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Masters Degrees (Filming)

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Develop as a producer/director of factual programmes and extend your creative skills and technical knowledge. With talks by industry professionals, and access to a broad range of equipment, you’ll create a portfolio of work that will help you stand out from the crowd. Read more

Develop as a producer/director of factual programmes and extend your creative skills and technical knowledge. With talks by industry professionals, and access to a broad range of equipment, you’ll create a portfolio of work that will help you stand out from the crowd.

Overview

No matter what experience you have of filmmaking, our course will develop your knowledge of factual UK TV and digital media content production, and your creative skills, to an advanced level. Along the way, you’ll make seven films of different lengths and write a dissertation on a media subject that excites and interests you.

Focusing on two key roles, the director and the producer (which in current factual programming are merged into one), you’ll explore the dynamics of this ever-changing industry, and what it takes to succeed. You’ll learn to become a visual storyteller, a communicator, a collaborator, a motivator and a problem solver. You’ll also develop skills in scheduling, production managing, budgeting and marketing programmes. Although the emphasis is on factual programming, there is scope and flexibility to develop more creative films.

With specialist technical workshops on camera operation, sound, lighting and editing, you’ll develop professional skills in screen-based production. This will be supported by tutorials, diary work, and independent research, giving you a strong critical and contextual grounding for your practical work.

You’ll be encouraged to collaborate with other students on this course and others, becoming a flexible media professional who can produce and deliver high-quality video content for many different clients.

All our teaching staff have backgrounds in the film and television industries, and they're supported by industry specialists and visiting lecturers.

Teaching times:

Full-time:

Sept starters: Trimester 1 - Weds & Thurs 10.00 – 17.00; Trimester 2 – Tues & Weds 10.00 – 17.00; Trimester 3 – Tuesdays 10.00 – 13.00.

Jan starters: Trimester 2 - Weds & Thurs 10.00 – 17.00; Trimester 1 – Tues & Weds 10.00 – 17.00; Trimester 2 – Tuesdays 10.00 – 13.00.

Part time:

Semester 1: Thursday 10:00 - 17:00; Semester 2: Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00

Careers

Our course will prepare you for a career in TV or in the broader media, and help you to decide which areas of the industry attract you the most. Although the emphasis is on directing and producing, you might choose to move into cinematography, production management or even television programme sales once you graduate. You might also develop a particular interest in observational documentary, natural history films or science programming, and decide to follow a career in these fields.

Here at Cambridge School of Art, you’ll gain specialist skills that will be useful for traditional, experimental and creative documentary making, or films for education, training, public relations, current affairs, marketing and campaigning. Our course will prepare you to forge a portfolio or freelance career, and give you the ability to make high-quality content for broadcast, web, film festivals or cinema.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research

Visual Storytelling

Understanding the Audience

Master's Dissertation Art and Design

Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your learning, and ensure you’re developing the knowledge and skills to complete the course, through:

• Producing and directing films of different lengths and styles

• Working in a team on a TV Studio production

• Written production analyses and reflective commentaries

• Essays

• Filming schedules & budgets

• Film pitches

• Final Masters Project: this film is your “calling card” for the industry

Your assignments are usually submitted at the end of each term. You’ll also be assessed informally and given feedback during the term to help you achieve to the highest level. Feedback could be on a film, a presentation or group participation; it will be given by your tutor and your fellow students.

Events

Our Wired events are specialist lectures and workshops run by industry professionals, where you’ll learn about up-to-date practices and get invaluable advice. Our past speakers have included Sean Bobbitt (cinematographer: 12 Years a Slave, The Place Beyond the Pines, Hunger), Peter Strickland and Nic Knowland (director and cinematographer: Berberian Sound Studio), Cilla Ware (freelance drama director of Silk, Spooks, Primeval), Kathy Lee (film editor: Abuelas, A Letter to Dad), and Larry Sider (sound designer, The Piano Tuner of Earthquakes, Mirrormask).

Our Creative Front Futures events, run by Creative Front Cambridgeshire, will give you a broader taste of the creative industries, and let you find out more about the world of film and television production as well as explore other career options.

You’ll also get first-hand experience of the industry at informal work placements throughout the course and benefit from our close links with Cambridge Arts Picturehouse, where we hold regular student and industry events.

Specialist facilities

When shooting your projects you’ll have access to our fully-equipped HD TV studio with full lighting rig; our ground-breaking digital exhibition space Ruskin Gallery; a mixer; an autocue, multi-purpose scenic backdrops suitable for current affairs, magazine programmes and dramas; a film studio with overhead lighting, tracks, dollies and green screens and sets for flats; a full range of HD cameras (including Steadicam); location lighting; and sound-recording equipment.

For post-production work you’ll get access to over 30 editing suites with the complete Adobe Creative Cloud software suite including Premier Pro, after Affects, audition and Speed Grade and the Adobe Creative Suite master collection. You’ll be trained on all our equipment by a team of experienced technical staff, who also maintain and manage the facilities.



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Bristol is the global capital of natural history programme making and the natural place to study for an MA in Wildlife Filmmaking. Read more
Bristol is the global capital of natural history programme making and the natural place to study for an MA in Wildlife Filmmaking. On this highly popular Masters course you will learn how to develop and pitch ideas, tell great stories and make intelligent and surprising programmes to captivate and engage audiences.

Our partnership with the BBC Natural History Unit (NHU) means that, alongside your studies, you will have incredible opportunities to network with professional wildlife film makers, attend talks, film festivals and other events around the city.

Our MA students graduate with the skills, experience and knowledge needed for entry level jobs in all areas of production from online to broadcast. Graduates now work for the BBC, Icon Films, Discovery, Tigress and other top production companies in the UK and overseas.

Course detail

On this Masters course you will learn all you need to know via technical workshops, seminars, masterclasses and through experience and opportunities making films and digital content for clients. We also help you develop skills in research, script writing, directing, producing, production management and the pitching and commissioning of ideas.

One of the unique aspects of this course is that you will be matched with an industry mentor who, alongside your tutor, will guide you through the production of your final project. All students complete their Masters by writing, directing and producing a final project/film. These films are premiered each year and seen by an audience of invited film and television professionals from the BBC and independent sector.

Structure

The full master's course comprises 180 credits divided into three 60 credits stages: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, and Master's. Students work incrementally through the three stages and must pass all modules at each stage in order to progress to the next.

Modules

• Creating the Story
• Mastering the Business
• Preparing for Production
• Future Documentary
• Professional production

Format

The main teaching will take place in seminars and in workshops focused around the University's creative media centre at its Bower Ashton campus (see Study Facilities). You will also benefit from BBC visits, real-life filming experiences and allied conferences and external events.

All our teaching is informed by the latest industry developments, with valuable industry insight thinking on business developments from professional practitioners.

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a range of submissions including portfolios of work together with films and production work. The first two semesters drive your skills and learning towards your final natural history production which must be of professional standard with appropriate documentation and matching industry standard deliverables.

Careers / Further study

Students have worked on BBC series, produced films for the Festival of Nature, The Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust at Slimbridge, the RSPB and the Zoological Society of London - some of the UK's top wildlife and conservation organisations.

We also have an ongoing partnership with Wildscreen, the award-winning wildlife conservation charity and Encounters, the Bristol-based international short film festival. Students have been highly commended in the British Wildlife Photography Awards HD film category and were nominated in the Wildscreen Panda Awards. Graduates have also secured internships and employment with the BBC and other organisations such as Discovery, Icon Films, RDF and Tigress Productions.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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On this course you'll design visitor experiences and events for museums, brand, urban and community environments and work in small multidisciplinary teams to tell stories through text, image, sound and physical space. Read more

Introduction

On this course you'll design visitor experiences and events for museums, brand, urban and community environments and work in small multidisciplinary teams to tell stories through text, image, sound and physical space. You'll benefit from strong industry links that provide live, funded projects, mentors and placements.

Content

MA Narrative Environments is part of the Spatial Practices programme. The course combines storytelling with experience design, interaction design, museum studies, exhibition design, event design and communication design. You will develop and install interventions in cultural and corporate settings as well as making critical urban interventions in the public realm. You will undertake site and social research, visiting spaces, observing, filming and talking to visitors and inhabitants. You'll also produce proposals and make and test these in situ.

Distinct disciplines contribute to the postgraduate programme. Developing a new science centre, for example, draws on architects, curators, destination consultants, 3D designers, communication designers, interaction designers, time-based media designers, scenographers, writers, retailers and project managers. We value all.

Structure

MA Narrative Environments lasts 60 weeks structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each (i.e. two academic years) in its 'extended full-time mode'.

MA Narrative Environments is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises 2 units:

Unit 1 (60 credits) lasts 20 weeks.
Unit 2 (120 credits) runs for 10 weeks in the first year and 30 weeks in the second year.

Both units must be passed in order to achieve the MA, but the classification of the award of MA derives from your mark for Unit 2 only.

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This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in. Read more

This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in. You have your own camera equipment throughout and there are two dedicated Mac Editing suites for this degree.

About this degree

Students will learn to devise a visual research project; to apply anthropological and social science approaches to documentary film work; to think critically about the relationship between form and content in ethnographic/documentary practice; using our professional level equipment, to master the technical skills needed to produce different kinds of films of different lengths for varied audiences; and to critically view and review film material.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (60 credits), two optional /elective modules (30 credits) and a project/diary (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filming and Editing
  • Students without a social science background at either undergraduate or Master's level also take Social Anthropology or another social science foundational module in term one as agreed with the tutor.

Optional modules

Students choose two of the following:

  • Anthropology and Photography
  • Documentary Film and the Ethnographic Eye
  • The Story and I - Finding the Form and/or Time and the Staged Index
  • One of the practical film-related options offered as part of Film Studies MA according to provision
  • One of the film history modules taught in the School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES), or Departments of History or English, (for example, Russian Cinema in SSEES), details to be confirmed
  • An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities
  • An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities

Dissertation/report

A major practical film project and diary allowing the students to demonstrate their mastery of the skills of documentary film-making in a film of 20–35 minutes.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of practical tutorials, seminars and masterclasses and assessed by camera and editing exercises and a written piece.

Placement

We facilitate two types of placements. Firstly, we will enable short-term internships at the film companies with whom we already have relationships through Open City Docs. Secondly, as opportunities arise students can work on collaborative or other film-making projects, such as the Doc in a Day workshops or UCL film productions.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Ethnographic and Documentary Film (Practical) MA

Careers

The programme equips students for careers in:

  • mass media including broadcast, cinematic and web-based moving image
  • film and TV industry as camera operators, producers, directors, editors, researchers
  • academia – ethnographic research, visual media and culture
  • marketing and research
  • communication and other media
  • archives, as well as cultural heritage organisations.

Employability

The increasing demand for social and scientifically trained moving image specialists in the years ahead will continue, if not accelerate. Many of the graduates of our existing programmes now work in organisations such as Ipsos Mori film unit, independent production companies, BBC World Service and BBC Education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA will allow you to benefit from UCL’s unique position in the heart of London, and from the many activities in film within UCL Anthropology. The programme is unique in using professional film-makers to teach within a truly pan-disciplinary university research environment. It provides outstanding access to camera and editing facilities.

UCL now houses London’s Global Documentary Film Festival, Open City Docs Fest, created by Professor Michael Stewart. You can participate in the curation and delivery of this festival; gain experience in the delivery of a major public arts event; and benefit from established partnerships with world-famous institutions such as the the Science Museum and the British Film Institute.

This degree provides three strands: non-fiction cinema and reportage based documentary; a 'Mixed Realities' strand (including VR, Augemented; and interactive documentary production).

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Anthropology

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The NFTS is the only UK film school where you can specialise in cinematography for 2 years at MA level. -The only specialist 2-year Cinematography course in the UK. Read more
The NFTS is the only UK film school where you can specialise in cinematography for 2 years at MA level.

-The only specialist 2-year Cinematography course in the UK.
-Three stages, bluescreen and greenscreen facilities.
-Shoot live action and animated films.
-Students use 16mm, Super 16mm and 35mm film, digital video and HD cameras.
-Unlike other Schools, all production costs are met by the school.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Those accepted onto courses starting in 2018 will have their fees guaranteed at the UK rate for both years of the course. Postgraduate students can apply for a loan to help with their studies via the Student Loans Company Loans. A £ 10,000 loan is available to contribute to course and living costs. The Post Graduate Loan is only open to EU/EEA and UK Students who normally live in England. It is not currently available to Scottish, Welsh or Northern Ireland Students. Find out more here: https://nfts.co.uk/fees-funding/funding-guide

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. This course explores the many ways in which the cinematographer participates in the collaborative process of translating screenplays into meaningful and stimulating films. Exercises, workshops, masterclasses and productions, supported by critical and analytical study of the history and development of cinematography, give students a solid foundation in the art and craft of their future career.

The aim is to improve and expand the students' technical knowledge and skills using all of the above mentioned methods of image capture.

Cinematography graduates are in demand in the UK, Europe and the US and go on to work in both film and television. Recent new graduates have found work as 2nd Unit DoPs on feature films, and have shot commercials, episodic television series and documentaries for Channel 4, Granada and BSkyB, as well as short films and TV programmes for a variety of independent production companies.

CURRICULUM

Creative expression is developed alongside technical expertise. As well as film, training in High Definition, Digital Cinema and Digital Post Production is an integral part of the course. Visual storytelling is emphasised alongside the art of creating mood and evoking emotion through the right combination of composition and lighting. Working closely with students of other specialisations, student cinematographers have a creative involvement in fiction, animation and documentary films, commercials and multicamera television, lighting and shooting several productions during their time at the School.

During the course students will be provided with tutorials, seminars, screen studies, workshops and master classes with specialist tutors and visiting professionals. All workshops and master classes are mandatory. Through Tutorials students will be guided towards finding their own criteria for self assessment and finding their own individual challenges. The aim of the tutorials is to encourage the student to get the best out of themselves through discussions and critiques with their peers and through an awareness of self. While supportive overall, tutorials will have an element of critique and challenge. They should allow the student to step back and reflect on their own work.

Seminars will deal with stylistic approaches, principles of optics and photographic and video theory. Special attention will be given to the importance of relationships and interaction with other specialisations, like directors, editors, designers, sound and post production. Also, regular seminars and lectures will be conducted on Screen Art. Screen Art is crucial to broaden students' critical understanding of the art of cinema. This need is satisfied by providing systematic screenings, special events, seminars, discussions and analysis. These happen throughout the two year course.

Workshops and Practical Exercises are designed to teach most aspects of traditional and digital cinematography - cameras, lenses, grip equipment, originating materials (film stock/tape), light meters, location lighting, studio lighting, day for night, night for night, filming in moving vehicles and also film grammar, crew roles, studio protocol, laboratory procedures and special visual effects. The aim is also to develop responsibility and professionalism. This is supported and overseen by the teaching staff, who aim to challenge and nurture the student’s talent without undermining their independence.

Production Exercises provide a valuable experience in that they enable the student to work as part of a creative team. The cinematographer is able to utilise the skills and knowledge acquired whilst taking part in Workshops and Exercises.

Unlike other Schools, all production costs are met by the school. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

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This taught degree programme has a unique focus, offering training in all aspects of filmmaking, from concept and creative development through the filmmaking process and on to distribution and marketing. Read more
This taught degree programme has a unique focus, offering training in all aspects of filmmaking, from concept and creative development through the filmmaking process and on to distribution and marketing. By the end of the degree, students will have developed a competition and festival-ready calling-card short film, together with transferrable skills in developing and marketing their product and an understanding of the nature of the film industry.

Teaching on this degree conforms to current industry practice, and includes training and mentoring in standard development documents, such as screenplay, treatment and storyboards, and in areas such as risk assessment and budget management. Visiting guest speakers from various areas of the film industry provide an essential context on changing practices, as well as offering useful information of their own experiences in film. The programme does not include training in basic production techniques, and successful applicants will have a first degree in Media Studies or a related discipline, and/or equivalent industry experience.

All students on this programme receive a production budget.

Modules:

The Film Industry: The aim of this module is to foster an understanding of the workings of the international film industry; film production, distribution, exhibition, marketing and consumption will all be examined. There will be an initial focus on the historical development of the film industry on an international scale, with a particular emphasis on Hollywood and its relationship with the rest of the world. Various aspects and traditions within the modern day film industry will be examined, including ‘independent’ and ‘world’ cinema, and the situation in the UK, as well as Hollywood today.

Concept Development: This module introduces students to the practical and theoretical aspects of developing concepts for film, as well as the craft of screenwriting including script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue. Students will be encouraged to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice, as well an understanding of storytelling in visual media at postgraduate level.

Film Production: The micro short: This module aims to develop students’ knowledge of the technical aspects of filmmaking, including direction, camera-work, lighting, music and editing, with the aim of producing a high-quality two-minute short film. Students will also gain understanding of the economic forces that frame the film industry and an understanding of the role of technology in production, content manipulation, distribution, access and use.

Writing the Short Film: This module expands students’ practical experience of screenwriting, and advances core theories on the synthesis of creative and industry practice, as well as focusing specifically on the history, format, aesthetics and demands of the short film. Students will also learn how to present and communicate their concepts in industry standard documents such as beat sheets, treatments and storyboards, in order to facilitate the filming of short film screenplays in the latter part of the MA course.

Pre-Production: The short film: This module aims to develop knowledge on the practical and budgetary aspects of pre-producing a festival quality short film, including commissioning strategies, casting, rehearsals, risk assessment, location scouting, and the managing and co-ordination of a production crew. Students will also manage a production budget in order to understand the economic practicalities of filmmaking and the importance of the commissioning and funding structures of the creative industries.

Film Production - Dissertation: This module utilises the skills and knowledge developed during the previous modules on this MA; providing students with funding and the opportunity to recruit a crew from undergraduate students to produce a short film. Students will generate work that displays exceptional capability in operational aspects of media production technologies, systems, techniques and professional practices to produce a competition and festival-ready calling-card short film.

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Today’s audiences can watch documentaries and factual programming at cinemas and art galleries, on television and iPhones, or via YouTube and Vimeo. Read more
Today’s audiences can watch documentaries and factual programming at cinemas and art galleries, on television and iPhones, or via YouTube and Vimeo. Technological innovation and the digital revolution have changed the way we think and talk about factual content. This MA course focuses on the creative, technical and industry skills you need to develop documentaries and factual programming across the contemporary media landscape. We will teach you how to film reality from a variety of perspectives, understanding and sometimes challenging traditional interpretations of the documentary and its delivery. The course will equip you with the necessary skills, conceptual approach, and mindset for a career in the creative media industries.

Hands-on practical experience. Gain training and production experience in producing, directing, camera operation, sound and editing.

Real-life experience. Produce a documentary/factual project for an external industry client and work alongside the award-winning production facility, Met Film Production known for its critically acclaimed documentaries: Sour Grapes and the 2016 Grierson Trust winner – How To Change the World.

Learn how to film reality. Through practical work explore the creative, conceptual and ethical approaches to filming reality and documenting the experiences of real people.

Industry awareness. Build your understanding of the contemporary industry landscape for documentaries and factual programming, including commissioning, financing, distribution and exhibition, festivals, and the emerging world of interactive and transmedia digital content.

Professional feedback. Pitch your projects to industry professionals and receive ‘real world’ feedback and guidance to further develop your projects.

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This exciting new programme focuses on the practical skills of investigative journalism, and is ideally suited to established professionals who wish to develop their skillset or change careers, as well as students progressing from undergraduate study. Read more

About the course

This exciting new programme focuses on the practical skills of investigative journalism, and is ideally suited to established professionals who wish to develop their skillset or change careers, as well as students progressing from undergraduate study.

The MA equips graduates with a wide range of specialist skills and competencies, which range from filming, editing and storytelling, to newsgathering, dealing with complex data and running real world investigations. The programme will provide you with the tools you need to produce commercially viable television investigations targeted at national and international audiences. The content of this course is endorsed by and has been developed with Channel 4, meaning you are assured of the highest quality teaching by expert academics, including professional journalists from a variety of disciplines with strong track records in industry and experience in helping students and trainees embark on successful careers.

As part of the degree, you will be expected to devise, pitch and manage investigations, in consultation with some the UK’s leading providers. We have a 20 year track record of launching graduates into the highly competitive world of journalism, with graduates now working for both local and national organisations like the BBC, Mail Online, top news agencies, national and international magazines and related careers such as PR and corporate communications. This is a specialist course designed to give you a specific skill set which will be directly relevant to a career in investigative journalism.

During the course you will have the opportunity to produce your own, professional standard programme to a quality where it can be pitched to major networks as your final project.

The next available start date for this course is September 2017.

Reasons to Study:

• Course developed in collaboration with Channel 4
professional endorsement from industry ensures high quality teaching by expert academics and professional journalists

• Designed with input from Industry leaders
this specialist course is designed to provide you with the skills, knowledge and contacts you need to embark on a successful career in investigative journalism

• Work on live briefs
produce your own professional programme to pitch to major broadcasters or elsewhere

• First in the UK for media research
our Media Discourse group and The Centre for Cinema and Television History (CATH) informs teaching on the course allowing students to gain expertise into the subject area. DMU’s research in media was recognised as first in the UK for research output in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014

• Work on live briefs
produce your own professional programme to pitch to major broadcasters or elsewhere

• More than 20 years’ experience of teaching journalism
our teaching staff have many years of industry experience which you can draw upon to develop skills and expertise that are relevant for a career in Journalism

• Excellent graduate prospects
this course will equip graduates for a successful career in Investigative Journalism, in national television as well as working for national and international news agencies and roles in PR and corporate communications

Course Structure

Modules

The programme modules include:
- Investigative Journalism – Skills and Theory
- Introduction to Practical Investigative Journalism
- Investigative Journalism – Global Perspectives
- Advanced Practical Investigative Journalism
- Final project

Teaching and assessment

You will experience a wide range of teaching styles and environments, from traditional lectures and seminars to intensive skills workshops, news days and studio work. As a postgraduate student, you will be increasingly responsible for developing your own professional practice and working with other course members to produce pieces of journalism.

You will be working collaboratively with undergraduate students and other postgraduate students from our portfolio of related journalism courses including on events.

This is an intensive programme and you should be aware that full-time engagement will be expected throughout.

There will be a diverse range of assessments, including traditional essays, presentations, case studies, phase tests and reports as well as continuous assessment of professional practice. These culminate in your final project or dissertation.

Contact and learning hours

You will normally attend at least 12 hours of timetabled taught sessions per week. As part of this, you will be expected to produce substantial amounts of journalism outside of class.

To find out more

To learn more about this course and DMU, visit our website:
Postgraduate open days: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/open-evenings/postgraduate-open-days.aspx

Applying for a postgraduate course:
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply.aspx

Funding for postgraduate students
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/postgraduate-funding-2017-18/postgraduate-funding-2017-18.aspx

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Think you’ve got what it takes to succeed as a creative entrepreneur? Based in Southampton Solent University’s own on-campus creative agency, this master’s programme is ideally suited to savvy graduates who are looking to make their mark in the creative industries. Read more

Think you’ve got what it takes to succeed as a creative entrepreneur? Based in Southampton Solent University’s own on-campus creative agency, this master’s programme is ideally suited to savvy graduates who are looking to make their mark in the creative industries. If you have ever thought about setting up your own creative enterprise or working as a freelancer, this intensive course will help you develop the essential skills required to succeed.

The tutoring team on Southampton Solent University’s MA Creative Enterprise programme believe that the best way to learn freelance and enterprise skills is to get involved with real commercial projects.

Our established industry links and on-site creative agency provide students with access to these projects, where they will be expected to take full responsibility for managing the client, communicating successfully and delivering projects to budget. Past students have even had the opportunity to pitch for paid work as part of the course.

Taught portions of the course closely examine the creative economy, helping students to understand how the different sectors of the creative industry operate. Students also learn a range of strategic thinking and problem solving skills, building a set of transferable skills which will help them throughout their career.

What does this course lead to?

This course equips students to identify opportunities that are appropriate to their skillset and aspirations, helping them to take their existing creative skills and apply them in a commercial setting. This may take the form of in-house employment, freelance work, entrepreneurship - or a combination of the three.

The enterprise skills that students develop can be used throughout their careers and will help to maximise their employability. This includes a thorough understanding of how business is conducted within the creative industries and a toolkit of general business and enterprise skills.

Who is this course for?

This course is a must for entrepreneurial graduates or ambitious professionals who are keen to start their own creative enterprise or work as a freelancer in the creative industries.

What you will study

Year one

Core units

  • Research Methods & Masters Project Proposal
  • Masters Project
  • The Creative Economy
  • Strategic Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Working in the Creative Industries

Facilities

Students have access to a range of facilities to suit their creative discipline, from printing presses and photography studios to animation suites and green-screen spaces. The University also offers a range of digital cameras, recording equipment, multi-camera studios, audio booths and an extensive media loans scheme. 

Solent is also home to a 24-hour library, modern IT facilities and a range of expert learning and employability support services.

Your future

Suitable occupations for graduates include:

  • Creative freelance work
  • Entrepreneurship within the creative industries
  • In-house practice
  • Agency account management
  • Art direction
  • Consultancy

There’s a chance of progression to further study, including a PhD, on successful completion of the course.

Industry links

Solent Creatives have excellent contacts with industry across a range of different sectors, having worked with over 800 business since it opened for business. These have included Marks & Spencer, Southampton Airport, Sodexo, Oxfam, the NHS and many small and medium sized organisations from the local area. Past projects have seen students filming live events, managing social media content, designing corporate brochures and organising charity fashion shows.  

Solent Creatives is also active in various networking groups including the JCI, Creative Network South and Hampshire Chamber of Commerce.



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A unique course, the only one of its kind in the UK, designed to fast track you into the industry. -Exclusive scholarship available for this course with RSPB.*. Read more
A unique course, the only one of its kind in the UK, designed to fast track you into the industry.

-Exclusive scholarship available for this course with RSPB.*
-Students will gain the skills and expertise needed to direct science, natural history and wildlife productions and the know-how to produce entire shows.
-The course gives students the ability to generate science and natural history programme ideas and formats.
-Gain the confidence and know-how to pitch those ideas to commissioning editors.
-Graduate with brilliant list of industry contacts and relevant skills for building a sustainable career as a Producer/Director.
-Work experince at the UK’s major wildlife production companies.
-Sir David Attenborough will deliver a masterclass/lecture to the students.

'A new MA designed to bring on the next generation of natural-history programme makers' BBC Wildlife

'You are the future. It’s up to you to change things about the way you look at the natural world, using formats I haven’t dreamed about.' Sir David Attenborough, NFTS Masterclass 2017 (Picture: Sir David Attenborough with Science and Natural History Students)

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Those accepted onto courses starting in 2018 will have their fees guaranteed at the UK rate for both years of the course. Postgraduate students can apply for a loan to help with their studies via the Student Loans Company Loans. A £ 10,000 loan is available to contribute to course and living costs. The Post Graduate Loan is only open to EU/EEA and UK Students who normally live in England. It is not currently available to Scottish, Welsh or Northern Ireland Students. Find out more here: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/content.php?r=22757-Postgraduate-Loan

COURSE OVERVIEW

New technology and a greater variety of formats are challenging the traditional boundaries of Science and Natural History Programming and driving greater audience demand. British production companies are at the forefront of leading innovation in formats and high-end content, with growing opportunities to work with North American and international broadcasters.

This course will give you:
-The skills to direct science and natural history productions.
-The know-how to produce entire shows.
-A practical working knowledge of current science and natural history television production methods.
-The ability to generate science and natural history programme ideas and formats.
-Knowledge of how the business works and current trends, including co-productions etc.
-The confidence and know-how to pitch those ideas to commissioning editors.
-Brilliant industry contacts and relevant skills for building a sustainable career as a Producer/Director.
-Access to NFTS's Masterclasses led by major creative figures from film, television and games.

The National Film and Television School’s Science and Natural History Masters focuses on developing Producers and Directors. Therefore, as part of the course students will be exposed to the development and production challenges of specialist factual genres, such as Landmark / Blue Chip (interchangeable terms for high budget, high production value programming mainly used in a pure wildlife context), mini landmarks, Children’s, People and Nature, Live, Expedition films, Magazine formats, Obs-doc etc. In addition there will be a focus on promoting cross-genre ideas to foster creativity.

Editorial policy and standards, together with codes of practice relating to science and the filming of animals, and Health and Safety will be fully explored.

Students will gain practical experience in both the research and development of programming of this type whilst also developing a body of work that showcases their practical film making skills and innovation within the genre.

*RSPB Scholarship
An exclusive scholarship is available for this course, kindly provided by course partner, RSPB. This scholarship is open to students who live within the RSPB’s conservation remit of the UK and UK overseas territories including Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, Montserrat, St Helena and Dependencies (Ascension Island & Tristan da Cunha), Turks and Caicos Islands, Pitcairn Island, British Antarctic Territory, British Indian Ocean Territory, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands

How To Apply For Scholarship
-If you are accepted onto the Directing & Producing Science & Natural History MA, you will be invited to submit a funding application to apply for the scholarship.
-Funding applications are only open to successful applicants.
-Applicants will be asked to provide proof of citizenship to qualify for the scholarship.
-Click the link to download further information about the RSPB partnership: https://nfts.co.uk/sites/default/files/u102/Documents/Funding/RSPB_Scholarship_04_2017.doc

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This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in ethnomusicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. Read more

This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in ethnomusicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. The programme of study consists of four taught course units (each 30 credits) plus a dissertation (60 credits). The combination of core and optional course units allows each student to plot a path that best matches his or her special interests and aspirations. Together, the taught units encompass a wide range of topics and approaches - from gender and ethnicity, music and conflict, music revivals and performance culture, to postcolonial theory and the politics of ethnography. Seminars allow for close collaboration between lecturers and students, with ample opportunity for students to present their own work and receive individual feedback. Discussion and debate forms an important part of most course units.

All students on the MusM Music programme take Advanced Music Studies: Skills and Methodologies as their core unit. Students on the Ethnomusicology pathway also take Studying World Music Cultures: Themes and Debates and, usually, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography . Other optional course units normally include  Case Studies in Musicology: Texts and Histories ; and Historical or Contemporary Performance (subject to audition). A maximum of 30 credits may be chosen from another MA programme in the arts or social sciences (subject to availability and approval by the course tutor): possible options include Gender, Sexuality and the Body ; Filming History: Making Documentary Films for Research; and Documentary and Sensory Media . Students may also undertake a Work Placement with a local arts organisation or institution (by prior arrangement and subject to availability).

SALC Placement offers students the opportunity to spend a minimum of 20 days over a period of up to 12 weeks with an arts and cultural organisation, business or service provider. Placements will be established in Semester 1 to take place early in semester 2; they will be supervised by a work-based mentor and overseen by an academic staff member. The placement may take the form of an investigation of a specific business idea, development strategy or management proposition to resolve a problem or particular issue, and will result in a placement report, proposal or essay.

For further information about the content of individual course units, see Course Unit Details below.

Aims

This programme aims to:

  • —Build on undergraduate studies of music and society and the cultural study of music, introducing students to a wide range of advanced methodologies, theories, discourses and practices.
  • —Enable students to refine and develop their individual skills, talents and interests.
  • —Prepare students for a career, either inside or outside music, where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.
  • —Foster the skills in critical thinking, argumentation, and effective written and oral communication necessary for further postgraduate study.
  • —Enable students to gain an expert and detailed knowledge of a specialist topic, and to formulate ideas that can later be pursued within further research programmes.

Teaching and learning

Most taught course units are delivered via weekly seminars and/or tutorials. Full-time students take two 30-credit course units per semester; part-time students take one. The dissertation is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Seminars feature a range of presentation formats and activities, including presentations by course tutors, student presentations, discussion and debate based on prepared reading or coursework tasks, and workshop-style activities. Members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultations during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units are assessed by coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The precise nature of the assessment varies according to what is appropriate to the course unit in question. In most cases, a choice of questions or topics is offered. All taught units must be satisfactorily completed. The dissertation (12,000-15,000 words) is based on independent research into a topic agreed in consultation with the supervisor. A Research Outline needs to be presented and approved (usually in February) before students proceed with their dissertation. All coursework is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner. Recitals are heard by at least two internal examiners.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced musical training has been directly relevant include arts management and the culture industries, music publishing, music journalism, librarianship, music therapy and performance. Careers outside of music have included accountancy, law, social work and human resources.



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Digital Direction is a new 240-credit, 15-month Master’s programme starting in September 2017. Read more

Digital Direction is a new 240-credit, 15-month Master’s programme starting in September 2017.

Digital Direction addresses media and storytelling in the digital era, assessing emerging issues associated with contemporary digital communication and the creative economy, training new creative leaders who are responsive to continually changing contexts, infrastructures and technologies and engendering a new wave of creative leadership. Graduates will develop a deep understanding of critical and experimental communication/media production, creation and design practices, and through applied innovation will address current and future contexts.

The programme prepares students to evolve and lead new approaches to media and storytelling through predictive innovation, enabled by rapidly changing cultural and industrial practices, plus uses of, and developments in, digital technologies. Centring on the interrelated domains of broadcasting, film and experience/brand, the programme addresses knowledge and skills gaps in four key areas of practice: production, direction, content development/making/writing and communication/digital media design.

The programme proposes new imperatives for storytelling in an age of alternative facts and fictions; challenges associated with multiple media forms and systems; and methods for engaging publics as audiences, users, consumers, (co-)creators, stakeholders and participants.

Established approaches to production, direction, content creation and communication/digital media design are transforming at an exponential rate, employing innovative forms of storytelling and narrative experience to engage audiences in new ways. The programme is informed by associated transformations in digital technologies, including the prevalence of post-broadcast models of On Demand media; the proliferation of networked forms of production and distribution; source- and platform-agnostic, multi-cast, multi-access and multi-layered, multi-linear media; cultures of openness and control; and the primacy of interactivity.

The programme acknowledges human adaptations to living with digital technologies. Contemporary media platforms are mobile, embedded in multiple types of environments, infrastructures and products, and user-controlled with an engagement in more democratic forms of content generation and curation. In parallel, core discrete professions within the media and communication design industries are being challenged and broadened by increasingly transdisciplinary requirements. .

The programme equips students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to engage productively with the creative, design and commercial demands of this emerging and rapidly evolving multi-platform and multi-layered world. To match, a transdisciplinary approach is demanded with a strong narrative sense and a honed instinct for communication. Our contemporary uses of new digital technologies have prompted a reconsideration of communication borders and different types of responsive modes; and content developers and distributors are, in turn, converging within an increasingly fluid space.

Traditional skill sets involving narration, scriptwriting, production design, direction, set design, casting, photography, filming, lighting, and sound recording, for example, are now increasingly accompanied and informed by hitherto unrelated practices such as coding and programming, interactive design, AI, cross-platform and cross-media integration (e.g. transmedia), data visualisation and analytics, visual design, gamification, virtual/augmented reality and social media. Digital Direction addresses the demands of this new world – for example, by enabling designer-directors to produce and create content for social videos with an accompanying strategy for ensuring delivery to their target audiences, including deployment of mechanisms for openness and input.

The programme draws on six key principles from the School of Communication – conceptualisation, experimentation, expression, information, contextualisation and interdisciplinarity – which are in turn supported and developed through strategic research clusters based on the broader themes of identity, experience and publishing.



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