Education.

We have a thriving community of postgraduate musicians who receive regular individual tuition from staff who are recognised nationally and internationally in their chosen specialisms, and by a team of part-time instrumental and vocal teachers from regional and national orchestras, many of whom are distinguished solo performers.

You’ll have many opportunities to perform by taking part in directed ensembles, amongst which are the Symphony Orchestra, Chamber Orchestra, Big Band, Symphonic Wind Orchestra, Brass Band, Choir, Chamber Choir, Opera Group, New Music Ensemble, Early Music Ensemble, Folk Group, Samba Band, Blues Group, Improvisation Group, and A Cappella Choir, as well as various chamber music ensembles.

Our Live Music at the University of Huddersfield series features a range of weekly student concerts, as well as recitals and masterclasses by guest artists. Recent visitors have included Emma Kirkby (voice), Garth Knox (viola), Anton Lyakhovsky (piano), Neil Heyde (cello), Richard Haynes (clarinet), Jah Wobble (pop ensembles), Lore Lixenberg (voice), John Scott Whiteley (organ), Claude Delangle and Snake Davis (saxophone), Ensemble 360,vocal ensemble EXAUDI, and the instrumental group ELISION.



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Songwriting remains one of the UK’s biggest exports, with UK music stronger than ever. Popular song is the heart of the industry; global demand for new songs is high. Read more
Songwriting remains one of the UK’s biggest exports, with UK music stronger than ever. Popular song is the heart of the industry; global demand for new songs is high. Focusing your portfolio through research prepares you to contribute to this field.

The MA is for students with a thorough grounding in their own specialism who wish to extend and develop their songwriting knowledge and skills at advanced academic level, in a creative environment.

Therefore, the course is aimed at both unpublished songwriters wishing to develop their craft to professional level, and published songwriters wishing to achieve academic accreditation while exploring their creativity and formalising their prior experience.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

From day one you’ll write songs, using alternative strategies designed to work alongside your current creative approaches. Applying practice-based learning at our world-heritage research centres, through a range of creative strategies and critical perspective on your songs’ relationship with audience and industry, you’ll develop and focus your output.

Lyric-writing, and a fluent command of imagery, metaphor and narrative is nurtured as chords and melody take shape around language’s meaning, and vice versa. You’ll investigate the power and potential of song forms, modes of address, perspectives, time-frames and characters.

Having stretched the range of creative options available to you within your own artistic palette, you’ll turn your hand to research; this is your entry to the post-graduate world. You’ll identify the industrial context relevant to your songs; your knowledge of your field will become intensified through primary research, secondary research and contact with guest speakers from industry.

Collaborating with songwriters from near and far will increase your creative and networking range; ahead of your Major Project contextual and collaborative research perform the vital tasks of shaping your song outputs.

MODULES

There are a range of modules which include:
Songwriting Skills: a twelve-week process during which you’ll develop a feel for sensory imagery, metaphor and a facility for narrative tension.

Song Identity and Culture: here you investigate and unravel your personal songwriting ‘DNA’. You’ll look at your own work and that of others, in the context of artistic identity and culture.

Professional Collaboration: you’ll negotiate collaboration with other students within a professional context. For example, songwriters might collaborate in the traditional manner of successful and acclaimed songwriting teams, or may work with choreographers, film makers, poets, composers, arrangers or remixers.

Research Methodologies and Context: a ‘pathfinder’ contextual study into an economic/cultural context for your future song outputs. From folk to hip-hop, indie, metal, etc., each industrial context possesses a uniquely different set of venues, publishers, labels, agents, producers and performers.

Major Project: bring all your research and preparation into focus. You are asked to present a showcase artefact representing the songs developed during your time on the course. Usually this is an album. For some it will be several projects for differing contexts, like a writer’s showcase for a publisher.

For detailed information on the course modules, please visit the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-songwriting/

TEACHING METHODS

There are regular taught sessions running across each of the three trimesters. Lectures, visiting speakers, seminars, workshops, tutorials, presentations and playback sessions work on song material and research outcomes. Students play their songs to one another in a supportive yet dynamic environment facilitating networking and analysis and developing the language of creative critique. This can be in a live capacity or via playback.

For information about resources and facilities, please visit our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-songwriting/

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessments range from simple audio sketches in the early stages to full album productions in the final stages; each of which is assessed for quality and market focus. On the research modules, formal, researched and referenced papers express your intellectual and analytical development, and presentation skills bring your work to life.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

There is a broad range of professional outcomes from this course and our graduates now work as:

• Signed artists
• Signed writers
• Lecturers
• Researchers
• Agents
• Performers
• Teachers
• Therapists
• Publishers

The course is also an excellent grounding if you’re interested in further study; a number of our alumni have progressed onto PhD study.

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Research and field collection in Scottish Ethnology encompasses the areas of oral narrative, song and instrumental music, material culture, social organisation, custom and belief, and place names. Read more

Research and field collection in Scottish Ethnology encompasses the areas of oral narrative, song and instrumental music, material culture, social organisation, custom and belief, and place names.

Both oral and written sources are emphasised and Scotland offers excellent opportunities for fieldwork in Scots and Gaelic.

We use a combination of traditional and innovative methods to impart research training.

You will be encouraged to make direct contact with original sources and to gain hands-on experience, whether in reading medieval manuscripts or in handling electronically stored data.

Research training and expert research supervision are provided.

Facilities

The School of Scottish Studies Archives includes over 12,000 hours of sound recordings, an extensive photographic and video collection, manuscripts, linguistic and place-name surveys, and donated collections such as:

  • the John Levy Archive of religious music
  • the Burton-Manning Collection of Appalachian oral tradition
  • the Will Forret and Gus MacDonald Collections of Scottish music
  • the Edgar Ashton Folk Revival Collection


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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

Do you see yourself on the stage singing beautiful arias, being the female lead in opera, singing lieder, folk songs and other types of music? Are you already performing and you want to refine those skills to gain even more work, techniques and ability? University of Aberdeen provides you with that platform to experiment, improve your level, the genres of music you perform and your technique to allow you to progress your music career. Whilst you progress there are plenty of opportunities to perform by yourself and with others and plenty of experiences to enjoy on campus and further afield.

If you are a performer who would like to fine tune your skills or you would like to research other types of music to enable you to perform to wider audiences Vocal Music can help you towards that goal. The programme is also aimed at choral music and musicologists in this genre to enable and enrich performance.  Vocal music has started to become popular again within society and composers have been able to bring their skills within the mainstream musical area. World renowned composer Paul Mealor at Aberdeen provided a range of contemporary musical composition aimed at choral music performance, some of which was performed by modern choirs under direction of Gareth Malone and special composition for the Royal Wedding in 2011.  His work has also been popularised on Classic FM.

An innovative Masters Degree programme specialising in vocal and choral music, led by the distinguished Royal Wedding composer Professor Paul Mealor intended for composers, musicologists, performers and other interested parties in choral music

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Compulsory

  • Music Research Skills

Optional

  • Renaisssance Counterpoint
  • Vocalstration

Semester 2

  • Music Research Seminar Series

Optional

  • Words and Music
  • Contemporary European Opera
  • Electroacoustic Composition: the Voice and the Machine

Semester 3

  • Extended Project Module

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  •  You are mentored and taught by world renowned and UK known musicologists Professor Paul Mealor, Dr Frauke Jurgensen, Dr David Smith, Dr Edward Campbell and others
  • You can perform and take part in any musical genre whilst you study at Aberdeen including Dunedin Consort, Juice and Caledonian Voices plus many choirs and groups spanning the ages of music
  • You are situated in beautiful 'Old Aberdeen' home to a chapel choir, nearby cathedral and contemporary library with stunning view

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Months Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



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Our Music MLitt enables you to develop a flexible individual research programme in classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music, applying approaches of interest to you (eg historiographic, theoretical, cultural, critical), under the supervision of specialists who are leaders in their field. Read more
Our Music MLitt enables you to develop a flexible individual research programme in classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music, applying approaches of interest to you (eg historiographic, theoretical, cultural, critical), under the supervision of specialists who are leaders in their field.

This programme is primarily aimed at students who want to pursue independent musicological research, and who like the idea of first working on shorter research assignments (which can be on related or separate topics), before embarking on an extended final dissertation.

It provides an excellent foundation for continuing on to doctoral study. It is also a valuable qualification in its own right and can add a further dimension to your undergraduate degree, in a 3+1 model.

The MLitt is a modular research programme, which means that it is made up of discrete areas of study:
-Music research training (20 credits)
-Research assignments (80 credits)
-Dissertation (80 credits)

The research assignments are one of the programme’s distinctive features. They allow you to propose and research two or three separate projects (weighted at 40+40, or 20+20+40 credits), which may be connected or on discrete topics, and which lay the ground for your final dissertation. These are completed at the end of April (in year two for part time students) leaving the rest of the programme devoted to your dissertation.

Delivery

The course is delivered on the Newcastle campus (with options – under certain circumstances – for study abroad). All students are required to complete the Music Research Training module during their first two semesters of study and beyond this, study is based on one to one tutorials with supervisors appropriate to your research assignments or dissertation.

The subjects of your Research Assignments and final dissertation require a formal proposal and approval; if these are practicable and within our areas of expertise, these can all be on a topic of your own choosing.

The MLitt is designed primarily with scholarly types of research in mind, but can also accommodate some practical components where appropriate, for example performance in the context of performance practice research.

Facilities

We have outstanding specialist music facilities, including our £4.5m purpose built Music Studios, designed with performance, multimedia and studio-based work in mind.

Additional facilities include:
-Two professional grade recording studios
-A large student common room, including a work area with PCs featuring specialist music software
-A range of recently refurbished rehearsal spaces
-A full range of recently refurbished teaching facilities, including a 100-seat lecture theatre, two 50 seat lecture theatres and three 25-seater seminar rooms
-12 practice rooms with integrated recording facilities
-A dedicated postgraduate workspace
-A project room equipped with 5.1 mixing system

The University Library also has extensive music collections (including a number of important manuscript and microfilm collections), subscribes to many specialist Music journals, has access to a significant body of online resources, and is widely recognised for the supportive service it offers students and staff.

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About the course. 2019 start. This distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Read more

About the course

2019 start

This distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Traditional and world musics and their associated cultures are studied through practical methods such as fieldwork and direct participation in music-making as well as library research and theoretical interpretation.

Students gain both a deeper knowledge of the music and a set of skills for discovering and communicating new knowledge about music. The courses are intended for musicians, educators and enthusiasts who want to know more about traditional and world musics and about ways of studying and understanding music in its social and cultural context.

The course shares various modules with MA World Music Studies, while allowing students to specialise in an area of their choice. Traditional Music of the British Isles takes advantage of Sheffield's position as a major hub of both English and 'Celtic' musical activity to pursue in-depth studies on British and Irish traditional musics.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

The University offers a range of scholarships and funding for the brightest students and the Department of Music offers a number of studentships for the strongest candidates. Small grants are also available to support postgraduate research project.

For more information about funding opportunities including application deadlines visit: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/funding

Find information about scholarships and funding for international students at: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/international/enquiry/money/scholarships

Course tutors

The course is taught by qualified ethnomusicologists who have both scholarly and practical expertise in traditional and world musics: Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Seminars, individual tutorials and fieldwork. Assessment takes a variety of forms such as reports and essays. They are usually individual assessments, even if they concern the processes and outcomes of group work.

Distance learning

Distance learning means most of the teaching is done through online course materials and readings supported by email, phone or Skype tutorials. You will need to attend the University for one residential each year.



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About the course. This course offers you the opportunity to engage with a range of specialist areas including Mozart, Renaissance music, music and visual culture, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century style, the concerto genre and the Broadway musical. Read more

About the course

This course offers you the opportunity to engage with a range of specialist areas including Mozart, Renaissance music, music and visual culture, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century style, the concerto genre and the Broadway musical.

Course themes can include gender, philosophy, culture and aesthetics, and may involve an examination of history, composition, performance and reception.

You will engage with how music is created, disseminated and received, via a range of methodologies and often through interaction with other disciplines.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is through seminars, reading group, graduate study days and individual tutorials. Assessment is through essays, short presentations and dissertation.



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About the course. This course offers an ideal opportunity for you to immerse yourself in the creation and presentation of contemporary music. Read more

About the course

This course offers an ideal opportunity for you to immerse yourself in the creation and presentation of contemporary music. You can choose to specialise in instrumental composition and explore a broad range of compositional approaches and techniques while collaborating with performers.

Alternatively, you may specialise in electronic/electroacoustic composition which includes the opportunity to explore creative applications of analogue/digital technologies, real-time audio processing techniques, and aesthetics of sonic art.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course tutors

Dorothy Ker, Adrian Moore, George Nicholson and Adam Stanovic are all highly experienced and internationally recognised composers.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Seminars, individual tutorials, workshops and graduate study days. Assessment takes a variety of forms such as compositions and essays.



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EXPLORE EUROPE’S HISTORY AND CULTURE FROM A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. In the Master’s programme in Cultural History of Modern Europe, you will study Europe’s position in the world from a cultural-historical perspective, with an emphasis on modern history. Read more

EXPLORE EUROPE’S HISTORY AND CULTURE FROM A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

In the Master’s programme in Cultural History of Modern Europe, you will study Europe’s position in the world from a cultural-historical perspective, with an emphasis on modern history. Our programme offers you profound insight into the history of ideas and practices that form the identities of individuals, groups, and societies, including heritage and public history in international frameworks.

The programme content focuses on theories of modern cultural history, global perspectives on European civilisation, the politics of heritage and cultural memory, aspects of transnational history and postcolonial culture, global practices of citizenship, and the development of career-oriented academic competencies. We begin by looking at contemporary problems and discussions. 

This programme offers an English track and a Dutch track. The modules offered in these tracks are the same – only the language of instruction differs.

WHY STUDY IN UTRECHT?

  • You will benefit from a unique cultural-historical approach to globalisation that will equip you with interdisciplinary knowledge and tools for analysis.
  • The programme offers you a choice of (international) internships and the opportunity to study abroad, helping you to expand your networks and gain valuable workplace experience.
  • You will learn from lecturers who are motivated, experienced, and internationally recognised as experts in their fields.
  • You will receive personal help and supervision throughout your studies.

PART-TIME

The part-time option allows you to complete the full-time programme over two years instead of one.

AFTER GRADUATION

After graduating from the Master’s programme in Cultural History of Modern Europe, you will:

  • Have the skills and knowledge to analyse and understand processes of identity formation in their cultural-historical context.
  • Be equipped with the tools to analyse the relationship between material facts and cultural constructs, between historical sources and folk tales, and between history, memories, and heritage.
  • Have a global perspective and understand how European cultural-historical developments relate to the rest of the world.
  • Understand the cultural-historical backgrounds of contemporary culturally diverse societies.
  • Be prepared for a profession that involves a combination of theoretical reflection and analytical and communicative skills. 

Graduates from our programme have found jobs in museums and heritage organisations, as well as in the field of (secondary) education. Read more about possible career prospects.



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The study of anthropology draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus. Read more
The study of anthropology draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
To this end, the department of anthropology at Binghamton University offers students training in the four traditional subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and social/cultural anthropology, while encouraging students to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
Recent doctoral graduates are employed in positions at the New York State Department of Health, the National Geographic Society, Museum of International Folk Art, Purdue University, and the University of Tennessee.

Anthropology seeks to understand the nature and origins of human biological variability, cultural diversity and social formations through systematic exploration, scientific examination and the application of theory to human populations and their artifacts, including their social configurations, past and present.
Although anthropology has historically been most successful in the analysis of small sociocultural systems, its current challenge is to situate the direct objects of study in their global contexts in both space and time. The discipline draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
While training in the traditional four subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology and social/cultural anthropology are offered in the department at Binghamton, students are encouraged to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
A central objective of graduate training in anthropology is the ability to develop an original research design and to communicate the research findings in a research paper, thesis or dissertation of publishable quality. All recipients of graduate degrees submit and defend formal, written demonstration of their ability to apply appropriate analysis to an original research project, except for the MS degree for which an oral demonstration of ability is required.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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The Master's in Teaching at Brunel University London, for Newly Qualified Teachers with 60 credits, aims to help them to make a real difference to pupils’ learning outcomes. Read more

About the Course

The Master's in Teaching at Brunel University London, for Newly Qualified Teachers with 60 credits, aims to help them to make a real difference to pupils’ learning outcomes.

The course combines a close focus on educational practice while stimulating early career teachers’ professional learning. It develops their understanding of key educational and social science concepts such as pedagogy, socio-cultural diversity and motivation.

Some key benefits of undertaking the Masters in Teaching at Brunel University London include:

-opportunities to accelerate career progression by developing high quality pedagogical expertise that makes a real impact on pupil outcomes;
-the transformation of 60 PG Cert credits into a Master's degree;
-part-time mode of delivery: three Saturday conferences each year incorporating seminar workshops, action learning sets and tutorials;
-blended approach to learning: face-to-face sessions supported by online components and ongoing participation in the course Virtual Learning Environment;
-flexibility to stage learning: working toward 20, 40 and 60 assessed credits in years 1,2 and 3 respectively;
-Year 1 fee waived for Newly Qualified Teachers working in enhanced partnership schools.*
*For further information about the enhanced partnership please contact: Partnership Development Manager, Michelle Evans –

Aims

The Master's in Teaching at Brunel University London:

-engages students in intellectually challenging research and experientially-based exploration of questions of teaching, learning and schools, while systematically developing their professional knowledge and understanding, and awareness of current problems and new insights;
-helps students to develop an informed, enquiring, self-sustaining approach to professional practice and to professional learning;
-equips students with the strategies necessary to identify, locate and critically evaluate relevant research and theoretical literature, and other forms of evidence that could usefully inform their practice;
-enables students to conduct worthwhile practitioner enquiries in their own professional setting, including research and development projects specifically intended to improve pupil outcomes;
-encourages students to work collaboratively with colleagues and other professionals or stakeholders (including parents), engaging them in the processes of research and its findings
-helps students to develop a creative and constructively critical approach towards educational innovation.

Course Content

The Masters in Teaching at Brunel University London is designed for early career teachers who are interested in developing a research-informed, critical approach to the development of their practice. The focus is on the processes of teaching and learning and the programme is rooted in participants’ own school-based experience. It involves carrying out investigations in school, supported by appropriate reading, and attendance at three intensive conference days normally held on a Saturday at Brunel University London each year. Throughout the programme there is a strong emphasis on collaboration. The university’s Virtual Learning Environment (Blackboard Learn) is used extensively to support the school-based tasks and to sustain critical discussion.

Year 1 - starts by focusing on pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning that can positively impact, and make a real difference to, pupils and schools.

Students will have some seminars together, and work in smaller groups with teachers from a range of subject areas or phases.

For example, the Responsive Teaching module provides a lens through which students critically explore a range of contemporary issues relating to educational provision and their own practice framed around five key themes: folk pedagogies; funds of knowledge; culturally responsive teaching; pupil voice; and, assessment for learning.

Year 2 - the programme begins by focusing on pupils, and then considers how teachers and schools can respond. Students will have some seminars together and work in either subject-specific groups or general groups.

For example, the Learners and Learning module provides a lens through which students critically explore a range of contemporary issues relating to educational provision and their own practice framed around four key themes: learning; designing learning/mediating a curriculum; assessment and motivation; and, schools, equity and achievement.

Year 3 - all students will undertake a Research and Development project which involves implementing a new strategy and reviewing its progress, while working with colleagues.

Core teaching for all students will be supported by work in supervision groups and action learning sets exploring the specific applications and implications of these key ideas in their curriculum areas.

All students are expected to contribute to an annual conference held for course participants by presenting ideas about effective research instruments and strategies to evaluate the efficiency of the teaching innovations they have introduced.

For more information on the Special Features of this course and the Teaching and Assesment, please visit this link http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/ma-in-teaching-mat

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The Master of Music in Music Education (Kodaly Methodology Option) is designed to provide certification in Kodaly Methodology as recommended by the Organization of American Kodaly Educators. Read more
The Master of Music in Music Education (Kodaly Methodology Option) is designed to provide certification in Kodaly Methodology as recommended by the Organization of American Kodaly Educators. To complete requirements for the degree and AOSA certification requires an eighteen (18) credit hour concentration:

• Level I: MUE 560 (2) Musicianship Training, MUE 561 (2) Methodology
• Level II: MUE 562 (2) Musicianship Training, MUE 563 () Methodology
• Level III: MUE 564 (2) Musicianship Training, MUE 565 (2) Methodology

Additional Courses: MUE 566 (2) Kodaly Conducting, MUE 567 (2) Kodaly Folk Song Analysis, MUE 568 (2) Kodaly Games and Materials, MUE 569 (1) Kodaly Final Project

All students in M.M. programs in music education also must complete a comprehensive exit examination.  Students not holding Level I Certification in music education must complete prerequisite undergraduate work prior to admission into a graduate program that requires Level I Certification.

For more information about the course curriculum, please visit the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/school-of-music/music-education/music-education-mm-kodaly-concentration/

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