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The MSc in Midwifery is a professional programme leading to registration for graduates with a first degree. Midwives are the primary healthcare professionals in normal pregnancy and childbirth. Read more
The MSc in Midwifery is a professional programme leading to registration for graduates with a first degree.

Midwives are the primary healthcare professionals in normal pregnancy and childbirth: they provide health and parent education, carry out antenatal and post-natal assessments, and support mothers and families through pregnancy and after the birth. They also provide care during labour and birth in a variety of settings, including home birth.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/midwifery-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and maintain excellent practice links with those areas locally and across the region.

- Many of our lecturers have reputations for excellence and have established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international levels.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of maternal and women's public health, cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, and interprofessional education and collaborative practice.

- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent.

- Oxford Brookes is a student-centred institution that is fully committed to each individual achieving their potential. To support this, we offer a broad range of student support schemes to facilitate learning and development.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

- We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills simulation suites and resources.

- Our courses are open to a wide range of health and social care professionals providing highly flexible continuing professional development (CPD) study opportunities with part-time, full-time and mixed-mode options (including opportunities for e-learning, blended and distance learning).

- We support multi- and interprofessional learning and teaching, and many of our courses are either fully multiprofessional or offer excellent opportunities for shared learning.

Professional accreditation

On successful completion of the midwifery master's programme, you will be entered onto the midwifery part of the register of the Nursing and Midwifery Council of the United Kingdom.

This course in detail

The following midwifery courses are offered:
- a three-year midwifery programme for those with a first class honours degree plus Biology or Human Biology A level at grade B or above. Previous health care experience is desirable, but not essential.

- a 21-month post-experience master’s degree for experienced adult nurses registered with the NMC who have a first class honours degree.

The practice and educational content of the course is the same as the BSc course; however, assessment will be at master's level. This will enhance development of critical thinking skills which will prepare students for further postgraduate studies. In addition, Midwifery MSc students will have the opportunity to undertake primary research for their dissertation.

During Year 1, you will undertake level 6 modules. In years 2 and 3 you will study level 7 modules.

Upon successful completion of the course, you will be a fully qualified midwife and eligible to apply for registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. http://www.nmc-uk.org/

Teaching and learning

We offer a friendly and stimulating learning environment; we consistently receive high satisfaction ratings for our student support and learning resources in student surveys. We have excellent teaching facilities, dedicated clinical skills suites and simulation resources, which include a well equipped movement laboratory, a family of computerised simulation manikins (including a simman, simbaby and birthing mother), an extensive range of anatomy models and fully networked computer rooms.

At Oxford Brookes, no professional group works in isolation. We teach a wide range of pre-qualification and foundation courses including health and social care, all branches of nursing, midwifery, occupational therapy, osteopathy, operating department practice, paramedic emergency care, and social work. You will share your learning with these other health care students. This is a key component of the course as it is essential to developing your teamwork skills and your understanding of the other roles you will encounter in practice.

We have excellent library resources, accessible both through the web and through a range of locally based facilities on university and NHS sites.

Information technology plays an important role in health care courses and a very extensive range of learning resources can be accessed through ‘Brookes Virtual’, an online repository of lectures, handouts, information and learning exercises.

Careers

Midwifery is an exciting and diverse career choice. As the main healthcare professionals for the pregnant mother and her family throughout the childbearing process, midwives play a fundamental role in providing care and advice during pregnancy and birth, and in the postnatal period. Midwives are the experts in normal childbirth.

A master's degree in midwifery will provide a strong basis for a future career in research, education, management or consultancy. It is hoped that future graduates will influence midwifery practice in the UK and elsewhere.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

We have a number of both promising and experienced researchers working in established areas including maternal and women's public health, cancer care, children and families, drugs and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, and interprofessional education and collaborative practice. Over the past few years, these researchers have won external research and consultancy contracts including grants, fellowships and studentships for NHS staff. Our research staff collaborate with researchers from across Oxford Brookes University and from the Institute of Health Sciences at the University of Oxford, along with research teams from many other UK and international centres.

Our academic staff have extensive experience of NHS, clinical practice and general management at senior level. They also have a significant record of research and publications on a range of topics, including water birth and breast feeding. The currency of the course is also assured by the lecturers' close involvement in the maternity services and their movement between that sector and education.

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent. The university has been careful to nurture emerging research strengths, and the international standing achieved by subjects allied to health demonstrates significant progress since 2008.

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Train as an Orthodontic Therapist on our unique modular and GDC-approved training programme. This programme is designed for qualified Orthodontic Nurses and Dental Care Professionals who wish to develop their clinical and academic skills and train as an Orthodontic Therapist. Read more
Train as an Orthodontic Therapist on our unique modular and GDC-approved training programme.

This programme is designed for qualified Orthodontic Nurses and Dental Care Professionals who wish to develop their clinical and academic skills and train as an Orthodontic Therapist.

Combining a range of first class clinical facilities and advanced educational strategies, you will benefit from a challenging, stimulating and fun learning environment.

Course directors are specialist orthodontic practitioners who have over six years of experience working with orthodontic therapists in their own practices.

Teaching Methods

Combining a range of first class clinical facilities and advanced educational strategies, you will benefit from a challenging, stimulating and fun learning environment.

Course directors are specialist orthodontic practitioners who have over six years of experience working with orthodontic therapists in their own practices.

Lecturers and tutors include specialist orthodontists, trainers and orthodontic therapists to provide a high quality and balanced educational experience.

You will learn how to provide safe and effective treatment, both in our state of the art facilities within the University’s approved training centre, The Leamington Spa Orthodontic Centre, and in your own practice.

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Those holding the Higher Diploma are deemed to have reached the honours degree standard in Mathematics. The Diploma is awarded at pass and honours levels. Read more

Overview

Those holding the Higher Diploma are deemed to have reached the honours degree standard in Mathematics. The Diploma is awarded at pass and honours levels.

The Institute of Mathematics and its Applications admits those with a First Class or Second Class Grade 1 Higher Diploma to Graduate Membership. Others who have passed the Higher Diploma are admitted to Associate Membership.

Course Structure

This is a one-year full-time course, though it may also be taken part-time over two or more years. Modules include Partial Differential Equations, Group Theory, Rings and fields, Probability, Research Projects and Differential Geometry.

Career Options

Students who attain First Class Honours or Second Class Grade 1 in the Diploma are eligible to apply to higher postgraduate programs in Mathematics or related fields. The Diploma may also be taken as a final course in Mathematics for those wishing to take up employment in, for example, Industry, Commerce, Banking and Finance, Insurance, Software Development, Process Engineering or Education.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code

MHR54

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Those holding the Higher Diploma are deemed to have reached the honours degree standard in Mathematics. The Diploma is awarded at pass and honours levels. Read more

Overview

Those holding the Higher Diploma are deemed to have reached the honours degree standard in Mathematics. The Diploma is awarded at pass and honours levels.

The Institute of Mathematics and its Applications admits those with a First Class or Second Class Grade 1 Higher Diploma to Graduate Membership. Others who have passed the Higher Diploma are admitted to Associate Membership.

Course Structure

This course may be taken part-time over two or more years. Modules include Partial Differential Equations, Group Theory, Rings and fields, Probability, Research Projects and Differential Geometry.

Career Options

Students who attain First Class Honours or Second Class Grade 1 in the Diploma are eligible to apply to higher postgraduate programs in Mathematics or related fields. The Diploma may also be taken as a final course in Mathematics for those wishing to take up employment in, for example, Industry, Commerce, Banking and Finance, Insurance, Software Development, Process Engineering or Education.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHR55 Part-time

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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ACCA is the global body for professional accountants, with 162,000 members, 428,000 students and 91 offices in 173 countries. The ACCA Professional Qualification is therefore recognised and supported by top employers around the world. Read more

Why ACCA?

ACCA is the global body for professional accountants, with 162,000 members, 428,000 students and 91 offices in 173 countries. The ACCA Professional Qualification is therefore recognised and supported by top employers around the world. On qualification, students become Chartered Certified Accountants.

The qualification provides a solid grounding in all areas of business and finance, including reporting, taxation, and audit. In addition, it covers the value added areas of leadership and management, strategy and innovation, and sustainable management accounting. Further, it allows specialisation with option papers at the final level.

ACCA students are required to pass exams and undertake relevant work experience to become Chartered Certified Accountants. Both the exams and the experience requirements are set and approved by ACCA. Students are also required to complete the ACCA’s professional ethics module. See http://www.accaglobal.com for more information.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/821-association-of-chartered-certified-accountants-acca-cardiff-campus

Why study ACCA at the University of South Wales?

The University of South Wales has a rich history of providing first class tuition for ACCA, ACA and CIMA Professional Qualifications and we typically teach 300-350 part-time professional accountancy students each year. We also franchise AAT tuition to local further education colleges. Our Professional Tuition Hub is a key element of the School of Law, Accounting & Finance with a focus on professional tuition. We have over 40 years experience of teaching ACCA.

We now offer tuition for the globally recognised ACCA Professional Qualification at both our Newport City and Cardiff campuses.

100% Student Satisfaction

Our new Cardiff based ACCA provision is delivered by the same course team that achieved 100% student satisfaction in the 2015 National Student Survey.

What you will study

Fundamentals Level #:
Skills Papers:
- F7 Financial Reporting
- F8 Audit and Assurance

Professional Level #:
Essentials Papers:
- P1 Governance, Risk and Ethics
- P2 Corporate Reporting
- P3 Business Analysis

Option Papers – Choose two from:
- P5 Advanced Performance Management
- P6 Advanced Taxation
- P7 Advanced Audit and Assurance

#Tuition for all ACCA papers (F1-F9 and P1-P7) is also available at our Newport City Campus

Learning and teaching methods

We offer a flexible portfolio of ACCA courses at our Newport City (part-time and full-time) and Cardiff (part-time only) campuses.

- ACCA at Atlantic House, Cardiff Campus:
ACCA tuition is now available at our Cardiff Campus for papers F7-F8 and Professional Level papers (excluding P4).

The course is delivered on an employer-friendly, afternoon-evening basis. Tuition occurs in weekly slots, with students attending one day per week. Tuition runs between September-December (for examinations in December) and January-June (for examinations in June). September-December deliveries also include additional whole days. Students can commence studies in either September or January.

Course delivery has been designed to offer an excellent platform to learn, with knowledge built up gradually and sustainably through exam question practice which is undertaken week-on-week. This mode of delivery also ensures that students are not required to be absent from their work place for long periods of time.

Five reasons to study ACCA at the University of South Wales

1. Award winning
We offer award winning tuition. We were the PQ Magazine ‘Public Sector Accountancy College of the Year’ in 2010 and 2012, and we have been shortlisted in 2011 and 2013-2015. We also have award winning students. Two of our final year ACCA students have won national prizes in both 2013 and 2014 for final level exam performance. In 2014, presented at the ACCA Cymru Wales annual conference dinner, Lucy Whittington and Farzana Ahmed jointly won the Sir Julian Hodge Prize for highest scores in final level papers in Wales. In 2013, James Leaves won the Terry Weston Memorial Prize, and Lucy Saunders won the Sir Julian Hodge Prize. Furthermore, in 2011, Newport ACCA student Amanda Say was the winner of the PQ Magazine ‘Part-Time Student of the Year’ Award.

2. Choice – We offer tuition in key South Wales locations
Our Professional Tuition Hub is located at our state of the art City Campus on the banks of the river Usk in Newport City Centre. Opened in 2011, City Campus has excellent teaching rooms, library and student catering facilities. City Campus is easily accessible from across South Wales and border counties – being near Newport train station and M4 Junctions 27 and 28 – and has ample safe, secure parking on the doorstep. We also offer ACCA tuition at our Cardiff Campus Atlantic House building, situated in the heart of the Cardiff Financial and Professional Services enterprise zone and close to our Atrium building with its first class student amenities.

3. Excellent study and employer resources
Study texts and other resources (including progress tests and mock examinations for all papers, to reinforce exam technique) are supplied to our students as part of the tuition fee. Our tuition sessions can be recorded and replayed by students for the duration of the teaching year. Student performance reports for sponsoring employers are available on request.

4. An experienced and focused tuition team
Our permanent professional course tuition team consists of 11 qualified accountants and 1 qualified lawyer (plus other subject specialists). Members of the team:
• have significant accounting practice and industry ‘first career’ experience, as well as vast experience of teaching students to pass professional exams;
• also work/have worked for the private sector tuition providers;
• provide CPD sessions for the local professional bodies; and
• engage in bespoke CPD training for large organisations.

We are able to supplement our permanent tuition team with excellent local visiting lecturers. Our team regularly attend professional body Lecturers’ Conferences.

5. Professional body relationships
We work closely with the professional bodies, locally and nationally. For example:
• We were the headline sponsor of the ACCA Wales national conference in 2013 and 2014
• We are members of ACCA’s Exam Review Board
• We hosted the ICAEW BASE Business Game in March 2015
• Our Academic Manager is a member of the South Wales Society of Chartered Accountants committee
• We have hosted CIMA CPD lectures at City Campus for a number of years
• The professional bodies regularly sponsor student prizes

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The ACCA Professional Qualification is relevant to each and every sector of accountancy and finance and opens up opportunities to work in a variety of different industries and roles across the globe. ACCA students therefore train in all sectors, although a large minority work in accounting practice. Post-qualification, Chartered Certified Accountants can work at the highest levels as chief accountants, finance directors, CEO’s and accounting practice partners, and many change sectors across their careers.

Assessment methods

You will sit exams, usually in December and June.

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The MSc in International Management & Law is a unique course that will help you to develop the knowledge and skills required by international managers and leaders to operate globally with a solid understanding of various forms of legal regulation. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in International Management & Law is a unique course that will help you to develop the knowledge and skills required by international managers and leaders to operate globally with a solid understanding of various forms of legal regulation.

You'll develop the knowledge, understanding, technical and analytical skills in International Business and Law. This will allow you to work in all organisations where a good knowledge of International Business, Management Practice and Law is required.

What you’ll study

Semester 1
You’ll begin with an introduction to the Professional Management Practice programme. Running throughout the first two semesters, this class offers a combination of workshops and learning exercises. You’ll have the opportunity to identify and develop the soft skills needed as a future international manager or leader.

You’ll also attend an Integrated Skills Workshop which focuses on your personal approach to learning and managing yourself.

Core classes:
-Managing Across Cultures
-Law of International Business

Semester 2
Core classes:
-Global Business Environment
-Comparative Law of Obligations

You’ll also take part in group exercises (eg arranging a professional, cultural or careers-focused event) to address a managerial or leadership development need identified during the outward bound activity.

You’ll choose two elective classes from a shared pool of international and general management and one elective class from law topics. Elective modules vary from year to year, but may include:

Management electives:
-Digital Leadership: Strategy & Management
-Programme & Project Management
-Strategic Financial Management
-Managing in Europe (Toulouse)
-Developing Effective Consulting Skills
-Foundations of Risk
-Games of Strategy
-New Venture Creation
-Leadership

Law electives:
-Contemporary Employment Relations
-Labour Law in the Global Economy
-Comparative Company Law
-World Trade Law
-UK & EU Environmental Law
-International Environment Law
-International Banking Law
-Financial Regulation & Compliance
-E-Commerce
-Arbitration Law
-Intellectual Property Law

You’re required to complete a practically-oriented project. This gives you an opportunity to explore, at length, some aspects of theory or methods, or knowledge or skills introduced on the taught element of the programme. You can focus on either International Management or Law. The project is supported by a class in project methodology.

Work placement

This course includes a number of elective classes for you to choose from. If you're interested in studying abroad, the Managing in Europe elective class provides the opportunity to do this with classes taught at Toulouse Business School, France.

Collaborative learning

The MSc in International Management & Law is designed to be a collaborative learning experience. It's a partnership between academic staff and students, and between students from different cultural backgrounds. Working together allows those involved to build upon their collective understanding in interrogating, at an advanced level, the global issues impacting organisations.

Course content

Semester 1
The MSc in International Management & Law begins with an introduction to the Management Development Programme. During this introduction, it's impressed on you that you're responsible for developing both your knowledge and skills and that you should approach your studies as active learners. This introduction is complemented by an Integrated Skills Workshop which focuses on your personal approach to learning and managing themselves.

The core Law class in the first semester is the Law of International Business. It introduces you to the concepts underpinning the regulation of businesses. It will explain the different types of business entities and introduce you to company and corporate law concepts.

In this semester the core International Management class is Managing Across Cultures. This class will help you develop an awareness, knowledge and understanding of the importance of the often overlooked 'soft skills' of management, particularly as concerns cross-cultural variations and their impact on the practices and processes of management. It'll examine the main concepts currently employed to understand the complexity presented to managers in their process of managing people across national and cultural borders, addressing the issues of the impact of culture on management structures and processes. It will then provide understanding of the role which cross-cultural management can play in achieving competitive advantage in international business.

Semester 2
The programme then leads into two core classes. The first is in International Management, namely Global Business Environment. This class is designed to inspire you with the platform of knowledge and understanding on the economic, institutional and socio-cultural contexts which form the background to International Management.

The core Law class is Comparative Law of Obligations. This will consider obligations law in the context of different constitutional arrangements around the world. It will include material on delict/torts, contract and restitution in countries including the UK, Australia, Canada, the EU, the USA and China and also some material on the law of obligations in the Islamic tradition.

Upon completion of the compulsory classes and towards the end of the taught programme, you choose elective classes, allowing you to explore a range of topics. Students enrolled on the MSc in International Management & Law will be able to choose classes from a shared pool of international, general management and law topics available.

Semester 3
The project class rounds off the programme in the third and final semester. This provides you with an opportunity to explore at length and in depth some aspects of theory or methods, knowledge or skills introduced on the taught element of the programme. The project is supported by a class in project methodology. At this stage of the programme you may be interested in aligning career aspirations with project work.

Learning & teaching

Modes of learning include lectures, seminars, workshops, case studies, expert guest lecturers, self-study exercises, project work, and individual study and research. Individual class specifications detail the objectives, learning outcomes and content for each core module of the programme, with a breakdown of teaching methods and forms of assessments used.

There's a strong theme throughout the core classes of ongoing transferable skills development, including team-work, problem-solving, data handling and analytical skills, evaluation skills and written and oral communication. Particularly, the consulting in practice class provides you with professional, highly-transferable skills including leadership, project management, decision-making and negotiation.

Assessment

All core classes in the programme include coursework as an element of final assessment. Other methods of assessment are also used, appropriate to the focus of the class, including group and individual project work, presentations and online assessed exercises. Relative weighting of coursework and other assessment methods vary from class to class.

The dissertation or project will be assessed by in-depth project evaluation reports, supervisor feedback reports and a critical reflection of professional and personal skills.

How can I fund my course?

One scholarship of £6000 – DSO Female Leader of the Future
One scholarship of £6000 – DSO European Visionary Scholarship* (for those who are prepared to test new ideas; to go beyond the status quo and make a difference to industry and society)
Two scholarships of £6000 – DSO International Leader of the Future Scholarships
£2000 partial scholarships for Strathclyde graduates may also be available for eligible candidates

Check our Scholarship Search for more help with fees and funding: http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

Scottish students:
Students living in Scotland can find out more about funding from the Student Awards Agency Scotland.

English/EU students:
Students ordinarily resident in England may be eligible to apply for a loan of up to £10,000 to cover their tuition fees and living costs. Students resident in the EU may also apply.

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This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/maamasapm

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibility of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MA programme in Media and International Conflict is designed to enable students to develop understanding of the ways in which media interact with war, international conflict and security. Read more
This MA programme in Media and International Conflict is designed to enable students to develop understanding of the ways in which media interact with war, international conflict and security. It analyzes the complex roles played by the media in the enactment and representation of international conflict and addresses the relationships among media, governments, the military, and NGOs in framing perceptions of international conflict.

It provides an interdisciplinary approach that considers both cultural and political dimensions of media responses to international conflicts, focusing on issues such as : public diplomacy as soft power, human rights and representation, distinctions between information and propaganda, the ethics of depicting human suffering, the role of new and social media in perceptions of conflict, the visual economy of the production, circulation and reception of imagery of conflict, and the effects of news reporting on government policy and NGO activity. Modules in this programme are taught by resident UCD faculty and by external speakers, both academics and practitioners, who will broaden intellectual discussion and speak to examples of media work.
The programme will interest those seeking a career in international communications, media, NGOs, public sector or professionals seeking more critical understanding of the international dimensions of their industry, and those wishing to prepare for advanced research in this area.

“Studying in the Clinton Institute was a wonderful experience. The classes are small, which means you really get to know everybody, and there is a very comfortable atmosphere. A wide range of topics ensured that everybody got a chance to study and discuss areas that they are passionate about. Lively debates were the norm!. This MA was a fascinating journey through history, current affairs, politics and media. It offered a great opportunity to build strong research, writing and presenting skills, with the help of diligent and engaging staff of the Institute. I would do it all over again if I could!” – Karen

CURRICULUM

This is a 90 credit programme, of which 60 credits come from taught modules and 30 from a dissertation. 50 credits are from core modules and the remaining 10 from a list of options available through other Schools.
Type of modules you could expect to take but is subject to change each year:

Media and International Conflict
Public Diplomacy
New Media and New Conflict
Challenges Facing US Foreign Policy

Eligibility

Applicants for the MA should hold one of the following qualifications:
• A first class or second class, grade 1 degree
• A US or Canadian degree with a GPA of 3.0
• If an applicant doesn’t meet the normal entry requirement of a Level 8 degree, in exceptional circumstances they would normally • • present another qualification or award along with extensive work experience in order to be considered.

To Apply

http://www.ucd.ie/apply

Queries can be directed to, Catherine Carey, Manager


http://www.ucdclinton.ie

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Because of the United States’ unrivalled status in the world today, the debates on American values and the mission of American democracy have become a matter of global concern. Read more
Because of the United States’ unrivalled status in the world today, the debates on American values and the mission of American democracy have become a matter of global concern. This programme introduces students to advanced study of American culture and politics, in both domestic and international contexts. It is a multidisciplinary programme that promotes study of the interactions of cultural social and political factors. It aims to deepen and widen students’ knowledge of major topics and issues as well as to enable them to develop a significant measure of expertise in the subject chosen for the dissertation. The MA programme draws on the expertise of UCD faculty across a number of departments, as well as that of the Professor of American Studies and the contribution of visiting scholars.

“Doing an MA in American Studies at the UCD Clinton Institute was one of the best decisions I have made. Each of the classes offered were interesting, engaging and left me with a deeper understanding of American political issues. I am now putting everything I learned at the Institute to good use by working in Washington DC and so I would definitely recommend the programme to anyone considering it” – Niamh

Careers

Our graduates work in a variety of area and include:
IT, NGOs, Public and Civil Service, Communications, Banking, Teaching, Media and Research.

CURRICULUM

This is a 90 credit programme, of which 60 credits come from taught modules and 30 from a dissertation. 50 credits are from core modules and the remaining 10 from a list of options available through other Schools.
Type of modules you could expect to take but is subject to change each year incdlue:

America and Globalisation
American Culture
American Political Tradition
American Politics Today

ELIGIBILITY

Applicants for the MA should hold one of the following qualifications:
• A first class or second class, grade 1 degree
• A US or Canadian degree with a GPA of 3.0
• If an applicant doesn’t meet the normal entry requirement of a Level 8 degree, in exceptional circumstances they would normally • • present another qualification or award along with extensive work experience in order to be considered.

To Apply

http://www.ucd.ie/apply

Queries can be directed to, Catherine Carey, Manager


http://www.ucdclinton.ie

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The MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Read more
The MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Students will acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests, as well as a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the sciences in society. Those intending to go on to doctoral work will learn the research skills needed to help them prepare a well planned and focused PhD proposal. During the course students gain experience of presenting their own work and discussing the issues that arise from it with an audience of their peers and senior members of the Department; they will attend lectures, supervisions and research seminars in a range of technical and specialist subjects central to research in the different areas of History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine.

The educational aims of the programme are:

- to give students with relevant training at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in History, Philosophy of Science and Medicine under close supervision;
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- to enable students to acquire a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the sciences in society; and
- to help students intending to go on to doctoral work to acquire the requisite research skills and to prepare a well planned and focussed PhD proposal.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmpstm

Course detail

The MPhil course is taught by supervisions and seminars and assessed by three research essays and a dissertation.

The topics of the essays and dissertation should each fall within the following specified subject areas:

1. General philosophy of science
2. History of ancient and medieval science, technology and medicine
3. History of early modern science, technology and medicine
4. History of modern science, technology and medicine
5. History, philosophy and sociology of the life sciences
6. History, philosophy and sociology of the physical and mathematical sciences
7. History, philosophy and sociology of the social and psychological sciences
8. History, philosophy and sociology of medicine
9. Ethics and politics of science
10. History and methodology of history, philosophy and sociology of science, technology and medicine

Format

The MPhil seminars are the core teaching resource for this course. In the first part of year these seminars are led by different senior members of the Department and focus on selected readings. During the rest of the year the seminars provide opportunities for MPhil students to present their own work.

Students are encouraged to attend the lectures, research seminars, workshops and reading groups that make the Department a hive of intellectual activity. The Department also offers graduate training workshops, which focus on key research, presentation, publication and employment skills.

The MPhil programme is administered by the MPhil Manager, who meets all new MPhil students as a group in early October, then sees each of the students individually to discuss their proposed essay and dissertation topics. The Manager is responsible for finding appropriate supervisors for each of these topics; the supervisors are then responsible for helping the student do the research and writing needed for the essays and the dissertation. Students will see each of their supervisors frequently; the MPhil Manager sees each student at regular intervals during the year to discuss progress and offer help and advice.

Supervisions are designed to provide students with the opportunity to set their own agenda for their studies. The supervisor's job is to support the student's research, not to grade their work – supervisors are formally excluded from the examination process.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmpstm

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- Knowledge and Understanding -

- developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen areas of History, Philosophy of Science and Medicine and of the critical debates within them;
- acquired a conceptual understanding that enables the evaluation of current research and methodologies;
- formed a critical view of the roles of the sciences in society.

- Skills and other attributes -

By the end of the course students should have:

- acquired or consolidated historiographic, linguistic, technical and ancillary skills appropriate for research in their chosen area;
- demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research;
- presented their own ideas in a public forum and learned to contribute constructively within an international environment.

Assessment

- A dissertation of up to 15,000 words. Examiners may request an oral examination but this is not normally required.
- Three essays, each of up to 5,000 words.

Students receive independent reports from two examiners on each of their three essays and the dissertation.

Continuing

The usual preconditions for continuing to the PhD are an overall first class mark in the MPhil, a satisfactory performance in an interview and agreement of the PhD proposal with a potential supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Rausing Studentships
- Raymond and Edith Williamson Studentships
- Lipton Studentships
- Wellcome Master's Awards

Please see the Department's graduate funding page for more information: http://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/studying/graduate/funding.html

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mapmasmst

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Students are also expected to have acquired general transferable skills relevant to mathematics as outlined in the Faculty
Transferable Skills Statement http://www.maths.cam.ac.uk/undergrad/course/transferable_skills.pdf .

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibiltiy of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mapmaspmm

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Students are also expected to have acquired general transferable skills relevant to mathematics as outlined in the Faculty Transferable Skills Statement http://www.maths.cam.ac.uk/undergrad/course/transferable_skills.pdf .

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibility of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Essay supervision and support for lectures by means of examples classes is approximately 30 hours per year.

Formal examinable lectures and non-examinable lectures total approximately 184 hours per year, of which on average 112 hours are for examinable courses.

Some statistics courses may involve practical data analysis sessions.

There is an opportunity to participate in the Part III seminar series, either by giving a talk or through attendance. This is encouraged but does not contribute to the formal assessment.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
The MPhil in Health, Medicine, and Society is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Read more
The MPhil in Health, Medicine, and Society is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Students will acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests, as well as a critical and well-informed understanding of the roles of the history, philosophy, sociology and anthropology of health and medicine.

Those intending to go on to doctoral work will learn the research skills needed to help them prepare a well planned and focused PhD proposal. During the course students gain experience of presenting their own work and discussing the issues that arise from it with an audience of their peers and senior members of the Department; they will attend lectures, supervisions and research seminars in a range of technical and specialist subjects central to research in the different areas of history, philosophy, sociology and anthropology of health and medicine.

The MPhil is jointly run by the Departments of History and Philosophy of Science, Sociology and Social Anthropology. It is a full-time course and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Its main aims are:

- to give students with relevant training at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in Health, Medicine and Society (HMS) under close supervision;
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- to enable students to acquire a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the history, philosophy, sociology and anthropology of health and medicine; and
- to help students intending to go on to doctoral work to acquire the requisite research skills and to prepare a well planned and focussed PhD proposal.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding -

By the end of the course, students will have:

- Developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen areas of history, philosophy, sociology and social anthropology of health and medicine and of the critical debates within them;
- Acquired a conceptual understanding that enables the evaluation of current research and methodologies;
- Formed a critical view of the roles of the health, medicine and society.

Skills and other attributes -

By the end of the course, students should have:

- Acquired or consolidated methodological, linguistic, technical and ancillary skills appropriate for research in their chosen area;
- Demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research;
- Presented their own ideas in a public forum and learned to contribute constructively within an international environment.

Continuing -

Students admitted for the MPhil can apply to continue as PhD students. The usual preconditions for continuing to the PhD are an overall first class mark in the MPhil, a satisfactory performance in an interview and agreement of the PhD proposal with a potential supervisor.

Teaching

The course is overseen by a Manager who takes responsibility for day-to-day oversight of the course and liaison with staff and students. Students choose a ‘home’ subject (History, Philosophy, Sociology or Social Anthropology), and the Advisor for that subject guides them in formulating a programme of study. Students work with supervisors in writing their essays and dissertation.

The core modules are the main teaching resource for this course. All students attend all core modules which run twice a week during Michaelmas term and are led by different senior members of teaching staff and focus on selected readings. Eight optional modules run during Lent term, and students are advised to attend at least two of these. In Easter term students attend Dissertation seminars which provide opportunities for them to present their own work. Students receive two one-to-one supervisions on the modules on which they choose to write essays and four on their dissertations.

The Advisors assist students in the identification of a topic and a supervisor for their dissertation during Michaelmas term. Students will be expected to start work on their dissertation during Michaelmas and continue working on it throughout the course of the year.

See more on the website - http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmphms/study

Assessment

Thesis:
Students submit a dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Essays:
Students submit three essays, one of which is up to 3000 words and two of which are up to 5000 words.

How to Apply

Please see details of this on the website here - http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmphms/apply

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The United States is the most influential nation in the world. However, a number of challenges in recent years have called into question the sustainability of American leadership abroad and prosperity at home. Read more
The United States is the most influential nation in the world. However, a number of challenges in recent years have called into question the sustainability of American leadership abroad and prosperity at home. These include, but are not limited to, the notion of American decline in relation to rising powers such as China: a political system that appears to have entered an extended period of dysfunction; recurring problems in race relations; and rising economic inequality. This MA degree programme, which is the first of its kind in Europe or North America, allows students to explore in depth the foreign policy and political challenges facing the United States. Drawing upon the disciplines of history and political science, it explores a wide variety of topics such as the origins of American exceptionalism, the importance placed upon individual liberty, the emergence of the US as a world power, the Cold War, transatlantic relations, presidential and congressional election, race and gender, partisanship and more. Modules in this programme are taught by resident UCD faculty and by visiting lecturers, who will consider theoretical and practical perspectives. The programme will interest those seeking a career in government, media, in the non-profit sector, in business and those hoping to undertake advanced study in these areas.

“Having spent years working in news I’d always wanted to get behind the headlines. This masters offers a fascinating insight into the policies, ideologies and people that have shaped the US and thus our world order”. – Niamh

CURRICULUM

This is a 90 credit programme, of which 60 credits come from taught modules and 30 from a dissertation. 50 credits are from core modules and the remaining 10 from a list of options available through other Schools.
Type of modules you could expect to take but is subject to change each year include:
American Political Tradition
Foundations of US Foreign Policy
American Politics Today
Challenges in Contemporary US Foreign Policy

Eligibility

Applicants for the MA should hold one of the following qualifications:
• A first class or second class, grade 1 degree
• A US or Canadian degree with a GPA of 3.0
• If an applicant doesn’t meet the normal entry requirement of a Level 8 degree, in exceptional circumstances they would normally • • present another qualification or award along with extensive work experience in order to be considered.

To Apply

http://www.ucd.ie/apply

Queries can be directed to, Catherine Carey, Manager


http://www.ucdclinton.ie

Read less
Our Creative Writing. First Novel Master's degree works with a very small cohort. This means you'll receive one-to-one tuition on a far more regular basis compared to many other Creative Writing postgraduate courses. Read more
Our Creative Writing: First Novel Master's degree works with a very small cohort. This means you'll receive one-to-one tuition on a far more regular basis compared to many other Creative Writing postgraduate courses.

Here, you will be personally guided through the journey of your first draft, rather than being another student at the back of a large class. No short stories, no poetry, no screenplay, just your novel.

Your novel deserves a tutor that understands all - not just some of its parts - and you deserve a tutor who will coach not just the first draft of your novel, but also the development of your creative process.

Why St Mary's?

Our tutors are practising writers, and have between them written best-selling novels and won major literary awards. Drawing on our connections with the industry you'll also have seminars with some of the most sought-after agents and publishers in London.

When you have finished the degree, you can choose to continue workshopping and drafting with the dedicated cohorts we establish every year. We are passionate about our craft and about your craft too. That's why our first PhD student in Creative Writing struck a major two-book deal with Canongate and sales in multiple foreign territories.

Current students are receiving visits from high profile industry experts from the publishing world throughout this semester. These include visits, Q&As and masterclasses from Conville and Walsh, Canongate, Bookouture, Janklow and Nesbit, Little Brown, Corsair and Atom and Picador, and pitching opportunities to top agents and publishers: Hellie Ogden, Jo Unwin, Francesca Main, James Gurbutt, Natalie Butlin, Jessie Botterill, Sophie Lambert

We want to hear about your novel – the one you know you have to write. Pick up the phone or email the Programme Director: or call 020 8240 4380.

Course Content

A full list of modules is available on our website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/creative-writing-first-novel

Assessment

Each module produces a creative element of your draft which will be assessed. In the seminar modules, you will also be assessed by presentation to the group.

One-to-one tutorial feedback and support is essential for the writer aiming to complete a productive draft in just one year.

In formal assessment, each module will produce a mixture of creative submission to deadline, workshop engagement, critical reflection and seminar presentation. The weight of marking always rests with creative submission and the aim is to complete a draft of a novel through continuous assessment.

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