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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Swansea University has been at the forefront of international research in the area of computational engineering. Internationally renowned engineers at Swansea pioneered the development of numerical techniques, such as the finite element method, and associated computational procedures that have enabled the solution of many complex engineering problems. As a student on the Master's course in Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics, you will find the course utilises the expertise of academic staff to provide high-quality postgraduate training.

Key Features: Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics

Computer simulation is now an established discipline that has an important role to play in engineering, science and in newly emerging areas of interdisciplinary research.

Using mathematical modelling as the basis, computational methods provide procedures which, with the aid of the computer, allow complex problems to be solved. The techniques play an ever-increasing role in industry and there is further emphasis to apply the methodology to other important areas such as medicine and the life sciences.

This Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course provides a solid foundation in computer modelling and the finite element method in particular.

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering, within which this course is run, has excellent computing facilities, including a state-of-the-art multi-processor super computer with virtual reality facilities and high-speed networking.

Modules

Modules on the Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

Reservoir Modelling and Simulation
Solid Mechanics
Finite Element Computational Analysis
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
Computational Plasticity
Fluid-Structure Interaction
Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Dynamics and Transient Analysis
Computational Case Study
Communication Skills for Research Engineers
Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations

Accreditation

The MSc Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

The MSc Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

The MSc Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Hardware includes a 450 cpu Cluster, high-end graphics workstations and high-speed network links. Extensive software packages include both in-house developed and 'off-the-shelf' commercial.

Links with Industry

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering has an extensive track record of industrial collaboration and contributes to many exciting projects, including the aerodynamics for the current World Land Speed Record car, Thrust SSC, and the future BLOODHOUND SSC, and the design of the double-decker super-jet Airbus A380.

Careers

Employment in a wide range of industries, which require the skills developed during the Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course, from aerospace to the medical sector. Computational modelling techniques have developed in importance to provide solutions to complex problems and as a graduate of this course in Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics, you will be able to utilise your highly sought-after skills in industry or research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

World-Leading Research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

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This is an advanced postgraduate course specialising in structural engineering covering advanced structural analysis and design, structural computing simulation and also offering units linked with steel, concrete, timber and other structural designs. Read more
This is an advanced postgraduate course specialising in structural engineering covering advanced structural analysis and design, structural computing simulation and also offering units linked with steel, concrete, timber and other structural designs. It will also provide you with knowledge to design structures under dynamic and earthquake conditions.

The modules taught focus on learning advanced methods and techniques while developing analytic skills across a range of structural engineering topics.

Two modules, Finite Elements and Stress Analysis and Advanced Computing Structural Simulation, focus on learning advanced computing methods and commercial computing software for structures modelling and simulation.

Advanced Structural Analysis and Design and the Masonry and Timber Engineering modules will cover advanced structural theory and designing traditional structures, such as, steel, concrete, masonry and timbers. Earthquake Engineering will cover design of structures in seismic areas and analysis of structures under dynamic loading.

Soil-Structure Engineering will cover interaction of geotechnics and structures as well as foundation structures. Finally, you'll either conduct a structural related research project or a design project.

If you'd like any further information, please contact the course administrator, Ms. Jo Hillman: or call 020 7815 7106.

Accreditation:
Joint Board of Moderators (ICE, IStructE, IHE, CIHT)

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/structural-engineering-msc

Modules

Teaching techniques include: lectures, workshops, tutorials, laboratories, field trips and IT based blended learning. Visiting lecturers from industry contribute in some modules.

Module descriptions

- Advanced structural design
The module will deal with the design of structural elements and complex structural systems using the increasingly popular structural Eurocodes. It will cover engineering design principles and analytic techniques as well as the application of industrial standard software packages. There will also be an element of group and research work based on innovative design techniques.

- Soil-structure engineering
To acquaint the student with classical and modern methods for the analysis and design of structures that are embedded in the ground, specifically embedded retaining walls, piled foundations, and tunnels.

- Finite elements and stress analysis
The module will equip the student with linear elastic analysis of thin-walled sections, 2D and 3D stress analysis and transformations. It will introduce the Finite Element method theory and use ANSYS software.

- Masonry and timber engineering
This module introduces students to the materials, properties and design processes using timber and masonry construction. Eurocodes are used for the design of elements. Proprietary computer programmes are used alongside hand calculations. New techniques are introduced and discussed.

- Structural dynamics and earthquake engineering
The module aims to develop a thorough understanding of causes and nature of vibration in structures and to enable students to analyse the response of a structure under earthquake loadings.

- Advanced computing and structural simulation
The module will enable the students to use the advanced Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software (ANSYS) for modelling steel, reinforced concrete and composite structures. Both material and geometrical nonlinearities will be considered which link the complex structural system.

- Project / dissertation
This module is one third of the course and is an individually supervised piece of work that is typically either a research project or an innovative design exercise. The theme is related to topics covered on the course.

Employability

Employment prospects for graduates of Structural Engineering are strong. Successful students will enter into a variety of positions with employers which might include: structural engineer, consultant, project manager, government advisor and researcher.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

This degree is an accredited MSc (Technical) course by the Joint Board of Moderators as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computational Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computational Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Swansea University has gained a significant international profile as one of the key international centres for research and training in computational mechanics and engineering. As a student on the Master's course in Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics, you will be provided with in-depth, multidisciplinary training in the application of the finite element method and related state-of-the-art numerical and computational techniques to the solution and simulation of highly challenging problems in engineering analysis and design.

Key Features of Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics MSc

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering is acknowledged internationally as the leading UK centre for computational engineering research. It represents an interdisciplinary group of researchers who are active in computational or applied mechanics. It is unrivalled concentration of knowledge and expertise in this field. Many numerical techniques currently in use in commercial simulation software have originated from Swansea University.

The Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course is a two-year postgraduate programme run by an international consortium of four leading European Universities, namely Swansea University, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (Spain), École Centrale de Nantes (France) and University of Stuttgart (Germany) in cooperation with the International Centre for Numerical Methods in Engineering (CIMNE, Spain).

As a student on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will gain a general knowledge of the theory of computational mechanics, including the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, appreciate the worth of undertaking a computational simulation in an industrial context, and be provided with training in the development of new software for the improved simulation of current engineering problems.

In the first year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will follow an agreed common set of core modules leading to common examinations in Swansea or Barcelona. In addition, an industrial placement will take place during this year, where you will have the opportunity to be exposed to the use of computational mechanics within an industrial context. For the second year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics, you will move to one of the other Universities, depending upon your preferred specialisation, to complete a series of taught modules and the research thesis. There will be a wide choice of specialisation areas (i.e. fluids, structures, aerospace, biomedical) by incorporating modules from the four Universities. This allows you to experience postgraduate education in more than one European institution.

Modules

Modules on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course can vary each year but you could expect to study the following core modules (together with elective modules):

Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
Continuum Mechanics
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
Industrial Project
Finite Element Computational Analysis
Entrepreneurship for Engineers
Finite Element in Fluids
Computational Plasticity
Fluid-Structure Interaction
Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Dynamics and Transient Analysis
Reservoir Modelling and Simulation

Accreditation

The Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

See http://www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

This degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Links with Industry

On the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will have the opportunity to apply your skills and knowledge in computational mechanics in an industrial context.

As a student on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course you will be placed in engineering industries, consultancies or research institutions that have an interest and expertise in computational mechanics. Typically, you will be trained by the relevant industry in the use of their in-house or commercial computational mechanics software.

You will also gain knowledge and expertise on the use of the particular range of commercial software used in the industry where you are placed.

Careers

The next decade will experience an explosive growth in the demand for accurate and reliable numerical simulation and optimisation of engineering systems.

Computational mechanics will become even more multidisciplinary than in the past and many technological tools will be, for instance, integrated to explore biological systems and submicron devices. This will have a major impact in our everyday lives.

Employment can be found in a broad range of engineering industries as this course provides the skills for the modelling, formulation, analysis and implementation of simulation tools for advanced engineering problems.



Student Quotes

“I gained immensely from the high quality coursework, extensive research support, confluence of cultures and unforgettable friendship.”

Prabhu Muthuganeisan, MSc Computational Mechanics

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Innovative design allows more interesting and functional architecture but challenges traditional concepts of fire safety. To respond to these demands takes specialist knowledge and advanced skills in engineering analysis. Read more

Programme description

Innovative design allows more interesting and functional architecture but challenges traditional concepts of fire safety. To respond to these demands takes specialist knowledge and advanced skills in engineering analysis.

This programme covers the fundamentals of fire science, including laboratory classes, fire safety engineering and relevant structural engineering topics, such as finite element methods.

You will gain knowledge of the critical issues in structural fire safety engineering, and an understanding of relevant fire and structural behaviours.

You will become familiar with performance-based approaches to design and have an awareness of the capabilities – and limitations – of relevant advanced modelling methods for structures and fire.

This programme is fully accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM)

Facilities

Our Building Research Establishment (BRE) Centre for Fire Safety Engineering hosts bespoke equipment to support groundbreaking research and teaching, with combined thermal and mechanical loading and use of the latest image analysis techniques.

Programme structure

This programme is run over 12 months, with two semesters of taught courses followed by a research project leading to a masters thesis.

Semester 1 courses
Fire Science and Fire Dynamics
Structural Design for Fire
Finite Element Analysis for Solids
Fire Investigation and Failure Analysis
Thin-Walled Members and Stability
Semester 2 courses
Fire Science Laboratory
Fire Safety Engineering Analysis and Design
The Finite Element Method
Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering

Career opportunities

Internationally, there is great demand for graduates in this field, with expertise in structural fire safety engineering particularly sought after as performance-based design expands. All of our previous graduates are in relevant employment, with the majority working in fire teams at engineering consultancies.

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This is a broad based civil engineering course covering the areas of structures, geotechnics, water engineering and water transportation. Read more
This is a broad based civil engineering course covering the areas of structures, geotechnics, water engineering and water transportation.

The technical modules of the course aim to develop the understanding and application of advanced theoretical contents of the specialist subject.

Structural topics are taught in the two modules of Finite Elements and Stress Analysis, and Advanced Structural Design. The interaction of geotechnics and structures is covered in the Soil-Structure Engineering module. The Water Resources Systems Management module looks into the water engineering aspects. The transportation field is studied in the Highway and Railway Engineering and Operations module. The final module, Asset Management and Project Appraisal of Infrastructures examines the methods, merits and economics of repairs of existing structures.

You'll be required to complete an individual project into a specific area of the programme studied, providing you with the opportunity of pursuing a programme of independent study. The work is to be of an investigative nature having an experimental, analytical, computer-based or fieldwork input.

If you'd like any further information, please contact the course administrator, Ms. Jo Hillman: or call 020 7815 7106.

- Accreditation:
Joint Board of Moderators (ICE, IStructE, IHE, CIHT)

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/civil-engineering-msc

Modules

Teaching techniques include lectures, workshops, tutorials, laboratories, field trips and IT based blended learning. Visiting lecturers from industry contribute in some modules.

- Advanced structural design
The module will use the European codes for safe and effective design of normal structural elements and structural systems. It will cover engineering principles and analytical techniques and using software.

- Soil-structure engineering
This module will acquaint the students with classical and modern methods for the analysis and design of structures which are embedded in the ground, specifically embedded retaining walls, piled foundations and tunnels.

- Finite elements and stress analysis
The module will equip the student with linear elastic analysis of thin-walled sections, 2D and 3D stress analysis and transformations. It will introduce the Finite Element method theory and use ANSYS software.

- Highway engineering and operation
The module covers the system characteristics and operations for highways before considering geometric alignment and construction of highways.

- Railway engineering and operation
This module will underpin understanding of railway system characteristics and operations, and provide skills in geometric design for railways.

- Water engineering
This module covers the concepts and theories of groundwater hydrology, the principles of groundwater flow, well hydraulics analysis and design, contaminants transport in the aquifer, and remediation technology of contaminated groundwater. There is an introduction to aspects of 3-dimensional groundwater flows using USGS MODFLOW and FEFLOW with practical.

- Project
This module is one third of the course and is an individually supervised piece of work that is typically either a research project or an innovative design exercise. The theme is related to topics covered on the course.

Employability

Employment prospects for graduates of these courses are very good, especially in view of the upturn in new infrastructure projects in the UK and overseas. Successful students enter into a variety of positions within the construction industry, ranging from working in a design office, with contractors and in local authorities.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

This degree is an accredited MSc (Technical) course by the Joint Board of Moderators as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

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This MSc programme offers very relevant modules in highly sought-after engineering and scientific subjects. Read more
This MSc programme offers very relevant modules in highly sought-after engineering and scientific subjects. Computational modelling has become an essential part of industrial product development; the manufacturing sector in particular has been experiencing a significant uptake of computational engineering technologies to increase its competitiveness in the global market. This programme is designed for engineering and science graduates, providing a wide exploration of these new and advanced technologies. Problem based learning facilities the application of the modelling techniques.

Subject guide and modules

The range of modules reflects the nature of engineering modelling and the uses it is put to in engineering and commercial practice.
Core modules:
-Computational Fluid Dynamics and Applications (ME4501)
-Practical Numerical Methods (ME4510)
-CAD Principles and Materials Selection (ME4505)
-Advanced Computer Aided Design (ADVCAD) (ME4518)
-Major Project (PD4000)
-Research Project (PD4001)
-Renewable Energy (ME4504)
-Sustainable Design (PD4005)

Elective Modules:
-Solid Mechanics and Finite Element Analysis (ME3070)
-Strategic Finance (EM4001)
-Project Management (EM4003)
-New Product Development (EM4006)
-Innovation Business Development (PD4008)
-Finite Element Analysis: Theory and Application (ME4502)

Learning, teaching & assessment

The modules in this programme are delivered with lectures and lab-based tutorials giving a good balance between scientific methodologies and hands-on practice.

There is a heavy emphasis on the use of computational engineering methods and this is reflected in the way the programme is delivered and assessed.

Modules are assessed through either course work or exams. The major project is assessed by dissertation; examples of past major projects include development of CFD code, aero and structural dynamics of vehicles and aircraft, and analysis of development of industrial machines.

Personal development

Along with the range of technical skills, the Programme aims to develop self reliance, project management, IT communications and research skills.

You will develop and deliver a major dissertation and the necessary project management processes. You will also make several individual presentations and get chance to hone your interview techniques.

Career prospects

Career prospects for graduates are excellent. The programme puts practical engineering modelling, research and project management skills in to the hands of graduate. This helps career progression in industries where computer-based technology is required including manufacturing, R&D, science, IT, design and academia.

Recent graduates have been employed in a range of jobs including:
-Product development with a manufacturer of domestic heating products
-Computer aided design with a manufacturer of military/surveillance equipment

Professional accreditation

The MSc Mechanical Engineering (Modelling) is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) for the purpose of meeting the educational requirements of Chartered Engineer (CEng).

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This highly focused MSc explores some of the mathematics behind modern secure information and communications systems, specialising in mathematics relevant for public key cryptography, coding theory and information theory. Read more
This highly focused MSc explores some of the mathematics behind modern secure information and communications systems, specialising in mathematics relevant for public key cryptography, coding theory and information theory. During the course critical awareness of problems in information transmission, data compression and cryptography is raised, and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to solve these problems are explored.

The Mathematics Department at Royal Holloway is well known for its expertise in information security and cryptography and our academic staff include several leading researchers in these areas. Students on the programme have the opportunity to carry out their dissertation projects in cutting-edge research areas and to be supervised by experts.

The transferable skills gained during the MSc will open up a range of career options as well as provide a solid foundation for advanced research at PhD level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mathematics/coursefinder/mscmathematicsofcryptographyandcommunications(msc).aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will be provided with a solid mathematical foundation and a knowledge and understanding of the subjects of cryptography and communications preparing you for research or professional employment in this area.

- The mathematical foundations needed for applications in communication theory and cryptography are covered including Algebra, Combinatorics Complexity Theory/Algorithms and Number Theory.

- You will have the opportunity to carry out your dissertation project in a cutting-edge research area; our dissertation supervisors are experts in their fields who publish regularly in internationally competitive journals and there are several joint projects with industrial partners and Royal Holloway staff.

- After completing the course former students have a good foundation for the next step of their career both inside and outside academia.

Department research and industry highlights

The members of the Mathematics Department cover a range of research areas. There are particularly strong groups in information security, number theory, quantum theory, group theory and combinatorics. The Information Security Group has particularly strong links to industry.

Course content and structure

You will study eight courses as well as complete a main project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Core courses:
Advanced Cipher Systems
Mathematical and security properties of both symmetric key cipher systems and public key cryptography are discussed as well as methods for obtaining confidentiality and authentication.

Channels
In this unit, you will investigate the problems of data compression and information transmission in both noiseless and noisy environments.

Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
The aim of this unit is to provide you with an introduction to the theory of error-correcting codes employing the methods of elementary enumeration, linear algebra and finite fields.

Public Key Cryptography
This course introduces some of the mathematical ideas essential for an understanding of public key cryptography, such as discrete logarithms, lattices and elliptic curves. Several important public key cryptosystems are studied, such as RSA, Rabin, ElGamal Encryption, Schnorr signatures; and modern notions of security and attack models for public key cryptosystems are discussed.

Main project
The main project (dissertation) accounts for 25% of the assessment of the course and you will conduct this under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Additional courses:
Applications of Field Theory
You will be introduced to some of the basic theory of field extensions, with special emphasis on applications in the context of finite fields.

Quantum Information Theory
‘Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it' (Niels Bohr). The aim of this unit is to provide you with a sufficient understanding of quantum theory in the spirit of the above quote. Many applications of the novel field of quantum information theory can be studied using undergraduate mathematics.

Network Algorithms
In this unit you will be introduced to the formal idea of an algorithm, when it is a good algorithm and techniques for constructing algorithms and checking that they work; explore connectivity and colourings of graphs, from an algorithmic perspective; and study how algebraic methods such as path algebras and cycle spaces may be used to solve network problems.

Advanced Financial Mathematics
In this unit you will investigate the validity of various linear and non-linear time series occurring in finance and extend the use of stochastic calculus to interest rate movements and credit rating;

Combinatorics
The aim of this unit is to introduce some standard techniques and concepts of combinatorics, including: methods of counting including the principle of inclusion and exclusion; generating functions; probabilistic methods; and permutations, Ramsey theory.

Computational Number Theory
You will be provided with an introduction to many major methods currently used for testing/proving primality and for the factorisation of composite integers. The course will develop the mathematical theory that underlies these methods, as well as describing the methods themselves.

Complexity Theory
Several classes of computational complexity are introduced. You will discuss how to recognise when different problems have different computational hardness, and be able to deduce cryptographic properties of related algorithms and protocols.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a suitable mathematical foundation for undertaking research or professional employment in cryptography and/or communications

- the appropriate background in information theory and coding theory enabling them to understand and be able to apply the theory of communication through noisy channels

- the appropriate background in algebra and number theory to develop an understanding of modern public key cryptosystems

- a critical awareness of problems in information transmission and data compression, and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to solve these problems

- a critical awareness of problems in cryptography and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to provide solutions to these problems

- a range of transferable skills including familiarity with a computer algebra package, experience with independent research and managing the writing of a dissertation.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. The examinations in May/June count for 75% of the final average and the dissertation, which has to be submitted in September, counts for the remaining 25%.

Employability & career opportunities

Our students have gone on to successful careers in a variety of industries, such as information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunication. In recent years our graduates have entered into roles including Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security manager at London Underground.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications. Read more
This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications.

You will explore the mathematical techniques that are commonly used to solve problems in the real world, in particular in communication theory and in physics. As part of the course you will carry out an independent research investigation under the supervision of a member of staff. Popular dissertation topics chosen by students include projects in the areas of communication theory, mathematical physics, and financial mathematics.

The transferable skills gained on this course will open you up to a range of career options as well as provide a solid foundation for advanced research at PhD level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mathematics/coursefinder/mscmathematicsforapplications.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will be provided with a solid mathematical foundation and knowledge and understanding of the subjects of cryptography and communications, preparing you for research or professional employment in this area.

- The Mathematics Department at Royal Holloway is well known for its expertise in information security and cryptography. The academics who teach on this course include several leading researchers in these areas.

- The mathematical foundations needed for applications in communication theory and cryptography are covered including Algebra, Combinatorics Complexity Theory/Algorithms and Number Theory.

- You will have the opportunity to carry out your dissertation project in a cutting-edge research area; our dissertation supervisors are experts in their fields who publish regularly in internationally competitive journals and there are several joint projects with industrial partners and Royal Holloway staff.

- After completing the course students have a good foundation for the next step of their career both inside and outside academia.

Department research and industry highlights

The members of the Mathematics Department cover a range of research areas. There are particularly strong groups in information security, number theory, quantum theory, group theory and combinatorics. The Information Security Group has particularly strong links to industry.

Course content and structure

You will study eight courses and complete a main project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Core courses:
Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
The aim of this unit is to provide you with an introduction to the theory of error-correcting codes employing the methods of elementary enumeration, linear algebra and finite fields.

Advanced Cipher Systems
Mathematical and security properties of both symmetric key cipher systems and public key cryptography are discussed, as well as methods for obtaining confidentiality and authentication.

Main project
The main project (dissertation) accounts for 25% of the assessment of the course and you will conduct this under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Additional courses:
Applications of Field Theory
You will be introduced to some of the basic theory of field extensions, with special emphasis on applications in the context of finite fields.

Quantum Information Theory
‘Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it' (Niels Bohr). The aim of this unit is to provide you with a sufficient understanding of quantum theory in the spirit of the above quote. Many applications of the novel field of quantum information theory can be studied using undergraduate mathematics.

Network Algorithms
In this unit you will be introduced to the formal idea of an algorithm, when it is a good algorithm and techniques for constructing algorithms and checking that they work; explore connectivity and colourings of graphs, from an algorithmic perspective; and study how algebraic methods such as path algebras and cycle spaces may be used to solve network problems.

Advanced Financial Mathematics
In this unit you will investigate the validity of various linear and non-linear time series occurring in finance and extend the use of stochastic calculus to interest rate movements and credit rating;

Combinatorics
The aim of this unit is to introduce some standard techniques and concepts of combinatorics, including: methods of counting including the principle of inclusion and exclusion; generating functions; probabilistic methods; and permutations, Ramsey theory.

Computational Number Theory
You will be provided with an introduction to many major methods currently used for testing/proving primality and for the factorisation of composite integers. The course will develop the mathematical theory that underlies these methods, as well as describing the methods themselves.

Complexity Theory
Several classes of computational complexity are introduced. You will discuss how to recognise when different problems have different computational hardness, and be able to deduce cryptographic properties of related algorithms and protocols.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- knowledge and understanding of: the principles of communication through noisy channels using coding theory; the principles of cryptography as a tool for securing data; and the role and limitations of mathematics in the solution of problems arising in the real world

- a high level of ability in subject-specific skills, such as algebra and number theory

- developed the capacity to synthesise information from a number of sources with critical awareness

- critically analysed the strengths and weaknesses of solutions to problems in applications of mathematics

- the ability to clearly formulate problems and express technical content and conclusions in written form

- personal skills of time management, self-motivation, flexibility and adaptability.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. The examinations in May/June count for 75% of the final average and the dissertation, which has to be submitted in September, counts for the remaining 25%.

Employability & career opportunities

Our students have gone on to successful careers in a variety of industries, such as information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunication. In recent years our graduates have entered into roles including Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security Manager at London Underground.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This course is designed to respond to a growing shortage of workforce in mechanical engineering sectors. It intends to equip our students with relevant and up-to-date knowledge and skills for their engineering competencies and careers. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to respond to a growing shortage of workforce in mechanical engineering sectors. It intends to equip our students with relevant and up-to-date knowledge and skills for their engineering competencies and careers. Students have a chance to broaden and deepen their knowledge in wide range of mechanical engineering subjects. This enables our students to undertake an advanced treatment of core mechanical engineering disciplines such as design and critical evaluation of structural integrity, computation fluid dynamics, advanced materials, energy and control systems.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Use simulation and modelling application software for virtual design and manufacturing
Utilise our strong links with companies and investigate real industrial problems to enhance your understanding of the profession
Tie in the topic of your individual project with one of our research groups and benefit from the expertise of our actively researching academics

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course has been accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), meeting the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). It will provide you with some of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Design
Research and development
Product manufacture
Project management

Module Details

You will study several key topics that will help equip you to work as a mechanical engineer in a broad spectrum of mechanical engineering business activity management, research, design and development roles. You will also complete a four-month individual project tailored to your individual interests that can take place in our own laboratories or, by agreement, in industry.

Here are the units you will study:

Structural Integrity: Contemporary approaches are applied to the evaluation of mixed mode fracture and fatigue failure. Dynamic plastic responses of structures and the performance of composite structures are evaluated.

Industrial Control Systems: This unit covers mathematical representation of control system models is developed principally using Laplace transforms. System behaviour and simulation is analysed with practical case studies, leading to control system specifications.

Advanced Materials: This unit is designed to deal with a wide range of advanced materials for engineering applications. Teaching will address analytical and numerical methods to assess the strength, stiffness, toughness, non-linearity behaviours, vibration and failures of engineering materials for component and structure design.

Energy Systems: This unit is designed to study the principles and techniques of operation of thermodynamics and combustion systems, as well as the provision and management of energy. The current and future requirements and trends in energy production and consumption are addressed.

Structural Application of Finite Elements: The use of finite element analysis techniques and software applied to structural problems is developed. Modelling with both isotropic and orthotropic materials is investigated, as well as such topics as cracking in dissimilar materials and composite laminates.

Computational Fluid Dynamics: A practical case study analysis approach is used for model formulation and CFD simulation. Fundamental principles are used to appraise the results of CFD analysis of problems with industrial applications.

Individual Project: A strong feature of the course is the individual project, which comprises a third of the course. We encourage students to undertake projects in industrial companies, but we can also use our extensive resources and staff skills to undertake projects within the University.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials (personal and academic), laboratory sessions and project work. The course has a strong practical emphasis with a significant amount of your time spent our laboratories. We pride ourselves on working at the leading-edge of technology and learning practices.

A range of assessment methods encourages a deeper understanding of engineering and allows you to develop your skills. Here’s how we assess your work:

Written examinations
Coursework
Laboratory-based project work
A major individual project/dissertation

Student Destinations

The demand for more highly skilled mechanical engineers is always present and it is generally accepted that there is a current shortage of engineers.

When you graduate from this course you could find employment in a wide range of mechanical engineering-based careers, such as design, research and development and manufacturing. You could work for a large company, in the Armed Forces or in one of the many small companies within this sector. You could even start your own specialist company.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Mechanical engineer
Product design engineer
Aerospace engineer
Application engineer

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Duration. MSc - 1 year (full-time) or 3 years (part-time). PgDip - 1 year (full-time) or 2 years (part-time). PgCert - 1 semester (full-time) or 1 year (part-time). Read more
Duration:
MSc - 1 year (full-time) or 3 years (part-time)
PgDip - 1 year (full-time) or 2 years (part-time)
PgCert - 1 semester (full-time) or 1 year (part-time)

Simple timetable information
Full-time: 2 days a week
Part-time: 1 day a week

Entry Requirements
An undergraduate Civil Engineering degree with a minimum of a BEng (Hons) - Lower Second (2.2) Classification, or a BSc (Hons) – Upper Second (2.1) Classification. Applicants with appropriate relevant professional experience will also be considered.

Course units
Civil Engineering course units:
– Coastal Engineering
– Computer Aided Structural Design
– Earthquake Engineering
– Finite Element Methods
– Research Methods
– Soil-Structure Engineering
– Steel-Concrete Design
– Transportation and Traffic
– Major Project
Structural Design course units:
– Advanced Structural Analysis
– Computer Aided Structural Design
– Earthquake Engineering
– Finite Element Methods
– Masonry and Timber Engineering
– Research Methods
– Soil-Structure Engineering
– Steel-Concrete Design
– Project

Course description
The postgraduate programmes follow a fixed selection of eight core taught units centred on research skills and relevant technical units. The Research Methods unit aims to equip the students with the necessary skills for planning a research programme, formulating a hypothesis, developing and extending their knowledge of qualitative and quantitative methods, and evaluating the outcome of the research project.

The project unit is an individual submission of an investigation into a specific area of the programme
studied, providing the student with the opportunity to pursue a programme of independent study. The work is to be of an investigative nature having an experimental, analytical, computer based or fieldwork input.

The technical units aim to develop the understanding and application of advanced theoretical contents of the specialist subject.

Career opportunities
Employment prospects for graduates of these courses are very good, especially in view of the upturn in new infrastructure projects in the UK (e.g. Olympics 2012). Successful students enter into a variety of positions within the construction industry, ranging from working in a design office to working
with contractors and in local authorities.

Typical background of applicant
The programme is designed primarily for engineers and other construction industry professionals who are seeking to enhance their understanding of advanced civil, structural and geotechnical engineering technology. It may also be of interest to graduates who are seeking to directly enhance their attractiveness to potential employers.

Professional contacts/industry links
The MSc course is approved by the Joint Board of Moderators as a programme of further learning, in
accordance with Engineering Council requirements.

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This course is for practising engineers or graduates who want to become technical specialists or managers in industrial and manufacturing companies. Read more
This course is for practising engineers or graduates who want to become technical specialists or managers in industrial and manufacturing companies. It increases your career potential by improving your:
-Knowledge and experience of materials engineering.
-Technical and problem solving skills.
-Management skills.
-Ability to take on greater responsibility.

You also develop your understanding of current best practice in the theory and application of leading edge technologies, processes and systems in materials engineering.

You study:
-Two management modules
-Five technical modules
-One optional module (option modules include: advanced manufacturing technology; CAD/CAM; engineering for sustainability; equipment engineering and design; finite element / finite difference analysis)

The international product development module involves working in multidisciplinary teams to develop a new product within a global market. This develops much sought after advanced technical and business skills. The project provides a supported environment to develop your ability in an area of your interest.

Professional recognition

Accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of partly meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer; graduates who have a BEng (Hons) accredited for CEng will be able to show that they have satisfied the further learning requirement for CEng accreditation.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/msc-advanced-materials-engineering

Course structure

Full time – 12 to 18 months.
Part time – typically 3 years, maximum 6 years.
Starts September and January.

Core management modules
-Finance and marketing
-Project and quality management

Core technical modules
-Fatigue and fracture mechanics
-Advance investigatory techniques for materials engineers
-Advanced metallic materials
-Competitive materials technology
-Group project – international product development

Option modules (one from)
-Advanced manufacturing technology
-CAD/CAM
-Sustainability energy and environmental management

MSc
-Project and dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment: examination, coursework, project reports.

Other admission requirements

Overseas applicants from countries whose first language is not English must normally produce evidence of competence in English. An IELTS score of 6.0 with 5.5 in all skills (or equivalent) is the standard for non-native speakers of English. If your English language skill is currently below an IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in all skills we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English level.

India
-A first class BE in an relevant discipline, or a good second class BE with a strong performance in mechanical and manufacturing subjects.

China
-A four year Bachelors degree in an relevant discipline, with an overall average of at least 80 per cent or equivalent.

Other countries
-A good honours degree or equivalent in an relevant subject.

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This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, or science with excellent numeracy skills, wishing to pursue careers in the application of mathematics, in traditional areas such as engineering and science and in service areas such as finance and banking, where knowledge of modern applications of mathematics would be advantageous. Read more
This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, or science with excellent numeracy skills, wishing to pursue careers in the application of mathematics, in traditional areas such as engineering and science and in service areas such as finance and banking, where knowledge of modern applications of mathematics would be advantageous. The core philosophy of the programme is to equip students both with mathematics and its applications and with high-level scientific software and associated numerical skills. The Greenwich campus, near the financial district of Canary Wharf, enables the department to build ties with many modern engineering and applied mathematics practitioners enabling our students to become part of a wider group. The Leslie Comrie seminar series, inviting both academics and industrialists, allows you to interact with our external links creating an advantageous learning experience. We provide you the grounds for building a high profile of understanding of current research practices in the industry. Our classes contain interactive applications that enhance the learning experience by innovative teaching practices. Utilising research expertise within the department you will graduate with a strong understanding of numerical methods. You will also develop an understanding for further applicability in various fields of applied mathematics and engineering.

This programme is suitable both for fresh graduates and also for experienced professional practitioners who wish to further their skills. The programme core modules cover modern mathematical skills together with applications across different industries, and there are optional professional modules directly related to research expertise within the Faculty. This ensures that students have an advanced understanding of both theory and practice in their selected specialist areas. Students will gain knowledge of mathematical skills and applications, computational skills, and relevant professional experience, related to traditional engineering and science modelling, modern enterprise applications, finance, and service industries. They will gain an understanding of emerging applications. There will be hands-on training in various development tools and in the use of computational software related to their professional direction. Assessment takes the form of 100% coursework, based on applications of current market practices. A supervised thesis project takes place at the end of the last teaching term during the summer months. Projects are allocated in March and students are invited to undertake a project that provides genuine insight in an area of the research interests within the department. The programme is also available on a part-time basis.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/maths/appmaths

Mathematics

Postgraduate mathematics students benefit from award-winning teaching and great facilities. Our programmes are informed by world-renowned research and our links with industry ensure our students develop the academic and practical skills that will enhance their career prospects.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Option Set 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

Option Set 2
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are also required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Principles and Practice of Evacuation Modelling (30 credits)
Principles and Practice of Fire Modelling (30 credits)

Option Set 3

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are also required to choose 45 credits from this list of options.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

Students are also required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Enterprise Software Engineering Development (15 credits)
Software Tools and Techniques (15 credits)
Actuarial Mathematics and Risk Modelling (15 credits)
Financial Time Series (15 credits)
Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

100% coursework: a supervised thesis project (during the summer months).

Career options

Our graduates are equipped with the tools to involve in many engineering applications and computational engineering sectors such as reliability engineering, risk management, complex engineering systems, fire safety and finance. Our expert seminar series gives you the opportunity to interact with leading figures from industry and academia and undertake projects of current industry practice. A postgraduate qualification is a major achievement and a milestone in your specialised career path leading to a professional career. The Department also offers a PhD programme which trains highly skilled candidates towards research careers in academia and industry. Our current collaborations for our PhD candidates lie with the STRIKE project for mathematical and computational applications.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, computer science and finance/economics wishing to pursue careers in the financial services and banking industry. Read more
This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, computer science and finance/economics wishing to pursue careers in the financial services and banking industry. The structure is of an interdisciplinary nature in which graduates coming from different disciplines collaborate to address the computational aspects of market risk. Our core philosophy is to equip our students with the appropriate knowledge in mathematical finance, focusing on a strong development of associated computational methods.

Our Royal Maritime (Heritage) London based campus, close to the financial district of Canary Wharf, enables the department to build ties with market practitioners permitting our students to become part of a wider financial group. Our seminar series, inviting both academics and practitioners, allows you to interact with our external links creating an advantageous learning experience. We provide the knowledge for you to build up your profile of understanding of current research practice in finance. You will be trained and equipped with the skills for derivatives pricing and make use of non-linear methods for quantitative analysis (programming in Matlab, R and VBA). Our classes include interactive applications that enhance your learning experience through innovative teaching. By utilising research expertise within the department you will graduate with a strong understanding of numerical methods. You will also develop an understanding for further applicability in relevant fields as in energy commodity markets, where part of our current research focuses on by combining the world leading Agent-Based research team with our Computational Finance applications for crude oil price modelling.

The programme welcomes both recent graduates as well as experienced professional practitioners who wish to further their skills. Programme assessments are all 100% coursework with problems relating to current market practice. A supervised dissertation project takes place after the end of the last teaching term during the summer months. Projects are allocated in March and students are encouraged to work on projects that provide genuine insight in financial markets analysis. The programme is also available on a part-time basis. For those already at employment the flexible part-time mode of study, two years typically but can be flexible, allows students to be committed to both the MSc programme and employment.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/maths/compfinance

Mathematics

Postgraduate mathematics students benefit from award-winning teaching and great facilities. Our programmes are informed by world-renowned research and our links with industry ensure our students develop the academic and practical skills that will enhance their career prospects.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Financial Markets (Dual Award) (15 credits)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematical Finance (30 credits)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Enterprise Software Engineering Development (15 credits)
Software Tools and Techniques (15 credits)
Actuarial Mathematics and Risk Modelling (15 credits)
Financial Time Series (15 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Computational Methods (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematical Finance (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Financial Markets (Dual Award) (15 credits)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

100% coursework. Coursework assessment at the postgraduate level allows for better elaboration of ideas and expansion of knowledge. A supervised dissertation project takes places at the end of the teaching terms during the summer months. The Department is very keen to tackle dissertation topics.

Career options

Graduates are equipped with the tools needed to become quantitative analysts, work in risk and portfolio management as well as in the insurance sector. Our expert seminar series gives you the opportunity to interact with leading figures from industry and academia and undertake projects relating to current industry practice. A postgraduate qualification is a major achievement and a milestone in your specialised career path leading to a professional career. The Department also offers a PhD programme.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Programme structure. The programme offers four "core" modules, taken by all students, along with a variety of elective modules from which students can pick and choose. Read more
Programme structure
The programme offers four "core" modules, taken by all students, along with a variety of elective modules from which students can pick and choose. There are examinations and coursework in eight modules altogether, including the four core modules. Additionally, all students complete a dissertation.

Core modules
0.Probability and stochastics. This course provides the basics of the probabilistic ideas and mathematical language needed to fully appreciate the modern mathematical theory of finance and its applications. Topics include: measurable spaces, sigma-algebras, filtrations, probability spaces, martingales, continuous-time stochastic processes, Poisson processes, Brownian motion, stochastic integration, Ito calculus, log-normal processes, stochastic differential equations, the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process.


0.Financial markets. This course is designed to cover basic ideas about financial markets, including market terminology and conventions. Topics include: theory of interest, present value, future value, fixed-income securities, term structure of interest rates, elements of probability theory, mean-variance portfolio theory, the Markowitz model, capital asset pricing model (CAPM), portfolio performance, risk and utility, portfolio choice theorem, risk-neutral pricing, derivatives pricing theory, Cox-Ross-Rubinstein formula for option pricing.


0.Option pricing theory. The key ideas leading to the valuation of options and other important derivatives will be introduced. Topics include: risk-free asset, risky assets, single-period binomial model, option pricing on binomial trees, dynamical equations for price processes in continuous time, Radon-Nikodym process, equivalent martingale measures, Girsanov's theorem, change of measure, martingale representation theorem, self-financing strategy, market completeness, hedge portfolios, replication strategy, option pricing, Black-Scholes formula.


0.Financial computing I. The idea of this course is to enable students to learn how the theory of pricing and hedging can be implemented numerically. Topics include: (i) The Unix/Linux environment, C/C++ programming: types, decisions, loops, functions, arrays, pointers, strings, files, dynamic memory, preprocessor; (ii) data structures: lists and trees; (iii) introduction to parallel (multi-core, shared memory) computing: open MP constructs; applications to matrix arithmetic, finite difference methods, Monte Carlo option pricing.


0.Interest rate theory. An in-depth analysis of interest-rate modelling and derivative pricing will be presented. Topics include: interest rate markets, discount bonds, the short rate, forward rates, swap rates, yields, the Vasicek model, the Hull-White model, the Heath-Jarrow-Merton formalism, the market model, bond option pricing in the Vasicek model, the positive interest framework, option and swaption pricing in the Flesaker-Hughston model.

Elective modules

0.Portfolio theory. The general theory of financial portfolio based on utility theory will be introduced in this module. Topics include: utility functions, risk aversion, the St Petersburg paradox, convex dual functions, dynamic asset pricing, expectation, forecast and valuation, portfolio optimisation under budget constraints, wealth consumption, growth versus income.


0.Information in finance with application to credit risk management. An innovative and intuitive approach to asset pricing, based on the modelling of the flow of information in financial markets, will be introduced in this module. Topics include: information-based asset pricing – a new paradigm for financial risk management; modelling frameworks for cash flows and market information; applications to credit risk modelling, defaultable discount bond dynamics, the pricing and hedging of credit-risky derivatives such as credit default swaps (CDS), asset dependencies and correlation modelling, and the origin of stochastic volatility.

0.Mathematical theory of dynamic asset pricing. Financial modelling and risk management involve not only the valuation and hedging of various assets and their positions, but also the problem of asset allocation. The traditional approach of risk-neutral valuation treats the problem of valuation and hedging, but is limited when it comes to understanding asset returns and the behaviour of asset prices in the real-world 'physical' probability measure. The pricing kernel approach, however, treats these different aspects of financial modelling in a unified and coherent manner. This module introduces in detail the techniques of pricing kernel methodologies, and its applications to interest-rete modelling, foreign exchange market, and inflation-linked products. Another application concerns the modelling of financial markets where prices admit jumps. In this case, the relation between risk, risk aversion, and return is obscured in traditional approaches, but is made clear in the pricing kernel method. The module also covers the introduction to the theory of Lévy processes for jumps and its applications to dynamic asset pricing in the modern setting.

0.Financial computing II: High performance computing. In this parallel-computing module students will learn how to harness the power of a multi-core computer and Open MP to speed up a task by running it in parallel. Topics include: shared and distributed memory concepts; Message Passing and introduction to MPI constructs; communications models, applications and pitfalls; open MP within MPI; introduction to Graphics Processors; GPU computing and the CUDA programming model; CUDA within MPI; applications to matrix arithmetic, finite difference methods, Monte Carlo option pricing.


0.Risk measures, preference and portfolio choice. The idea of this module is to enable students to learn a variety of statistical techniques that will be useful in various practical applications in investment banks and hedge funds. Topics include: probability and statistical models, models for return distributions, financial time series, stationary processes, estimation of AR processes, portfolio regression, least square estimation, value-at-risk, coherent risk measures, GARCH models, non-parametric regression and splines.

Research project

Towards the end of the Spring Term, students will choose a topic to work on, which will lead to the preparation of an MSc dissertation. This can be thought of as a mini research project. The project supervisor will usually be a member of the financial mathematics group. In some cases the project may be overseen by an external supervisor based at a financial institution or another academic institution.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Modelling in Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Modelling in Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

This MRes in Computer Modelling in Engineering programme consists of two streams: students may choose to specialise in either structures or fluids. The taught modules provide a good grounding in computer modelling and in the finite element method, in particular.

Key Features of MRes in Computer Modelling in Engineering

Computer simulation is now an established discipline that has an important role to play in engineering, science and in newly emerging areas of interdisciplinary research.

Using mathematical modelling as the basis, computational methods provide procedures which, with the aid of the computer, allow complex problems to be solved. The techniques play an ever-increasing role in industry and there is further emphasis to apply the methodology to other important areas such as medicine and the life sciences.

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering, within which this course is run, has excellent computing facilities, including a state-of-the-art multi-processor super computer with virtual reality facilities and high-speed networking.

This Computer Modelling in Engineering course is suitable for those who are interested in gaining a solid understanding of computer modelling, specialising in either structures or fluids, and taking the skills gained through this course to develop their career in industry or research.

If you would like to qualify as a Chartered Engineer, this course is accredited with providing the additional educational components for the further learning needed to qualify as a Chartered Engineer, as set out by UK and European engineering professional institutions.

Modules

Modules on the Computer Modelling in Engineering programme typically include:

• Finite Element and Computational Analysis
• Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
• Solid Mechanics
• Advanced Fluid Mechanics
• Dynamics and Transient Analysis
• Communication Skills for Research Engineers
• MRes Research Project

Accreditation

The MRes Computer Modelling in Engineering course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

The MRes Computer Modelling in Engineering degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

The MRes Computer Modelling in Engineering degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Links with Industry

The Civil and Computational Engineering Centre has an extensive track record of industrial collaboration and contributes to many exciting projects, including the aerodynamics for the current World Land Speed Record car, Thrust SSC, and the future BLOODHOUND SSC, and the design of the double-decker super-jet Airbus A380.

Examples of recent collaborators and sponsoring agencies include: ABB, Audi, BAE Systems, British Gas, Cinpress, DERA, Dti, EADS, EPSRC, European Union, HEFCW, HSE, Hyder, Mobil, NASA, Quinshield, Rolls-Royce, South West Water, Sumitomo Shell, Unilever, US Army, WDA.

Student Quotes

“I was attracted to the MRes course at Swansea as the subject matter was just what I was looking for.

I previously worked as a Cardiovascular Research Assistant at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Melbourne. My employer, the Head of the Cardiology Department, encouraged me to develop skills in modelling as this has a lot of potential to help answer some current questions and controversies in the field. I was looking for a Master’s level course that could provide me with computational modelling skills that I could apply to blood flow problems, particularly those arising from congenital heart disease.

The College of Engineering at Swansea is certainly a good choice. In the computational modelling area, it is one of the leading centres in the world (they wrote the textbook, literally). A lot of people I knew in Swansea initially came to study for a couple of years, but then ended up never leaving. I can see how that could happen.”

Jonathan Mynard, MRes Computer Modelling in Engineering, then PhD at the University of Melbourne, currently post-doctoral fellow at the Biomedical Simulation Laboratory, University of Toronto, Canada

Careers

Employment in a wide range of industries, which require the skills developed during the Computer Modelling in Engineering course, from aerospace to the medical sector. Computational modelling techniques have developed in importance to provide solutions to complex problems and as a graduate of this course, you will be able to utilise your highly sought-after skills in industry or research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK
Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK
Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK

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