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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA is a stimulating and rewarding course designed to help you develop the craft of excellent writing, enable you to produce original fiction, and equip you with the knowledge to get it published. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA is a stimulating and rewarding course designed to help you develop the craft of excellent writing, enable you to produce original fiction, and equip you with the knowledge to get it published.

Why Study Creative Writing: Writing and Publishing Fiction with us?

This distinctive course comprises four modules – Writing Short Fiction for Publication, Writing Novels for Publication, Getting Published, and The Writing Project – which are taught by a team of published writers, scholars, and editors. Their publications include: flash fiction; novels; prose-poetry and short-story anthologies and collections; articles and essays; interviews; student textbooks; and writers’ guides. Two of the teaching team edit Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine, which has published stories by students on the MA.

The Parkgate Road Campus library is well stocked with creative writing textbooks and houses the Flash Fiction Special Collection, the world’s largest archive of flash-related books and magazines.

What will I learn?

You will study and try your hand at writing flash fiction, short stories, novellas, and novels. Getting Published looks at the world of fiction publishing. For The Writing Project, you will be able to write a collection of flashes and/or short stories, a novella, or a novel.

How will I be taught?

Typically, Writing Short Fiction for Publication and Writing Novels for Publication are taught by nine weekly two-hour seminars and two-hour workshops; and Getting Published is taught by five weekly two-hour seminars and two-hour workshops. One-to-one tutorials are also available. For The Writing Project (the final module), you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

The total workload, including reading, preparation, seminars, workshops, tutorials, research, and writing, is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework, including essays, a journal, creative pieces, and a 16,000-word writing project. There are no formal exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Modern and Contemporary Fiction is an innovative and stimulating course that explores a rich variety of 20th- and 21st-century fiction. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Modern and Contemporary Fiction is an innovative and stimulating course that explores a rich variety of 20th- and 21st-century fiction.

Why Study Modern and Contemporary Fiction with us?

This distinctive course is taught by a dynamic and experienced team with research strengths in modern and contemporary British, Irish, American, and South African fiction. Department members have published on a wide range of modernist, postmodernist, and postcolonial authors; on genres including science fiction, historical fiction, and crime/detective fiction; and on representations of addiction, terrorism, apartheid, fashion, and the female body. Two of the teaching team edit Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine.

The Parkgate Road Campus library is well stocked with texts on modern and contemporary fiction, and houses the Flash Fiction Special Collection, the world’s largest archive of flash-related books and magazines.

What will I learn?

The course comprises six modules. Shorter Fiction typically covers flash fiction, the short story, and the novella. Novel Histories: Past, Present, Future considers historical fiction, representations of the contemporary, and ‘future histories’ (including utopian/dystopian fiction), while Popular Fictions analyses such ‘genre fictions’ as crime/ detective fiction, science fiction, and the campus novel. Special Author(s)/Topic(s) focuses on an area in which the Department has particular expertise, and Research Methods will equip you to pursue your own interest in the Dissertation.

How will I be taught?

Typically, the first five modules are each taught by nine two-hour seminars. These are distributed over 23 weeks, generally with two two-hour seminars per week. One-to-one tutorials are also available. For the Dissertation, you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

The total workload (including reading, preparation, seminars, tutorials, research, and writing) is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework. The first five modules each have 4,000 words of assessment, followed by the 16,000-word Dissertation. There are no exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth. Read more
Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth.

The emphasis of this postgraduate creative writing course is cross-cultural and cross-genre, pointing up the needs and challenges of the contemporary writer who produces his or her creative work in the context of a global writerly and critical community. The master's degree in creative writing offers a clustered learning format of five Residences, two Guided Retreats and one Placement over two years. The research Placement, a distinguishing feature of the course, offers between one and two weeks' hands-on experience of writing in the real world. Students may undertake their placement in a literary agency, a publishing house, the offices of a literary periodical, a theatre company, a screen production company, or other relevant organization. Placement organisations have included Macmillan, Initialise Films, Random House, the BBC, the Literary Review, AM Heath, Pegasus Theatre, the Poetry Society, and Carcanet.

The virtual open event for this programme is available to watch at http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/cwopenday. The open event features acting Course Director Jane Draycott and course administrator Rebecca Rue, who discuss the programme, its requirements and the student experience. Participants' questions were texted in and answered during the event. A FAQ of all the questions and their answers is available at the top of this section.

The MSt has a blog, a resource for Oxford events, calls for submission, competitions, news, interviews and more, which is available at http://blogs.conted.ox.ac.uk/mstcw/.

"The Oxford MSt enables you to fast-track your career in writing."
- Fortuna Burke

"… the freedom to explore and experiment… has been fundamental to my development as a writer."
- Clare Tetley

"The range and variety of the group … offers truly exciting opportunities for the kind of exchanges that really accelerate your development as a writer."
- Michael Schuller

"What does the course offer? Self-discipline, professionalism and confidence."
- Abigail Green-Dove

"My life has been so enriched and expanded. My writing evolves daily through the tools that you gave me. Not to mention the wonderful friendships formed throughout our two years together."
- Lindsay Moore

"The Masters in Oxford, while encouraging creativity, raised the bar on the quality of the finished work and gave me the discipline to be a professional."
- Bette Adriaanse

"I doubt there’s a more suitable MSt in the United Kingdom for work which challenges boundaries and takes risks."
- Jennifer Thorp

Students and alumni have won a wide range of prizes. These successes include winning the Gregory O’Donoghue Prize, the Writers’ Village International Short Fiction Award 2014, the Parallel Universe Poetry Competition, the Martin Starkie Prize, the International Jane Martin Poetry Prize, the Heritage Arts Radio play competition, the Cascade Pictures Writer’s Couch pitching competition, first prize in the Poetry Book Society Student Poetry Competition, the Miracle Poetry Competition, Best Photography Book Award from POYi (Pictures of the Year international), and the Yeovil Literary Prize for Poetry. Two alumni have won the Oxford University’s DL Chapman Memorial Prize, another was a finalist in the 2013 Writers at Work Fellowship Competition, and another won the London Fringe Festival’s Short Fiction Award. Alumni have been awarded a Toshiba Studentship, a Hawthornden Fellowship, and funded residencies at the Banff Centre, Canada, and at the Expansionists Project, Whitstable.

Students and alumni have had their work shortlisted across the genres for, among others, the Asham Award, the Bridport Prize, the Bridport Prize for Flash Fiction, the Fish Flash Fiction prize, the Yeoville Literary Prize, the Oxonian poetry prize, the Fish Short Story Prize 2013, the Big Issue in the North’s New Writing Award, the Oxonian review, and the Aesthetica Creative Writing Competition. A 2010 graduate was short-listed for the Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger award 2011. Two alumni were longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, and one was shortlisted. An alumnus’ debut novel also made the longlist for the Not the Booker Prize.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-creative-writing

Destinations

Many of our graduate students have signed with agents, and each year a number go on to undertake doctoral study in creative writing or English Literature. Our graduates have obtained positions in publishing, media and the creative arts industries, as well as teaching positions in tertiary education.

The MSt has enjoyed a very strong application field since its inception, attracting record interest in recent years from a global constituency of writers. The course`s emphasis on critical analysis as well as on writerly and creative excellence attracts students of commensurately strong academic potential as well as of significant creative promise. This combination of academic rigour and creativity is a central distinctive feature of the course. The resulting emphasis on exploration and the development of an individual writerly voice serve to attract particularly talented students from around the world as well as a strongly diverse group of UK students of varied backgrounds and ethnicity.

Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Please consult http://www.kellogg.ox.ac.uk/.

Who should apply?

We are looking for writers with a proven record of commitment to their craft. You should be a keen reader, and bring an open-minded, questioning approach to both reading and writing. You will not necessarily have yet achieved publication, but you will have written regularly and read widely over a sustained period. You will be keen to dedicate time and energy and staying-power to harnessing your talent, enlarging your skills, and aiming your writerly production at consistently professional standards. It is likely you will have a first degree, or equivalent, although in some cases other evidence of suitability may be acceptable.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA we normally seek is 3.6 out of 4.0. We do not seek a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or GMAT score. Although a GRE or GMAT score is not a formal requirement, if one is available it should be supplied.

The high number of contact hours are concentrated into Residences and Retreats. Students should be at a stage in their writing where, with appropriate guidance, they can undertake agreed assignments, projects and essays between meetings. There is a dedicated Course Website for provision of up-to-date information; contact and exchange between students; and contact between students and tutors. The course, however, is not a ‘distance-learning’ course, and tutors, while being happy to help with questions or problems, do not offer regular weekly ‘office hours’.

The M.St is unlikely to be suitable for those who are just starting out on their writerly and critical development.

If you have any doubts about whether the M.St is right for your stage of development, please consult the website for information on our Undergraduate Diploma in Creative Writing https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/dipcw

What does the course cover?

The first year concentrates equally on prose (fiction and narrative non-fiction), poetry and drama. There is a significant critical reading and analysis component, which is linked to the writerly considerations explored in each of the three genres. Students are expected to engage fully with all three genres, in a spirit of exploration and with the aim of discovering what impact and relevance unaccustomed genres have for the development of their individual writerly voice. This necessarily involves undertaking assignments and exercises in areas that are new to students, and do not relate directly to any work they may have in progress. Students may be able to continue with their own longer term pieces-in-progress but the concentration of year 1 teaching is on producing new work, and the exercises and assignments, which should take priority, reflect this emphasis.

The second year offers specialisation in a single genre, again accompanied by a significant critical element focused around issues of interest to the individual student and related to the genre of choice.

Your specialisation choices are as follows:

- The novel
- Short fiction
- Radio drama
- TV drama
- Screenwriting
- Stage drama
- Poetry
- Narrative non-fiction

In year 2, the specialisation in the genre of students’ choice provides an opportunity for significant concentration on either new work, or, subject to consultation with supervisor, on existing work-in-progress.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area. Read more
The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-curating/

This two-part programme is designed to develop professional and academic excellence in the field of contemporary curatorial practice. It's aimed at curators and those with related academic and practical experience who wish to achieve professional excellence in their practice, to innovate in the expanding field of curatorial practice.

MFA Curating at Goldsmiths focuses in-depth on aesthetic, social, political and philosophical questions that are brought to bear in any place or at any event in which contemporary art is situated.

The programme is designed to provide a practice-led research context for students at any stage of their professional practice.

It also enables you to experiment and innovate in the expanded field of curatorial pedagogy, to collaborate on an interdisciplinary basis and extend your and other students' knowledge through this process.

Goldsmiths' MFA Curating programme is recognised worldwide for producing highly qualified curators and other arts professionals.

Our graduates find employment in top international museums, commercial galleries, auction houses, magazines, alternative spaces and not-for-profit organisations. Others choose employment as artist’s studio managers; arts education programmers; museum public talks and events organisers; gallery archivists and registrars.

Recent speakers

Recent speakers have included: Iwona Blazwick OBE, Whitechapel Gallery, London; Francesco Bonami, MCA Chicago; Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, 14th Istanbul Biennial; Julia Bryan-Wilson, University of California at Berkeley; Céline Condorelli, artist and co-founder of Eastside Projects, Birmingham; Diedrich Diedrichsen, Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna; Alex Farquharson, Nottingham Contemporary; Ryan Gander, artist; Mark Godfrey, Tate Modern, London; Boris Groys, Center for Art and Media Technology, Karlsruhe; Matthew Higgs, White Columns, New York; Jens Hoffman, Jewish Museum, New York; Laura Hoptman, MoMA, New York; Anthony Huberman, CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco; James Lingwood, Artangel, London; Gregor Muir, ICA, London; Paul O’Neill, CCS Bard College, New York; Scott Rothkopf, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Adrian Searle, The Guardian; Polly Staple, Chisenhale Gallery, London.

Recent Visiting Tutors

Chris Evans, artist; Lisa La Feuvre, Henry Moore Institute; Goldin+Senneby, Stockholm-based artists; Luis Jacob, Toronto-based artist; Tom Morton, frieze magazine; Paul O Neill, critic and curator; Sally O'Reilly, independent critic and curator; Mike Sperlinger, Lux; Rob Tuffnell, 83 Page Street; Alex Sainsbury, Raven Row; Lucy Byatt, Contemporary Art Society; Gavin Wade, Eastside Projects; Lydia Yee, Barbican Art Gallery; Form/Content

Work experience

The Tate Modern annually offers two hands-on internships to Goldsmiths MFA Curating students, who are given the opportunity to work directly on an exhibition matched to the students' interests. Accepted Goldsmiths curating students are given details on how to apply for a Tate Modern internship prior to starting the school year.

Other institutions with which the Goldsmiths MFA Curating programme has collaborated on real-life curatorial projects include 176/Zabludowicz Collection, London; Form/Content, London; ICA/Fourth Plinth Project, London, and more.

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Guest Research Student

If you are an international student and would like to study a 'tailor-made' programme (for up to a year), you may be interested in applying as a Guest Research Student.

Contact the department
If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Helena Reckitt.

Modules & Structure

In Year One, you're introduced to a series of curatorial concepts and practices through group analysis and guided research. There are also group seminars that look into significant ideas in philosophy and cultural theory to help you think broadly about your own practice

In Year Two, intensive workshops look in depth at a set of artistic and cultural themes chosen by the students. In Year Two you further develop independent curatorial research and practice, working either on your own ideas or with a London-based gallery or institution. The summer term of Year One acts as a transition to Year Two.

Government Art Collection

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Skills
Independent research and practice; public presentation; oral and written communication; project development; exhibition administration; concept development; collaboration; intellectual analysis; catalogue, essay and review writing; research organisation and presentation.

Careers

Graudates from the MFA in Curating go on to work in galleries and museums; as managers and directors in commercial galleries; independent curators; cultural policy makers, teachers and academics; writers and critics.

Recent employers of our MFA Curating students and graduates include:

Public sector

Tate Britain, London
Tate Modern, London
Guggenheim Museum, New York
Documenta, Kassel
Venice Biennale
Athens Biennial
Sydney Biennale
Portikus, Frankfurt
Witte de With, Rotterdam
FRAC Lorraine
Hayward Gallery, London
Hayward Touring Exhibitions, London
Museo d’Arte Moderna, Bologna
Modern Art Oxford
London Olympic Park (art sector)
Artists Space, New York
Henry Moore Institute, Leeds
Art on the Underground, London
Art Space, Auckland, New Zealand
Austrian Cultural Foundation. London
Romanian Cultural Institute, London
Spike Island, Bristol
Nottingham Contemporary, Nottingham

Private sector

176 Gallery, Zabludowicz Collection, London
Bloomberg Space, London
Christie’s, Amsterdam
Deitch Projects, New York
Deste Foundation, Athens
Frith Street Gallery, London
Haunch of Venison, Berlin
Kadist Art Foundation, Paris
Kate MacGarry Gallery, London
Kurimanzutto, Mexico City
Lisson Gallery, London
Matt’s Gallery, London
David Roberts Collection, London
White Cube Gallery, London
Vienna Art Fair, Vienna

Publications

Artforum, New York
Frieze, London
Flash Art International, Milan

Some of our graduates have founded their own projects and galleries, among these:

Lu Jie, Founder and Director, Long March Space, Beijing (number 95 in Art Review Power 100 List 2009)
Sarah Wang, Founding Director of the Creative Intelligence Agency, London
Zhang Wei, Founder and Director, Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou

Other entry requirements

Work experience is absolutely essential to demonstrate that you have a clear sense of current trends and activities in contemporary art. This should be demonstrated through your experience, and expanded upon in your personal statement.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Durham Online MBA will enhance your key business and leadership capabilities to enable you to achieve your career aspirations whilst you continue in full-time employment, so you can apply what you learn directly into the organisation you work for. Read more
The Durham Online MBA will enhance your key business and leadership capabilities to enable you to achieve your career aspirations whilst you continue in full-time employment, so you can apply what you learn directly into the organisation you work for.
Flexibility is at the heart of the Durham Online MBA as you can personalise your programme to meet your career goals. You can study fully online, complete some of your learning at Durham, undertake relevant optional modules, or choose to follow a pathway.

The global spread of students, alumni and faculty will give you the ability to network virtually with people from across the world, and from a wide-range of business sectors.

Online MBA: in detail

Structured around a two year study calendar, you can choose to undertake the programme 100% online or take a blended approach where you combine your online learning with residential modules. Whichever way you choose, our comprehensive induction will equip you with an essential toolkit of study skills to help you prepare for your MBA.

Our virtual learning environment is at the heart of your Online MBA experience. Through this you will receive online lectures, podcasts and webinars, as well as participating in a range of e-learning activities, discussion boards and virtual group work. There is a virtual campus, complete with powerful social networking tools to keep you in touch with your fellow students wherever they are in the world.

This virtual campus is supported with an annual Summer School held here in Durham, which brings together students from around the world to provide support and inspiration to drive you forward.

You will be expected to devote around 15 hours per week to study, and if you choose to undertake core modules at Durham these will typically take place in April and October.

Your online personal career advancement service is also core to the programme, accelerating your leadership capabilities to realise your full potential. Gaining global business experience is also an option through the International Business in Context module, which will give you the ability to operate within an international business environment.

Course structure

-Five core modules
-Two optional modules
-Strategic Case Analysis

Core modules

These are the foundation of your programme – establishing the management knowledge, understanding and research skills every leader needs.

-Accounting, Finance and Economics
-Leading and Managing People
-Marketing
-Operations and Technology
-Strategic Management

Optional modules

Optional modules provide you with an opportunity to enhance and deepen knowledge and skills in areas of particular interest to you, and that are relevant to your future career.

Modules on offer are dependent on demand, but in previous years have included:

-Entrepreneurship
-New Venture Creation
-Management Consultancy
-Project Management
-Business Analytics
-Technology Innovation
-International Business in Context

You also have the option to take a structured pathway focusing on the area of entrepreneurship, consultancy or technology. To undertake a pathway you would need to complete the following modules:

-Entrepreneurship: Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation,
-Consultancy: Management Consultancy and Project Management, or
-Technology: Business Analytics and Technology Innovation

Strategic Case Analysis

In this final project you will demonstrate your ability as an independent learner and researcher. This project will showcase your in-depth knowledge and understanding of topics covered in core modules.

The 12,000 word strategic case analysis will test your understanding of the case writing, analysis process and relevant research methodologies. It will also demonstrate your ability to apply and interpret what you have learned across your MBA to the analysis of a particular issue in depth.

Summer School

The Online MBA Summer School brings together students from around the world to provide support and inspiration to drive you forward.

This optional Summer School usually takes place during a week in July, and gives you the opportunity to study optional modules and take part in a rich menu of personal advancement workshops.

Hosted by the Business School, in the beautiful city of Durham, the Summer School also includes stimulating speaker events, a variety of social events, and a truly unique opportunity to taste the Durham experience.

Other admission requirements

This course includes online activities, so you will also need a computer with internet access. Almost all activities will be possible from a modern desktop or laptop computer (purchased since 2010). All resources will be accessible from a moderate broadband connection (0.5Mbps) but a greater bandwidth (up to 8Mbps) will provide a better experience for some resources and events.

You will need:
-A web browser (Resources are tested on the latest available versions of Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome)
-The ability to open and edit Microsoft Office documents (e.g. Microsoft Office, OpenOffice or access to Googledocs)
-Flash player
-JAVA
-Ability to open .pdf documents (e.g. Adobe Reader)
-A headset or headphones and microphone

To participate fully in some online events students should have a webcam and to access some tools and resources you may need the ability to install software.

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Introduction. The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video. Read more
Introduction
The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video.
The programme provides instruction in sound recording and design, camerawork, lighting, editing, scriptwriting, budgeting and directing.
The Department of Media is housed in a purpose built complex with professionally designed studios, cutting rooms and editing facilities.

Course Description
This MA Programme is aimed particularly at people who have a good first degree in a subject such as film, television, or media studies but who have limited practical experience. Good honours degrees in other subjects, together with evidence of a serious interest in film and video production outside a formal academic context, may also be appropriate.

This MA Programme will suit people who want a general introduction to all areas of pre-production, production and post-production within 16mm film and digital video. Although some degree of specialisation is possible this MA should be seen as a general introduction to all areas. One of the advantages of this approach is that all our MA students are encouraged to write and direct their own films.

During the first term of the programme (October - December) students undertake a number of familiarisation exercises in film and video, developing pre-production, production and post-production skills. These exercises include 4 short 16mm productions and a number of video productions. These are carried out in small teams and it should be noted that teamwork is a major focal point of this MA.
In the second term (January - March), the programme concentrates on the further development of skills in scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, sound design/dubbing with ProTools, editing with Avid and compositing with After Effects. During this term students carry out the pre-production for their assessed film/video.
This is then shot and edited in the final term (April - June). A budget of up to £500 is provided to cover the basic costs of production. Students receive support through individual tutorials, group seminars and studio classes.


The MA in Film Production is predominantly practical but it should not be seen only as a vocational preparation. Its important theoretical component is related to the practical side and a weekly two-hour session covers theoretical issues such as narrative style, representation or national identity. In addition, students are obliged to attend weekly screenings and playbacks in the final year undergraduate courses.
During July, August and September students research and write a 12000 word dissertation on the theory underpinning their assessed film.

Resources
The Department's video equipment includes DVC-PRO video cameras (equivalent to Digibeta), tracks, doorway dolly, jib, specialist lighting gear, editing on AVID Xpress Pro, sound dubbing in a digital dubbing suite using ProTools, and software such as Photoshop, After Effects and Flash. There is also a newly equipped 3 camera TV Studio using digital widescreen cameras, gallery with digital desk and sound room with 32 channel mixer.

Our film resources offer fully professional 16mm and Super 16 opportunities, using Arriflex, Aaton and Bolex cameras, Nagra sound recorders, solid state recorders, a fully equipped studio and portable lighting kits for location work.

Outside the Department there is a student run campus radio station, in which many students participate. BBC regional radio (Radio Kent) also operates a studio in the Media building and offers student involvement with professional broadcasting.

Student Destinations
Students who successfully complete the MA have gone onto a wide range of Media related careers often starting at the assistant level and moving up from there. A number of ex-students work within Camera Departments, Producing and Feature Film Editing. Lecturing within Further Education and Higher Education has also been a particularly successful employment route.

Funding
Significant funding may be available for UK and EU students who have a good academic background [e.g. a first class or 2.1 honours degree] from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (A.H.R.C.) Please see their website for application details (http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/) Please note that this application process takes some months with a completion deadline in April.

See our website http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-humanities/media/courses/ma_media-production.asp for more details.

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This course is for you if you want to develop your individual style and explore photography as a means of creative expression. You will create an impressive portfolio of work, which you will exhibit in real gallery space and disseminate to potential employers. Read more
This course is for you if you want to develop your individual style and explore photography as a means of creative expression. You will create an impressive portfolio of work, which you will exhibit in real gallery space and disseminate to potential employers.

Course overview

Through the MA Photography, you will develop a professional base for your future career. The course is tailored to your individual interests and we invite you to share your aspirations with us at interview.

During the course, we support the development of student-initiated projects in which individuals can implement, research and extend their practical and intellectual skills across the spectrum of photography, digital imaging and video. By the end of the course, you will have prepared a substantial portfolio of creative and written work and participated in a public exhibition and a publication.

At Masters level, the specialisms of tutors are an important factor. Sunderland’s academic team includes staff with world-class reputations whose research interests fall within the areas of landscape, documentary and diaristic photography, experimental and alternative photographic methods, and span a variety of themes, from representations of femininity, subcultures, curating and exhibiting art photography with a specialism in new photographic technologies and the networked image.

In addition, we operate the North East Photography Network (NEPN) which develops and promotes photography in the North East of England. We also have close links with major arts organisations such as the Arts Council, the Laing Art Gallery and the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art.

Graduates from Sunderland have gone on to work throughout the creative industries and education. A Masters qualification not only opens doors in the workplace but also helps you progress more rapidly once your career is underway.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/photography-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Photography 1 - Certificate (60 Credits)
-Self-negotiated Research Project (40 Credits)
-Revisiting Photography Theory (20 Credits)

Photography 2 – Postgraduate Diploma (60 Credits)
-Self-negotiated Portfolio Project (40 Credits)
-Issues in Contemporary Photographic Practice (20 Credits)

Photography 3 – Masters Degree (60 Credits)
-Exhibition (40 Credits)
-Research Project (20 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters programme requires a higher level of independent working.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods ranging from technical workshops, research seminars, theory lectures, practical demonstrations, peer critiques, and group discussions. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

You will have the opportunity to meet established photographers and hear about their work and careers. Past speakers have included Simon Norfolk, Liz Wells, Julian Stallabrass, Peter Kennard, Bas Vroege, Michele Sank. Portfolio review days allow you to discuss your portfolio with leading national and international artists, and photographic professionals, publishers, gallery and museum curators.

Assessment methods include project reports, research files, essays, your portfolio of work and the final exhibition.

Facilities & location

The University has invested in modern facilities in the recently refurbished Northern Centre of Photography that include:
-Chemical darkrooms for colour and black and white printing. You can print from 35mm to 5x4 with a large horizontal enlarger to create extra large prints
-Separate chemical darkroom for alternative printing methods
-Digital darkrooms with state-of-the-art scanners and digital production and printing
-Photography studios equipped with tungsten and flash lighting equipment
-Cameras ranging from 35mm to 5x4 Pentax, Nikon, Mamiya, Hasselblad, Fuji 6x7, Toyo, Sinar and Linhof. We provide Digital Nikons and Leaf backs for high-end digital studio work as well as HD video cameras
-Digital suites with open-access Apple Macs for editing video and digital images
-Digital studio with video, sound editing and screening facilities
-Project spaces
-Large wall screen with HD projection for film and video screenings
-Art gallery

Arts and Design Library
Our Arts and Design Library has a specialist collection of over 120,000 books, CD-ROMs, videos, slides and one of the largest electronic information networks in the sector.

Journals and research
We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for media and arts information
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for a range of positions within the creative sector which include professional photography and arts practice, curatorial, editorial and design work as well as education.

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working in art institutions, museums, community arts organisations, Further Education Colleges and the wider media industry.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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This innovative course is designed for teachers of creative and media subjects, at all levels in schools, further education and higher education. Read more
This innovative course is designed for teachers of creative and media subjects, at all levels in schools, further education and higher education. It is also suitable for those in relevant educational support and development roles who want to develop their knowledge and skills in one or more creative media disciplines. MA Creative & Media Education aims to provide you with knowledge and skills relating both to current debates and practices in the creative industries, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.

The course consists of regular individual tutorials, both face-to-face and online, as well as one intensive, two-day residential each term. The residentials typically feature master classes with leading figures from media education, together with skills workshops, enabling you to produce a range of learning resources for the classroom, and to develop your skills in areas such as interactive media (Flash, Dreamweaver), design (Photoshop, InDesign) and broadcast production (camera, editing).

You will join a community of creative researchers, sharing good practice and working collaboratively to address common issues around media education. The time you spend at work therefore contributes to the requirements of the course and what you learn immediately feeds into your teaching practice.

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MA Photography at London College of Communication has created many celebrated photographers and artists around the globe. This fine art photography MA has an international reputation for conceptually driven, research-led practices. Read more

Introduction

MA Photography at London College of Communication has created many celebrated photographers and artists around the globe. This fine art photography MA has an international reputation for conceptually driven, research-led practices. Based in the still image, an interdisciplinary approach encourages students to explore the ever-expanding boundaries of the photographic medium to develop a distinctive body of work that is contextualised within a wider critical framework.

Content

MA Photography is a fine art photography programme aimed at developing a personal, distinctive and conceptually strong practice grounded in research and critical thinking. While based in the still image it embraces cross-media and cross-genre practice. Recent alumni have won awards such as the Dazed/Converse Emerging Artist, Magenta Flash Forward Emerging Photographers and IdeasTap/Magnum Photographic Award, and have been selected for Bloomberg New Contemporaries.

MA Photography at London College of Communication is renowned for producing some of the most successful contemporary emerging photographers and artists. Part of the School of Media, the course offers a unique opportunity for photographers to develop a major body of research-based practice in the context of a critical understanding of contemporary photographic culture.

The course encourages students to work experimentally and produce work that tests the boundaries of the medium, encompassing the still image, video, installation, performance and digital media, and culminating in a public exhibition. The School of Media offers a longstanding tradition of photography education with a highly regarded research culture, and the course has close ties with the Photography and the Archive Research Centre and the Kubrick Archive, both based at LCC. Located close to central London, the course has excellent links with galleries, museums and archives.

MA Photography attracts a broad range of practitioners, from backgrounds in fine art photography, documentary photography, commercial photography and other areas of media practice. They are united by a desire to develop a distinctive personal practice with a high level of conceptual resolution. Graduates of the course go on to be successful fine artists as well as documentary and commercial photographers, gallerists, curators and writers, academics and teachers, and arts organisers of various kinds. Many prefer to find ways of supporting their art practice through combining it with teaching, commercial photography or other related activities. Students who may wish to progress to practice-led PhD are encouraged to develop their practice as research.
There are both analogue and digital photography facilities at LCC, including colour and black-and-white darkrooms, photographic studios and a Mac-based digital suite including Imacon scanners, as well as medium and large format analogue cameras, digital cameras, HD video cameras and lighting equipment. Students also have access to other technical facilities such as a 3D workshop or screenprinting.

Structure

Unit 1 - Exploring the Possibilities

Unit 2 - Taking an Idea Forward

Unit 3 - Collaborative Unit

Unit 4 - Resolving Outcomes

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MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. Read more
MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. The project work undertaken is underpinned with research, analysis and evidence of strategic thinking as well as self reflection.

On this course you will be able to devise new means of attracting audiences, whether in the areas of promotion and advertising or within the exhibition and corporate sector, moving image for mobile devices, the web, and in every area of motion design and the world of moving image.

The course has been designed for those looking for innovative, creative and critical learning, as you will engage with video, environmental, digital editing, sound and animation to develop your creative ideas and build a strong conceptual and technical basis for your development.

As well as providing opportunities to engage with more traditional areas of moving image such as short narrative film, promotions and branding, animation, motion graphics and broadcast design, the pathway also covers areas such as 3D projection and video mapping and CGI.

You will be expected to respond to new ideas, where the screen is not confined to the movie theatre or the living room. You will be encouraged to extend your knowledge of creative, interpretative and critical approaches to moving image practices. MA Moving Image provides an intensive arena for the discussion, development and production of high quality original audio-visual work. You will also be encouraged to engage with the wider context of moving image practice, for instance through submitting work to festivals and competitions.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

In the Technology Issues unit, and Concept and Prototyping unit, you will have the opportunity to engage with industry standard software (for example: After Effects, Cinema 4D, Final Cut Pro, Flash, Illustrator, Photoshop).

Supported in particular by the Research Process and Technology Issues units, the pathway will enable you to deepen your conceptual thinking and technical application through the development of your individual practice.

New technologies have transformed the relationships between traditional film, video and digital formats, offering new opportunities for experimentation and the business context of this is explored through the Business and Innovation unit.

In the Concept and Prototyping unit you will develop your main concepts with reference to theoretical and business contexts; and this work will culminate in the Major Project.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. It combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers. Read more
Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. It combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers.

Over forty years’ experience working with private and public sector clients has taught us that, for true professional development, you have to do more than just learn. You have to apply your learning in the workplace. Durham University Business School combines the rich heritage of Durham University with a progressive, dynamic approach to executive education. This enables us to deliver immediate high-impact results for individuals and organisations.

Each module has been developed by leading members of the Durham faculty, so you will benefit from the most advanced management knowledge. During the course, you will be taught by our world-class researchers, using a combination of physical and virtual classrooms. To make sure you have all the support you need to gain immediate benefits, you will also be assigned a Personal Tutor.

In detail

As a blended-learning, modular programme, you will be taught through a combination of classroom and state-of-the-art virtual courses. You’ll also have the opportunity to carry out practical activities, including workshops, discussions, events and consultancy initiatives, designed to help you develop your personal skills and plan your future career strategy.

Your study programme will last for 30 months. You should normally attend two five-day Residential Workshops during the first two years (alternative online options may also be available), study six further modules online and complete a six-month individual project of 15,000 words.

The programme starts with a comprehensive induction, designed to refresh your study skills and to guide you through the requirements of the programme. As well as getting to know more about the Business School and meeting the MA team and fellow participants, you will learn about academic writing, referencing and how to access and use online study materials.

Classroom and virtual learning sessions are led by senior members of the Durham faculty. Experts in their field, they will share the very latest in business and management knowledge. What’s more, throughout your studies you will be given access to our careers support services, professional development activities and a Personal Tutor for each module.
-Seven core modules
-One elective
-Dissertation or business project

In year one you’ll study online or attend a five-day residential workshop in Durham:
-Induction
-Business Economics & Accounting

You’ll study three online modules:
-Strategy
-Strategic Marketing Management
-Organisational Behaviour

In year two, you’ll study online or attend one further three-day residential workshop:
-Leadership or Human Resource Management
-Professional Development Activities

You’ll study three further online modules:
-Operations & Supply Chain Management
-Research methods
-One elective module selected from a range of specialist options available

Please note: the order in which modules are studied is dependent upon when you enroll and therefore may vary with the above.

The programme culminates with a six-month 15,000 word dissertation/business project on an approved topic and is overseen by a dedicated dissertation supervisor. This is normally undertaken in your own organisation and is an opportunity to analyse a practical, relevant management issue in some depth, demonstrating a critical understanding of the relevant theory and its applications.

Other admission requirements

This course includes online activities, so you will also need a computer with internet access. Almost all activities will be possible from a modern desktop or laptop computer (purchased since 2010). All resources will be accessible from a moderate broadband connection (0.5Mbps) but a greater bandwidth (up to 8Mbps) will provide a better experience for some resources and events.

You will need:
-A web browser (Resources are tested on the latest available versions of Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome)
-The ability to open and edit Microsoft Office documents (e.g. Microsoft Office, OpenOffice or access to Googledocs)
-Flash player
-JAVA
-Ability to open .pdf documents (e.g. Adobe Reader)
-A headset or headphones and microphone
-To participate fully in some online events students should have a webcam and to access some tools and resources you may need the ability to install software.

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This distinctive programme allows you to think about the critical and creative relationships between film, photography and the media, while developing your skills to produce projects of your own. Read more

Overview

This distinctive programme allows you to think about the critical and creative relationships between film, photography and the media, while developing your skills to produce projects of your own.

A major independent project sits at the heart of the course, supported by modules that put your practice into the context of contemporary debates. You’ll explore the different critical approaches to the making and consumption of photography and film, allowing them to inform the short film and photography projects you’ll work on.

It’s a flexible programme which allows you to choose from a range of optional modules to focus on topics that suit your own creative and critical interests. You could study cultural policy, international film industries, film and TV writing, feminism in the media and more.
You’ll be taught by leading researchers and practitioners in the field, and our cutting edge research will inform all your teaching.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Specialist Facilities

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course Content

The whole programme is based around a major independent project. You can choose to complete a dissertation and take classes developing your knowledge of research methods to support your work. Alternatively, you can complete a short film or photography project that you’ll exhibit at the end of the programme.

The modules you study throughout the year give you the theoretical and contextual knowledge you need to inform your project, as well as developing your skills in filmmaking and photography.

You’ll study two core modules. One will explore the links between photographic creativity, optical science and the nature of cinema and allow you to work on a short film project. The other will look at the historical development of photographic practice, contemporary issues and debates.

Alongside these modules you’ll choose from a range of options to focus on topics that interest you, from film industries around the world to new media, cultural policy, communication and development, television narrative and more. You could even choose to undertake a work placement in a media organisation.

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This diverse programme addresses the cultural, social, political and economic questions in media and communications. Taught by leading researchers in the field, you’ll gain an insight into the complexities of the global media landscape. Read more

Overview

This diverse programme addresses the cultural, social, political and economic questions in media and communications. Taught by leading researchers in the field, you’ll gain an insight into the complexities of the global media landscape.

If you’re already working in the communications and media industries, or want to deepen your understanding of the role communication plays in society, then this programme offers a multidisciplinary approach to the complex relationships between media and communications, people and organisations in global societies.

Core modules will give you the theoretical background to examine areas such as representation, media and power, the public sphere and audiences. You’ll explore how these principles relate to topical issues. Then you’ll focus on aspects of the subject that interest you, when you choose optional modules on topics such as the international film industry, public relations, communication in development contexts, or political communication.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Specialist Facilities

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course Content

You’ll study two core modules that lay the foundations of the programme, exploring theoretical approaches to communication and media. One of these will consider issues such as de-westernising media and communication studies, interpersonal communication, media and power and the concept of the public sphere. You’ll then use these theories to take a critical approach to real-world issues, as well as developing your own perspectives on topics that interest you.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

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The media, communications and information landscapes have changed beyond recognition and continue to evolve. This programme will give you an understanding of how messages flow across borders in a globalised world – and how they relate to political, economic and cultural affairs. Read more

Overview

The media, communications and information landscapes have changed beyond recognition and continue to evolve. This programme will give you an understanding of how messages flow across borders in a globalised world – and how they relate to political, economic and cultural affairs.

You’ll explore the concept of ‘global media’ and whether mass media inspire or simply report events. You’ll look at the role of social media in communications and how audiences around the world understand and consume global media products.

Core modules will give you the context and theoretical knowledge to consider these questions, and you’ll choose from optional modules to focus on the areas that suit your interests or career aspirations.

You could study war reporting, identity in the media, public relations and more, to gain the skills to thrive in a fast-paced and challenging sector.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Specialist Facilities

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course Content

You’ll study core modules throughout the course that give you the contextual knowledge and research skills to support your studies.

These will explore the relationships between communications and international systems: how communications networks can function as a source of power, how they are regulated and how new technologies are changing the landscape. You’ll also think about the economic and cultural impacts of globalised communication.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as the media and globalisation, urban narratives, public relations, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

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This programme combines the practice of journalism with theoretical perspectives, allowing you to think critically about journalism in a global context. Read more

Overview

This programme combines the practice of journalism with theoretical perspectives, allowing you to think critically about journalism in a global context.

Core modules will introduce you to different theories and approaches in international journalism, using research and case studies to consider the economic, cultural, social and political implications of journalistic practice. You’ll write news stories and gain an awareness of issues such as regulation and ethics.

At the same time, you’ll choose from a range of optional modules – you could study multimedia journalism, communication and development or identity in the media among others.

Our students have included people with little experience of journalism as well as experienced editors, journalists and bloggers looking for a new perspective on their work. Guided by leading researchers in the field, and focusing on contemporary practice, you’ll be well equipped to become an expert in your field.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Specialist Facilities

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course Content

Core modules will lay the foundations for your understanding of the theory and ongoing research in the world of global journalism, and how journalism shapes – and is shaped by – global political, social, economic and cultural issues. Then you’ll explore how this affects journalistic practice, considering issues like regulation and ethics as you build skills in news research and writing.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

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